Buud and Hayvice triumph at the 2016 Tararwera Ultramarathon

jonas finish line

Widely tipped to take out the internationally esteemed Tarawera Ultramarathon 100km event, Sweden’s Jonas Buud didn’t have it all his own way, battling it out over two thirds of the distance with Australia’s David Byrne.

Forty-one year old Buud, 100km world champion, eventually broke the bungy cord between the two just before the 60km mark and charged home to take the 2016 title at the finish line in Kawerau in a time of 08:00:53. Byrne, 35 years, finished second in 08:22:39.

Ryan Sandes from South Africa completed the podium in a time of 08:30:40. Japan’s Yoshikazu Hara finished fourth in 08:40:17, with New Zealand’s Vajin Armstrong the first Kiwi home in a time of 08:46:12.

Meanwhile, Wellington’s Fiona Hayvice claimed first place in the women’s 100km event, after race favourite Ruby Muir pulled out at the 76km mark due to stomach issues. Hayvice also won the Tarawera 50km Marathon in November last year.

Muir, from Hawke’s Bay, had led the field from the outset until her withdrawal from the race.

Hayvice won the event in a time of 10:34:26. Australia’s Melissa Robertson came second in 10:56:20, with New Zealander Fiona Eagles taking third in 11.24.57.

The men’s first and second spent much of the race together, with just seconds between them at several of the key aid stations, including Lake Okataina (39.4km), Humphries Bay (49.2km) and the Tarawera Outlet (57km).

Buud finally put a gap on Byrne and never looked back.

“I felt very strong for the first 60km,” he says. “The plan was to keep a good pace in the first 60km. The next dirt road stretch really suited me so I was able to speed up and continue with that pace. The last seven to ten kilometres was pretty heavy though!”

Buud says the morning’s rain was a help in the first half of the race, but the humid conditions in the second half made for it being “a bit warm”.

Byrne says he is thrilled to have run so well in his first ever 100km event, but he was completely demoralised by Buud who “looked like he was just jogging, and then took off”.

“Then I went into consolidation mode to get to the finish. It’s a great event and I’m really happy to run so well. I’ve only ever run 60km, this was my first 100km race but I had to do it in New Zealand – it’s the best country on the planet!”

Third place Sandes says he’s happy to take the last spot on the podium.

“I’m super stoked, it’s an awesome event. I was pretty conservative in the middle stretches, but the last bit on the road was hard and I was worried that third and fourth were going to run me down. I decided to make a break in the technical section, as I knew Vajin [Armstrong] would run away from me on the flat.”

Hayvice says she couldn’t be happier to take the win.

“I’m feeling awesome, what a great day. The Tarawera Ultra is dear to my heart because its the first ultra I ever ran and it usually lays the foundation for me for the year. I have a big schedule lined up for the year but now my foundation is laid and I’m stoked.”

Hayvice says she found the first part of the race “actually quite lonely” due to the new course and its big climbs which threw the field open.

“I ran a lot of it on my own which I haven’t done in previous years. Once you know you’re in the final stages, you just tick the kilometres off. My goal was just to better my time, but the course and conditions had an impact on that time – but the win has meant I changed the goal!”

New Zealand’s Vajin Armstrong finished fifth, claiming a new record for finishing in the top five placegetters for the sixth year in a row at the Tarawera Ultramarathon. Armstrong says he hadn’t intended running the event this year, after racing the Tarawera Ultra for the last five years, but once he saw the elite world champion field that was entered, he couldn’t resist.

“I wanted to run against the best runners in the world and I also felt like I had a bit more in my legs last year. The whole goal this year was to be a bit more aggressive and get myself into a position to compete with these top runners. This was by far my best performance here, even though the time was a bit slower with the slightly different course. Three or four years ago I would have won it today, but [race organiser] Paul keeps bringing better runners. The pedigree of this race is such that it now has world champion runners and I think it’s important for New Zealand runners to represent and show what we can do on the world stage.”

Due to course changes in for this year’s event, the actual course was 102.7km.

Race results: 

Tarawera Ultramarathon 100km Results:

Men:

  1. Jonas Buud (Sweden) 08:00:53
  2. David Byrne (Australia) 08:22:39
  3. Ryan Sandes (South Africa) 08:30:40
  4. Yoshikazu Hara (Japan) 08:40:17
  5. Vajin Armstrong (Christchurch, New Zealand) 08:46:12

Women:

  1. Fiona Hayvice (Wellington) 10:34:26
  2. Melissa Robertson (NSW, Australia) 10:56:20
  3. Fiona Eagles (Auckland) 11.24.57

Tarawera Ultramarathon 85km Results:

Men:

  1. Richard Coghlan (Japan) 08:40:55
  2. Valentin Benard (France) 08:50:58
  3. Lance Brew (Hamilton, NZ) 09:11:52
  4. Valentino Luna Hernand (Wellington, NZ) 9:34:12
  5. Sidney Willis (Townsville, Australia) 10:15:18

Women’s results unavailable at time of distribution.

 

Episode 105 – Eoin Keith and Matthew Laye

A_GRAVATAR

This is Episode 105 of Talk Ultra. Niandi and Ian are back from a multi-day training camp in Lanzarote, The Spine winner, Eoin Keith tells us all about his race and we speak with Rocky Raccoon and Fling Race winner, Mat thew Laye.

00:01:05 Show Start

Lanzarote multidaycamp – Images story and here is some feedback from the participants:

Audio feedback HERE

Images and daily reports HERE

00:12:38 NEWS

ULTRA EASY 100k – Australia

1 – Sam Mccutcheon 10:36 new CR

2 – Grant Guise 11:28

3 – Nick Johnston 11:31

1 – Louise Clifton 13:08

2 – Veronique Chamberland 14:15

3 – Floortje Grimmen 14:49

Arrowhead 135

1 – Jim Reed and Scott Hoberg finished together in 37:20

1 – Carla Goulart 52:51

Emelie Forsberg is injured and out of the SkiMo season: 

“My cruciate ligament is broken. An accident in the first downhill and my season is over. It’s pretty shitty right now. I donno what to say more.”

Honk Kong 100

Francois d’Haene is back with superb win in freaky weather Hong Kong, he ran 9:32 for as new CR ahead of team mate Yan Long Fei 9:37and Gediminas Grinius 9:53 3rd.

Dong Li won the ladies race I’m 12:05 ahead of Liza Borzoi and Silvia Trigueros, 12:30 and 12:34 respectively.

Susie Chan ran a new ‘Guiness’ 12-hour record of 68.5 miles on a treadmill.

As this show comes out Tararwera is going on in New Zealand, it’s Rocky Racoon 100 this weekend, Ian Sharman is running and he said the trails are in good condition, I wonder, can he get close to his 12:44 of 2011? On Thursday Niandi and I head out to Costa Rica with 2015 MDS champion, Elisabet Barnes for The Coastal Challenge.

The season is starting to hot up!

00:21:30 INTERVIEW with EOIN KEITH

01:06:21 INTERVIEW Rocky Raccoon and Highland Fling winner MATHEW LAYE talks running and PED’s.

UP & COMING RACES

Argentina

Columbia Cruce de los Andes | 90 kilometers | February 11, 2016 | website

Australia

Queensland

Caboolture Historical Village Dusk to Dawn 100km | 100 kilometers | February 13, 2016 | website

Caboolture Historical Village Dusk to Dawn 50km | 50 kilometers | February 13, 2016 | website

Tasmania

The Cradle Mountain Run | 82 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Brazil

1000 Miles | 1000 miles | February 09, 2016 | website

Chile

60K | 60 kilometers | February 13, 2016 | website

El Cruce Columbia | 103 kilometers | February 09, 2016 | website

Costa Rica

Adventure Category | 155 kilometers | February 13, 2016 | website

Expedition Category | 230 kilometers | February 13, 2016 | website

Finland

Lapland

66° North Ultra Race | 66 kilometers | February 19, 2016 | website

Roavve Polar Ultra 300 | 308 kilometers | February 19, 2016 | website

Rovaniemi 150 | 150 kilometers | February 19, 2016 | website

France

Aude

Gruissan Phoebus Trail | 50 kilometers | February 14, 2016 | website

Côtes-d’Armor

Défi Glazig (45 + 18) | 63 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Germany

Lower Saxony

Brocken-Challenge | 86 kilometers | February 13, 2016 | website

India

Gujarat

135 Miles | 135 miles | February 19, 2016 | website

160 km | 160 kilometers | February 19, 2016 | website

50 km | 50 kilometers | February 19, 2016 | website

Ireland

Kildare

Donadea 50K | 50 kilometers | February 13, 2016 | website

Italy

Marche

Maratona sulla sabbia – Ultra maratona | 50 kilometers | February 14, 2016 | website

New Zealand

Tarawera 100K Ultramarathon | 100 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Tarawera 60K Ultramarathon | 60 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Tarawera 85K Ultramarathon | 85 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Nicaragua

Fuego y Agua 100k | 100 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Fuego y Agua 50k | 50 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Oman

Wadi Bih Run | 72 kilometers | February 05, 2016 | website

South Africa

Wild Coast Lite | 110 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Wild Coast Ultra | 270 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Spain

Region of Murcia

100 km | 100 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Sri Lanka

RacingThePlanet: Sri Lanka 2016 | 250 kilometers | February 14, 2016 | website

Sweden

Ice Ultra | 230 kilometers | February 13, 2016 | website

Thailand

Thai Ultra Race | 140 kilometers | February 13, 2016 | website

United Kingdom

Cornwall

Arc of Attrition | 100 miles | February 05, 2016 | website

Devon

Coastal Trail Series – South Devon – Ultra | 34 miles | February 06, 2016 | website

Oxfordshire

Thames Trot 50 | 50 miles | February 06, 2016 | website

Surrey

The Pilgrim Challenge North Downs Way Multistage Ultra | 66 miles | February 06, 2016 | website

Worcestershire

Hot Runner 14 in 7 | 590 kilometers | February 15, 2016 | website

Hot Runner 7 in 7 | 295 kilometers | February 15, 2016 | website

USA

Alaska

Little Su 50K | 50 kilometers | February 13, 2016 | website

Susitna 100 | 100 miles | February 13, 2016 | website

Arizona

100K | 100 kilometers | February 13, 2016 | website

50K | 50 kilometers | February 13, 2016 | website

Pemberton Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | February 13, 2016 | website

Ragnar Relay Del Sol | 200 miles | February 19, 2016 | website

Southwest 125 Ultra | 125 miles | February 15, 2016 | website

Arkansas

White Rock Classic 50K | 50 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

California

American Canyon 50K Ultramarathon | 50 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Jed Smith Ultra Classic – 50K | 50 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Jed Smith Ultra Classic – 50 Miler | 50 miles | February 06, 2016 | website

Sean O’Brian 100K Trail Run | 100 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Sean O’Brian 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Sean O’Brian 50-Mile Trail Run | 50 miles | February 06, 2016 | website

Sean O’Brien 50K | 50 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Sean O’Brien 50M | 50 miles | February 06, 2016 | website

Florida

110 With Donna Ultra Marathon | 110 miles | February 14, 2016 | website

Destin 50K Beach Ultra | 50 kilometers | February 14, 2016 | website

Destin 50M Beach Ultra | 50 miles | February 14, 2016 | website

Iron Horse 100 km | 100 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Iron Horse 100 Mile | 100 miles | February 06, 2016 | website

Iron Horse 50 Mile | 50 miles | February 06, 2016 | website

Ragnar Relay Florida Keys | 199 miles | February 05, 2016 | website

Skydive Ultra 100M Run | 100 miles | February 06, 2016 | website

Skydive Ultra 50 km Run | 50 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Skydive Ultra 50M Run | 50 miles | February 06, 2016 | website

Louisiana

Rouge-Orleans Ultramarathon & Team Relay | 126 miles | February 07, 2016 | website

Nevada

Jackpot Ultra Running Festival 100 Miler | 100 miles | February 13, 2016 | website

North Carolina

Uwharrie 40-Mile Mountain Run | 40 miles | February 06, 2016 | website

Oregon

Bristow 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Hagg Lake 50k Trail run | 50 kilometers | February 13, 2016 | website

South Carolina

Mill Stone 50K | 50 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Rut Rogue 40s – 40 Mile 3-5 Person Relay | 40 miles | February 06, 2016 | website

Rut Rogue 40s – 40 Mile Run | 40 miles | February 06, 2016 | website

Texas

Cross Timbers Trail Runs 50M | 50 miles | February 13, 2016 | website

Piney Woods TrailFest 50K | 50 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Rocky Raccoon 100 Mile | 100 miles | February 06, 2016 | website

Rocky Raccoon 50 Mile | 50 miles | February 06, 2016 | website

Utah

Moab’s Red Hot 55K | 55 kilometers | February 13, 2016 | website

Virginia

Holiday Lake 50K | 50 kilometers | February 13, 2016 | website

The Wild Oak Trail 100 | 100 miles | February 13, 2016 | website

Virginia Beach Distance Races 100k | 100 kilometers | February 07, 2016 | website

Virginia Beach Distance Races 50k | 50 kilometers | February 07, 2016 | website

Washington

Orcas Island 100 | 100 miles | February 19, 2016 | website

Orcas Island 50K | 50 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Woolley Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | February 13, 2016 | website

Wisconsin

John Dick Memorial 50K | 50 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

Venezuela

Ultra Laguna de Urao | 65 kilometers | February 06, 2016 | website

01:58:22 CLOSE

 

02:06:25

ITunes http://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/talk-ultra/id497318073

Libsyn – feed://talkultra.libsyn.com/rss

Website – talkultra.com

Lanzarote Multi-Day Training Camp 2016 – Day 8

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Day 8 of the 2016 Lanzarote multi-day camp was a cracker. The hottest day of the week with little or no wind, a stunning coastal route with mixed terrain, volcano climbing and descending and of course, stunning views and amazing people.

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As on all previous days, we had three run/ walk groups. Everyone managed to cover somewhere between 20 and 35km and it was interesting to see how during the week, people progressed, not only in fitness but in regard to equipment, planning and preparation.

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We also pushed everyone out of their own comfort zones with some tough climbing, very technical terrain and challenging descents. It’s all about taking things up a notch so that when race day comes around, the runners are prepared.

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“Brilliant MdS training camp in Lanzarote with organiser, coach and photographer Ian Corless and MdS 2015 champion Elisabet Barnes. 100-miles run in the week with some excellent advice and support plus great people!” – Paul Allum

Paul’s thoughts were echoed by so many of the camp attendees. Elinor Evans in particular found the whole experience enlightening and invaluable. During the weekly runs, the overnight bivouac, the volcano walk and the daily talks, Elinor realised that she had the wrong pack for her, the wrong sleeping bag, a need to address her nutrition and look at her MdS admin. Invaluable!

“The Training Camp in my opinion was exceptional and far exceeded my expectations. The whole program start to finish pushed everyone to achieve their potential while taking into account the wide variety of abilities. All of the coaches were supportive and challenging and while clearly experts in their field never made novices like me feel stupid. The information we got was priceless and the blend of commercialism and a genuine desire to want to help people achieve their goal of competing or completing MDS was incredibly well done. I wouldn’t just recommend this to future MDS competitors I’d suggest you add it to your Compulsory Kit list! Simply brilliant!” – Simon Dunn

Listen to camp attendee feedback HERE

“Fantastic week in magical terrain with lovely people – thank you Ian, Elisabet, Niandi and Marie-Paule – Sahara countdown is ON.” – Elinor Evans

The morning run of 3-5 hours was followed with a relaxing lunch and then an afternoon Q&A which addressed many of the issues raised during the week and allowed everyone to clarify and appease their minds ahead of their next multi-day race.

The day finished with 20-30min cool down run and then an evening group meal and drinks. It has been an incredible week and one that has provided inspiration for all concerned. Roll on 2017.

‘How was your holiday?’ ask the lads at work. 

‘Amazing’ I say. ‘Look at these pictures’. ‘That’s how to round tape to ensure you minimize the risk of blisters’. Blank looks. 

‘See her? She’s the 2015 MdS champion putting the needle into my foot’. 

More indifference. 

‘Lads, this is the same you fat bastards going to Weston Karting centre at the weekend and Jensen Button turning up to do the safety briefing’. 

They still don’t get it. 
‘Did you learn much in Lanzarote darling?’. 

‘I certainly did. The WAA bag is a goner. It would be like taking a knife to gun fight. Ok, it would be like taking a clutch bag to an all day shopping trip. You know, when only a tote will do’. 

A nod of understanding, but really boredom turning to neutrality at best. 
‘Was it fun running Daddy?’ ‘It was. Midpack daddy is certainly going to need more fat than carbs to keep him going in the dunes girls’. 

‘Did you bring us back any sweets?’. 

‘No’. 

‘Can we watch TV?’ 
‘How was the volcano mate?’. ‘Wonderful. It was cold, but the stars were out and we all had an amazing time’. 

‘Get much sleep?’ 

‘Yes. In fact I’ve found it hard to sleep since without the sound of Elaine gently rustling inside her tent next to me’.  

These people don’t understand me anymore…. I miss #Lanzarote 
– Rich Carps

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If you would like to take part in the 2017 Multi-Day Training Camp, please go HERE

Many thanks for the support of MyRacekit, OMM, Raidlight, PHD. Scott Running, inov-8 and Berghaus.

“Really great few days, some invaluable experience and some valuable miles in the legs. Kit choice, food, packing the bag now all things I’m ready for. Thank you to the organisers and thank you to the fellow participants for making it such a nurturing environment in which to prepare for the MdS.” – Leon Clarance

Lanzarote Multi-Day Training Camp 2016 – Day 6 and 7

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For the participants of the 2016 Lanzarote multi-day training camp, it all got ‘real’ on day 6 and 7 of the camp.

It all started of with blue skies, sun and a 2 hour run without packs so that everyone had an opportunity to work on a little faster running. In most cases it was a great tempo 10-12 miles in the bag.

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Following this we had a 2-hour talk, demo and an opportunity to test packs from WAA, OMM, Raidlight and Aarn with a very informative and enlightening discussion on bag packing from Elisabet Barnes. It really raised the question; what is and is not an essential item?

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Ultimately the day (and night) was all about a medium length run of 2-3 hours and an overnight bivouac.

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Heading out along the course, the runners departed in three groups: walking, run/ walking and ‘mostly’ running to a pre-arranged rendezvous on the coast.

Ian Corless moved ahead and set up camp inside an incredible and dormant volcano. Rendezvous time was 1900 and right on cue, the three groups all arrived from different directions within 15-minutes of each other.

Running with packs, the runners carried all essentials less the additional days food. Food requirements were snack for the run on both days, evening meal and snacks plus breakfast.

At the overnight bivouac we operated self-sufficiency, water was provided but rationed. The only treat came from 24 beers (alcoholic and non-alcoholic) transported in as a special treat.

A clear starry sky, camp fire and the illumination of head torches within the stunning setting of an amphitheatre of rock made everyone suddenly realise that it was one of the special moments.

It wasn’t all plain sailing though. One or two runners realised on the run that their chosen pack just wasn’t the one for them. This is the whole reason behind providing a real scenario such as this on a training camp. It’s invaluable to find out these issues before your chosen must-day race.

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It was lights out, well, head torches out around 9pm and as the warm night drifted past midnight, the temperatures dropped. Unlike races such as Marathon des Sables, the night was damp lowering temperatures even more. One common thread with 0700 wake up call, a cockerel crow by Niandi, was, ‘My sleeping bag is not warm enough!’

Yes, it had been a rough night for some.

Elinor Evans said, “This experience has been incredibly invaluable. I have learnt my packs not right for, my sleeping bag is not warm enough and I need a warmer jacket. Last night was beautiful but also a little harrowing as I got so cold. Better here though than at my race!”

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It was a sentiment echoed by Leon Clarance, “I was just cold last night. Despite additional layers, my sleeping bag was not warm enough. I also made the mistake of removing my socks. I woke up with feet of ice.”

In general though, freeze dried food and peoples selections seemed to hit the spot, apple pieces with custard proving to be a hit with those lucky enough to be carrying it.

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The bivouac provided everyone with a very real and practical scenario and valuable lessons were learnt. A bivouac debrief back at Club La Santa will allow everyone to discuss this.

Leaving camp, the sun was getting higher in the sky, a new day and more valuable experiences to follow. But before that debrief, there was another 2-3 hours of running.

It’s been a great two days and night.

If you would like to join our 2017 camp, please go HERE

Many thanks to Raidlight, OMM, PHD, inov-8, Berghaus, Scott Running and MyRaceKit for the support

 

Lanzarote Multi-Day Training Camp 2016 – Day 5

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It was day 5 of the Lanzarote 2016 multi-day training camp and what a day…

Leaving the resort at 0830, three groups covered 4-hours to 5hours 30-minutes on the challenging trails of Lanzarote in three groups: walking, walk/ running and running.

It was a tough day, the clouds cleared, the sky came a deep blue and the heat started to slowly rise but all the time it was masked by the ever present winds coming from Morocco.

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Starting at Club La Santa, the groups moved along the coastline, moved inland to Soo and then re-navigated back to the coast and the village of La Santa before heading out on new coastline. Lanzarote’s mixed terrain provides the perfect environment for a multi-day camp and today, camp attendees enjoyed a real mix os sandy access roads, volcano trails, climbing, coasteering, volcano climbing and then out-and-out technical dried lava.

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Elisabet Barnes from MyRaceKit and sponsored Raidlight athlete guided the ‘fast’ group over 5-hours and 15-minutes and although it’s her first time on the Canarian island, she is taken back by its unique beauty and its specific trails.

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“Lanzarote is just amazing. The climate and the trails are just perfect for Marathon des Sables training. La Santa and the surrounding area manages to throw everything at you that you will experience in a typical edition of the iconic Moroccan race, even down to the strong winds, variable heat and especially the mixed terrain. Soft sand, stoney ground, hard trails, tough climbs and beautiful views; what more could you ask for?”

Like any training camp, mixed abilities are catered for and Niandi Carmont has guided a run/ walk group and Marie-Paule Pierson (who recently competed Atacama) has guided and paced the walkers.

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After a midday break, the afternoon had a foot care seminar hosted by Elisabet Barnes where she clearly explained the pros and cons of specific foot treatments and she also provided some very clear and highly informative ‘taping’ workshops.

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Tomorrow is another long day with a 2-hour run at 0700, a seminar late morning and then in the afternoon a 2 to 3-hour run will be followed with an overnight bivouac.

If you would like to join our 2017 training camp, please go HERE.

Many thanks to Raidlight, OMM, inov-8, Scott Running, Berghaus, PHD and MyRaceKit of the support of this camp.

Lanzarote Multi-Day Training Camp 2016 – Day 4

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It was an active recovery day at the 2016 Lanzarote multi-day training camp. It was kicked off with a guided 3-hour walk through some of the islands most stunning volcano sections close to the Timanfaya National Park.

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Famous for it’s volcanic landscape, today everyone was able to appreciate up close how dramatic and tough these trails can be. Black lava sand, interspersed with jagged rocks but ultimately everyone was blown away with the dramatic and somewhat eerie vistas. In the early 1700’s, this area had six continuous years of volcanic eruptions that created this stunning landscape.

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Elinor Evans, a yoga expert undertaking Marathon des Sables for the first time in 2016 commented after the walk:

“It’s been a really special day in this environment. We have walked with our packs, covered some miles and in the process had a wonderful learning experience. It has been magical.”

It was a sentiment echoed by everyone in the camp and with 5-hours of running waiting for everyone tomorrow, the opportunity to walk today was welcome.

The evening discussion was all about food and hydration for multi-day racing and we discussed the different nutritional needs for someone who may be looking to compete, the mid-packer and the walker. Of course, it’s all very personal, but many similarities from all three scenarios crossed over providing all the participants with plenty of key and essential information that they can now take away and formulate their own strategies for their chosen race.

Tomorrow, Sunday, kicks off with a 5-hour run along a new coastal section that will involve some climbing, scrambling and of course a plethora of mixed terrain.

If you are interested in a multi-day training camp, our 2017 dates are set and you can view HERE

Many thanks to:

Raidlight, OMM, inov-8, Berghaus, PHD, MyRaceKit and Scott Running for the support with this camp.

Lanzarote Multi-Day Training Camp 2016 – Day 3

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The 2016 Lanzarote multi-day training camp really got underway today with a full day of activity. This morning was a 4-hour run or hike over some very specific terrain that provided every participant a full-on appreciation of what terrain they may encounter at a race such as Marathon des Sables.

Mitch Keene, on the training camp with his wife, said post run:

“It was great to experience the sort of terrain that we are likely to come across when we get to the real event. To understand what it is like to run in some deep sand. It was also great camaraderie on the run. It’s good to know that there is going to be people around you who are in the same sort of position as you are and learning from them. And then there is just some basic stuff like understanding that wearing very short socks is a bad idea when running in the sand. So really simple stuff that you think you know when you set off but don’t. The whole learning experience is phenomenal out here and I really enjoyed it.”

The morning session took a relatively flat run out over very mixed terrain (sand, rock, lava, dunes) in three groups. Elisabet Barnes leading the runners who are able to hold a faster and more consistent pace. Niandi Carmont leading the runners who will run and occasionally walk and then Marie-Paule Pierson leading a small group who intend to walk the whole event. Ian Corless moved from one group to the next.

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“It’s nice meeting people who actually want to talk to you while you are running. I have found it quite difficult taking up running again on my own and going to events on my own,” said Leon Clarance. “People are usually polite but today people were actually chatting about their own experiences and it was nice to meet some likeminded people.”

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At the coastal resort of Famara, everyone turned 180-deg and the re-traced along the coastline but this time taking in the small mountains and hills that back on to the sea in this area. At times rocky and technical, everyone had a real insight into the complex terrain that one may encounter in a multi-day event. At the summit, one or two runners experimented with foot care and treatment; a key element of successful multi-day competition.

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“It’s ben a real eye opener,” said Alan Guthrie. “I have been behind with my training and today I managed my longest session for some time in some very specific terrain that directly relates to my chosen event; Marathon des Sables. It’s been a tough session but I have loved every minute of it.”

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Post run stretching relaxed tired muscles and 2-hour break was followed with a talk and discussion called, ‘What goes in the Multi-Day Pack?’

And just when the runners thought it was time to relax and chill-out an ‘optional’ 20-30min shake out run fired everyone up for one last effort, making the day a very successful and tiring one. Evening drinks, relaxing chat and good food was extremely welcome. Tomorrow we have a structured group walk in the Timanfaya National Park in a series of volcanoes followed with a talk on nutrition and hydration.

Many thanks to MyRaceKit, Raidlight, OMM, PHD, inov-8, Scott Running and Berghaus for the support.

If you would like to take part in a multi-day training camp like this, dates have been set for 2017 and it’s possible to book HERE

Click on an image to view today’s gallery

Lanzarote Multi-Day Training Camp 2016 – Day 2

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The Lanzarote 2016 multi-day training camp got underway today with an easy 1-hour run along the coastal trails of La Santa to Famara.

In total, we have a group of 27 runners with a broad range of 2016 objectives such as Marathon des Sables (Morocco), The Coastal Challenge (Costa Rica), Big Red Run (Australia), Cape Wraith Ultra (UK) and the Everest Trail Race (Nepal).

It’s always great to see so many runners of mixed ability come together with one goal in mind; completion of a challenging multi-day race!

Tomorrow, 4-hours of classic desert terrain awaits the runners as they depart in three groups lead by Elisabet Barnes, Niandi Carmont and Marie-Paule Pierson. Ian Corless, camp co-ordinator and planner, will move through the groups, running out-and-back to ensure that everyone is on track and comfortable.

In the afternoon, a group talk and discussion followed with an easy 30-60 min run.

Lanzarote, situated off the coast of Morocco provides the perfect environment to simulate many of the conditions that runners will experience in a classic multi-day race; wind, sand, rocks, tough terrain, climbs and maybe even a little scrambling.

If you are interested in a multi-day training, dates for 2017 have been set and you can view HERE

Many thanks to the following brands for helping with this camp:

MyRaceKit, OMM, inov-8, Berghaus, PHD, Raidlight, Scott Running

 

SCOTT TRAIL PRO TR’ 6.0 PACK – Review

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Race vests are not new to ultra running, arguably, one could say that we may well be at saturation point with the selection of products available. Salomon, Ultimate Direction, inov-8, Compressport, UltraAspire, The North Face and so on, all have products on the market and they all offer a very unique and practical way to carry mandatory kit, hydration, food and other optional accessories while training or racing. We could argue all day about which pack is best and ultimately it all comes down to personal taste.

For one day and single stage races 3-5ltr packs are very popular and for longer events, UTMB a classic example, 12ltr (or similar) packs are required due to the increased mandatory kit, additional requirement for liquid and also the option for flexibility.

If you are on a budget and looking for a ‘one pack does all’ scenario, then I always recommend purchasing a larger pack. You can always carry less but it’s very difficult to add more to a pack that is bulging at the seams.

Bottles have in many cases replaced the use of a bladder as the ‘go-to’ system for hydration as they are easier to use, easier to refill, easier to monitor how much or how little one drinks and also through pack design and the development of new bottles (soft flasks for example) the ease in which to carry them has increased.

With all the above considered, SCOTT SPORTS have now joined the party with a new vest  for 2016 called – SCOTT TRAIL PRO TR’ 6.0 PACK

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Main features include:

  • Two 250ml Hydrapack soft flasks with straw.
  • Adjustable fitting.
  • Hook and Loop side adjustment system.
  • Stretch mesh chest pockets x2.
  • Stretchable front and side pockets x2.
  • Hydration bladder compatible.
  • Reflective logo prints.
  • Pole bungee.
  • Keyholder.
  • Rear light clip.
  • Safety Whistle.

Sporting an all black stealth look with yellow logos, the SCOTT Vest is a good looking pack that immediately catches ones eye.

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Let’s be clear here, it’s a running vest, so on first impressions it looks like many other vests on the market. However, on close inspection you soon become aware that SCOTT have re-worked the classic vest design and offered a couple of new changes.

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Firstly the bottles, like many other packs, sit on the shoulder straps in two adjustable pockets that can be tightened and loosened with a ‘quick-release’ cord that works exceptionally well even when wearing gloves.

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The soft flasks (provided) are 250ml in size and have straws to facilitate ‘on-the-go’ drinking without having to move the flasks.

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The addition of two plastic clips that sit on the upper section of the shoulder straps (left and right) clip and hold the straws to stop them flapping and hitting your face when running; it’s a nice touch!

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A safety whistle is also available.

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Sitting below the bottle holders are two zipper pockets on the left and the right lower shoulder straps that can be used to hold anything from food to valuable items such as a small camera, phone, gps or similar.

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Sitting above the bottle holders are two small stretch pockets with a plastic puller that are ideal for gels, energy bars or similar.

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On the left and right side (under the arms) are two smaller stretch pockets with a velcro fastening that allows quick access to a bar, gel or other similar item.

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It’s also possible to squeeze gloves or a hat into the pockets providing they are not too large. However, it’s an either/ or situation, the pockets won’t accommodate both food and accessories.

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Fastening the pack is done via two ‘hook and loop’ systems that can be moved up or down to ensure a good fit. The straps can be tightened or loosened via a common and widely used adjustable system. The hook and loop system is minimalist but a little fiddly, especially if wearing gloves. However, once fastened it’s secure.

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It’s on the rear of the pack where some new technology is displayed. On either side (left and right) are two velcro straps that can be loosened or tightened to allow the pack to adjust for larger or smaller body shapes.

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It’s a practical solution to a common problem that arises from different sized runners. A plus side of this system is that it will also allow pack adjustment should you wear more or less clothes or should you carry more or less items in the pack. In the lower back, it’s also possible to adjust the pack making it smaller or larger via hidden velcro attachments.

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The rear of the pack has three pockets, the first pocket sits closest to ones back and has an attachment strap to hold a bladder in place. It would happily take most standard 1.5 or 2ltr bladders.

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This bladder pocket is a great addition for when races require mandatory liquid allowances of 2ltr plus. It also provides great flexibility for races in hot climates when more liquid would be required or when racing with minimal or no aid station options. If you don’t wish to use a bladder, no problem, you have an additional pocket to carry apparel.

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The second pocket is a zipper pocket for apparel such as jacket, gloves, hat, over trousers and so on. It will hold standard mandatory kit.

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The third pocket is open ended and stretch fabric for immediate and essential items such as windproof, gloves and hat. This pocket can be accessed without removing the pack, please note, you will need to practice this.

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On the upper left shoulder and on the lower right hand side are two adjustable, quick release bungee cords that will hold poles in place when not in use. It’s a practical system, however, many of the new folding poles may well be too short to fit between the two cords; you may want to check this?

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IN USE

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The vest fits exceptionally well, is well padded and comfortable with little to no bounce, even when fully loaded. The option to adjust the pack via the velcro straps was especially welcome when my partner, Niandi, used the pack for her own runs and testing.

“The vest has been designed in such a way that it works well for the female form, I had no issue with the pack chaffing or compressing my chest. However, ladies with a larger chest may wish to try the pack to ensure that this also applies for them,” commented Niandi. “The 250ml soft flasks are ideal as they are not too large or too heavy on the chest straps. The straws work brilliantly but the addition of the plastic clips that hold the straws when not is use is a revelation. Such a simple idea.”

The downside of the chest pockets and the 250ml flasks is that for many runners, a max 500ml capacity may be too little? We did try larger flasks and 500ml hard bottles in the pockets, they will fit and the adjustable cord does hold them in place, but it’s less comfortable that the two 250ml flasks provided.

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There are ways around the hydration issue and of course the bladder pocket on the rear is the most obvious solution for anything from 1ltr, 1.5ltr and 2ltrs. Another possibility is adding an additional one or two soft flasks to one of the rear pockets. There is definitely room to do this and on several occasions both Niandi and myself did this on longer runs. It may not be the most time efficient method but the pack comes on and off quickly and it’s easy to swap or refill the front chest soft flasks.

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The vest is well made and durable, this increases the overall weight of the pack and although not heavy, it’s notably more substantial than say a Salomon S-Lab vest. The SCOTT vest is reassuringly well built and although it’s way too early to tell, the vest feels as though it would provide long service.

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Access to liquid ‘on-the-go’ is excellent via the straws. The two front zipper pockets provide easy access to essential items that maybe need more security and the two upper stretch pockets are ideal for quick access to gels/ bars. The two smaller side pockets with velcro fastening provide quick access to small bars, gels or other items but they can be a little fiddly.

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The rear three pockets are easy accessed (not when running) and they hold a great deal. The zipper pocket is a nice addition as it provides security to any valuable items that you may be carrying. The open ended stretch pocket is great for quick access to windproof, hat and gloves without removing the pack.  A rear light clip is also welcome as many races now require a rear led light.

The pole bungees work exceptionally well if your poles are long enough? Unfortunately, the issue is common on many vests now. The increased use of poles for trail running has resulted in many manufacturers re-designing poles in an effort to make them smaller and lighter. This is a real bonus from a running perspective, however, it’s less of a bonus when trying to store poles when not in use. Many new poles (when folded) are now too short to fit between the pole attachments. My Black Diamond Z-Poles did not fit on the SCOTT vest. This is a problem I am used to and I now usually add two bungee cords to the front of my vests to hold the poles. It’s a system I have developed over the years that works quickly, efficiently and in all honesty, for me it is preferable to all other options available.

CONCLUSION

The SCOTT vest is a very welcome addition and alternative to the many vest options that are currently available on the market from various brands. The adjustment system, soft flask holding system and overall capacity will make this pack ideal for any race distance; marathon to long distance ultra. When not fully loaded, the pack can be adjusted to fit snugly against the torso with no bounce. Fully loaded, the velcro straps can be released and therefore allow for greater movement and the option to hold mandatory kit. It’s a versatile vest (with a reassurance from Niandi) that works well for male and female torsos. We always say here that you need to ensure that a pack works for you and your body shape. A big guy may well say the vest is too small for him, equally, a lady with large chest may well find that the pack lacks the comfort, security and anti-chaffing that Niandi loved about this pack.

There are very few downsides to this vest, however, the most obvious issue may well be that the soft-flasks on the chest are 250ml and not 500ml. Only you can decide if this is a make or break issue? Certainly the addition of the bladder pocket on the rear mitigates this problem.

There is no easy access dump pocket that can hold items such as gloves, hat and/ or buff. They can be added to the zipper pockets that sit below the soft flasks but the system isn’t as quick or as easy as some of the alternatives. It’s a small issue but it may well be a big issue for you?

Ultimately, we recommend the pack. It’s been a pleasure to wear and use and  it’s been our standard run pack for the last few months.

Close-up gallery

Lanzarote Multi-Day Training Camp 2016 – Day 1

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Day 1 in Lanzarote for the 2016 multi-day training camp. It’s all about scouting courses, checking out terrain and looking for some specific routes that will put our 26 clients through their paces that will help simulate classic multi-day races like Marathon des Sables, Atacama, The Coastal Challenge and more…

MDS 2015 champion, Elisabet Barnes is here and just recently she has secured a three year sponsorship deal with Raidlight. Lanzarote is not only an opportunity to test new Raidlight apparel and packs but also to train and pass on Elisabet’s experience to those who may well be undertaking a multi-day race for the first time.

Our other coaches, Niandi Carmont and Marie-Paule Pierson will also be passing on their own wisdom from their own multi-day experiences. Niandi in particular has been racing ultras for approximately 20-years, anything from 50k, 100k, 100-miles and of course multi-day races such as Marathon des Sables and The Coastal Challenge,

Our clients arrive tomorrow, Thursday. It will be a settle in day with an easy run late afternoon and then all the action starts on Friday with a coastal run that includes mixed terrain, soft sand, some scrambling and of course great weather and great views.

Thanks to OMM, inov-8, Scott Running, Raidlight, Berghaus and PHD of the support on this camp.