Episode 73 – Kremer, Collison, Greyling

Ep73

 

This is episode 73 of Talk Ultra and on this weeks show we speak with Skyrunner World Series Champ and Mourne Skyline winner, Stevie Kremer. Kim Collison tells us all about his running and his great 2014 season. Landie Greyling discusses running in South Africa and the up and coming Salomon SkyRun. In Talk Training it is episode 3 of our navigation special with Charlie Sproson, the News, a Blog, Up & Coming races and Speedgoat Karl talks busting quads.


NEWS

Mourne Skyline MTR

  1. Stevie Kremer 4:24.2 (10th overall)
  2. Jo Meek 4:30.3
  3. Diane Wilson 4:45.4
  4. Sharon Trimble 5:02.1
  5. Shileen O’Kane 5:03.1

 

  1. Kim Collison 3:57.0
  2. Eoin Lennon 3:59.4
  3. J Marshall Thomson 4:08.3
  4. Ally Beaven 4:12.0
  5. David Steele 4:15.0

INTERVIEW with Kim Collison

Raid de la Reunion

  1. Francois D’Haene 24:25:02
  2. Ludovic Pommeret 25:55:26
  3. Aurelien Collet 27:24:53
  4. Gediminus Grinius 27:25:13
  5. Javier Dominguez 28:23:43
  1. Nathalie Mauclair 31:27:28
  2. Juliette Blanchet 34:17:54
  3. Uxue Fraile 34:18:02
  4. Christine Benard 35:45:21
  5. Melanie Rousset 36:28:49

 
Templiers

Benoit Cori 6:36:49
Sylvain Court 6:39:15
Alex Nichols 6:43:14
Sage Canaday 6:45:00
Zach Miller 6:51:01

Nuria Picas 7:51:46
Juliette Benedicto 8:00:33
Magdalena Boulet 8:02:40
Maud Gobert 8:20:18
Aliza Lapierre 8:20:35

Holly Rush 6th

BLOG
 
#GirlwhatCycles Niandi Carmont tells us all about her new journey in #CyclingforRunners @girlwhatcycles – HERE
 
INTERVIEW

Stevie Kremer
 
INTERVIEW
 
Landie Greyling

GOOD, BAD & UGLY

TALK TRAINING – Navigation part 3 with Charlie Sproson

 
UP & COMING RACES

Antartica
Last Desert (Antarctica) | 250 kilometers | November 01, 2014 | website

Argentina
Puna Inca Trail | 200 kilometers | November 04, 2014 | website

Australia
New South Wales
Carcoar Cup Ultra Marathon | 60 kilometers | November 02, 2014 | website
Queensland
Blackall 100 | 100 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
Blackall 100 – 50 km | 50 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
Run to Paradise Ultra Marathon | 74 kilometers | November 09, 2014 | website

Brazil
60k Aceguá a Melo | 60 kilometers | November 09, 2014 | website

Estonia
Haanja Jala100 – 100 km | 100 kilometers | November 01, 2014 | website

France
Aveyron
Trail des Hospitaliers | 75 kilometers | November 02, 2014 | website
Marne
SPARNATRAIL classique | 55 kilometers | November 09, 2014 | website

Germany
North Rhine-Westphalia
Bottroper Herbstwaldlauf – 50 km | 50 kilometers | November 02, 2014 | website

Hong-Kong
Oxfam Trailwalker Hong Kong | 100 kilometers | November 14, 2014 | website
Salomon LT 70 | 70 kilometers | November 01, 2014 | website

India
Bangalore Ultra Marathon – 100 km | 100 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
Bangalore Ultra Marathon – 50 km | 50 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
Bangalore Ultra Marathon – 75 km | 75 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
Himalayan 100 Mile Stage Race | 100 miles | October 31, 2014 | website

Italy
Tuscany
Eroica Running Ultramaratona | 65 kilometers | November 02, 2014 | website

Jordan
Jordan Running Adventure Race – 190 km | 190 kilometers | November 02, 2014 | website
Jordan Running Adventure Race – 70 km | 70 kilometers | November 03, 2014 | website

Morocco
Trans 333 | 333 kilometers | October 31, 2014 | website
Ultra Runners Race 777+++ | 777 kilometers | October 31, 2014 | website

Namibia
100 km of Kalahari | 100 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
Desert Ultra | 250 kilometers | November 14, 2014 | website

Nepal
Everest Trail Race | 160 kilometers | November 09, 2014 | website
Manaslu Trail Race | 212 kilometers | November 11, 2014 | website
NEPAL Action Asia 3 day ultra 100km | 100 kilometers | November 01, 2014 | website
Nepal Action Asia Ultra 3 day marathon 60k | 60 kilometers | November 01, 2014 | website
Solukhumbu Trail | 289 kilometers | October 31, 2014 | website

New Zealand
Queen Charlotte Ultramarathon / Relay | 71 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
Taranaki Steelformers 100 mile Around the mountain Solo | 100 miles | November 07, 2014 | website
Taranaki Steelformers 150 km Around the mountain Running and Walking Relay | 150 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
The Taniwha – 60 km | 60 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website

Oman
Oman Desert Marathon | 165 kilometers | November 07, 2014 | website

Spain
Valencian Community
Mondúber Utrail | 80 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website

Thailand
Zulu W 80 km Run | 80 kilometers | November 02, 2014 | website

United Kingdom
Kirklees
White Rose Ultra 60 Mile | 60 miles | November 02, 2014 | website
Northamptonshire
XNRG Druid Challenge | 84 miles | November 07, 2014 | website

Uruguay
ULTRA Maratón Altas Cumbres Serranas 100K Ultra | 100 kilometers | November 01, 2014 | website
ULTRA Maratón Altas Cumbres Serranas 60K Ultra | 60 kilometers | November 01, 2014 | website

USA
Alabama
Pinhoti 100 | 100 miles | November 01, 2014 | website
Arizona
Javelina Jundred 100 Mile Endurance Run | 100 miles | November 01, 2014 | website
California
Almaden Hills 50K Run | 50 kilometers | November 01, 2014 | website
Chino Hills Spring Trail Series 50K | 50 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
CTR Lake Chabot Train Run 50 km (Nov) | 50 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
Dirty Dare Trail Run 50 km | 50 kilometers | November 01, 2014 | website
Rio Del Lago 100K | 100 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
Rio Del Lago 100M | 100 miles | November 08, 2014 | website
Rio Del Lago 50K | 50 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
Two Cities Ultra Marathon | 50 kilometers | November 02, 2014 | website
Georgia
Georgia Sky to Summit 50k | 50 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
Illinois
Chicago Lakefront 50K | 50 kilometers | November 01, 2014 | website
Indiana
Owen Putnam State Forest 50K | 50 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
Owen Putnam State Forest 50 Miles | 50 miles | November 08, 2014 | website
Maryland
Rosaryville Veteran’s Day 50k | 50 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
Massachusetts
Stone Cat 50 Mile | 50 miles | November 08, 2014 | website
Missouri
Ozark Trail 100 Mile Endurance Run | 100 miles | November 01, 2014 | website
Nevada
Bootlegger 50K | 50 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
Coyote Springs 100K Trail Run | 100 kilometers | November 01, 2014 | website
Coyote Springs 100M Trail Run | 100 miles | November 01, 2014 | website
Coyote Springs 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | November 01, 2014 | website
Coyote Springs 50M Trail Run | 50 miles | November 01, 2014 | website
Ragnar Relay Las Vegas | 195 miles | November 07, 2014 | website
New Hampshire
Ghost Train Ultra Race 100M | 100 miles | November 01, 2014 | website
Ghost Train Ultra Race 45M | 45 miles | November 01, 2014 | website
Ghost Train Ultra Race 60M | 60 miles | November 01, 2014 | website
Ghost Train Ultra Race 75M | 75 miles | November 01, 2014 | website
Ghost Train Ultra Race 90M | 90 miles | November 01, 2014 | website
New Jersey
NJ Trail Series One Day – 50K | 50 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
New York
Mendon 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | November 01, 2014 | website
Oklahoma
Turkey & Taturs 50K Trail Race | 50 kilometers | November 02, 2014 | website
Oregon
Silver Falls 50K Ultra Trail Run | 50 kilometers | November 01, 2014 | website
Tennessee
Nashville Ultra Marathon 50 K Race | 50 kilometers | November 01, 2014 | website
Nashville Ultra Marathon 50 Mile Race | 50 miles | November 01, 2014 | website
Nashville Ultra Marathon 60 K Race | 60 kilometers | November 01, 2014 | website
Nashville Ultra Marathon 70 K Race | 70 kilometers | November 01, 2014 | website
Upchuck 50K Trail Running Race | 50 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
Virginia
Mountain Masochist Trail Run | 50 miles | November 01, 2014 | website
Paris Mountain 50 Mile Ultra | 50 miles | November 08, 2014 | website
Washington
First Call 50K | 50 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website
First Call Veterans Day 50K | 50 kilometers | November 08, 2014 | website

CLOSE

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Skyrunner® World Series and Continental Championships 2015

©iancorless.com_IMG_3117Marino2014_

REACH FOR THE SKY!

As one season comes to an end the planning of a new season starts and today we are pleased to announce the calendar for the Skyrunner® World Series and Continental Championships 2015.

In less than three years, Skyrunning has grown to a new level and today, the announcement of the 2015 calendar signifies a significant expansion of the sport and it truly becomes a world series with the addition of the Continental Championships.

It is a very exciting time and in conjunction with the growth of the National Series, it has never been a better time to be a Skyrunner…

Lauri van Houten, executive director for the ISF today provided the details of the new series and lists the full calendar for 2015.

The big news for 2015 is that the Series goes global – more races, more places and, now, the chance to count an extra race in the ranking.  The successful 5 SKY/5 ULTRA/ 5 VK formula stays where three results out of five are scored, but now you can choose a fourth race from the Continental Championships of your choice.

Twenty-seven races in nine countries stretch across five continentsAfrica, Australia and China make their first appearance together with the rugged mountains north of the Arctic Circle in Norway.

New Skyrunner® National Series will be announced throughout the year, so skyrunning closer to home becomes a tangible reality in: Africa, North & South America, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Greece, Italy, Oceania, Poland, Portugal, Russia and Spain.

Benefits in the Series and Championships include 1,700 race slots450 free entries250 accommodation and 80 travel slots. The Series final $ 25,000 is redistributed and additional prizes – not just for the winners – are on the way.

We are proud to reconfirm and thank our our partners Salomon, Active Patch 4U, Compressport, Scott Sports, inov-8, Arc’teryx and La Sportiva for their support and look forward to announcing new ones for 2015.

Skyrunner-World-Series-Logo_150

2015 SKYRUNNER® WORLD SERIES & CONTINENTAL CHAMPIONSHIP

 

IMPORTANT please note re scoring:

Points will be available  in 3 Skyrunner® World Series races + 1 Continental Championship race for each discipline.

2015 SKYRUNNER® WORLD SERIES

SKY

  • July 19 – Dolomites SkyRace® – 22 km, Canazei – Italy
  • August 22 – Matterhorn Ultraks 46K – Zermatt – Switzerland
  • September 5 – The Rut 25K – Montana – USA
  • October 4 – Suunto Lantau 2 Peaks – 21 km, Hong Kong – China
  • October 18 – Skyrunning Extreme – 23 km, Limone Sul Garda – Italy

ULTRA

  • May 9 – Transvulcania Ultramarathon – 75 km, La Palma – Spain
  • June 27 – Mont Blanc 80K – Chamonix – France
  • August 2 – Tromsø SkyRace® – 45 km, Tromso – Norway
  • September 6 – The Rut 50K – Montana – USA
  • September 19 – Ultra Pirineu – 103 km, Bagà – Spain

VK

  • July 10 – Kilomètre Vertical Face De Bellevarde, Val D’Isère – France
  • July 17 – Dolomites Vertical Kilometer®, Canazei – Italy
  • August 1 – Tromsø Vertical Kilometer®, Tromso – Norway
  • September 4 – Lone Peak Vertical Kilometer®, Montana – USA
  • October 16 – Vertical Kilometer® Crèste de la Mugheira, Limone Sul Garda – Italy

CONTINENTAL CHAMPIONSHIPS

EUROPE

  • May 17 – SKY Maratòn Alpina Zegama-Aizkorri – 42 km, Zegama – Spain
  • July 12 – ULTRA Ice-Trail Tarentaise – 65 km, Val d’Isère – France
  • June 26 – VERTICAL KM Vertical, Chamonix – France

AFRICA

  • July 18 – SKY Ti DoDo Trail – 25 km, Black River Gorges – Mauritius
  • July 18 – ULTRA Xtreme DoDo Trail – 50 km, Le Morne – Mauritius

ASIA

  • February 7 – SKY Sai Kung – 26 km- Hong Kong – China
  • February 7 – ULTRA Sai Kung – 50 km, Hong Kong – China

N AMERICA

  • July 19 – ULTRA Power of Four Trail – 50 km, Aspen – Colorado
  • October 3 – SKY Flagstaff SkyRace® – 39 km, Flagstaff – Arizona
  • October 4 – VERTICAL Flagstaff Vertical Kilometer®, Flagstaff – Arizona

OCEANIA

  • 11 April – ULTRA Buffalo Stampede Ultra SkyMarathon®- 75 km – Australia
  • 12 April – SKY Buffalo Stampede SkyMarathon® - 41 km – Australia

 

INFO:

  • SKYRUNNER® WORLD SERIES PRIZES
  • US $25,000 will be awarded to each Series M/F champion.
  • SKY: $ 3,000 / 1,500 / 750.  ULTRA: $ 3,000 / 1,500 / 750. VERTICAL: $1,000 / 700 / 300.
  • SKYRUNNING CONTINENTAL CHAMPIONSHIPS PRIZES
  • Medals and titles will be awarded in each discipline to M/F champions. 
  • RANKING POINTS
  • * Scoring: 3 Skyrunner® World Series results + 1 Continental Championship in each discipline
  • Ranking points in the final races of all three Series will be increased by 20%.
  • Ranking points breakdown: 100-88-78-72-68-66-64-62-60-58-56-54-52-50 down to 2 points to 40thposition for men and 15thposition for women.
  • TEAM POINTS
  • The Team & National ranking system is based on the individual points scored by the first three men and the first women of the same team obtained in all SWS races.

FOLLOW ALL THE NEWS at SKYRUNNING.COM

CALENDAR 2015 – NOW AVAILABLE to order

1

 

2015 calendar is now available to pre order.

Delivery will be guaranteed the first week of December.

The calendar has highlights from a great 2014 racing season and includes images of ISF president, Marino Giacometti, Maite Maiora, Stevie Kremer, Jo Meek, Marco De Gasperi, Luis Alberto Hernando, Emelie Forsberg, Zaid Ait Malek, Martin Gaffuri, Kilian Jornet, Francois D’Haene and Anna Frost.

Cost will be £20.00 inc post and package within UK.

(An additional £5.00 for postage outside UK.)

To pre order, please fill in this request form, importantly, please specify postage within UK or outside UK. You will receive an invoice via Paypal.

Payments are accepted via debit card, credit card or Paypal account.

Navigation 101: Intermediate Navigation – Beyond the Basics by Mountain Run

Mountain Run

This is a second article in a trio of interviews with Ian Corless, about Navigation for Ultra Runners & more. Read article one HERE

all content ©mountainrun

In the first interview we covered the Basics of Navigation, this encompassed maps, compasses, setting your map & how to set a bearing.

The second interview was moving into intermediate navigation & it consisted of the following information & techniques:

  1. Declination/Magnetic Variation
  2. Grid Numbers/Plotting a Grid Reference
  3. Back Bearings
  4. Re-Orienting/Re-locating
  5. Thumbing the Map
  6. Hand-railing
  7. Catching Features
  8. Aiming Off

So lets start with:

1) Magnetic Declination or Magnetic Variation: 

There are 3 points at which north is seen. 1) True North, 2) Grid North & 3) Magnetic North. We are concerned with Grid North & Magnetic North.

Grid North is what is detailed on a map, its where the North/South grid lines show us the direction of north, according to the grid lines printed on the map. This is almost the same as True North, so we will group True North & Grid North the same. These are fixed points & do not move.

Magnetic North is what your compass needle points towards, being magnetised & this is not a fixed point, it moves over time. Magnetic North is explained as so:

“The North Magnetic Pole is the point on the surface of Earth‘s Northern Hemisphere at which the planet’s magnetic field points vertically downwards (in other words, if a magnetic compass needle is allowed to rotate about a horizontal axis, it will point straight down). There is only one location where this occurs, near (but distinct from) the Geographic North Pole and the Geomagnetic North Pole.

The North Magnetic Pole moves over time due to magnetic changes in the Earth’s core.[1] In 2001, it was determined by the Geological Survey of Canada to lie near Ellesmere Island in northern Canada at 81.3°N 110.8°W. It was situated at 83.1°N 117.8°W in 2005. In 2009, while still situated within the Canadian Arctic territorial claim at 84.9°N 131.0°W,[2] it was moving toward Russia at between 34 and 37 miles (55 and 60 km) per year.[3] As of 2012, the pole is projected to have moved beyond the Canadian Arctic territorial claim to 85.9°N 147.0°W.[2]

Because we have a variance between True North & Magnetic North, we therefore need to use something called the Magnetic Variation. This is described as follows: 

“Magnetic declination or variation is the angle on the horizontal plane between magnetic north (the direction the north end of a compass needle points, corresponding to the direction of the Earth’s magnetic field lines) and true north (the direction along a meridian towards the geographic North Pole). This angle varies depending on position on the Earth’s surface, and changes over time.”

It is also explained more formally, Bowditch defines variation as “the angle between the magnetic and geographic meridians at any place, expressed in degrees and minutes east or west to indicate the direction of magnetic north from true north. The angle between magnetic and grid meridians is called grid magnetic angle, grid variation.

Magnetic_North_Pole_Positions

Depending on which country you reside in will then depend on what the Magnetic Variation actually is. For example, if you live in the UK then the Magnetic North is 1.5 degree’s at the start of 2014 west of True North. The reason it is west is that we sit to the east of the Agonic Line or line of Zero Declination where Mag North & True North are the same. There are several points where this occurs around the world. Its a bit technical, but all you need to remember is that the Mag Variation is printed on all maps in the UK to advise what the Mag Variation is at what ever year the map was printed.

IGRF_2000_magnetic_declination

In order to correct your bearing to take into account the Mag Variation, you must adjust the compass 1.5 degrees east of the bearing you have taken, or more easily remembered, add 1.5 degrees on to your compass bearing you have just taken from the map. To make life even more confusing, the Mag Variation in 2015 is 0, therefore Mag Variation need not be corrected for that year, so it is almost not worth making this correction for the next year & certainly if your navigation is broken down into small legs. It really only comes into play right now, if you are travelling over large expanses of land, without any catching features, hand rails etc.

Transversely, if you are using the Mag Variation, remember when making a sighted bearing, whilst relocations, you might want to subtract 1.5 degree’s off your bearing in order to get an accurate bearing when you place the compass on the map. It all depends how accurate you need the bearing to be? Are you looking at a mountain summit? If so, is your bearing really that accurate anyway.

So Mag Variation in the UK is not really necessary right now.

If you are in Europe or other parts of the world like the US, then your Mag Declination/Variation will be different. It should be on the map you are using, if not consult a website like Wiki for more information.

North & South of the Equator. 

If you buy your compass in the northern hemisphere, then it is not set to work in the southern hemisphere & visa versa. Silva produce 3 types of compasses to work in 3 different magnetic zones. The best piece of advise is if you are traveling, then buy a compass for use in the zone which you are traveling. Best to contact a company like Silva to get the right compass.

Can I set the declination on a compass, so I can forget about the Mag Variation? 

Yes is the answer, but they don’t come at a small price. Most compasses, of reasonable value, like Silva 2NL-360 Explorer will have a Declination Scale on the bevel base plate, this can be used for quick adjustment. If you want to set the mag declination, then you need to purchase a compass capable of doing this, like the Silva 15T-360/6400 Green military compass. Its not really necessary for general use, especially in the UK right now.

Ok, so the confusing Mag Declination/Variation is done. Use at will, just remember to check on the country you are in as to what the variation is & apply it if necessary. Its list on the map you have in your hand, or at least the one you will be using.

2) Grid Numbers & Plotting a Grid Reference

Grid numbers are applied to the grid lines. These are a squared matrix applied to the whole country to divide it into different sections. They are laid out to make squares 100k by 100k, these squares are then broken down to have a further matrix applied giving squares of 1km by 1km. These are the lines/squares printed on your map. The lines running from east to west are numbered from south to north, these are the ‘northings’, the lines running from north to south are numbers west to east, these are called the ‘eastings’. A grid reference is made up of these printed numbers.

northings-eastings

So on the image pictured to the left, we have Eastings along the bottom & Northings running up the side. In order to find a certain grid we need 4 of these numbers. This a 4 figure GR.

We are always given the Eastings first & the Northings second.  A 4 figure GR would read as 17 45

Once we understand this we can move to a 6 figure GR. This is done by breaking down each of the squares into a further 10 divisions on either scale, making 100 squares inside the existing square and will allow us to pin point a location to within a 100m square on the ground. A 6 figure GR would be something like 175 454.

This can be taken into a further pin point of 10m squares by using the same logic & so on.

A roamer on your compass can be of great help here to pin point 6 figure GR’s.

Not following? Book on a course….

3) Back Bearings. 

Very useful in either re-locating yourself or using a feature to make sure you are looking at what you think your looking at. A back bearing is taken by using a sighting of an identifiable feature, be it a path, summit, building or  large reentrant & applying it to the map. This can help you do one of 2 things. 1 – re-locate yourself on a line feature (its hard to relocate with this technique exactly, but it can help your judgement or give you a rough location) or 2 – help you to make sure the feature you are looking at is the same one you are looking at on the map.

Remember that when taking a back bearing, you might need to subtract the Mag Variation to make sure its correct. 

compassatpeak

To take a back bearing, line the direction of travel arrow at the front of your compass with the feature, make it as exact as possible. Then swivel the rotating bevel so that you line the red end of the needle in the red house/shed, remember the Red in Shed. This is now your bearing set. Next put the compass on the map & line the front side up with the feature you think you are looking at, and move the compass until your orienting lines on the base plate match with the N/S Grid Lines on the map. You should now be able to locate yourself somewhere along the side of the compass.

A back bearing works best if you are already located on a line feature, as this bearing will then cross the line feature at some point, giving you a rough location of where you are on that line feature.

4) Re-Orienting/Re-Locating.

A very necessary skill, used to either make sure you are where you think you are, or as it sounds, to actually re-locate. Once you are adept at this skill, it should be used throughout the day, as you progress through your race or just through the mountains to keep a check on your position, but of course if you are thumbing the map, then it will be a whole lot quicker & easier. When you’re really good at it you will re-locate whilst on the move.

Clients on a recent OMM Mountain Skills Day relocating on Place Fell, Eastern Lakes

©iancorless.com.IMG_5128GL3D_Day1

How to do it: 

Use everything at your disposal. This means look for all the identifiable features you can see, summits, paths, streams, woods, walls, buildings, ruins, sheepfolds etc. Orientate your map, if it is not already! Now match the features on your map to the ground, or visa versa. If your still not sure, then use a back bearing by locating a summit or other feature & take a bearing from it by following what was discussed above.

If you are not on a line feature you will then need to start really assessing the contours & because you have studied your contours well at home, you have a good handle on how to interpret what you are looking at to the features/contours on the ground. Are you in a reentrant, or is there one close by. Is the valley in the right place in front of you in relation to the map.

Re-Location requires lots of practice, the more you do, the better you will get until you can re-orientate whilst on the move.

5) Thumbing the map. 

Thumbing the map with compass in hand.

©iancorless.com_IMG_5329Marmot24_2014_

A very simple, but very useful technique. Once you start to get a handle on navigation, map reading & compass work you will be able to fold your map smaller, so not needing so much of it in view. The smaller you can have your map folded, the easier it is to thumb the map. By doing this we mean, fold your map in half, half again and so on until you have a manageable size to hold in your hand. Obviously make sure you can see the area you are in. Now, knowing where you are on the map, put your thumb over this location. Having the map oriented correctly in your hand is very important. As you walk/run along your chosen courses/bearing, you simply move you thumb small increments to keep up to date with your progress.

Why is this useful? 

Because you need to be able to locate your rough position on the map at a split second or whilst on the move. When you want to check your surroundings against the map, just pull it up to have a look & your thumb will be placed near to where you are, you can then re-locate very quickly & keep a track of your progress from map to land or the other way round. This is how you will learn to re-locate whilst on the move!

6) Hand-railing. 

It is as it sounds, using a handrail to help you on your way as you travel across the land. So what is a handrail? It a feature on the map that allows you to use it as a hand-rail. It is always a line feature & can be as simple as a path, or as obscure as a blind ridge line (by blind I mean rounded & not obvious). Once you have established the handrail is going in the direction of travel you want you can walk/run along it until you need to make your next decision.

Examples of Hand Rails

Handrails

How do you know when to stop? Use the next technique, a catching feature….

7) Catching Features. 

A catching feature again is as it sounds, its a feature that catches you. It can be designed to wake the brain up to say your nearly at your destination, next direction change or just as a marker to what is coming next. You can have as many catching features as you like along your chosen course. Don’t pick too many though, as it will be hard to remember. Try to limit them as wake up calls, or direction changes, but you can still use them as markers to track your progress.

Plenty of Catching Features in the image below: 

Catching-Features_edited-2

A catching feature might be a wall corner, building, junction in a path or river or a crag that you are moving past. Used in conjunction with thumbing the map & hard rails, you can see that you can really track your progress as you move forwards.

8) Aiming Off. 

The last technique in our intermediate navigational skill set. We use aiming off to catch a line feature, that we may then use as our next bearing setter or as a handrail until we reach the next catching feature.

To aim off we use a bearing slightly off to the side of the line feature we are heading for. This can be either left or right, but it need to be obvious, otherwise you might miss it.

Aiming Of below so you don’t miss the control, best practice in foul weather!

Aiming-Off_edited_edited-1

Lets say your travelling across open ground south to north, there is a tarn in front of you running from west to east & you want to catch this feature, but keep moving past it. The weather is in and visibility isn’t what you want it to be. You want to pass the tarn to the east, so you need it to be on the western side of you. How will you know you have passed it, if you can’t see so well due to mist? The tarn might be 500 m long, west to east. By aiming off, rather than passing the tarn on a bearing and checking it off as you go, you are better aiming off your bearing slightly to the west & hitting the tarn, this then gives you an identifiable feature to break up your leg & confirm you are where you think you are. You can then take your next bearing to the location you want to reach, using the techniques of handrails, catching features & possibly aiming off again.

Get these skills dialled in good weather & you can now be ready to head out in to the open fell in inclement weather. Get them dialled in bad weather & your getting ready to head out at night.

Still not got it? 

Are you interested in an UltraTrail Nav Day or a Mountain Marathon Skills Day?

Send us your details here:

 

Philipp Reiter prepares for the Salomon SkyRun

Philipp Reiter ©iancorless.com

Philipp Reiter ©iancorless.comHow have the last couple of months been from a racing perspective?

 Philipp Retier has had a quite 2014 due to a problematic foot injury. The season started well with a multi day adventure at The Coastal Challenge in Costa Rica and the iconic, Transvulcania. In June, running ground to a halt after running 100-miles in the charity D-Day celebrations in Normandy. Philipp is back on track now and I caught up with him as he prepares for the Salomon SkyRun in South Africa.

How have the last couple of months been from a racing perspective?

Unfortunately I have been injured for the whole summer from a community running event on the flat asphalt road and was not really able to run. I could not think about racing. To stay fit I was cycling quite a lot around my home town – MTB, road bike and cross-bike.
As you can imagine, it was very disappointing for me, but it is great to have a big (running) perspective now at the end of November with the Salomon SkyRun.

Philipp Reiter, Salomon ©iancorless.com

Philipp Reiter, Salomon ©iancorless.com

Do you have any targets between now and your trip to SA?

My studies at the university started in the beginning of October, so I have enough work trying to fit everything in my day; so no races are planned in preparation. I still feel more familiar to cycling than to running at the moment which I have to change in the next weeks.

How’s training going – have you done anything specific for SA?

I have already asked a few participants about the terrain and climate at the SkyRun and figured out that the weather is changing pretty fast – hot and very dry in the valleys, freezing cold and stormy on the ridges. For the cold I can prepare at home and for the hot maybe a few sauna-sessions should be good! As the terrain is very rocky and rough I will run more off-trail at home.

Julia Bottger, Philipp Reiter and Ryan Sandes in Gran Canaria copyright Ian Corless

Julia Bottger, Philipp Reiter and Ryan Sandes in Gran Canaria copyright Ian Corless

Maybe you have been brushing up on your navigation and looking at some maps?

Yes, indeed! I was asked to scout routes for a trailrunning stage race here in Germany, so I have done quite a lot of map work trying to find the best, fastest and most beautiful spots. I mainly run around with a map in my hands which could be similar in South Africa…

 

Are you intimidated by the navigation element of the SkyRun?

Should I? It is totally new for me not to “just” follow the marks in a race but that makes it more interesting. Then it’s not only fast legs and stong lungs to be in a good position but also your brain has to work much more! I am only a bit worried as I have no experience using the compass for navigation or a mobile GPS-device apart from my watch.

The course sounds extreme, particularly if the weather turns. Have you researched the course?

No, not really. I have only watched some videos from the last editions and they made the course and the race look quite tough. It’s not the heat or the cold alone that make me worried but the extreme fast changes of both. So the backpack will be more heavy than in a “normal” race as it’s quite a lot of stuff to carry…

Philipp Reiter, Salomon ©iancorless.com

Philipp Reiter, Salomon ©iancorless.com

A strong local contingent will be toeing the line… Iain Don Wauchope, AJ Calitz and so on… do you know much about them?

Yes, I have heared that they are really strong and apart form their fitness they are very familiar to the race route, the climate and the terrain. They know exactly where to find water, how to climb the barbed wired fences,… So, I will just thry to follow them.

Michael De Haast has put up a great price purse should somebody post a great time, is that an incentive for you?

Aaagh, that is a good question. I have read that it’s $10.000 for the first runner who goes under 12 hours! But I guess that is almost impossible and I know that my teammate Ryan Sandes, who is an excellent runner especially in that type of terrain, needed about 12:30h last year. So I am not sure if someone can beat that. It would be a great boost for my student wallet though.

Have you been to SA before?

No, unfortunately not. But one of my climbing friends was there last year for bouldering and he was so excited that he will come back next year. He showed me some pictures – just stunning!

What are you most looking forward to?

The huge untouched landscape, some wild animals you can only see in the zoo at home (giraffes, lions, elephants,…), get to know the SA culture and how it’s connected to the European colony many years ago. Eat the famous steaks. Go running on the table mountain and explore Cape Town – quite a few things to do… maybe I will need to stay?

“The Salomon SkyRun is something completely new. I have been running in the jungle of Costa Rica, the Rocky Mountains in the USA, scrambled in the French Alps and raced on dry Spain islands but it’s was all marked. I never had to care about choosing the best and fastest way, run with a map in my hands and think about not missing the next well to fill up my water bottles. To perform good in this SA adventure I will not only need power in my legs, strong lungs and mental force but also navigation skills and the ability to read the terrain to choose the best way. It’s much more about tactics and planning! – I can’t wait!” Philipp Reiter

Philipp Reiter at the finish of Trofeo Kima copyright Ian Corless

Philipp Reiter at the finish of Trofeo Kima copyright Ian Corless

Like the Wind – Issue 3

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LIKE the WIND issue 3 now available

Please check out edition 3 of LIKE the WIND magazine. This is something that I am really passionate about. It is a great showcase and resource for those who are interested in all things running.

Like the Wind magazine is a collection of stories about running, from the track, trail and road. There are personal anecdotes, inspirational tales and wonderful pictures, all designed to inspire and delight

Launched in February 2014, Like the Wind magazine is printed on responsibly sourced paper certified by the Forest Stewardship Council, so that it is as sustainable as it is beautiful. With a wonderful weight, this magazine looks and feels fantastic and is a real treat to read and collect.

I, like all the other contributors provide our services free of charge. Any profit the magazines makes goes to our designated charities.

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In edition 3, I have an article and images on the inspiring Kilian Jornet. If you would like a copy, please go HERE 

Starting next week, LIKE the WIND will have a Pop Up store in London for 1-week (info HERE) please come and check it out.

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I will be doing a photography workshop on Thursday 30th in the afternoon (book HERE).

I hope to see some of you at some point during the week.

Raid de la Reunion #DiagonaledesFous 2014 Race Preview

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With 5-summits over 2000m, the Raid de la Reunion (Diagonale des Fous) is a great season closer for the UTWT. Now in its 22nd edition, ‘Reunion’ as it is affectionately known has gained legendary status within ultra running circles, not only because of some epic battles that have taken place on the course but also because of the fans, terrain and the tough 164km course and 9000m+ of ascent.

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Francois D’Haene, winner of the 2013 edition and recent winner of the TNFUTMB is without doubt the hot favourite. Currently, he is arguably one of the best 100-mile mountain runners in the world.

Lithuanian, Grinius Gediminas who is 2nd in the overall UTWT ranking may well be a surprise package after a solid and impressive 5th at TNFUTMB and 3rd place at Lavaredo. Will Reunion be one race too many? I don’t think so. He seems to have his head screwed on.

The ever-present Antoine Guillon who recently placed 3rd at Tor des Geants lies 3rd in UTWT rankings and is a consistent performer. I don’t see him winning but a top place is a distinct possibility. Reunion is a tough and long race though. As we have seen in past editions, anything can happen.

©iancorless.com.IMG_7127Transvulcania14Xavier Thevenard after winning the 2013 TNFUTMB seemed to go into a little bit of a meltdown with the weight of expectation placed upon him. However, he recently came out of the whole with a win at TDS. In doing so, he became the only runner to win at UTMB, CCC and TDS, quite a result. Xavier may well feel at home on Reunion. I think we will see a good run.

Iker Karrera ©iancorless.com

Iker Karrera ©iancorless.com

Iker Karrera is a machine on tough courses as his 2013 Tor des Geants confirms. He raced well at Reunion in 2012 but his recent joint 2/3rd with Tofol Castanyer behind Francois D’Haene is a sure sign that he is in form for the 164km adventure. Question is, can he beat Francois?

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Pascal Blanc is serious contender and knows the course like the back of his hand. He has a string of top-10 finishes, his highest place being second. In this field his experience will really count.

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Julien Chorier impressed me no end at Ronda dels Cims in 2013 and then placed 2nd behind Kilian at Hardrock 100. He is meticulous in planning and if he has no back issues, he may very well be the one who can push his fellow Frenchman, Francois D’Haene to the line.

©iancorless.com.IMG_9119Transvulcania14Jason Schlarb (current interview on Talk Ultra) surprised me with 4th at UTMB. He has certainly honed his European mountain skills in 2014. Reunion however is a little more extreme and may well shock Jason. He seems motivated though and the opportunity to race such a quality field will excite him. Expect him to be out of the mix early on and then work his way through the devastation.

Freddy Thevenin placed second last year behind Francois D’Haene but I don’t see him making the podium this year. He is a top-10 contender for sure.

©iancorless.com.IMG_3848MDS2014Christophe Le Saux never stops… I am not sure but I think he has done every race in the 2014 UTWT. That is seriously impressive. He will be in the mix, likely top-10 but not a contender for the podium.

I am going to give a shout out for Stuart Air. He’s a Brit who has had quite a year… he ran Hardrock 100 and now Reunion. Great to see someone local, (a Brit) mixing it up with the best in the world.

Ones to watch:

David Pasquio – 5th in 2013

Sondre Amadahl – 7th at UTMB

Tsuyoshi Kaburaki

Javier Dominguez

On a final note, Ryan Sandes leads the 2014 UTWT rankings but will not race.

 

LADIES

Nathalie Mauclair ©iancorless.com

Nathalie Mauclair returns as the 2013, defending champion and I wouldn’t want to bet against her. She ran a great race in 2013 ahead of Emelie Forsberg and in 2014 the French lady has had a string of great results, notably 3rd at UTMB and Western States, Nathalie has speed and endurance; a lethal combination. However, the speed can sometimes upset the apple cart by running too hard/ fast too early.

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Julia Bottger won the 2014 Ronda dels Cims and knows the Reunion course well. She loves long and technical mountain races and as her results at Tor des Geants show, she will be a definite podium contender here on the island. Julia has had a busy year though. It started in Costa Rica at The Coastal Challenge and post Reunion she still has the Salomon SkyRun to do.

Nerea Martinez  ©iancorless.com

Nerea Martinez ©iancorless.com

Nerea Martinez like Julia embraces tough. She placed 2nd at Ronda dels Cims and has had a string of top results ranking top-5 at Transgrancanaria, UTMF, TDS and she placed 6th at Lavaredo.

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Uxue Fraille knows how to pace herself and can play the waiting game. As the other ladies falter and fail, expect Uxue to move up and contend the podium. Placing 3rd at Transvulcania was a great result early in 2014 and recently placing 5th at UTMB confirms that a podium place at Reunion is a distinct possibility.

Denise Zimmerman placed 3rd at Tor des Geants and although I am sure the other ladies have acknowledged her presence in the race, she may well be a surprise to watchers and followers. Denise is no one trick pony as she has made the podium at Transgrancanaria and placed highly at UTMB in the past.

Finally, Lisa Borzani may mix things up and although she finished 2nd at the 2014 Tor des Geants, I don’t see her having the gusto to rally once again for another big effort. Particularly when you look at her recent results. Back-to-back podium places at Tor and TDS must leave you jaded.

Alexandra Rousset may pull something out of the bag. She placed 4th in 2012 and has won the race previously (2004).

Notably, UTWT series leader Nuria Picas will not run and in addition, neither will Fernanda Maciel and Francesca Canepa.

 

2500 runners will toe the line and more information is available HERE

CYCLING for RUNNERS – Article 3 Lets Get Started!

 

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In article 2 of CYCLING for RUNNERS we gave you several bullet points in why cycling can benefit your running: RECOVERY, CADENCE, LONG SESSIONS and STRENGTH. As we move through our articles we will address these issues in more depth and we will provide sessions and plans to help you maximize your time whilst training.

It’s time to start cycling!

Before you hop on board lets first just tick off some key issues.

  • You have the correct size bike.
  • You have fitted yourself to your bike taking a good look at saddle height, saddle fore and aft and your reach to the handlebars.
  • You have attached cleats to your cycle shoes and you have carefully adjusted them so that you cycle with a natural motion.

If we have a tick to all of the above, we need to quickly look at cycling apparel and what you will need.

Short Sleeve Cycle Jersey with either half-zip or full-length zip to help control your temperature whilst cycling. The jersey should have 2/3 pockets on the rear to hold essentials such as food, inner tube, tools, and jacket.

Scott RC Mens Short Sleeve - Cycling for Runners

Cycling Shorts with pad for that all needed comfort. Many different varieties exist and it all comes down to personal taste. Ladies, female specific products do exist.

Scott RC Mens Shorts - Cycling for RunnersCycling Socks – get short ones. It may sound vain but cycling with long socks looks ridiculous! (Unless you use compression)

Scott RC Tech sock - Cycling for RunnersCycling shoes

Scott Shoes - Cycling for RunnersCycling Mitts/ Gloves – these are really important. They work in two ways, they add some additional padding when holding the bars and help avoid numb hands but more importantly, if you come off your bike, the first thing you do is put your hands out… yes, you have guessed it! No skin on your hand and gravel stuck in your palm is not fun! Believe us.

Scott Liner Glove - Cycling for Runners

Helmet – essential! Don’t even contemplate going outside without one. Make sure it fits properly.

Scott Helmet - Cycling for RunnersGlasses – debris is all around us, on a bike you are moving fast so don’t take risks. Get some protection.

Scott Glasses - Cycling for Runners Wind/ Waterproof Jacket

Scott Waterproof Jacket - Cycling for RunnersArm Warmers – these are a great addition to a s/s top and allow you to control your temperature whilst out on a ride.

Scott AS Arm Warmer - Cycling for RunnersLeg Warmers – as above, they convert your shorts into full length tights and therefore provide two easy options.

  • Scott Legwarmer - Cycling for Runners Spare inner tubes (2)
  • Tyre levers (these remove the tyre so you can replace an inner tube should you get a puncture.
  • Small essential tool kit
  •  Pump
  •  Water bottles

Okay, so the above list provides an immediate kit list that will get you on the road and training. The above is based around milder temperatures. Just like running, as temperatures drop, the need for more specific and warmer apparel will be required. We will address some of the options in article 5.

 

YOUR FIRST TRAINING SESSION (Session-1)

We are assuming here that you are new to cycling. You may have cycled in the past but it has been a while or maybe you have never cycled whilst running?

The good news is that cycling has relatively no impact. Hey, that is one of the reasons why we are incorporating it into our run training right? Like anything new, we start slow and we build up. At first, we recommend that you replace one or two run sessions per week with bike sessions. Initially, we will not be looking at speed, strength or endurance. Cycling will be used as recovery or an alternative to an easy run. From our perspective, it makes sense to us that your cycling days are Monday, Wednesday or Saturday.

Why?

  • On Sunday, most people do a long run, so, spinning out your legs on Monday is a great way to recover and use cycling.
  • Tuesday’s and Thursday’s often include speed or strength running, so, splitting those sessions up with a spin on Wednesday is an ideal recovery tool but if required will still allow you to work on your endurance.
  • Saturday is the day before your long run (typically); so, at this stage a spin out on your bike will feed those endorphins, loosen your legs off and prepare you for Sunday without adding too much stress or soreness.

Adding cycling at this stage in your training, we recommend you keep a few pointers in mind:

  1. Maintain your long run.
  2. Maintain one run session that involves speed, fartlek or hill work.
  3. Work on a cycling cadence of 90 rpm
  4. Keep cycle gearing light so that you can ‘spin’ your legs
  5. Be road savvy – roads are far more dangerous for cyclists than runners

So, in SESSION-1 we are going to replace a ‘recovery run’ or two easy/ recovery runs with cycling. Typically, a recovery run or easy run will be anything between 20-50 minutes or 3-5 miles. Of course, we are all different and as we mentioned in our introduction, we see runners falling into 4-groups, so, you will need to tweak and adjust your training for your level.

As a general rule, we double our run minute mile pace to gain a similar effect on the bike. So, if you are running 7-minute miles, we would say 14-minutes on the bike.

Quite simply, SESSION-1 is about replacing those 3-5 mile runs with a bike ride of double time.

Scenario 1

I run 3 recovery miles in 30 minutes – replace your ‘easy’ run with 60-minutes of cycling keeping gearing light and aiming for a cadence of 90-rpm. Keep the roads flat and hills to a minimum.

Scenario 2

My recovery 3-mile recovery runs take 21minutes – replace your run with a 40-45 minute easy cycle. Again, keep the gearing light, cadence around 90-rpm and road conditions easy.

What do we mean by ‘light gearing?’

Your bicycle comes with gears. Typically two chain rings at the front and ten at the rear. Gears allow you to make pedalling easier or harder. In simple terms, if you can turn a ‘hard’ gear with 90-rpm you will go considerably faster than turning an ‘easy’ gear with 90-rpm. However, terrain, weather and so many other factors come into play. So, when you ride up hill you need an easier gear to enable you to get up the hill. The steeper the hill, the easier the gear required. By contrast, going down a step hill you will be able to be in the hardest gear possible and still spin your legs at 90+ rpm.

For the purposes of replacing recovery/easy runs with cycling, we want to ensure that the gearing used is light so that you can ‘spin your legs.’ This will mean being on the ‘smaller’ chain ring at the front and one of the ‘larger’ chain rings at the rear. Play around with gears and work on that optimum cadence of 90 rpm. Pedal in circles! As you progress with cycling, you will be able to develop your pedalling technique by pedalling at a slow cadence in a higher gear, but this is for later!

TIP: Cycling is not just pushing with the pedal but also about pulling. You push down and as you reach the bottom of the pedal stroke you need to drop your heal, pull back and then lift. By doing this, you will not only generate more power with each revolution of the pedal but you will also fire muscles that get neglected when running. If you are struggling to grasp the technique, we recommend to clients that they should pretend they are wiping dog dirt off the bottom of the shoe… can you imagine it? Remember, pedal in circles, use all 360 degrees of the pedal stroke.

See this You Tube clip by the ©GlobalCyclingNetwork

HEART RATE or RPE

Heart rate and monitoring heart rate while exercising has been used for years as a way of keeping training honest. It’s important at this stage that your ‘cycle effort’ should feel no harder than your ‘run effort.’ If in doubt, use a HRM to monitor your easy run HRM and cycling HRM. Please be aware that you can expect a slightly different HR on a bike in relation to running. A drift of 5bpm =/- is normal, but you will need to keep an eye on this. We are all unique. We use Suunto Ambit with HR monitors.

Suunto Ambit 3 Peak HR side view

If a HRM intimidates you, use RPE (Rate of Perceived Exertion). RPE is a great way to monitor your effort based on your own personal experiences as an athlete. I use a scale of 1-10. 1 being asleep, 10 being passed out on the finish line exhausted. For the purposes of a recovery run or cycle, I would be looking at an RPE of 4 or 5.

NOTE

There is no magic formula to doing a great bike ride and at this stage of CYCLING for RUNNERS; you should embrace the bike as a break. Something new. An adventure that may well lead to something new and as we keep saying; it will definitely make you a better runner!

We recommend you apply SESSION-1 for 1-month cycling once or twice a week to allow adaptation to take place.

In Article 4 we will discuss cycling indoors and using either a Spin Bike at the gym or using a Turbo Trainer in your home.

Article 5 will provide you with SESSION-2 and we will discuss winter apparel.

Join us on STRAVA

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Thanks to SCOTT SPORTS and SUUNTO for the support and backing

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Check out SCOTT HERE

Check out SUUNTO HERE

CYCLING for RUNNERS PAGE HERE

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Mourne Skyline MTR 2014 – Race Report

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Misty skies, gale force winds, relentless climbing, technical terrain and an incredible field of runners made the inaugural Mourne Skyline MTR a day to remember.

Concluding Skyrunning UK’s first year, the Mourne Skyline MTR really was a fitting end to what has been an incredible year. The course, organisation and the field of runners made this a special and unforgettable day in the mountains.

©iancorless.com_Mourne-6576The addition of Skyrunner® World Series champion (2013 and 2014) Stevie Kremer did provide some icing on the Mourne cake. However, ‘Pocket Rocket’ was not isolated… Jo Meek, British Ultra Trail Champion, provided more than enough pressure on the Colorado based Skyrunner on what proved to be one of the most exciting ladies mountain races I have followed for some time. Sharon Trimble, Diane Wilson and Shileen O’Kane would bring local knowledge and fell experience to the mix making this a classic in the making.

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As expected, Kremer pushed hard from the off and after leaving the Donard Forest the trail became steeper and more technical playing to the Colorado runners strength. Although a gap opened up, it was nothing substantial and Meek maintained a gap keeping Kremer in sight. After passing over the saddle, runners were hit by gale force winds and low cloud as they headed out to Slieve Bearnagh, Slieve Meelmore and then an anticlockwise loop that would eventually return them to Slieve Meelmore and then run back to the finish. Conditions were brutal… thankfully the previous nights torrential rain had disappeared. Had it not, runners and marshals would have had a very testing day!

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Wilson, Trimble and O’Kane in many respects were running for third such was the pace of the front two ladies. On the flat, Meek would catch Kremer and then pull away. The relentless and rollercoaster nature of the terrain and mountains would then allow Kremer to pull back and pass on the climbs. This to and froing made for an exhilarating competition of willpower, mental strength and endurance. The latter half of the course, on paper, looked made for Kremer as climb and after climb would allow her to open a gap. However, Meek was having none of it. Running with blinkered vision, Meek fought the technical terrain and chased. ‘I was swearing at the terrain and my own frustrations in managing my technical ability,’ said Meek. Kremer was having no easy ride too, ‘that is the hardest race I have ever done! Harder than Zegama Aizkorri it was just brutal. Relentless climbing, technical and with the wind it was just soooo hard!’

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After CP4, Kremer opened up a gap and extended this on the steep ascent to Slieve Commedagh. Battered by the winds, Kremer put her head down and now pushed hard to the highest point of the course, Slieve Donard. Turning at the summit and descending down the lead extended and on the final technical descent to Newcastle the gap really opened up eventually providing Kremer a winning time of 4:24.2 to Meek’s 4:30.3. The time gaps don’t reflect how close this race was! Post race, Meek was very philosophical, ‘I really did push and race hard but the relentless ankle twisting and gnarly terrain beat me down and in the latter stages as Kremer pulled away I eased off a little knowing that 2nd place was secure.’ Diane Wilson placed 3rd producing a great run on home soil in a time of 4:45.4.

©iancorless.com_Mourne-1133 In the men’s race, local man, Allan Bogle pushed hard in the early stages closely followed by Kim Collison, Eoin Lennon and just 5 seconds back, J Marshall Thomson. It was close, and unlike the ladies race a winner looked likely to come from any of the front contenders. Particularly when one looked at the contenders looking for honours. Ally Beaven, David Steele and Paul Navesy all showed previous results that would mean they could never be ruled out of a podium place.

©iancorless.com_Mourne-0112 ©iancorless.com_Mourne-0130 British Ultra Trail Champion, Collison showed his class at descending and moved away from the other men but Lennon was never going to relinquish the lead without a fight. These two fought a hard battle all day and Lennon showed the wounds of war as blood tricked down his leg.

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Revelation of the race, was Colorado based J Marshall Thomson (Stevie’s fiancé) who raced in the top-5 all day and despite having never raced on ‘typical’ UK terrain pulled out a top-drawer run to place 3rd. ‘That was some of the most crazy terrain I have ever run. It was relentless. The terrain was beyond technical. You had no idea where to put your feet and I can’t tell you how many times I fell over… I loved it!’ said Thomson.

©iancorless.com_Mourne-6344 Collison won the race in 3:57.0 an incredible time in very tough conditions. Ryan Maxwell, race director for the Mourne Skyline MTR had predicted a win time of 4-hours, however, with conditions on the day, we expected this to be optimistic. For Collison and Lennon to both run sub-4 is a real testament to the competition between the two front men.

Thomson moved up into 3rd place and brought a truly international flavour to the men’s podium, his time of 4:08.3 reflecting his ability.

©iancorless.com_Mourne-0433The 2014 Mourne Skyline MTR has firmly established itself as a must-do race after just one edition. The combination of location, local infrastructure, great organisation, enthusiastic locals and a brutal course will guarantee that demand will be high for the 2015 edition.

Covering 35km and a total elevation gain of 3370m, the Mourne Skyline MTR is everything a Skyrunning race should be. I for one can’t wait for 2015.

RACE IMAGES HERE 

You can purchase race images HERE

RESULTS WOMEN Mourne Skyline Mountain-Trail Race

Stevie Kremer 4:24.2 (10th overall)

Jo Meek 4:30.3

Diane Wilson 4:45.4

Sharon Trimble 5:02.1

Shileen O’Kane 5:03.1

RESULTS MEN Mourne Skyline Mountain-Trail Race

Kim Collison 3:57.0

Eoin Lennon 3:59.4

J Marshall Thomson 4:08.3

Ally Beaven 4:12.0

David Steele 4:15.0

Mourne Skyline MTR 2014 – Race Images

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Misty skies, gale force winds, relentless climbing, technical terrain and an incredible field of runners made the inaugural Mourne Skyline MTR a day to remember.

Congratulations to Stevie Kremer and Kim Collison on two great performances.

Stevie said post race, ‘that is the hardest race I have ever done! Harder than Zegama Aizkorri it was just brutal. Relentless climbing, technical and with the wind it was just soooo hard. Kilian Jornet would love it!’

A full race report will follow.

RESULTS WOMEN Mourne Skyline Mountain-Trail Race
Stevie Kremer 4:24.2 (10th overall)
Jo Meek 4:30.3
Diane Wilson 4:45.4
Sharon Trimble 5:02.1
Shileen O’Kane 5:03.1

RESULTS MEN Mourne Skyline Mountain-Trail Race
Kim Collinson 3:57.0
Eoin Lennon 3:59.4
J Marshall Thomson 4:08.3
Ally Beaven 4:12.0
David Steele 4:15.0