SCOTT sports partner with Skyrunning

Marco De Gasperi ©iancorless.com

Marco De Gasperi ©iancorless.com

The ISF is pleased to announce SCOTT Sports will partner with the 2014 Skyrunner® World Series, joining other prestigious outdoor brands: Salomon, Arc’teryx, inov-8, La Sportiva and Compressport.

SCOTT Sports will be present not only with a team of top international runners, but will again be present as main sponsor at the successful Matterhorn Ultraks, fourth race in the Sky Series.

The international team of world-class athletes includes Italian Marco De Gasperi, six-time World Mountain Running Champion and top level skyrunner; American Joe Gray, USA Mountain Runner of the year and top finisher at the Course de Sierre-Zinal; vertical and sky specialist Celine Lafaye from France, 10th on the ISF Sky Ranking; and, from Spain, Pablo Villa, a top placer in the 2012 TDS and the 2013 Gore-Tex Transalpine Run.

The SCOTT team also counts American distance runner Meghan Arbogast, a top finisher at UTMV and Western States, she recently won the USATF Trail National Championship together with new entry Jodee Adams-Moore who will be launching her skyrunning season at the Transvulcania Ultramarathon on May 10.  SCOTT Running Director, Scott McCoubrey commented, “Jodee is a perfect fit for the SCOTT team.  She is an extremely versatile runner, with a passion for the mountains and running on the trails.  Based on her recent success, it should be a blast watching her performances this year.” New British talent Stu Air will join her at Transvulcania.

SCOTT ambassador Ian Sharman, 100-mile champion – winner and record holder of the Grand Slam of Ultrarunning – is director of the newly launched US Skyrunner® Series.

SCOTT Sports has enjoyed much success with the Kinabalu trail shoe – named after the 4,000m Malaysian mountain which has represented the final of the Skyrunner® World Series on many occasions. SCOTT athlete Marco De Gasperi set the standing race record here.

Marco De Gasperi ©iancorless.com

Marco De Gasperi ©iancorless.com

Alongside the Kinabalu, new styles include Trail Rocket and Grip 3.0 are proposed for 2014 together with the new runningcollection – available at the principal Skyrunner® World Series races.

Marino Giacometti, ISF president, commented, “We’re very pleased to welcome on board SCOTT with their team and excellent products.  Since the age of 17 when Marco De Gasperi ran his first skyrunning race on Monte Rosa, he has been a great ambassador for the sport and we’re proud to see him at the pinnacle of his career.  We look forward to have the rest of the talented team competing at the races – who knows who the next great champion will be!”

Joscha Harms, SCOTT Softgoods and Running Marketing Manager, concludes, “SCOTT Sports is a leading brand for high functioning sporting goods, and is known for innovative products with unique designs. We are happy to collaborate with the Skyrunner World Series to position our Running division as a high functioning trailrunning brand in a very competitive market. We believe that this, paired with our strong products and outstanding performances of our athletes, will increase our brand credibility and integrity within the market.”

SCOTT Trail running team members

Marco De Gasperi (ITA)

Ian Sharman (GBR)

Joe Gray (USA)

Jodee Adams-Moore (USA)

Meghan Arbogast (USA)

Ryan Bak (USA)

Celine Lafaye (FRA)

Pablo Manuel Villa (ESP)

Simona Staicu (HUN)

Stu Air (GBR)

Jeremy Humphrey (USA)

Fabian Alraun (GER)

Gerd Frick (ITA)

Adam Kovacs (HUN)

Stephan Wenk (SUI)

 

SCOTT Sports

Episode 44 – Sharman, Hollon, Clark, Clayton

Episode 44 of Talk Ultra - Sharman, Hollon, Clark, Clayton

Episode 44 of Talk Ultra and on this weeks show we have a long distance theme. We have an interview with Nickademus Hollon who just recently placed 7th overall at Tor des Geants. We also have an in-depth chat with Ian Sharman about his incredible summer running the Grand Slam. We also speak to Nick Clark in his regular Grand Slam slot, Clarky’s Corner. We speak to Brit, Emma Clayton about her silver medal in the WMRA worlds in Poland. The news, Talk Training, a blog, up and coming races and of course, Speedgoat Karl.

00:09:56 NEWS

Run Rabbit Run

  1. Jason Schlarb 17:15:20
  2. Karl Meltzer 18:32:07
  3. Jeff Browning 18:52:00
  4. Josh Arthur
  5. Timothy Olson
  1. Michele Yates 20:16:54
  2. Nikki Kimball 20:59:13
  3. Rhonda Claridge 21:45:05
  4. Becky Wheeler
  5. Pam Smith

Wasatch 100

  1. Nick Clark 20:24:26
  2. Ian Sharman 21:01:30
  3. Rod Bien 22:01:58

 00:15:08 INTERVIEW Ian Sharman Grand Slam Interview

  1. Sarah Evan McCloskey 24:31:19
  2. Andrea Martinez 26:21:17
  3. Paulette J Zilmer 27:15:02

Tor des Geants

  1. Iker Karrera 70:04:15
  2. Oscar Perez 70:29:41
  3. Franco Colle 72:05:23
  1. Francesca Canepa 88:12:17
  2. Nerea Martinez 91:01:42
  3. Emanuela Tonetti 94:45:59

Jungfrau Marathon

Men:

1. Geoffrey Gikuni Ndungu 2:50:28

2. Petro Mamo 2:52:49

3. Viktor Röthlin 2:53:21

4. Robert Krupicka 3:00:48

5. Hosea Tuei 3:02:12

Ladies:

1. Andrea Mayr 3:20:20

2. Aline Camboulives 3:25:08

3. Martina Strähl 3:25:23

4. Sabine Reiner 3:25:59

5. Stevie Kremer 3:27:09

The North Face Endurance Challenge (Wisconsin) 50mile and 50K

Nicholas Wied emailed in… The 50 Mile

Men

1. Tyler Sigl (Green Bay, WI) 5:38:49;

2. Brian Condon (Madison, WI) 5:55:43;

3. Adam Condit 6:08:38. 

This is crazy because Ian Sharman set the CR last year at 5:55. 

This is Tyler’s 1st ultra, he is a 2:15 marathon guy who works a full time job and trains on the side.  He lowered Ian’s record by almost 20 minutes, INSANE! 

Another note, Brian Condon running his 3rd ultra and 2nd 50 miler (he also took 2nd behind David Riddle at Ice Age 50) ran the same time as Ian’s CR. 

50mile women

1.Molly Culver 7:51:12;

2.Wendy Lilly 8:20:03;

3. Holly Fearing 8:32:42.    

50K Men

1.Andy Nesheim 4:01, 2. Brian Udovich 4:08, 3. Andrew Hollatz 4:14. 

50K Women

1. Lorena Campos (Chile) 4:21, 2. rin Seffrood 4:38, 3. Bri Famera 4:40. 

Kilian & Emelie – rescued

UROC preview

On a final note, in the Sun Newspaper (not that I read the Sun) a snippet said, “Rab Lee from Bowness and pal, Mark Howlett set a new World Record for running 68.2 miles – three legged, non stop in 24 hours at the Glenmore24 – BONKERS


01:30:10 BLOGS

Kilian Jornet – http://www.kilianjornet.cat/en/blog

“This is a warning that the mountain is a hard and dangerous place, even when precautions are taken. One must be humble in the mountains, because a high price can be paid for our failures, especially when travelling light. We must accept and be aware of the risks that we are prepared to take individually and with the people who accompany us, depending on our physical and technical skill and also our experience.”

01:31:14 15 MIN OF FAME with Brit Emma Clayton

01:43:09 TALK TRAINING – Marc Laithwaite

02:07:22 INTERVIEW

This week’s interview is with Nickademus Hollon. Nick is not your normal runner… he seeks out the tough and the extreme. We interviewed Nick earlier this year when he became the youngest and one of only 14 people to finish the Barkley. Just recently, he took on the Tor des Geants in Italy.

03:04:05 MELTZER MOMENT 

Good –

Bad –

and Ugly – 

03:09:15 SMILESandMILES with Emelie Forsberg – smilesandmiles@yahoo.com

03:34:42 CLARKY’S CORNER – discusses Wasatch and his summer on the trails going head-to-head with Ian Sharman

03:51:48 Up & Coming RACES for the next two weeks

Australia

South Australia

Yurrebilla Trail 56km Ultra | 56 kilometers | September 22, 2013 | website

Austria

Wörthersee Trail-Maniac 57 K | 57 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Brazil

Jungle Marathon Brazil – 100 km | 100 kilometers | October 03, 2013 | website

Jungle Marathon Brazil – 240 km | 242 kilometers | October 03, 2013 | website

Canada

British Columbia

50K Cody Claim Run | 50 kilometers | September 29, 2013 | website

Frosty Mountain Ultra Trail Race | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Great Lake Walk and Ultramarathon | 56 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Ontario

Sears Great Canadian Run – Toronto | 141 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Chile

Patagonian International Marathon – 63K | 63 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

France

Aveyron

100 km de Millau | 100 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

Haute-Loire

Le Grand Trail du Saint Jacques | 66 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

Haute-Savoie

Trail des Aiguilles Rouges | 50 kilometers | September 29, 2013 | website

Ille-et-Vilaine

100 km de la Vallée du Semnon | 100 kilometers | September 22, 2013 | website

50 km de la Vallée du Semnon | 50 kilometers | September 22, 2013 | website

Loir-et-Cher

Ultrail de Beauval | 65 kilometers | September 29, 2013 | website

Lot

Figeac – St-Cirq-Lapopie – Conques : du 20 au 24 septembre 2013 | 208 kilometers | September 20, 2013 | website

Nord

La Contrebandière | 65 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

Seine-et-Marne

Impérial Trail – 64 km | 64 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Germany

Baden-Württemberg

KuSuH Trail 100 | 100 miles | September 28, 2013 | website

Bavaria

Allgäuer Volksbank Voralpenmarathon – 50 km | 50 kilometers | September 22, 2013 | website

Churfranken Trailrun | 73 kilometers | September 22, 2013 | website

Lower Saxony

Volkslauf ” Gesund beginnt im Mund” – 52.8 km | 52 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

North Rhine-Westphalia

50 km von Hitdorf | 50 kilometers | October 03, 2013 | website

Rhineland-Palatinate

Dorint-RUN50 | 50 kilometers | September 20, 2013 | website

Greece

Spartathlon | 245 kilometers | September 27, 2013 | website

Italy

Friuli-Venezia Giulia

Magredi Mountain Trail 100 Mile | 100 miles | October 04, 2013 | website

Piedmont

Trail di Oulx – 50 km | 50 kilometers | September 22, 2013 | website

Veneto

Lupatotissima 100km | 100 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Japan

Akita Nairiku 100km Marathon | 100 kilometers | September 22, 2013 | website

Akita Nairiku 50km Marathon | 50 kilometers | September 22, 2013 | website

Kenya

Amazing Maasai Ultra | 75 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

Morocco

UltraTrail Atlas Toubkal | 105 kilometers | October 03, 2013 | website

Norway

Nordmarka Ultra Challenge | 82 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

Singapore

Craze Ultra 100 miles | 100 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Craze Ultra 101 km | 101 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Craze Ultra 78 km | 78 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

South Africa

Bonitas City2City Marathon – 50 km | 50 kilometers | September 29, 2013 | website

Spain

Catalonia

Ultra Cavalls del Vent | 100 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Madrid

100 km Madrid-Segovia | 100 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

50 km Madrid Trail | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Turkey

Lycian Way Ultramarathon | 250 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

United Kingdom

England

Atlantic Coast 3-Day Challenge | 78 miles | October 04, 2013 | website

Cotswold Way Century 100mi | 102 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Hardmoors 60 | 60 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

High Peak 40 Mile Challenge | 40 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

London to Brighton Run | 56 miles | September 22, 2013 | website

XNRG Toad Challenge 2013 | 90 miles | September 20, 2013 | website

Northern Ireland

Causeway Coast Ultra Marathon | 39 miles | September 28, 2013 | website

USA

Alaska

Equinox Ultra Marathon 50 km | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Arizona

Mogollon Monster 100 | 106 miles | September 28, 2013 | website

California

Coastal 50K | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Ragnar Relay Napa Valley | 186 miles | September 20, 2013 | website

Sierra Nevada 100K | 100 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Sierra Nevada Double Marathon | 52 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Tahoe 50 | 50 miles | September 29, 2013 | website

Tahoe 72 | 72 miles | September 29, 2013 | website

Colorado

Devil Mountain 50K | 50 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

Devil Mountain 50 Mile Ultra | 50 miles | September 28, 2013 | website

The Bear Chase Race 50K Trail Race | 50 kilometers | September 29, 2013 | website

The Bear Chase Race 50 Mile Trail Race | 50 miles | September 29, 2013 | website

Georgia

Georgia Jewel 100 Mile Run | 100 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Georgia Jewel 35 Mile Run | 35 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Georgia Jewel 50 Mile Run | 50 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

The North Face Endurance Challenge-Georgia 50K | 50 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

The North Face Endurance Challenge-Georgia Gore-Tex® 50 Mile | 50 miles | September 28, 2013 | website

Idaho

Priest Lake 50K Ultra Marathon | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Kansas

FlatRock 50K | 50 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

Maryland

Ragnar Relay Washington D.C. | 200 miles | October 04, 2013 | website

Massachusetts

Hancock Shalker Village 50 Mile Race | 50 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Michigan

Dances With Dirt – Hell (50km) | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Dances With Dirt – Hell (50mi) | 50 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

DWD Hell 50K | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

DWD Hell 50M | 50 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

New Jersey

The Mountain Madness 50K | 50 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

New York

Chautauqua Ultras 50K | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Chautauqua Ultras 50 Mi | 50 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Ragnar Relay Adirondacks | 210 miles | September 28, 2013 | website

Virgil Crest 100 Mile Ultra | 100 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Virgil Crest 50 Mile Ultra | 50 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Ohio

Hocking Hills Indian 60K Run | 60 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Oregon

Flagline 50k Trail Run | 50 kilometers | September 22, 2013 | website

Pennsylvania

Trails 4 Tails Ultra Run | 40 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Utah

Bear 100 | 100 miles | September 27, 2013 | website

Grand to Grand Ultra | 160 miles | September 22, 2013 | website

Zion-Bryce Traverse | 85 miles | September 28, 2013 | website

Vermont

Vermont 50 Ultra Run | 50 miles | September 29, 2013 | website

Virginia

GrindStone 100 | 101 miles | October 04, 2013 | website

Trail Runner Ultra Race of Champions 100K | 100 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

Uber Rock 50K Trail Race | 50 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

Washington

Cle Elum Ridge 50K | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Middle Fork 50K | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Wyoming

Sundance 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

CLOSE

03:59:20

Links:

Leadville 100 – Men’s Race Summary

Did you read the script for the 2013 men’s Leadville 100? It went something like this…

2011 winner, Ryan Sandes would return fired up for victory after missing Western States due to injury. Ryan, the outright favorite would be pushed by Ultra legend, Scott Jurek. Scott after a few years away from competitive running would return to the 100-mile distance and push for the win. Mike Aish, fast man from New Zealand would learn lessons from his 2012 blow up and contend for the podium. A race within the race would continue with Grand Slam leaders, Ian Sharman and Nick Clark would push each other to the limits racing the third 100 in seven weeks but due to added fatigue would not contend for the podium!

So how did I think the race would pan out? Well, I thought Aish would take the lead relatively early on. Using his natural speed he would gain a gap and then spend much of the first half of the race looking behind him…  Ryan Sandes and Scott Jurek would match each other stride for stride all the way to Hope Pass and then the race would start. They would pick up pacers and then Sandes would slowly move away, catch Aish, move past and then Jurek would pursue. In the process Aish would blow but not enough to stop the race. With Jurek in second place, Sharman and Clark would now pursue. They would both catch Aish and Clark would move away and reduce some of his time gap on Sharman and thus making the final race in the ‘Slam’ a really exciting nail biter. The podium would be Sandes, Jurek and Clark.

Well, you may as well rip that script up. The race is done and what a race. What initially appeared to be a race with very few surprises up at the front end, it actually turned into a really exciting nail biter and it just goes to show that the 100-mile distance and in particular, those that race the distance can never be counted on for being predictable.

The Race

With a 0400 start, the early pace was steady. However, at May Queen, mile 13.5 a lone Ian Sharman was in the lead by just under two minutes with all the main contenders chasing. Wasn’t Sharman supposed to be a little tired? This was his third 100n in seven weeks… either he knew something that we didn’t or he was on a suicide mission.

At mile 22 ‘Powerline’ we got back on script with Mike Aish taking the lead. He was alone and out in front. That’s more like it. We are back on prediction and this race is settling nicely.

Behind Aish the chasers had fragmented a little but we had no big surprises, well, no big surprises other than Scott Jurek was a little further back than expected, but with less than 25% of the race done, this was surely the experience of a master of his craft keeping calm.

Aish continued to push and at Twin Lakes he was 10 minutes inside Matt Carpenter’s CR split. Okay, we started to ask the question, how much had Aish learnt from his blow up in 2012 and were we about to witness and incredible performance? When second place arrived, Aish had an eighteen-minute lead. Wow, this was getting exciting.

It was early days but at 40-miles of the Leadville course covered and Aish having a commanding lead of approximately twenty minutes over Sandes, Sharman, Clark, Jurek, Catalano and so on, a counter move was going to need to come or Aish was going to need to slow.

At Hopeless Pass, mile 44.5 signs of fatigue started to show on Aish. Sandes, Clark and Sharman had closed to within fifteen minutes. The big news here came from Scott Jurek; he was thirty-four mins down on Aish and although in sixth place was obviously struggling. The pre race script was starting to be rewritten.

Winfield and the 50-mile turn point. A key moment in the race and an opportunity for runners to collect pacers. Of course, the other big advantage here is that you get an opportunity to look at the gaps between runners and also how they look. Sharman arrived in second place and had closed to within eleven minutes of Aish. Clark arrived five minutes after Sharman and the news came that Ryan Sandes was dropping from the race. He was in severe hip and back pain and took the wise choice to retire. It was a sad moment for Ryan, his 2012 season was incredible and 2013 has been plagued by problems. Ryan sent me a message; “I have had some bad luck the last few months. Never nice to DNF but was hobbling with my back …. Getting old;) thanks for all.” Of course, Ryan will be back and his decision to drop without doubt is the best long-term decision.

Scott Jurek was now in fifth place and just under thirty minutes behind Sharman. Were we going to witness a classic Jurek comeback?

Returning through Hopeless AS at mile 55.5, Sharman had closed to within six minutes of Aish. Was it really possible that Sharman and Clark racing the third 100 in seven weeks would contend the top slot at Leadville?

At mile 60, Aish and Sharman were together, Clark was third and Jurek was fourth fifty-five minutes back. The 2013 Leadville 100 was turning into an epic race and of course, we had the race within the race for the Grand Slam.

Returning to Half Pipe at mile 70, Sharman had taken the lead, Clark was second 16.5 minutes in arrears and Aish was third and obviously paying for his early efforts. We know had a scenario that in all reality, I had not anticipated. Of course Sharman and Clark had every possibility of winning Leadville but not during the Grand Slam with tired bodies. Would we really see these two battle it out?

At Half Pipe, Aish rested for fourteen minutes. Yes, fourteen minutes. I suppose the luxury of his time gap of Jurek allowed for this and the pace of Sharman and Clark made him realize he was fighting for third.

With twenty miles to go, Clark was just under seventeen minutes behind Sharman. It was all to play for… twenty miles is a long with eighty miles in tired legs.

May Queen, mile 86,5 and Clark had closed a little, the gap was just under fifteen minutes. Armed with the news, Sharman dug deep pushed, he later said on twitter, “Thank you everyone for all the messages. Overwhelmed by the responses about ‪#‎LT100. Hurt like hell at the end.”

At the finish, a victorious Ian Sharman crossed the line in 16:30. He had opened up his gap on Nick Clark by thirty-three minutes. Mike Aish most definitely had learnt from his 2012 experience and held on for third.

It was an incredible race and I need to give huge credit to Bryon Powell and the iRunFar team for providing the step-by-step action via twitter.

I wouldn’t normally write such a detailed account about a race that I had not attended, but the action that unfolded in Leadville may well turn out to be one of those iconic races we all remember. To see two runners, Sharman and Clark, perform at such a high level when so far into the Grand Slam is inspirational. In addition, it also provides a lesson for us all. A 100-miles is a long way, anything can happen and no matter how we think a race may unfold, every now and again, the book gets thrown out of the window and we are treated to an inspiring and iconic race. In addition, Mike Aish also showed that taking a break to recoup and recharge is no bad thing, his fourteen-minute break did him no harm and he still made the podium.

Many congratulations to all.

Attention now turns to final race in the Grand Slam, Wasatch. It will only take Ian Sharman to have a so, so day and for Nick to be flying… exciting!

I will be catching up with Nick for the next episode of Talk Ultra so make sure you check out Episode 42 out on Friday 23rd August.

What is the Grand Slam?

The Grand Slam of Ultrarunning award is recognition for those who complete four of the oldest 100 mile trail runs in the U.S. The “Slam” consists of officially finishing the Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run, the Vermont 100 Mile Endurance Run, the Leadville Trail 100 Mile Run and the Wasatch Front 100 Mile Endurance Run all in the same year. The Grand Slam of Ultrarunning Award was established in 1986, when Tom Green was the first finisher.

Results:

MEN

  1. Ian Sharman 16:30 (4th fastest time)
  2. Nick Clark 17:06
  3. Mike Aish 18:28
  4. Kyle Pietari 18:37
  5. Andrew Catalano 18:43
  6. Timo Meyer 19:04
  7. Eric Sullivan 19:17
  8. Scott Jurek 19:21
  9. Bob Africa 19:38
  10. Javier Montero 19:45

LADIES

  1. Ashley Arnold 20:25
  2. Saheen Sattar 22:42
  3. Keila Merino 22:47
  4. Katrin Silva 23:16
  5. Becca Hall 23:43
  6. Kara Henry 23:50
  7. Abby Mcqueeney Menamonte 24:06
  8. Maddy Hribar 24:24
  9. Nicole Struder 24:25
  10. Maggie Nelson 24:37

Leadville 100 2013 Race Preview

screenshot_322

Leadville 100 kicks off at 0400 on Saturday morning and although the field may not be ‘stacked’, what it does have is the return of Ryan Sandes, the 2011 winner and the return of ultra running legend, Scott Jurek.

If you had doubts about how exciting this race may be, take a read of what Scott Jurek said in my re race interview, “You bet! I am here to do whatever it takes to run my best time and ideally win this race. I have put in the training. I am mentally prepared. My goal is to win…”

So, there you have it. If nobody else turned up to race, a Sandes/ Jurek smack down would be an interesting prospect by any body’s standards.

The Leadville 100 course is a 50-mile out and back all undertaken at high altitude with Hope Pass being the highest point on the course. When a race is almost 2-miles above sea level, the one thing you need to be sure of is the ability to run and race at altitude. Pacers are allowed and importantly they are allowed to ‘mule’ for the runner, a homage to the old mining days.

So, how will this race unfold?

iancorless.comP1000777

Ryan Sandes is without doubt the number one favorite. After placing second at Western States last year, he was without doubt very excited at returning in 2013 and attempting to go one place higher. However, a sprained ankle in the build up ruled him out and he had no option to rest and recover. He refocused and placed his emphasis on Leadville. Ryan, like his teammate, Julien Chorier, does not do race after race. He focuses, prepares and turns up with the ‘A’ game switched on. Ryan is here to win Leadville and without doubt he is the hot tip for the race.

Image taken from scottjurek.com ©scottjurek

Image taken from scottjurek.com ©scottjurek

Scott Jurek has been away from competitive running for a few years. Many of us thought that his writing, love and promotion of vegetarian food and his work with Chris McDougall would keep him away from running competitively and therefore a new chapter in his life had started. Apparently not! For sure, he is in the latter years of his racing career and for many of us we had no real idea what his intentions would be. However in my pre race interview with him he made it apparently clear, he is here to race and win! Awesome. We are all excited to have Scott back on a 100-mile start line and it sounds as though Ryan and all the other contenders have a ‘race on’ with a legend of the sport. I can’t wait! To clarify, Scott can in this race, no doubt! Interview with Scott Jurek here

Ian Sharman training in La Palma ©iancorless.com

Ian Sharman training in La Palma ©iancorless.com

We have a race within a race at Leadville as Nick Clark and Ian Sharman line up for the third 100-miler in the four race ‘Grand Slam’. Now of course, if Nick or Ian were fresh, you would include them as potential winners of this race, particularly Nick who is used to the high altitude. Both of these guys are without doubt podium potential, of course, they are going to be little jaded and therefore this removes them from the top slot. However, you never know… it only needs other contenders to have a mediocre or bad day and Nick or Ian to have a great day.

Mike Aish ran Leadville in 2012 and was without doubt a dark horse. He was very clear pre race that he would run up front and see what happened. He warned it could go either way, victory or blow up. As it happened, he blew up! One year on he is wiser and older. He has changed his training and done more miles.

Michael Arnstein has ‘Sharmanesque’ speed on the flatter and faster courses. Leadville is a race suits him, he has experience with Leadville, eighth in 2012 and his best performance came in 2011 with fourth.  He will need to be in great shape and in fine form to make the podium.

Mike Le Roux ran the Grand Slam last year and that puts him in a good place for this year. With just one race to concentrate on, he will be able to focus and race fresh. He placed third at Vermont 100 last year and as mentioned, this was part of the ‘slam’, so he is what it takes to most definitely get in the top ten and if all goes well, claw at the podium.

Nick Pedatella is also racing the Grand Slam but is some way behind Nick and Ian. His 23rd at Vermont and 28th at Western States are solid performances, but with two 100’s in the legs, the third can only be a little more jaded. Having said that, he will probably place in the top twenty.

Other names to watch:

Timo Meyer was sixth at Tarawera earlier in 2013, Craig Howie placed top ten at Leadville in 2012 and Andrew Catalano placed sixth in 2012.

Leadville is the biggest ultra in the US and therefore with no qualification criteria, the 1200 start list can throw up a few surprises.

The ladies race is wide open. In many respects, like the men’s race we have a few clear favorites but then the front-end competition drops off quite quickly. Tina Lewis, the 2012 champion is undecided if she will run. She has had a foot injury and only yesterday she posted on social media, “Alright, I have about 30 minutes to make the call – Pikes Peak Marathon or Leadville 100!!! Leaning towards being a dreamer, hopeful and taking chances!!” I don’t need to tell you, Leadville and Pikes Peak are a world apart and this is not a great sign for Tina’s mental approach, so, if she decides to run her performance is unpredictable. However, she is the defending champ and therefore the nod goes in Tina’s direction.

*update on Tina – “I am healthy and rested just not perfectly trained for the distance. Don’t we do this because we love it and Leadville is in my heart. I can just go out and try my best, right? I will aim to be smart and stop if my foot hurts.”

Denise Bourassa placed eighth at the 2013 Western States and therefore she is my hot tip for the win. She has had consistently good performances and the only question mark may come if WSER has left Denise a little jaded.

Ashley Arnold placed third at Leadville in 2010 and so therefore she is a tip for the top of the podium. She has all the experience required to run well.

Who else? Well, to be honest, it is wide open. One or two names shine out as contenders for the top ten but as stated, in a field of 1200 I think we will see many ladies names that we have not seen before.

LINKS:

Leadville 100 website HERE

Athlete Tracking HERE

Scott Jurek – Leadville 100 pre race interview

Image taken from scottjurek.com ©scottjurek

Image taken from scottjurek.com ©scottjurek

Scott Jurek, Leadville 100 2013, pre race interview

It has been some years since Scott Jurek lined up on a 100-mile start line, but he is back! After some time away from competitive running, Scott has recently got married, wrote a book and successfully promoted that book all over the world. He will be 40 in October and although he admits that he may not race competitively for too much longer, he does say he has some good racing left in him…

IC – I am joined by Scott Jurek just days ahead of Leadville 100. Welcome back Scott.

SJ – Thanks Ian it is great to be here.

IC – Scott Jurek lining up on a 100-mile start line causes some interest and we are all wondering what is tempting you back. What is bringing you back to a 100-mile start line again?

SJ – I always had it in the back of my mind to come back to Leadville after I ran here in 2004 as part of the ‘Grand Slam’. Now that I live in Colorado it made perfect sense to run the home course so to speak. I am looking forward to getting back in the swing. I have been very busy for a few years with my book and I had a ton of effort prior to its release to get that done. It has been fun training hard and getting up high again. Leadville is a great race. It has lots of excitement around it. I have done Western States so many times that it made sense to come back to a race that I had not been at for almost a decade.

IC – Is Leadville the start of something new or is this is a one-off?

SJ – Laughs, new as in racing 100’s again?

IC – Exactly.

SJ – I have mentioned before that I will retire. I turn 40 in October. I have a few more goals and I know many people would love to see Scott Jurek race forever. I love to race, I love the sport, and you know it is almost twenty years now since I started. At some point, maybe next year I will wind things down. I have goals, particularly the 24-hour, I want the American record back and I am interested in the world record. We have so many great races now that it is hard to know what to do. I have a few more in me and I want to give it a go!

IC – You mentioned twenty years in the sport. We look back at your career, nobody questions your ability, multiple wins at Western States, in many ways you have created the community and the sport, not single-handed, other people obviously were influential. Do you feel the sport has moved on, although 40 is not old do you feel that at 40 you can’t be competitive anymore?

SJ – It’s a great question. Look at Western States this year! Mike Morton came back after a long hiatus and he was up at the front, he is in his 40’s. He had an incredible race. I believe that we only have so many great races and great years. I want to continue to have a great taste for the sport. I don’t want to burnt out. I want to be involved, help out and run for fun as a mid-packer. From a competition point of view, I would be lying, particularly if you look at research that it is hard to be at the top of the game. My body feels great but mentally it is hard to get out of the door sometimes. Day after day, month after month, particularly if you want to win. You come to a point, maybe it’s physical or mental, but we know muscles and nerves don’t react as quick, so, it’s definitely one of those things. I don’t limit myself but it does get harder, Scott Jurek is getting older and the field is getting younger and younger. I started in my 20’s; it is different to starting in your 30’s.

IC – Yes, you must look back now over you’re career and think to yourself that you are in a great place. You were setting the standard, you have seen the sport grow and expand. Ultra has never been stronger. We have never had so many races. We have never witnessed so many new CR’s. It must be satisfying?

SJ – It’s great. I came into the sport and I remember the old timers saying, ‘things are changing, we need to keep it the same’. I think like anything we have evolution and change, it’s a great thing for the sport. Of course we have some issues. Races are harder to get into. Twenty years ago you could enter Leadville at the last minute, not now! We have drawbacks but we have so many benefits. People are inspired and have great life experiences. We need to share what we have. Obviously we hold on to tradition and the simple aspects of the sport that make it special. More changes will come; prize money, competition and hopefully we will see more drug testing. At the core the sport will remain the same. I want to be involved in that even if I am not racing at the top level. It is something I have life experience with and I want to make sure that is passed on.

IC – I posted on Facebook asking, were people excited Scott Jurek was racing at Leadville. Of course we had great comments and support. Funnily enough, within twenty-four hours I found out that Ann Trason was toeing a 100-mile start line in September, so there is hope you may continue… we never thought Ann would run again.

SJ – I have known Ann for years particularly in her peak. She retired through injury. I think from what I have heard that Ann has a great attitude. She was even pacing at Western States this year randomly. That is a true champion. I am not sure what her goals are. Will she race or is she racing for fun? She may want to be part of the community. She was a competitive force. It’s just great to see her back out in the community. She also race directed for a few years. It’s a great sign; it is what the sport is about. It is about giving back. We all love to see champs come back and win but maybe Ann does not have that desire, it’s just super to see her back.

IC – One thing I did say when I posted was that as far as I was concerned, it didn’t matter if Ann was first or last. What was important was that she was back racing. That was all that counted. You mentioned that you personally don’t want to stop running and that you are more than happy to be a mid-packer. Do you think that Scott Jurek can ever be a mid-packer?

SJ – Definitely. I have gone to races and paced, I have helped at races. I have run an event for the fun; I have run with my wife. For me I have the right approach to it. It is hard sometimes to be a top athlete and not be pushing for the win. It is healthy for me though. It is nice to cruise along, hang out at feed stations and have fun. I am at the point that I can turn off the competitive juices as and when I want to. I am looking forward to doing the events that I haven’t been able to do. I want to do lower key events and that includes International races. It’s a good place to be and it is a good lesson for all, it is not always about goals and PR’s.

Image taken from scottjurek.com ©scottjurek

Image taken from scottjurek.com ©scottjurek

IC – Absolutely.

SJ – You can get bogged down. Just go out and embrace the experience. That is why we do it isn’t it? Experiences are what count.

IC – You mention competitive juices and Leadville 100 is about to take place. An out and back course in the Colorado Rockies with plenty of altitude and Hope Pass the highest point. Are you going into this to win?

SJ – You bet! I am here to do whatever it takes to run my best time and ideally win this race. I have put in the training. I am mentally prepared. My goal is to win… Ryan Sandes is here from South Africa, he and I ran together a few weeks back. Nick Clark and Ian Sharman are doing the Grand Slam; they may be a little tired. Nick is a Colorado guy, used to altitude and is tough. Mike Aish dropped last year but he may put it right this year. Leadville has no qualifier, you can literally have never run a 10k and sign up. This can throw up some surprises. Someone may turn up and pull it off. It is an exciting race. Many people don’t realize it is our biggest race, 1200 people will toe the line on Saturday. It has loads of excitement and fun because of the out and back; 50 out, 50 back.

Image taken from scottjurek.com ©scottjurek

Image taken from scottjurek.com ©scottjurek

IC – Of course you will get to see how the race unfolds on the out and back too. In the past you have paced Anton Krupicka at Leadville, earlier this year you paced Seb Chaigneau at Hardrock 100. Who will pace you at Leadville?

(Laughs)

SJ – Well my old buddy Justin will pace, he has paced and crewed for me at Badwater, and Spartathlon he has seen me in some high moments and some low moments. It’s great to have him back. I have a surprise pacer; I wont release that info just yet. It’s a secret. You’ll see at Hope Pass. I went old school with my pacers, guys who have been around for a few years…

IC – Is Ann Trason going to pop up and pace?

(Laughter)

SJ – I will give you a clue, not Ann Trason! You have to remember at Leadville you can ‘mule’. Pacers can carry bottles and food and whatever may be required. It is in recognition of the miners who used to use mules. So, a pacer may be carrying three bottles. It’s kind of unique. It makes it harder for the pacer…

IC – Sounds like you have got it easy Scott. The pacer has the tough job.

(Laughter)

SJ – Maybe in some respects but they only need to do 25 miles.

IC – Awesome. I am going to let you go. I am taking up precious recovery time getting ready for the race. We will catch up with you after the race and get the lowdown on the action. Obviously on behalf of everyone I would like to wish you all the best. It’s great to see you back on a 100-mile start again.

SJ – I am looking forward to it. It’s gonna be fun and we will catch up after!

LINKS:

Scott Jurek website HERE 

Brooks HERE

Eat and Run HERE

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Western States Endurance Run Preview

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In a recent interview with Rob Krar about his incredible ‘FKT’ (fastest known time) on the Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim we discussed the up and coming Western States. Humble and respectful he called it the Super Bowl of ultra running. You have to agree, Western States is the Super Bowl of 100-mile events.

 

June 29th in Squaw Valley, once again an incredibly talented male field will toe the line to do battle over probably the most iconic 100-mile race on the calendar. It may not be the hardest but it has history. Way back in ‘73’ when Gordy Ainsleigh’s horse went lame, he had two choices; not to take part in the iconic 100-mile horse race called the Tevis Cup or run it… now of course, way back then running the course was the most ridiculous idea ever. But Gordy, ever the maverick, brushed caution aside and tackled the heat to arrive in Auburn. The stage was set and the 100-mile Western States Endurance Run was created.

 

The race – Male

 

So, Ryan Sandes wont join the party due to injury, shame! However, the men’s field has enough quality names to make the 2013 edition of the race an exciting one. We have a champ and previous course record holder returning after a 16 year gap, we have last years champ and course record holder, we have the new and the old. This year could be an exciting race because of the variables and unpredictability of those involved.

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Timothy Olson as the remaining champion and course record holder, of course gets top billing. His recent 4th place at Transvulcania La Palma was a real indicator that his form was coming. I went out for a run with him just days after the race and he was moving fast and effortless, no sign of a tough 80km race in his legs. He said, “I could have done with the finish line being a little farther away, I was just getting warmed up”.  Early 2013 season form wasn’t too shabby either with win at Bandera 50k, 2nd Ray Miller, and 2nd at Tarawera behind Sage Canaday in New Zealand. His relative silence post Transvulcania should worry the competition; he has been training and training hard. Can he go faster than his incredible 14:46:44 set in 2013?

 

Brit, Nick Clark in a recent interview with me ahead of this year’s race said, “I am running to win, I feel good this year. I have started my three week taper and I don’t know, maybe this could be my year!” Nick is super consistent over the 100-mile distance and demands respect from his peers. He ran 15:44 last year for 3rd place and almost certainly he is going to need to run that quick, if not quicker if he wants to be in contention for a podium place. Even more impressive is that Nick is taking on the Grand Slam. However, it’s one race at a time and he plans to run all of them as hard as he can. A win at Fuego Y Agua he says was so long ago that it has no real meaning for Western States but his 10th at Lake Sonoma recently was a little disappointing by his standards. However, as we keep saying, 100 miles is a different race altogether.

 

Sixteen years ago, Mike Morton set a course record at Western States and then disappeared into running wilderness. A combination of injury and work commitments took him away from the sport. However, just a couple of years ago he came back on the scene with a comeback not dissimilar to that of Robert Redford playing Roy Hobbs in the film, ‘The Natural’. Mike seems to be able to churn out 100-mile races in 13:11 and win them. He had an incredible 2012 with multiple 100-mile wins, a win and missing the CR at Badwater 135 and then setting an American 24-hour record of 172+ miles. He has been relatively quiet lately which can only mean one thing, he is preparing! You would say that age may well be against him, but this is Mike Morton… will 2013 have one of the greatest comebacks in sport ever, a win for Mike Morton? It is a distinct possibility!

 

Hal Koerner has been quiet recently and it is impossible to gauge what his form is like. Having said that, his reputation precedes him and his list of palmares confirms that he will always be in the mix. His win at the 2012 Hardrock 100 confirms that he can always pull something special out of the bag when required.

 

Ian Sharman has consistently improved at WSER and last year placed 5th with a great run. However, by Ian’s standards he has been very quiet lately. He pushed himself a little too hard in the latter stages of 2012, basically, one race too many and he has had some niggling knee issues. He went to Fuego Y Agua but didn’t run. He has had a couple of top 5 placing’s in recent months and most recently he raced a multi-stage race in the rainforests of Peru. Although lying in 2nd place overall he didn’t finish the last stage as he felt niggling pain in his troublesome knee. So, the jury is out. In addition, like Nick Clark, Ian will run the Grand Slam. His original intention was to run each race to the best of his ability and see what happens. He prepares well and understands the demands of each race so you can’t rule him out of the top 10.

 

Dave Mackey 4th in 2012 and in doing so broke Tsuyoshi Kaburaki’s ‘Masters’ time with 15:53:36. He has always raced consistently over the 100km distance but has never had quite the luck over the 100-mile distance. In early 2012 he was second at Bandera 100k behind a storming Sage Canaday but a great indicator of form is the recent San Diego 100. Dave was blazing a trail at the front of the race until he went of course at around the 60-mile mark. Although initially disappointing, this may actually be a blessing in disguise for WSER. He definitely has podium potential if his day goes well.

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Cameron Clayton young, brash and bold has laid it all on the line and said he plans to just run! No caution for the demands of 100 miles, he will go for glory. Cameron, like Sage Canaday is new to ultra running, he has enthusiasm to take on the best and see what happens. I have to say I like his approach. In an interview with him post Transvulcania (he placed 7th) he said then that his intentions for Western States would be to go for glory, “I may not get the chance to run at Western States again so I need to run for the win. If I don’t top the podium, that is fine, at least I will have tried”. So there you have it, WSER will be Cameron’s first 100 outing, it’s a fair prediction to say that we will see him at the head of the race in the early stages, question is, will he pull along some others or will they allow him to head on up the trail on his own?

 

Rob Krar like Cameron is new to the 100-mile distance but he is giving it 100% respect. He is a little daunted by the distance and as he said in my interview with him, “I just don’t know what to expect, my rim-t0-rim-to-rim is my longest ever run at just over 40 miles, Western States is a completely different experience”. Rob, like Mike Morton is also a come back story, originally a track and field athlete he ran 1500m and holds an impressive 1:06 for a half marathon. He has only ever run one road marathon and that was around 2:30, so, he has speed. His win and CR at Leona Divide 50 turned heads but his Grand Canyon double crossing time took breaths away… if he brings that speed to WSER anything is possible. He is a real unknown but I can’t help but think we will see a surprise!

 

Karl Meltzer needs no introduction! He has wanted to run at WSER for years and now he finally he has the chance, however, his build up has not been ideal with a problematic calf. Last week he told me that he is pretty sure it is all cleared up now and that he had just had 10 days of consecutive running. Karl said, “I finally feel that a top 10 place is now possible, we will have to see”. With over 30 wins at the 100-mile distance, Karl brings experience to the race. Just like Run Rabbit Run last year, he will allow the main contenders to head off up the trail and as he gets warm (around 60 miles) he will then slowly but surely start to pick them off. A podium place is unlikely but a top 10 is a distinct possibility. I certainly hope so! Top 10 will give him a guaranteed slot for 2014 and then he can run the Grand Slam.

 

Dylan Bowman placed 7th at 2012 WSER and has had a couple of great performances at Ray Miller 50 and Miwok 60k. Considering the depth of the 2013 field a top 10 placing is highly likely, the question is, can he embrace early season form and move into the top 5.

 

Jorge Maravilla and Joe Uhan placed 8th and 9th respectively at the 2012 race but both runners have had relatively quiet times lately. Jorge placed 3rd at UROC in late 2012 and recently was joint winner at the Great Wall Marathon in China with his Salomon teammates, but it’s difficult to predict what form Jorge and Joe will bring to this years race. It is fair to assume that no news is good news and that they will arrive on the start line ready to push hard.

 

The list could go on but here is a selection of other notable names that will almost certainly drift into the top 20 and of course, on a good day, they may even make top 10.

 

Yassine Diboun, Trent Briney, Andy Jones Wilkins, Gustavo Reyes, Nick Pedatella (also going for Gran Slam), Paul Terranova (ran the Grand Slam last year) and finally, Jacob Rydman.

 

Notable non-starters for the 2013 are as follows:

 

Ryan Sandes who pushed the pace at the front last year, placed 2nd overall and in doing so, also broke Geoff Roes old course record. Needless to say, we are all disappointed that Ryan can’t make it. He unfortunately twisted his ankle on a training run and needs to allow for recovery. Fellow South Africa, the Comrades King, Bruce Fordyce is also a no show due to injury. Bruce would not have contested the overall placing but to have 9x Comrades Marathon winner on the WSER course would have been special. He told me via email that he has carried over his place for 2014.

 

 

Notable no-racers:

The 2013 race has a quality field, however, we have notable omissions: Kilian Jornet, Anton Krupicka, Dakota Jones, Geoff Roes, Sage Canaday, Julien Chorier, Max King, Mike Wolfe, Mike Foote, Joe Grant and so on.

 

The race – Female

 

With no Ellie Greenwood, no Lizzy Hawker, no Kami Semick, and no Krissy Moehl I have to say I can’t help but feel a little cheated with the ladies field. Don’t get me wrong, we have some great talent ready to toe the line but I do feel as though it’s about who is not here than who is…

 

Having said that, Rory Bosio was 2nd in 2012 and she returns this year as odds on favorite. At 28 years old she manages to go about her run life with very little fuss or exposure. She keeps herself to herself but she has some impressive results that we should all be shouting about. She has run WSER three times; 4th in 2010, 5th in 2011 and of course, 2nd in 2012. Do you see the progression! 2013 may very well be the year the she has a 1st next to her name. She placed 4th at Lake Sonoma recently and was 2nd at Way to cool earlier in 2013, not results that you would predict a WSER win on, but she knows how to run this race!

 

I am going to stick my neck out here and say that Cassie Scallon has every possibility of not only making the podium or winning the race! The only question mark comes from a fall she took at Cayuga Trails a couple of weeks ago. Had she not pulled out of that race and been in tip top form she would have been my prediction for the win. She earned her WSER slot at Lake Sonoma and after missing the race last year; I can’t help but feel that she will be fired up for this edition. Of course, she hasn’t run this race before and experience counts for a great deal!

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Talking of experience, Nikki Kimball has plenty. Nikki placed 5th in 2012 but look at her history; she won the race in 2004, 2006 and 2007 and she was 4th in 2009, 3rd in 2010 and 2011. That his some history! Now in her early 40’s you may well say that age is against her but you just can’t rule her out. She has been troubled with injuries but without doubt the 2012 Transvulcania La Palma was a turning point for her, she finished that race in tears. Not because of pain but joy that things had gone well. Her recent form is difficult to predict as she too pulled out of Cayuga Trails.

 

Another newbie, Emily Harrison brings speed to the WSER arena. She has a marathon PB of 2:32 and although that may not be a prediction of a good Western States performance, it does show that the speed is available if needed. She earned her place at JFK50 when she placed 2nd behind Ellie Greenwood and recently she has had a win at Moab Red Hot 55k. Emily has the potential to pull something out of the back and may very well make the podium.

 

Aliza Lapierre was 3rd last year and it almost feels disrespectful to wait this long before mentioning her but she has had surgery and only returned to running in late April, early March of this year. Her form for WSER is an unknown but if one thing in her favor is that she will be fresh and keen to perform. That counts for a great deal when it gets hard.

 

Tina Lewis, Amy Sproston, Ashley Nordell and Meghan Arbogast all return after placing 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th respectively in 2012.

 

Certainly I see Ashley Nordell moving to a higher place for 2013 and she has the potential to make top 5 should all go well.

 

Tina Lewis placed best of the bunch in 2012 and although injury has caused serious issues in the build up to this years race, her win at Leadville in the latter half of last year has to mean that, if fit, she will improve on her 7th.

 

Amy Sproston won Ray Miller 50, Iznik Ultra 80k and was 3rd at Lake Sonoma all in the first half of 2013. A 100km champion she has speed and although 100 miles may not be her distance you have to say that in this ladies field, should things go right, a placing higher than 8th awaits.

 

Meghan Arbogast may well be a dark horse of the race… you just can’t rule her out! She proved this by beating Rory Bosio to the top slot at Way to Cool 50k. Last year she ran just under 20 hours (19:54) and I think she will need an ‘18’ time to contest the front of the race but she can do it, don’t rule her out.

Joelle Vaught has been top 10 at WSER before in 2010 when she ran 20:19. Certainly if she wants to place top 10 in 2013 she needs to be looking at sub 20. Her win at Pocatello 50 (to put things in perspective, she beat her own course record by just over 20 minutes) recently would suggest that a surprise may well come from Joelle.

 

Jennifer Benna recently turned up at Transvulcania La Palma and dropped early on saying that it just didn’t feel right. To travel that far and drop so early shows some real commitment to the bigger picture, that being WSER. She has already won a 100 this year at Zion 100 way back in April (probably why she didn’t feel great in May) I think Jennifer has the potential to make the top 10 but she will need a good day.

 

My final tip is Pam Smith, she has run WSER before and has placed 10th in 2010 and 2011. She hasn’t run under 20 hours but if she managed to match her previous best of 20:40, another top 10 may well just be hers, just!

 

Ones to watch:

 

Kerrie Bruxvoort, Denise Bourassa and Rhonda Claridge.

 

Provide us with your feedback:

  • What are your predictions for the men’s and ladies races?
  • Who will surprise us this year?
  • Will the course record go in either race?
  • Who isn’t racing that you had hoped would be?

LINKS:

WSER website HERE

Scott Running Apparel Test

©copyright .iancorless.com._1010719New apparel can really give your running mojo a boost. I have never known it not to work…  I think deep down we always like new kit to try out or new kit to give our running a boost. Running is a simple sport, you need a pair of shoes, socks, shorts (or skort) and away you go. Never quite works out like that though does it. New products arrive in the market place all the time; new colour ways, re designs, new cuts and completely new products.

Scott Sports are well established in the bike, winter sports and outdoor sector but less so in running. That is until recently. With some high level athlete sponsorship and a new range of products, the brand goes from strength to strength.

I have used and ‘loved’ the Scott T2 Kinabalu trail show for some time now (read my review here) and I used the eRide Grip 2 almost exclusively over Winter months and on the Transvulcania La Palma course in December 2012 (review here).

In March 2013 I received some of the new apparel range from Scott and I have been testing these products for a while now on local trails and when travelling. They have several ranges of clothing that crossover and coordinate with each other extremely well. However, Scott also have two distinct groups:

The Performance range (in my opinion) is geared towards road running and potential triathlon markets, whereas the Outdoor & Trail is far more ‘ultra’ specific or ideal for any general running. Outdoor & Trail has two distinct looks; the AMT range which is colourful, light and boasts some innovative fabrics and the more conventional and understated. For this review I am looking at the more conventional and understated.

  • Scott Windbreaker AMT
  • Scott Sardar long sleeve with 1/2 zip
  • Scott Crestone crew
  • Scott Somerset short
  • Scott T2 Kinabalu shoes
  • Accessory – Scott Race cap

Scott Apparel2It’s not often that you get to try out new kit and run with the brands main athlete (or at least one of the main athletes) but that is what happened in La Palma. Just a couple of days after Sage Canaday secured a stunning third place behind Kilian Jornet and Luis Alberto Hernando at the 2013 edition of the Transvulcania La Palma, we went out on the trails for a ‘play’ and a little sight seeing.

Sage Canaday 3rd place Transvulcania 2013

Sage Canaday 3rd place Transvulcania 2013

The CLOTHING

Crestone Crew

You may think at first touch that this garment is a ‘compression’ piece of clothing. It has a slightly ‘heavier’ feel to the fabric and panels on the back, front and under the arms look as though they would ‘compress’. Not so. The fit is ‘athletic’, so in real terms it is cut to the shape of your buddy but it does not fit really tight. It has just the right amount of freedom. I have to say that really ‘tight’ garments now don’t appeal to me. An element of loose fabric is nice. The ‘panels’ on the front, back and underarms allow key areas to release heat and sweat and they work extremely well.

Scott have used a fabric (Polyamide)  in conjunction with (Elastane) that provides an ‘elasticity’ to it. The garment stretches and adapts to body movement without pulling. Treated with Chitosante the fabric is odor resistant and I have to say that from repeated use and washing, the garment has retained no lasting door. Weighing in at 180g for a mens medium the Crestone is a real pleasure to wear and has become a great day-to-day product. Looks are understated with a simple one tone colour, a small logo in the middle of the chest and the word ‘Scott’ at the bottom front of the garment on the left hand side.

Sizing – I personally feel that the whole Scott Apparel range sizes a little small. I am a 38″ chest and would normally choose ‘small’, however, I have found that ‘medium’ is best across the board. In particular, the ‘elastic’ nature of the Crestone does mean that this garment will have a tighter fit in comparison to a ‘loose’ tee top such as the AMT s/s. It comes down to personal choice.

Crestone

Somerset Short

These shorts are long (9.5″ seam) and loose with three pockets. They are ideal for training runs and long days out providing no rubbing or irritation. The waist band is extremely comfortable and has a simple drawstring to adjust tension.

Branded with the Scott logo on the right hand leg, the shorts are simple and understated. They have a ‘V’ cut into the seam to allow some additional leg freedom and this works extremely well, particularly when climbing or stepping up.

Two side pockets are generous and will easily hold a mobile phone, camera or equally chunky item. On the rear in the middle and at the top is a zippered pocket that will hold keys or any other valuable item.

The inner brief is short and comfortable and they have a lightweight 2-way breathable fabric. They also include the Chitosante to keep door away and they have DUROshade to protect against the sun.

In use the shorts are hassle free, comfortable and ideal for long days on the trail. In addition, due to the understated look, longer length and pockets, they would also be ideal as a casual short.

In racing, you may require something more minimal? Weighing 220g for a mens medium they are not heavy but depending on how minimalist you like to go, the additional pockets in a racing short may well be an unnecessary addition.

Somerset

Sardar Long Sleeve with 1/2 zip

Made from lightweight Polyester with mesh inserts, this top is ideally for cold or chilly days on the trail. It has a 1/2 zip to help regulate temperature.

Mesh panels are on the elbow to allow additional movement and a mesh panel across the shoulders for breathability. On the rear is a zipperd pocket situated in the lower back. The pocket is ideal for money, phone and/or keys.

The top is not a garment that you can take off and run with (unless you tie it around your waist) should you become warm. It’s too bulky for that, so, it is definitely a garment when the external temperatures require something warmer. Having said that, the fabric is extremely smooth and comfortable. Without doubt you can use this layer on its own or as a second layer.

Made from 73% Polyester, 27% Polyamide it also has ‘Coolmax’ and Chitosante to reduce door . At 180g it really is a great lightweight warm layer.

Sardar

Winbreaker AMT

The AMT range is a breakthrough range for Scott. Designed to be extremely light weight and functional, they really do offer something fresh the the apparel market. The ‘Windbreaker’ is just 60g for a medium. It rolls up into a tiny ball (smaller than an apple) and it really is a jacket that can be taken on every run.

It has a hood, tailored fit and a 1/2 zip.

The hood although useful is a little loose with no option to adjust, so, if the wind is blowing it  an become a little irritating. However, this is very much an emergency layer and as such the hood may very well be welcome should conditions turn nasty.

The 1/2 zip provides an ability to regulate temperature and reassuringly, when zipped up it goes high and helps stop the wind blowing around your neck and going down your back.

Elastic hems promise a secure fit and a lower back adds some additional protection. The fabric is water repellant and abrasion resistant, this jacket is an ideal emergency layer in mild conditions.

AMT windbreaker

T2 Kinabalu

I have worn and reviewed the T2 Kinabalu before, so, please read HERE

In summary, they are currently my favourite every day shoe for trail. Extremely versatile, comfortable and great to look at. They adapt to all surfaces, including mud. The only time I would reach for another shoe is when conditions required a very aggressive grip.

Ultimately, if you could only purchase one pair of shoes that could do all jobs, the T2 Kinabalu would be it.

screenshot_167

Race cap

I guess a hat is a hat… but not all hats are the same! The Scott Race cap ticks all the boxes. It has mesh on the top to allow heat to escape, a terry band to keep sweat from dripping down your face, velcro adjustment at the rear for a precise fit and good looks.

Would I change anything? Yes! I like my hats (for summer use) to have the inside of the peak black… why? well it reduces glare and allows me to relax my eyes and squint less. Very few manufacturers do this but in my opinion it makes perfect sense. Am I being fussy?

It’s a great hat though, comfortable to wear, cool and the terry band works really well.

Race cap

SUMMARY

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Scott Sports really have stepped up the mark in the last twenty four months. The addition of Marco De Gasperi, Sage Canaday and Ian Sharman on the athlete team has most certainly influenced product development. The T2 Kinabalu has a great deal of Marco’s direct feedback into the shoe.

As time progresses the brand will develop even more. Currently, Scott have on offer some great apparel and shoes. It’s always a great sign for me when I go to my cupboards to get clothing for a run and I seek out a certain top or short instead of grabbing what is at hand. I do this with the Scott apparel all the time!

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LINKS:

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Scott T2 Kinabalu Review

T2 Kinabalu

Sage CanadayMarco De GasperiIan Sharman and Joe Gray amongst others are utilising the benefits of the new Scott range of run shoes, you may very well want to take a more in-depth look at the 2013 offerings yourself?

Scott Running brand.

I did a review of the Scott eRide Grip 2 some time ago, I used the shoe extensively on the trails out in La Palma on the Transvulcania La Palma course. In summary, the shoe really impressed me. It had the combination of factors that makes a shoe great to wear. You can read the review HERE

copyright Ian Corless

copyright Ian Corless

Impressions

I have now had the Scott T2 Kinabalu for a couple of months. The design of this shoe has had great input from legendary mountain runner Marco De Gasperi and the T2 Kinabalu shows that all the great features of the Scott eRide Grip 2 have been transferred to the T2 Kinabalu but in a lighter more streamlined shoe. Sizing was true to size and the drop is 11mm.

From the moment I first put the shoes on, adjusted the laces and stepped out of the door and headed of for a one hour run the T2 Kinabalu put a smile on my face. A mile of road to my local trails felt comfortable and the shoes offered grip, cushioning and a wonderful ‘return’ of energy to the next foot strike. I bounced along. On trail the grip was secure and reassuring. I did find that my heel was moving a little initially but I re-laced the shoe differently and suddenly my foot was held secure and tight.

I have been through thick mud, snow, ice, hard trail, rocks, mountains and water crossings and have accumulated some 400+ miles in these shoes. Here are my thoughts.

Upper

At the front of the shoe, protection runs around the toe area providing adequate protection should you strike rocks or roots. The toe box is wide providing plenty of room but not so much room that they become loose. Your toes are able to spread and help provide feel and contact with the ground. At the rear your heel is held firm with no hot spots. The upper is light, breathable and colourful! I like the colour and the boldness of the shoe but some may very well find them a little OTT. It all comes down to personal taste. Within the upper is a support structure (synthetic overlay) that helps hold the foot in place. The laces are not as ‘stretchy’ as those on the Grip 2 but they have a texture too them that ‘grips’. This holds the laces firm and once adjusted I have had no need to tighten them when running. A nice touch is the elastic bungee on the front of the shoe that allows you to pass excess lace underneath so that it does not flap around. It’s not as fancy or extravagant as the ‘Salomon Lace Garage’ but it does the job well.

Midsole

The midsole has ‘Aero Foam’ which is Scott’s own technology and for a more minimalist shoe it provides great cushioning and feel for the ground. After several runs the midsole ‘bedded’ in and started to mould to my foot providing additional comfort. The sock liner is perforated and the midsole has ‘drainage’ ports to allow water to escape. A real plus in wet weather or water crossings. The platform of the shoe is wide and offers great grip, it has no cut away for the arch or any additional features that cut into the sole, so, what you have is great platform that creates maximum contact with the ground. You can really feel it. Without doubt the shoe is neural and low to the ground. It has all the feel and benefits of a minimalist shoe or racing flat but with cushioning.

eRide

One of the great aspects of this shoe is the eRide sole. As I explain below, the eRide technology is designed to make you a more efficient runner. By efficient, I mean striking the ground with a mid to fore-foot toe off. But an 11mm ‘drop’ normally would not promote this run style… step in eRide. Strike the ground with your heel and you feel the shoe propel you forward. Now I am a mid-foot striker but going downhill I felt the shoe throw me forward all the time, encouraging me to make the most of the hill and encouraging me to save my quads by stopping me braking.

Sole

Grip is not as severe as the eRide Grip 2 model but its greater than many shoes in it’s class and provides excellent traction on hard trail, rocks, ice, snow and wet ground. On muddy ground it provides some traction but not as much as the Grip 2. What I love about the T2 Kinabalu is its ability to transfer between all types of terrain providing great feel and comfort. These features are transferred even to road or pavement and I would have no problem running long stretches of road in the T2 Kinabalu.

Summary

I have been testing many pairs of shoes recently and I now use the T2 Kinabalu as my benchmark shoe. It has everything in one package; cushioning, light weight, great feel with the ground, comfort, security and most importantly the ability to handle a multitude of different terrains. If I was only allowed one pair of shoes, the T2 Kinabalu would be it.

A recent shoe test in ‘Trail Runnning‘ magazine also appointed the T2 Kinabalu as “Best In Test’ in the April 2013 edition.

Scott T2

T2 Kinabalu Information and Statistics

The T2 Kinabalu is the ultimate lightweight trail machine according to Scott. Maximum protection and traction with minimal weight. An ideal balance of lightweight materials, cushioning, protection and quick response thanks to eRide Technology. Shaped for smooth transition whether you are striking on the heel, mid foot or forefoot to adapt to the varied terrain. Our lightest trail shoe with uncompromised traction and protection, featuring an AeroFoam midsole, which is 50% lighter than traditional EVA foams.

copyright Ian Corless

copyright Ian Corless

Scott T2 Kinabalu

eRIDE

Get that fleet-footed feeling with our eRide range. The unique rocker shape creates a very stable midstance, promoting the faster and more efficient running style that runners strive for. You`ll be rocking as the miles roll by.

eride

copyright Ian Corless

copyright Ian Corless

The benefits:

1. Healthier body position

2. More energy efficient

3. Natural midfoot strike

4. Lower profile heel

5. Smoother ride

6. Minimal and lighter weight

Aero Foam

Working with our athletes, we always hear that they would like to run in lighter shoes, but are not willing to sacrifice any cushioning performance. So, we found an alternative to the EVA foam used in most running shoes. SCOTT Aero Foam combines lightweight materials with a wear resistant compound, resulting in shoes that are lighter, have more cushioning and last longer than traditional running shoes.

Aerofoam

Scott T2 Kinabalu

Specs

  • Weight 270g for UK9
  • Drop 11mm
  • eRideComposite push-through plate
  • AeroFoamWet traction rubber
  • Lace bungy
  • Upper: Mesh/Synthetic Overlays
  • Lower: EVA/rubber

Scott Website HERE

Memories of La Palma – Transvulcania

It’s not always the racing that leaves memories but often what happens around the racing. In 2012, arguably, one of the best fields ever assembled on the island of La Palma to take part in the Transvulcania La Palma.

This film was actually a trailer for Kilian’s Quest Season 4 ‘Living Legends’.

But it shows some great times and experiences and ultimately it shows what running is about… having fun!

Episode 31 – Joe Grant & Ruby Muir

Episode 31, Joe GRant, Ruby Muir, Atacama Crossing

Episode 31 of Talk Ultra. Joe Grant tells us all about his experiences covering 350 miles at the Iditarod Trail Invitational in Alaska. New run sensation, 21 yr old Ruby Muir from New Zealand tells us what it’s like dominating Tarawera Ultra and placing 7th overall. We speak with Daniel Rowlands & Rebecca Pattinson, respective winners of the Atacama Crossing in Chile. Ian Sharman discusses the News, Marc Laithwaite talks hills in Talk Training, Speedgoat has a Meltzer Moment and of course we have A year in the life of, MDS special and the Up & Coming Races.

00:00:44 Start
00:20:10 A Year in the life of… with Amanda Hyatt. Amanda finally seems to be getting the hand of ultra running. After being ‘shocked’ with her first race experience, she now has another race under her belt and feels far more confident.
00:33:30 News with Ian Sharman. Ian has had a niggle with a knee injury but is back in training and has a race coming up in the next couple of weeks. He discusses the news from around the world.
00:41:40 Ruby Muir – 21 year old ultra newbie, Ruby Muir has elevated herself to a whole new level with a stunning performance at the very competetive Tarawera Ultra in New Zealand. Not only did she dominate the ladies race, she placed 7th overall. I caught up with her just this last week… “I am just a runner” this modest star of the future says.
01:00:00 Back to News
01:04:40 Daniel Rowlands from Zimbabwe has just won the Atacama Crossing in Chile. You can hear what he has to say and read his blog HERE
01:14:05 Rebecca Pattinson from the UK won the ladies race at Atacama Crossing and is somewhat surprised! She talks about her training and racing money for Autism. Take a look HERE
01:34:40 Back to News
01:42:15 Blog/ Video – SILENCE – Surrounded by the noise of the city, a noise that can drown out our ability to fully listen to what our bodies are telling us, the video highlights how it can disconnect us from the places that we’re running in and although running becomes an escape – it isn’t always relaxing. Why we Run? Watch it HERE
01:45:00 Talk Training with Marc Laithwaite, this week we discuss Hills. Going up and down them.
02:06:45 Interview. Our final catch up with Arc’teryx/Inov-8 athlete Joe Grant. Joe has just completed the 350 mile Iditarod Trail Invitational in joint 2nd place. It was a little tougher than he expected.
02:49:35 Back to Karl
02:56:30 A Meltzer Moment with Speedgoat Karl
03:03:05 MDS Special – This week we have our final catch up with Stuart Rae. The next time we speak it will be in the Sahara.
03:12:10 Up & Coming Races for the next two weeks.
03:14:45 Close
03:16:37

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Website – talkultra.com