How is your Posture? Part Quatre – Marc Laithwaite

postures1

                                                image from Primal Patterns

Okay, so we’re now onto part 4 of the series and this week we are looking at exercises to correct anterior tilt of the pelvis, which creates the lordosis posture. If you’ve not yet read parts 1, 2 and 3 read them HERE, HERE and HERE.

The topic for today is looking at breathing issues related to posture, we’re also going to look at the dreaded stitch. Aside from that, we’re going to look at ways of dealing with cramps.

Breathing and posture

The breathing issue is interesting for me as it’s something i’ve suffered from myself and couldn’t find a cure. They symptoms were very rapid and shallow breathing, I also felt that I couldn’t breathe deeply from my diaphragm. The best way to describe it was as if the bottom 2 thirds of my lungs didn’t work and i was just rapidly shifting air in and out of the top third. It felt to me at the time as though I had exercise induced asthma, there was some ‘wheezing’ which is a symptom of airway problems, so I went through that process and resolved nothing. The rapid shallow breathing was often, but not always linked to a pain under my ribs which most people would commonly refer to as a stitch. In a few triathlons I had to slow down to get rid of it, by relaxing and breathing deeply.

The key to resolving it was when i noticed that it was occuring more frequently in triathlon training and racing, compared to just running. Basically, it was a lot more likely to happen if I biked first. That got me thinking about posture and how it was affected by riding my bike before running. I soon noticed that I had a more pronounced lordosis posture (anterior tilt) after riding hard in the aero position then attempting to run. Interestingly, since identifying this problem i’ve spoke to more and more people who suffer stitch and breathing difficulties running in triathlon and a lot of them tend to be  children.

So what’s going on?

Time to post our anterior tilt photo again, it feels only right we put it in this final issue. I’ll start by saying that anterior-pelvic-tiltthis is purely my own thoughts and ideas, based on things I’ve tried which have worked for me. Nobody has given me a decent answer to why I had this recurring stitch or breathing difficulties.

Take a look at the photo right and picture the ‘abdominal cavity’. The abdominal cavity is the space which contains your intestines and in simple terms it’s a box with front, back, sides, floor and ceiling. The pelvic floor is underneath, the abdominals, lower back and obliques (muscles on sides) make the front, back and sides and your diphragm is the ceiling on this box.

If you have anterior tilt, this box becomes ’tilted’ out of position. If fact, it isn’t a box any more, it’s more like a rhomboid shape. If you don’t know what a rhomboid is, google it!! Keeping it simple, it’s fair to assume that if your diaphragm is pulled in an odd direction and out of position, it probably won’t pull down and allow you to deep breathe very well.

Keep is simple mate…

I’m trying. So having noticed this issue related to running after cycling and thinking about it way too much, I altered my posture when running. To my surprise, it was like someone has just pulled a giant plug out of my lungs and I could breathe normally!! I’ll explain the changes I made in as simple terms as possible.

Old technique:

1. Anterior tilt of the pelvis, creating an arched lower back and my stomach to stick out (leave it!!)
2. Felt like I was sticking my chest out at the same time. As I was sticking my chest out, I was looking slightly upwards (my natural line of site was upwards)
4. Point 2 & 3 meant that I was very upright, almost leaning back

New technique

1. To try and counter the upright / backwards lean I looked down at the road/track 15m ahead of me
2. Consciously held a slight forwards lean (my torso was slightly ahead of my pelvis)
3. Didn’t stick my chest out and shoulders back, moved shoulders forwards slightly (without hunching too much)
4. Pulled my belly in and avoided pelvis tilting forwards into lordosis

One final thing which can also help with the breathing issues, although not related to posture, is your stride rate. We are often encouraged to run or cycle with high cadences, 90 foot falls or 90 pedal revolutions per minute (or higher). Faster cadences for both cycling and running increase breathing rate. If you are struggling with rapid breathing, slow the cadence and stride out more (longer / slower strides), that can help to slow the breathing rate down.

Hopefully you can picture the changes above! I think it’s pretty common for runners who are tired and pushing hard to lean back, stick their chest out and look upwards. Thre result is a very upright and almost ‘leaning back’ posture. If you can relate to any of the breathing or ‘stitch’ symptoms above, then give the changes a go, see if they can help your run performances, if it works, i’d be interested to hear the feedback.

Cramping issues

There’s one final thing I’m going to talk about which is issues related to cramping. I explained in detail during previous blogs, the reasons for cramping and how posture can be a direct cause. As this is the final part of the ‘trilogy’ (I say trilogy in the tenuous sense of the word), I wanted to specifically answer a few questions which had been emailed, largely relating to cramp in the calf during open water swimming.

As per previous blogs, it’s nothing to do with salts etc the issue may well be related to changes in length and muscle stretch receptors / nervous system confusion. I’ve suffered from this issue and have a simple plan to resolve it. When swmming, your calf is in a shortened position and if it remains shortened for a long period of time, it can go into spasm. You need to remind your calf of it’s original length at regular intervals, so try this:

1. Every 3 minutes, pull your toes up to gently stretch your calf. Do it once on each leg and you don’t have to hold, just stretch and release. This inhibits your swimming slightly, but it’s not going to slow you more than 1 second at most!
2. You need to do it at regular intervals, not just in reponse to the cramp, so make it a habit every 3 minutes.
3. It needs to be gentle movement, don’t do a sharp stretch of the calf, which can also trigger spasm.

About Marc:

Sports Science lecturer for 10 years at St Helens HE College.

2004 established The Endurance Coach LTD sports science and coaching business. Worked with British Cycling as physiology support 2008-2008. Previous Triathlon England Regional Academy Head Coach, North West.

In 2006 established Epic Events Management LTD. Now one of the largest event companies in the NW, organising a range of triathlon, swimming and cycling events. EPIC EVENTS also encompasses Montane Trail 26 and Petzl Night Runner events.

In 2010 established Montane Lakeland 50 & 100 LTD. This has now become the UKs leading ultra distance trail running event.

In 2010 established The Endurance Store triathlon, trail running and open water swimming store. Based in Appley Bridge, Wigan, we are the North West’s community store, organising and supporting local athletes and local events.

Check out the endurance store HERE

Endurance Store Logo

Damage Limitation by Marc Laithwaite

©iancorless.com_RichtersveldRaceDay22015-8568

The term D.O.M.S. is used frequently within the world of endurance, it represents the ‘Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness’. The name refers to the fact that sometimes you don’t actually feel the effects of a training session or race until the following day when you step out of bed. Those who have ran a marathon will understand the sensation. You cross the line and undoubtedly you’re tired but there isn’t a great deal of physical pain. However, the next morning, or perhaps even the morning after that, your attempts to walk downstairs backwards provide the family with the highest level of entertainment they have ever experienced.

The same may be said of the inexperienced cyclist who decides to enter a 100 miles hilly cycle sportive, despite a poor training background. Aside from the embarrassment of being unable to sit down for a week, the morning after generally requires a family member to assist their descent to breakfast. So what’s happened? Has someone been repeatedly battering your tired legs throughout the night whilst you failed to wake from your exercise induced, coma like sleep? The answer lies with D.O.M.S. and the inflammation process.

The inflammation process

During a marathon running event the muscle tissue is damaged due to repeated stress and this triggers the inflammation process. The damage occurs ‘during’ the marathon but the inflammation process takes 24-48 hours to reach its peak, so the pain you feel the following morning was actually happening ‘real time’ during the second half of the race.

An important note to make here is that when people slow down in the final 6 miles of the marathon, we generally assume it is caused by low carbohydrate stores, often termed ‘hitting the wall’. However, there is likely to be a significant amount of muscle tissue damage by this stage in the race which will undoubtedly have an impact upon performance. Due to the D.O.M.S. effect, we rarely discuss the significance of tissue damage during the event. It’s important to recognise that the pain you experience 24-48 hours after the race is caused by damage which happened ‘real time’ in the second half of the marathon. That’s why you were getting slower!!

*Part of the inflammatory process involves fluid build up in the damaged area, due to this fluid build up you may weigh more 24-48 hours after the marathon that you did before, perhaps even 1-2kg extra in weight! Don’t worry.. it’s just water and it will pass.

How do I know if I’ve got tissue damage as opposed to simply having tight muscles?

  1. It’ll be very ‘tender, warm and swollen’ and if someone squeezes your leg you’ll instinctively want to punch them (NB: they never see the funny side of your response).
  2. When you stretch, it makes no difference to the tenderness, the pain still exists (it’s not tight, its damaged) and its probably better if you actually don’t stretch!

*Myth explosion – the pain and tenderness the day after the event has absolutely nothing to do with lactic acid in the muscles. It’s an old wife’s tail and I’m not even open to discussion on the matter.

How does damage affect performance?

You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to understand that a damaged muscle will not work as effectively as a healthy muscle. However, aside from the actual physical damage directly affecting performance, it’s possible that the inflammation process is acting on a much higher plane and going straight to the governor.

The central governor

There are various theories regarding ‘why we slow down’ and one of the most prominent in recent years has been the ‘central governor’. This theory suggests that fatigue is controlled by the brain (which can effectively switch off nerve signals to muscles) rather than fatigue being controlled by ‘peripheral factors’ such as the ‘actual muscle damage’.

Okay, here is a simple example:

  1. The muscles is damaged and therefore doesn’t work well, as a result you slow down. That is ‘peripheral control’, the muscle is damaged and the muscle doesn’t work, at no point is the brain involved.
  2. The muscle is damaged and somehow the brain’s monitoring system detects this. As a result the brain blocks nerve signals to the muscle so it can’t function fully and you are forced to slow down, that’s central governor control.

Why are we talking about central governor and gone off track from inflammation?

Yep, I was hoping you’d ask that. When we damage a muscle we kick start the ‘inflammatory process’ which is a chain of events involving a series of chemicals, each having a different purpose and action. One of the most widely researched in a chemical known as Interleukin-6 (IL-6) which is released into the blood stream during early stages of muscle damage and inflammation. Research suggests that IL-6 is detected by the brain and as a consequence, the brain then acts to slow you down in some way. In an old study (completed by Tim Noakes 2004) runners completed 2 separate 10k runs a week apart. They were healthy during both but prior to the second run they were injected with IL-6 and ran almost a minute slower.

Just stop and think about this for one second

Look at the 2 examples given at the top of this page for ‘peripheral control’ and ‘central control’. These 10k runners did not have muscle damage prior to either 10k, they were healthy, fuelled and ready to go until injected with IL-6. Their slower time cannot be explained by muscle damage, low fuel or any other form of peripheral control. The only possible explanation is the circulating chemicals. The chemical IL-6 has even been suggested as a possible cause for the lethargy associated with ‘chronic fatigue’ or ‘chronic overtraining’. We know that all general illnesses and all forms of stress kick start the inflammation process and that in turn creates IL-6.

How does energy and nutrition relate to tissue damage?

VERY IMPORTANT: In previous blogs we have talked a great deal about carbohydrate and fat use during exercise and how to refuel. There is a presumption that if you refuel correctly and use fat as a fuel source, you will be successful in endurance events. As a consequence, when people fail to hit their target times, the first thing they turn to as an excuse is ‘failing to get the nutrition correct’. We treat nutrition as some kind of magic wand and if it’s done correctly, you can cycle and run forever, but the reality is very different. It doesn’t matter how much fuel you pour into a broken car, it isn’t going to drive anywhere fast. Without the conditioning which comes from running long miles on hard surfaces, even the most fuel efficient athletes will break down due to tissue damage. CONSIDER THIS: The energy used when cycling and running at a steady pace are not significantly different (slightly higher for running). However, many people who can cycle for 6 hours with little issue, will find themselves in pretty bad shape after as little as 2 hours of running. So ask yourself this question, is it fuel intake or is it damage causing the issue?

What causes the damage?

  1. Damage will be far greater if you’re not conditioned to the distance and terrain. In simple terms you need to spend time on your feet and do the longer sessions.
  2. Harder surfaces are more likely to cause damage, although this isn’t always strictly true as runners do become accustomed to the surface they train on.
  3. Running down hill is the real killer as the muscles contract eccentrically, braking your speed, thereby causing much greater damage.
  4. This isn’t limited just to running. Cycling for several hours and repeatedly performing the same pedal action will lead to muscle tissue stress and damage.

How can you avoid the damage?

  1. As above, you need to complete longer sessions, including downhill running if relevant.
  2. It’s possible that damage may be reduced, by using compression clothing. Research is very poor but ‘subjective’ feedback suggests that it certainly helps.
  3. Your weight will have an impact upon damage, if you have a few KGs to lose, it will help!
  4. Whilst this is a subjective / commercial / controversial addition to the list, specific shoes such as HOKA which are specifically designed to reduce impact can reduce damage and associated DOMS.

What should I do if I have tissue damage?

  1. Rest and let your legs recover for a few days.
  2. Avoid very deep post event massage or stretching, sticking fingers into or stretching damaged tissue is never a good idea, wait a few days at least.
  3. After a few days do some light exercise such as cycling to encourage blood flow to the area and assist the repair process.

If you found this article useful, it would help us a great deal if you share on Facebook, Twitter and social media.

Until then, limit the damage…

About Marc:

Sports Science lecturer for 10 years at St Helens HE College.

2004 established The Endurance Coach LTD sports science and coaching business. Worked with British Cycling as physiology support 2008-2008. Previous Triathlon England Regional Academy Head Coach, North West.

In 2006 established Epic Events Management LTD. Now one of the largest event companies in the NW, organising a range of triathlon, swimming and cycling events. EPIC EVENTS also encompasses Montane Trail 26 and Petzl Night Runner events.

In 2010 established Montane Lakeland 50 & 100 LTD. This has now become the UKs leading ultra distance trail running event.

In 2010 established The Endurance Store triathlon, trail running and open water swimming store. Based in Appley Bridge, Wigan, we are the North West’s community store, organising and supporting local athletes and local events.

Check out the endurance store HERE

Endurance Store Logo

Episode 88 – FEJES HAWKER LAWSON

Ep88

Episode 88 of Talk Ultra and on this weeks show we speak with Scott Hawker about 2nd place at TNF100, we interview Joe Fejes about running 606.24 miles in 6 days and we speak with Dan Lawson about his record breaking 145 mile run at GUCR. The News, a Blog and Speedgoat Karl.

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If you enjoy Talk Ultra, consider a donation to help finance the show HERE

00:18:28 NEWS
 
Help Nepal – Nepal images ‘FACES of NEPAL’ – order a print and all funds donated to Nepal charities http://iancorless.org/2015/04/28/nepal-appeal-nepalearthquake/
 
Karl Meltzer another 100
Cruel Jewel 108 miler
GUCR
Dan Lawson 22:16
Mark Perkins 22:42
Andy Horrobin 26:24
Mimi Anderson 32:28
Alayne Malkin 34:41
Naomi Newton-Fisher 37:22
 
00:22:36 INTERVIEW
 
Daniel Lawson GUCR new CR interview
 
TNF100
Dylan Bowman 8:50:13
Scott Hawker 8:56:19
Yun Yanqiao 9:01:29
Dong Li 11:05:22
Amy Sproston 11:27:50
Shona Stephenson 11:47:02
 
ZEGAMA-AIZKORRI
Tadei Pivk 3:51:11
Manuel Merillas 3:51:47
Pere Rulla 3:52:50
Aritz Egea 3:59:27
Marco De Gasperi 3:59:48
Azara Garcia 4:41:23
Paula Cabrezo 4:43:44
Oihana Kortazar 4:44:57
Emelie Forsberg 4:49:38
Federica Boifava 4:51”32
Anton is injured…. again
 
Dave Mackey injured
 
Scott Jurek takes on the AT
 
Comrades with Ellie Greenwood, Max King and Sage Canaday – ouch!
 
01:29:15 INTERVIEW
 
Scott Hawker 2nd at TNF100
 
02:16:18 INTERVIEW
 
Joe Fejes EMU 6-day world trophy– Joe Fejes finished the event with 606.243 miles, which resets the American record for miles run in six days on a non-track surface.
02:45:00 BLOG
 
IAU WORLD TRAIL CHAMPS PREVIEW HERE
02:45:27 UP & COMING RACES
 

Argentina

Fiambala Desert Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Fiambala Desert Trail 80K | 80 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Australia

Queensland

Endura 50K | 50 kilometers | June 07, 2015 | website

Gold Coast 50 Miler | 50 miles | June 07, 2015 | website

Runners ConneXion 100 km | 100 kilometers | June 07, 2015 | website

Victoria

Macedon Ranges 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | May 31, 2015 | website

Western Australia

Kep Track 100km Ultra Marathon II | 100 kilometers | May 31, 2015 | website

Kep Track 75km Ultra Marathon II | 75 kilometers | May 31, 2015 | website

Belgium

Wallonia

Trail des Vallées du Chevalier – 62 km | 62 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Bhutan

The Last Secret | 200 kilometers | May 29, 2015 | website

Brazil

UAI Ultra dos Anjos Internacional 135 km Hard | 135 kilometers | June 03, 2015 | website

UAI Ultra dos Anjos Internacional 235 km | 235 kilometers | June 03, 2015 | website

UAI Ultra dos Anjos Internacional 65 km Easy | 65 kilometers | June 03, 2015 | website

UAI Ultra dos Anjos Internacional 95 km Medium | 95 kilometers | June 03, 2015 | website

Canada

Alberta

Blackfoot Ultra 100KM | 100 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Blackfoot Ultra 50 Km | 50 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Blackfoot Ultra 50 Miler | 50 miles | May 30, 2015 | website

Calgary Marathon 50K Ultra | 50 kilometers | May 31, 2015 | website

British Columbia

Vancouver 100 km | 100 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Vancouver 50 km | 50 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Vancouver 62.5 km | 62 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Vancouver 75.8 km | 75 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Vancouver 87.9 km | 87 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

China

Gobi March 2015 | 250 kilometers | May 31, 2015 | website

Colombia

Chicamocha Run 108 km | 108 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Chicamocha Run 166 km | 166 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Czech Republic

Craft Gemini Maraton | 84 kilometers | June 07, 2015 | website

Mammut Ultramaraton | 85 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Denmark

Midtjylland

Nordisk eXtrem maraton X50 | 50 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Nordisk eXtrem maraton X70 | 70 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Finland

Western Finland

Perniön 60 km | 60 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

SUOMI-RUN 100 km | 100 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

France

Ardèche

Trail de la Chaussée des Géants – 53 km | 53 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Dordogne

La Mythique International Run | 250 kilometers | June 04, 2015 | website

Gironde

Tour du Canton de Fronsac 60 km | 60 kilometers | June 07, 2015 | website

Haute-Loire

Le Puy-en-Velay – Conques (Juin) | 208 kilometers | June 04, 2015 | website

Haute-Savoie

Trail du Gypaète | 73 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Trail du Lac d’Annecy – Technica Maxi Race | 86 kilometers | May 31, 2015 | website

Trail du Lac d’Annecy – XL Race | 87 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Hautes-Pyrénées

Trail du Hautacam – 50 km | 59 kilometers | May 31, 2015 | website

Jura

La Transju’trail – 72 km | 72 kilometers | June 07, 2015 | website

Orne

Trail du Massif d’Ecouves en Pays d’Alançon – 61 km | 61 kilometers | June 07, 2015 | website

Pas-de-Calais

Trail des Pyramides Noires – 100 km | 100 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Saône-et-Loire

Ultra Trail de Côte-d’Or – 105 km | 105 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Yonne

Oxfam Trailwalker France | 100 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Germany

Baden-Württemberg

Schefflenzer Ultralauf – 100 km | 100 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Schefflenzer Ultralauf – 50 km | 50 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Hesse

WiBoLT | 320 kilometers | June 03, 2015 | website

North Rhine-Westphalia

Bödefelder Hollenlauf 101 KM | 101 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Bödefelder Hollenlauf 67 KM | 67 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Schleswig-Holstein

Lauf zwischen den Meeren | 94 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Hungary

Ultrabalaton | 212 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Italy

Piedmont

Trail del Monte Soglio – Gir Lung | 63 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Sardinia

Sardegna Lakes Trail | 150 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol

Vigolana Trail | 65 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Tuscany

100km del Passatore | 100 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Veneto

Gran Raid delle Prealpi Trevigiane | 72 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Japan

100 km | 100 kilometers | June 07, 2015 | website

71 km | 71 kilometers | June 07, 2015 | website

Hida Takayama Ultra Marathon -100 km | 100 kilometers | June 07, 2015 | website

Hida Takayama Ultra Marathon – 72 km | 72 kilometers | June 07, 2015 | website

Namibia

Richtersveld Wildrun | 150 kilometers | June 02, 2015 | website

Nepal

Mount Everest Extreme Ultra Marathon | 60 kilometers | May 29, 2015 | website

Netherlands

Friesland

Pieter-ROG-pad Special Waddeneilanden | 300 kilometers | June 04, 2015 | website

Norway

Romerike 100 | 100 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Romerike 50 | 50 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Peru

Jungle Ultra | 220 kilometers | June 05, 2015 | website

Philippines

100 km | 100 kilometers | June 12, 2015 | website

50 km | 50 kilometers | June 12, 2015 | website

Portugal

OMD – Ultra Trail Serra da Estrela – 100 Milhas+ | 100 miles | June 05, 2015 | website

OMD – Ultra Trail Serra da Estrela – K100 | 101 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

OMD – Ultra Trail Serra da Estrela – K70 | 70 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Ultramaratona Caminhos do Tejo – 144 km | 144 kilometers | June 12, 2015 | website

Ultramaratona Caminhos do Tejo – 57 km | 57 kilometers | June 12, 2015 | website

Romania

Fundu Moldovei 3-day staged 115km ultra | 115 kilometers | June 05, 2015 | website

Fundu Moldovei Ultra Romania | 115 kilometers | June 05, 2015 | website

Russia

Dubna – Dmitrov Trail. 2015 – 50K | 50 kilometers | May 31, 2015 | website

Serbia

Ultra Trail Stara Planina 122 km | 122 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Ultra Trail Stara Planina 73 km | 73 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

South Africa

Comrades Marathon | 89 kilometers | May 31, 2015 | website

Spain

Basque Country

Euskal Herria Mendi Erronka | 65 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Castile and León

Riaza Trail Challenge 70 km | 70 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Castile-La Mancha

Quixote Legend | 166 kilometers | May 29, 2015 | website

Catalonia

Trail Els Bastions® | 52 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Ulldeter Ultra | 52 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Ultra Els Bastions® | 90 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Galicia

Ultra Trail Aldeas do Courel | 84 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Sweden

Boras Ultra Marathon – 100 miles | 100 miles | May 30, 2015 | website

Boras Ultra Marathon – 87 km | 87 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Switzerland

Berne

100km run Biel | 100 kilometers | June 12, 2015 | website

United Kingdom

Calderdale

Calderdale Way Ultra (long) | 50 miles | June 06, 2015 | website

County Borough of Conwy

Dragon’s Back | 200 miles | June 08, 2015 | website

Devon

Dartmoor Discovery | 32 miles | June 06, 2015 | website

Gloucestershire

Aston Subedge Ultra Run | 56 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Northamptonshire

Northants Ultra | 35 miles | June 07, 2015 | website

Northern Ireland

Mourne Way Ultra Marathon | 84 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

North Yorkshire

Oxfam Trailtrekker GB (North) – 100 km | 100 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Oxfam Trailtrekker GB (North) – 65 km | 65 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Surrey

The Omen 66.6 | 67 miles | June 06, 2015 | website

Worcestershire

Severn Path Ultra | 58 miles | May 30, 2015 | website

Severn Plod Ultra | 45 miles | May 29, 2015 | website

Severn Way Ultra | 58 miles | May 31, 2015 | website

USA

Alabama

Rockin Choccolocco 50K | 50 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Arizona

Adrenaline 65K Night Run | 65 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Solemates Arizona 200 | 214 miles | June 10, 2015 | website

Arkansas

War Eagle Tail Twister Trail 50k | 50 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

California

Loco 50K | 50 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Loco 50K | 50 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Rim to Rim Trail Run – 50M | 50 miles | June 06, 2015 | website

San Diego 100 Mile Endurance Run | 100 miles | June 06, 2015 | website

San Francisco 100 Mile Endurance Run | 100 miles | May 30, 2015 | website

San Francisco 50 Mile Endurance Run | 50 miles | May 30, 2015 | website

Shadow of the Giants 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Colorado

Ultimate Direction Dirty 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Florida

Help Support Us | 1000 miles | June 06, 2015 | website

Lake to Ocean 100K | 100 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Georgia

Rogue Yeti 50K Run | 50 kilometers | May 29, 2015 | website

Rogue Yeti 50 Mile Run | 50 miles | May 29, 2015 | website

Idaho

Scout Mountain Ultra Trail 100k | 100 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Scout Mountain Ultra Trail 60k | 60 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Iowa

Heartland Relay 200 | 205 miles | June 06, 2015 | website

Heartland Relay 75 | 75 miles | June 07, 2015 | website

Kansas

Flint Hills Trail 40 Mile | 40 miles | May 30, 2015 | website

Michigan

Yankee Springs Trail Double Marathon | 84 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

New Jersey

Mayapple 100K Trail Run | 100 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

Mayapple 50k Trail Run | 50 kilometers | May 30, 2015 | website

New York

Cayuga Trails 50 | 50 miles | May 31, 2015 | website

North Carolina

Bethel Hill Moonlight Boogie 50 Mile | 50 miles | June 06, 2015 | website

Ohio

Buckeye Buster 50 | 50 miles | June 06, 2015 | website

Buckeye Buster 50K | 50 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Mohican Trail 100M Trail Run | 100 miles | May 30, 2015 | website

Mohican Trail 50M Trail Run | 50 miles | May 30, 2015 | website

Oregon

Bend Beer Chase | 70 miles | June 06, 2015 | website

Rhode Island

Gloridays | 44 miles | June 07, 2015 | website

South Carolina

El Diablo | 220 kilometers | June 05, 2015 | website

Family Tree 100 Relay | 100 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Forest Freak 50k | 50 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Hell Hole Hundred – 100K | 100 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Hell Hole Hundred – 100M | 100 miles | June 06, 2015 | website

Hell Hole Hundred – 60K | 60 kilometers | June 05, 2015 | website

Knock on Wood 100 Mile | 100 miles | June 06, 2015 | website

Utah

Squaw Peak 50 Mile Trail Run | 50 miles | June 06, 2015 | website

Ultra Advantures Bryce Canyon 100 Mile | 100 miles | June 05, 2015 | website

Ultra Advantures Bryce Canyon 50K | 50 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Ultra Advantures Bryce Canyon 50 Mile | 50 miles | June 06, 2015 | website

Vermont

Coyote Scramble Ultras 40 Miler | 40 miles | May 30, 2015 | website

Virginia

Old Dominion 100 Cross Country Run | 100 miles | June 06, 2015 | website

Washington

Echo Valley 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | May 31, 2015 | website

Echo Valley 50 Mile Trail Run | 50 miles | May 31, 2015 | website

Rainier to Ruston 50K Ultra | 50 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Rainier to Ruston 50M Ultra | 50 miles | June 06, 2015 | website

Vashon Island 50K Ultramarathon | 50 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Washington D.C.

Race Across Virginia – Nation’s Capital (4 Marathons) | 114 miles | May 30, 2015 | website

Wisconsin

Kettle Moraine 100 km Trail Run | 100 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Kettle Moraine 100 Mile Trail Run | 100 miles | June 06, 2015 | website

Kettle Moraine 38 Mile Night Fun Run | 38 miles | June 06, 2015 | website

Kettle Moraine 50 km Trail Run | 50 kilometers | June 06, 2015 | website

Ragnar Relay Chicago | 194 miles | June 12, 2015 | website
 
CLOSE

 02:49:25

LINKS

ITunes http://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/talk-ultra/id497318073

Libsyn – feed://talkultra.libsyn.com/rss

Website – talkultra.com

IAU WORLD TRAIL CHAMPIONSHIPS – ANNECY 2015

Logo_20WChp_202015_20v10_20fnoir_20v4

The world trail championships are this coming weekend. Yes! This weekend. What, you mean the same weekend as Comrades? I am afraid so. So while Ellie Greenwood looks to do the double we are going to need to keep an eye on Annecy too… yes! But wait a minute, isn’t Sage Canaday and Max King also running at Comrades?

Yes.

Okay, okay, split screen computer screen required.

I joke of course and ironically while the World Trail Champs kick off in Annecy and Comrades kicks of in Durban, South Africa I will be in another part of SA at the Richtersveld Wildrun with Nikki Kimball, James Cracknell and a whole host of talented runners.

It’s going to be a busy weekend!

The last world championship was in the UK. Wales actually and it took part over a lapped course. Ricky Lightfoot won for the men and Nathalie Mauclair for the ladies.

This year, the Worlds takes place on a course that in my opinion is a proper trail running race. At 85km in length and with 5000+m of climbing the race should test the men and ladies from the boys and girls.

screenshot_524

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However, the race is not without controversy.

The race will take place on the Technica Maxi-Race course with two starts! Yes folks, the world championship race starts 90-minutes before the annual open race. Wait a minute! I thought trail running was all about being inclusive?

Well it would appear that I am not the only one thinking that way. Francois d’Haene (Salomon), unbeatable in 2014, made it quite clear that he would not race. Anna Frost today (28th May) posted this, and I quote:

I will not be at one of my favourite races – the Maxi-Race – because I do not want to support the IAAF movement in our sport.

The sport will officially become an international ‘athletic’ discipline at the IAAF conference in August and I believe that changes will be implemented to make trail running fit into the IAAF philosophy rather than following the values that our trail running community have created.

Don’t know what I am talking about? Here are some examples:
• You race to be part of a running community? To have an oportunity to line up with the best of the best? I do too! But that does not happen in this race. The elites will start seperatly to all of you. It is no longer an open race.
• You like the freedom to enter any trail race you want? I do too! But that does not happen in this race. I need to be selected. I can not race for the brand that supports me. And if I do, and I manage to get a podium finish time…I wont be on the podium.
• If you have done the race course before it was fabulous. But not in this race. They have changed the course to faster, easier, flatter trails for access. That does not inspire me.

Trail running is fun, we can share it with everyone from volunteers, supporters, family and friends. It is open, we are free and inspired!

Read this great post by Andy Symonds http://www.andysymonds.blogspot.co.uk/2015/05/trail-politics.html?m=1

So what we have is a world championship race, with selected individuals racing ahead (90 minutes) of the open race. But what if someone in the open race runs quicker than the world championship race? Unlikely I know but not impossible?

Annecy is an amazing place and quite the setting for a stunning race like this. It really is an adventure playground.

screenshot_523

Staring at 3:30am (really?) on Saturday May 30th the best in the world will do battle on the trails in and around Annecy.

Ricky Lightfoot, Max King, Anton Krupicka, Sage Canaday, Kilian Jornet, Rob Krar, Francois d’Haene, Michel Lanne, Jason Schlarb, Tofol Castanyer, Iker Karrera, Ryan Sandes, Emelie Forsberg, Nuria Picas, Anna Frost, Rory Bosio, Lizzy Hawker….

Will NOT toe the line.

So if this is a World Trail Championship race; who is running?

For the Ladies:

Nathalie Mauclair ©iancorless.com

Nathalie Mauclair is the reigning champ and will look to defend her title and I expect her to do well and more than likely win again.

©iancorless.com_Transgrancanaria15-6611

Caroline Chaverot had a great run at Transgrancanaria earlier this year placing 2nd and she placed top 5 at the Skyrunning world championships in Chamonix.

Aurelia Truel placed 2nd behind Mauclair in 2013 but I don’t think this course will allow her to make the podium.

Cassie Scallon on paper has the race speed for a great result but Annecy has its challenges that I am not sure Cassie will be prepared for.

Uxue Fraille would probably prefer this race to be longer; she will play the waiting game and then pick people off.

©iancorless.comIMG_4811

Maud Gobert, has great potential for victory, particularly on home soil. On her day she can make it happen, don’t rule her out!

Lisa Borzani also has some great results coming into this race, 2nd at Tor des Geants being one of them, but there is a big difference between TDG and 85km in Annecy.

Krissy Moehl, Anne Lise Rousset, Andrea Huser, Ester Alves, Lucy Bartholomew, Sally Fawcett, Simona Morbelli and many more will contest top honours but lets give out a shout to Brit Lizzie Wraith.

©iancorless.com_GL3D2015-6248

Lizzie is the Lakeland 100 course record holder and currently preparing for the Dragon’s Back Race. Notable runners missing from the UK are Jo Meek and Holly Rush. Prety darn sure had these ladies been fit they would have raced well.

 For the Men:

©iancorless.com_Transvulcania2015-8400

Luis Alberto Hernando well and truly heads up the men’s field after his recent victory at Transvulcania Ultramarathon and as we all know, over 80km he is the one to beat as he proved at the Skyrunning World Championships in Chamonix.

Tom Owens at Trofeo Kima

Tom Owens at Trofeo Kima

Tom Owens is back on form and although he may well prefer the marathon distance he has a great record of top results at 50-80km with podium places at Trofeo Kima and Ice Trail Tarentaise.

©iancorless.com-0271Kima2014_Manuel Merillas had a great 2014 and was a revelation and a hot-tip as a star for the future. At the recent Transvulcania he detonated and moved from top 5 to outside the top 15. Showing incredible recovery, just one week later Manuel made the podium at Zegama-Aizkorri. I do wonder though if 85km is outside his race at the moment.

Alex Nichols ©iancorless.com

Alex Nichols is a fast guy and on his day, he recently beat Rob Krar at MoabRed Hot and he placed 3rd at Templiers in 2014. No stranger to racing Europe on the Skyrunning circuit. Alex may well make an impact at the front.

tnfutmb 2013 ©iancorless.com

UTMB winner Xavier Thevenard has seriously blown hot and cold over the last couple of years. He did win the TDS last year and in doing so became the only runner to win CCC, TDS and UTMB. Racing on French soil must have his passions and desire to do well very high, but maybe they will be too high?

©iancorless.com_Transgrancanaria15-4233

Gediminas Grinius nailed Transgrancanaria recently and that is backed up by an incredible series of results and races in 2014. I can’t help but think though that he will probably just be getting warm as the finish arrives!

©iancorless.com_Transvulcania2015-8640

Dani Garcia just rocked the field at  Transvulcania with 2nd place ahead of serious competition so who knows what he can do in Annecy. A real surprise package.

Kim Collison at Mourne Skyline MTR

Kim Collison at Mourne Skyline MTR

Kim Collison from the UK may also turn some heads. He will certainly be off the radar but he has the background to do well. He won the British Trail Championships, the Mourne Skyline MTR and as an adventure races and fell runner he is one of the best in the world.

Patrik Bringer has solid results at Transvulcania (5th in 2013) and has been on the podium in Annecy before, so he knows what he needs to do, always an advantage.

Julien Rancon, Fabien Antolinus (won Templiers, 2nd at Ice Trail and 2nd in Annecy – one to watch) and Sylvain Court head up the local French talent and then we have Pablo Vila, Iain Ridgway, David Laney, Paul Giblin, Eirik Haugsness and a whole host of other talent that will be looking to take top honours.

©iancorless.com_Transgrancanaria15-6833

In particular I think the Norwegian entries will make a few people turn their heads. They often fly under the radar but Lars-Erik Skjerveihm and Didrik Hermansen (2nd at Transgrancanaria) will rock the top end of the race.

©iancorless.com_TCC2015_Day6-2854

But the complete dark horse may well be Iain Don-Wauchope from South Africa. He is a complete unknown in Europe and having watched him race in SA and in Costa Rica, he is the real deal and if his travel goes well, watch out!

 Race website HERE

 You can follow the racing HERE live

News and reports on FACEBOOK HERE, TWITTER HERE, INSTAGRAM HERE

*Please note, the opinions of those who boycott the IAU World Championships are provided to give a perspective why some key names are missing from the competition. Anna Frost has vocalised those viewpoints and we provide them to provide information. This is in no way meant to distract from the ability of those who will race. We fully acknowledge to represent your country is a great honour.

The North Face Ultra Cardiac Trail Running Shoe Review

©iancorless.com_TNFUltraCardiac-7004

In recent years, The North Face have continually been improving their run shoes. Foe me, the Ultra Guide was a stand out shoe and it was a shoe that friends and readers of this website also enjoyed. The upper held the foot well the shoe was cushioned but not too cushioned, it had an 8mm drop and it was ideal for those longer days on the trail and the grip worked well on dry trail, rocks and and muddy (not too muddy) trail/ rocks. It was a winner!

When I heard about the Ultra MT shoe for 2015 I was excited. I thought this shoe would be a step up from the Ultra Guide and the new incarnation would be even better. I have to say, when I first got the Ultra MT I was impressed. Vibram sole, tough durable upper, great toe protection, good grip and so on…. the running experience for me though did not live up to the look of the shoe or my expectations. I did several runs in them looking for that glimmer of hope but for me they just didn’t do it. Sorry TNF but I just didn’t like them. They lacked life, responsiveness and they made my runs feel flat.

I was disappointed! The Ultra Guide would no longer be made and I thought the Ultra MT was the replacement! But then I got hold of the Ultra Cardiac.

All is forgiven TNF!

The Ultra Cardiac is the shoe I was hoping for. It has taken all that was good in the Ultra Guide, tweaked and fine tuned it and what we now have is a rock solid trail running shoe with good cushioning, a grippy Vibram sole and a plush feel when running.

The Shoe

©iancorless.com_TNFUltraCardiac-7018

 

First off, this is a good looking shoe. Okay let me clarify, this is a good looking show in my opinion! Looks are personal but the Ultra Cardiac ticks all the boxes for me. Although on paper, Quill Blue and Acid Yellow may not sound appealing. Visually it works especially with the addition of a good dose of black. You can’t go wrong with black.

©iancorless.com_TNFUltraCardiac-7034

True to size, I have a UK 9 and it fits exceptionally well, holds the foot firm, hugs the heel well with no rubbing, slipping or movement and the toe box is roomy but not ‘too’ roomy. At 301g/ 10.6oz for a UK 9 (UK 8 is 272g) the shoe is certainly comparable to the competition. Cushioning is plush with 20mm at the rear and 12mm at the front. This provides an 8mm drop (difference between front and back) that is definitely becoming the ‘norm’ in the trail running world. It used to be difficult to find a 6mm or 8mm drop shoe, now you have loads to choose from and 11mm/12mm drop shoes are becoming harder to find. In principal that is a good thing but lets be clear here, although we may be (to coin a phrase) ‘Born to Run’ not everyone should be running in low drop and minimalist shoes.

©iancorless.com_TNFUltraCardiac-7009

For me, 6mm and 8mm drop shoes really do provide a sweet spot for running and particularly when running long. They allow you a more natural feel (mid to forefoot) but also allow you a more relaxed foot strike (mid to heel) and comfort when you get tired. As mentioned, there is nor shortage of shoes with 6/8mm drop so although it’s not possible to compare like-for-like you may want to consider the following:

  • Salomon Sense Mantra 3 (HERE) 15mm/ 9mm has less cushioning, 6mm drop, very wide toe box, plush ride and all the wonderfrul ‘Sense’ attributes. A favourite of mine.
  • inov-8 Race Ultra 290 (HERE) 10mm/ 18mm has been a disappointment. Initially I liked the feel of it but over prolonged running I found the shoe sloppy, it lacked feel and responsiveness and it didn’t hold my heel. I know many out in run land who love the Race Ultra in the 290 and 270 versions (I don’t like the 270 either) so it may just be me.
  • Kinabalu Supertrac (HERE) 21mm/ 29mm is a really beefy cushioned shoe with serious grip. To be honest, it’s the odd one out here as the Ultra Cardia, Mantra 3 and Race Ultra all have similar outsoles whereas the Supertrac is all about grip!

Believe me, these are not the only shoes available at 6/8mm drop, but the above will give you a start point.

I have real confidence in recommending the Ultra Cardiac to anyone. It really is a great shoe that is well suited to everyday runs, dry trail races and even some road. This is not a muddy trail shoe, it can handle some wet stuff and even a little mud in places but the Vibram outsole is all about gripping dry trail, rocks and yes, wet rocks.

©iancorless.com_TNFUltraCardiac-7011

The upper is breathable and uses Ultra Airmesh and FlashDry™ to keep you cool and dry. It works! I found on repeated runs in warm weather that my feet didn’t over heat or expand. A sure sign that the upper is doing the job it is meant too.

©iancorless.com_TNFUltraCardiac-7038

The tongue is loose and well padded. After using attached tongues in other shoes and the Salomon Endofit I am always a little wary now when I see a tongue not attached to the shoe at the sides. To me it just makes sense! Rest assured. The Ultra Guide tongue was comfortable and had little side movement.

©iancorless.com_TNFUltraCardiac-7028

The heel box is well padded, curved and holds everything in place with no rubbing. It gets a big thumbs up.

©iancorless.com_TNFUltraCardiac-7021

Toe box has some protection with the outsole extending up the front of the shoe and then you have a reinforced area of blue and black. It’s minimal protection!

©iancorless.com_TNFUltraCardiac-7036

On the side of the shoe you can see the reinforcement to hold the foot in place and this does a great job without adding any restriction. The most notable areas are the yellow sections on the sole.

©iancorless.com_TNFUltraCardiac-7025

At the front you have EVA to give that plush feel on the trail and at the rear the ‘Cradle’ is designed to keep ones heel in place. I find it hard to be objective on the Cradle. Certainly my foot was held secure in the shoe and I had a very precise and controlled feel with the ground. However, I do strike mid to forefoot and therefore the Cradle may have to do less work for me?

©iancorless.com_TNFUltraCardiac-7041

The sole is made by Vibram so it’s fair to say that it works! The sole has no cut away so effectively it is one flat piece which gives a great reassurance on the trail. What I like about this shoe is its ability to switch from road to trail easily. It isn’t a road-to-trail shoe but it does a great job. The outsole is not aggressive but it does have lugs and it works on dry trail with loose debris such as rocks, stones, shale, pebbles and so on exceptionally well.

©iancorless.com_TNFUltraCardiac-7017

On rocks, the Vibram grips and provides reassurance even in the wet. When the trail gets muddy you are going to loose grip and this is where my comparisons with the old Ultra Guide leaves me just a tad disappointed. The new ULTRA MT has a sole that was similar to the old Ultra Guide. Don’t get me wrong, this new Ultra Cardiac is a great dry trail shoe and it’s a shoe I will use a great deal. But for me, TNF can you please but the Ultra MT outsole on the Cardiac upper and then you will have two great trail shoes for mixed conditions.

©iancorless.com_TNFUltraCardiac-7044

Summary

TNF have repeatedly had a mixed reputation when it came to running shoes. The Ultra Guide changed that and many hailed that shoe as a real step forward. The Ultra Trail shoe was also well received and it’s a shoe I still use for dry fast trail. The Ultra MT was a step back (in my opinion) and I was seriously concerned after several outings in them. However, the Ultra Cardiac has changed all that. The ‘Cardiac’ (I still question that name!) is a great shoe and one that I would gladly purchase and run in regularly. The cushioning is plush and I would say that if you need some added comfort on longer runs or races, this shoe would be well worth considering. As the name suggests, it would make a great ultra shoe.

Pros:

Cushioning is excellent

Vibram sole

8mm drop

Padded heel box and Tongue

Cons:

Toe box protection is minimal

Tongue not attached to the sides

The North Face say:

Featuring a breathable FlashDry™ upper and Vibram® outsole, this lightweight-yet-protective performance trail runner delivers an exceptionally smooth ride over the toughest of terrain. With its traction and balance enhancing full-length Vibram® outsole and fast-drying and cool Ultra Airmesh upper, this trail running shoe screams speed and comfort with maximum support. Read the full product feature list below.

FEATURES

  • Ultra Airmesh and FlashDry™ keep you cool and dry
  • Zonal protection in the heel and toe
  • Pebax® heel CRADLE™ for proper heel positioning and support
  • Luxurious cushioning in the collar lining and tongue for a comfortable fit
  • 20 mm heel /12 mm forefoot
  • EVA underfoot
  • Vibram® full-length outsole engineered for optimal traction and balance
  • 8 mm offset
  • Approximate Weight: 548 g (pair) *based on Men’s 8

RUNNING BEYOND – A new book announcement

Cover

Multiple meetings, trips backwards and forwards to London and I am pleased to say that I can now announce that I will have a new book available in late (September tbc) 2016.

It has been a long term dream to find the backing of a publisher and I am pleased to say that Aurum Press Ltd (Here) have had the trust to allow me to produce a book on a sport I love through photography and words.

An added bonus is that Kilian Jornet has agreed to write the foreword.

A work in progress, I anticipate some long days and nights as I evolve this project. I hope through imagery and words it will be an inspiration to those who look at it and read it.

Grubby pages with repeated use, I’d like to see multiple ‘post it’ notes marking races for future ‘bucket lists’ and most of all I hope it will be a book that allows you to dream.

Wish me luck as I put this together. Many thanks for the continued support and most importantly, thanks to Aurum Press Ltd, Kilian Jornet and all the wonderful races and people around the world who have afforded me the opportunity to make a dream a reality.

Ian

*Please note the cover is just an illustration. I anticipate a new cover for the actual book.

 

Episode 86 – Browning Yates Cracknell Barnes

Ep86

Episode 86 of Talk Ultra is a packed show. We speak with Jeff Browning about victrory at the controversial Ultra fiord. Michele Yates provides a great Talk Training by discussing running and pregnancy. We also catch up with Elisabet Barnes and James Cracknell who ran impressive times at London Marathon. The News, a Blog, Up and Coming Races and Speed Golf Karl Meltzer is back!
00:15:22 NEWS
 
Help Nepal – Nepal images ‘FACES of NEPAL’ – order a print and all funds donated to Nepal charities http://iancorless.org/2015/04/28/nepal-appeal-nepalearthquake/
 
3-Peaks UK
Ricky Lightfoot 2:51
Andrew Davies 2:53
Andrew Fallas 2:57
Helen Bonsor 3:27
Anna Lupton 3:34
Caitlin Rice 3:39
Fellsman UK
Adam Perry 10:23
Jez Bragg 10:44
Konrad Rawlik 10:57
Jasmin Paris 11:09 CR
Mary Gillie 13:02
Carol Morgan 14:13
Highland Fling
Matt Laye 7:04
Paul Navesy 7:06
Donnie Campbell 7:17 one week after winning Iznik Ultra
Rachel Campbell 8:42
Caroline McKay 8:55
Nicole Adams Hendry 8:59
Iznik Ultra

130km

Donnie Campbell 13:23:50
Mahmut Yavuz 14:31:20
Aykut Celikbas 14:48:29
Zoe Salt 15:14:37
Mariyla Niklova 19:29:45
Ingrid Qualizza 19:43:49

80km

Emmanuel Gault 6:45:25
Girondel Benoit 7:26:10
Tanzer Dursun 8:40:36
Alessia De Matteis 9:03:53
ElenaPolyakova 10:48:57
Coraline Chapatte 11:34:37
46km *update to results 21st April – unfortunately Jose De Pablo received a time penalty as he did not carry mandatory kit, new results are in bold.
Jose De Pablo 4:03:29 *Benoit Laval 4:19:03
Benoit Laval 4:19:03 *Duygun Yurteri 4:28:15
Duygun Yurteri 4:28:15 *Jose De Pablo 4:28:29
Catarina Scamelli 5:03:44
Ziliz Cancilar 5:04:55
Martine Nolan 5:09:44
Ultrafijord full results Here
100mile
Jeff Browning 24:25:39
Candice Burt 37:12:15
100k
Fernando Nazario de Rezende 16:50:20
Krissy Moehl 19:31:27
70k
Xavier Thevenard 8:46:00
Manuela Vilaseca 11:45:00
Transvulcania is next week!
 
London Marathon
MDS ladies winner Elisabet Barnes ran sub 3 (just) and we caught up with her on her post MDS run and as she prepares for running in Menorca – http://www.trailmenorca.com
00:36:07 INTERVIEW
 
Elisabet Barnes
Also running at VLM was Olympian James Cracknell who ran 2:50 as he prepares for Richterveld Wildrun in South Africa and Badwater
 
00:48:28 INTERVIEW
 
James Cracknell
00:58:31 BLOG
 
01:00:34 INTERVIEW
 
Jeff Browning recently won the Ultra fiord race. It was a race not without controversy… we just had to catch up and find out all about it!
 
02:05:03 TALK TRAINING
 
Michele Yates talks all about pregnancy, running and how you come back to not only running but racing and winning just months after giving birth!
02:41:35 UP & COMING RACES

Australia

New South Wales

WildEndurance 100km Team Challenge | 100 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

WildEndurance 50km Team Challenge | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

WildEndurance event | 100 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Northern Territory

TRACK Outback Race | 520 kilometers | May 06, 2015 | website

Queensland

Mt Mee Classic Trail 66 km Teams race | 66 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

The Great Wheelbarrow Race – Mareeba to Dimbulah | 104 kilometers | May 15, 2015 | website

Victoria

Wilsons Prom 100 – 100km | 100 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Wilsons Prom 100 – 60 km | 60 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Wilsons Prom 100 – 80 km | 80 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Austria

Über Drüber UltraMarathon | 63 kilometers | May 14, 2015 | website

Canada

Alberta

Run for the Braggin’ Rights | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Run for the Braggin’ Rights – Relay | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

British Columbia

Island Runner Elk/Beaver Ultras – 100K | 100 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Island Runner Elk/Beaver Ultras – 50K | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Island Runner Elk/Beaver Ultras – 50 Miles | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

The North Face Dirty Feet Kal Park 50 | 50 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

Ontario

Seaton Trail 50 km Trail | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Chile

Atacama Xtreme 100 Miles | 100 miles | May 15, 2015 | website

Atacama Xtreme 50 km | 50 kilometers | May 15, 2015 | website

Atacama Xtreme 50 Miles | 50 miles | May 15, 2015 | website

China

Trail de la Grande Muraille de Chine | 73 kilometers | May 08, 2015 | website

Denmark

Hovedstaden

Salomon Hammer Trail Bornholm -100 Miles | 100 miles | May 01, 2015 | website

Salomon Hammer Trail Bornholm – 50 km | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Salomon Hammer Trail Bornholm – 50 miles | 50 miles | May 01, 2015 | website

France

Ardèche

Trail l’Ardéchois – 57 km | 57 kilometers | May 01, 2015 | website

Ultra Trail l’Ardéchois | 98 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Drôme

Challenge du Val de Drôme | 148 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Les Aventuriers de la Drôme | 65 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Les Aventuriers du Bout de Drôme | 105 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Haute-Loire

Ultra Techni Trail de Tiranges | 50 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

Nord

100 km de Steenwerck | 100 kilometers | May 14, 2015 | website

Oise

Trail’Oise – 60 km | 60 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

Pyrénées-Atlantiques

Euskal Trails – Ultra Trail | 130 kilometers | May 15, 2015 | website

Trail des Villages | 80 kilometers | May 15, 2015 | website

Trail Gourmand | 50 kilometers | May 15, 2015 | website

Rhône

Ultra des Coursières | 103 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Savoie

Nivolet – Revard | 51 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Seine-Maritime

Tour du Pays de Caux | 88 kilometers | May 14, 2015 | website

Yonne

The Trail 110 | 110 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

The Trail 63 | 65 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

The Trail 85 | 85 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Germany

Baden-Württemberg

Stromberg Extrem 54,4 KM | 54 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

Rhineland-Palatinate

Bärenfels 50 km Trail | 50 kilometers | May 01, 2015 | website

Saar-Hunsrück-Supertrail | 128 kilometers | May 14, 2015 | website

Saarland

RAG-Hartfüßler – Trail 58 km | 58 kilometers | May 10, 2015 | website

Schleswig-Holstein

Steinburg – Ultra – Marathon 50 km | 50 kilometers | May 14, 2015 | website

Thuringia

GutsMuths-Rennsteiglauf Super Marathon | 72 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | websiteGreece

Doliho Ultra-Marathon | 255 kilometers | May 01, 2015 | website

Euchidios Athlos 107.5 Km | 107 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Euchidios Hyper-Athlos 215 km | 215 kilometers | May 08, 2015 | website

Indonesia

Volcans de l’Extrême | 164 kilometers | May 07, 2015 | website

Ireland

Munster

The Irish Trail 60 km | 60 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

The Irish Trail 85 km | 85 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Italy

Liguria

Gran Trail Rensen | 62 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

Lombardy

Laggo Maggiore Trail | 52 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

UMS Ultramaratona Milano Sanremo | 280 kilometers | May 01, 2015 | website

Sardinia

Sardinia Trail | 90 kilometers | May 08, 2015 | website

Kazakhstan

Tengri Ultra Trail 50 km | 50 kilometers | May 10, 2015 | website

Madagascar

Semi Trail des Ô Plateaux | 65 kilometers | May 01, 2015 | website

Ultra Trail des Ô Plateaux | 130 kilometers | May 01, 2015 | website

Malta

Eco Gozo Ultra 55k | 55 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Martinique

Tchimbé Raid | 91 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Mauritius

Royal Raid 80 km | 80 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Mayotte

Mahoraid | 70 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Poland

Portugal

Ultra-Trail de Sesimbra | 60 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

Spain

Andalusia

La Legión 101 km | 101 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Balearic Islands

Trail Menorca Cami de Cavalls | 185 kilometers | May 15, 2015 | website

Trail Menorca Cami de Cavalls Costa Nord | 100 kilometers | May 15, 2015 | website

Basque Country

Apuko Long Trail – 65 Km | 60 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Ultra Trail Apuko Extreme | 90 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Canary Islands

Transvulcania Ultramaratón | 73 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Castile and León

101 Peregrinos | 101 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Madrid

Sunrise Trail Ultra International | 68 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Valencian Community

CSP-115 | 118 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

MIM Marató i Mitja | 63 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Switzerland

Berne

Bielersee XXL 100 Meilen | 100 miles | May 15, 2015 | website

United Kingdom

Argyll and Bute

Kintyre Way Ultra Run | 66 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Kintyre Way Ultra Run – Tayinloan – Campbeltown | 35 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

County of Pembrokeshire

Coastal Trail Series – Pembrokeshire – Ultra | 34 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Greater London

Thames Path 100 | 100 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Hampshire

XNRG Pony Express Ultra | 60 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Isle of Wight

Isle of Wight Challenge | 106 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Isle of Wight Challenge – Half Island | 56 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Oxfordshire

T60 Nigh Race | 60 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Wiltshire

Marlborough Downs Challenge – 33 mile | 33 miles | May 10, 2015 | website

Worcestershire

Malvern Hills 105 Mile Ultra | 105 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Malvern Hills 34 Mile Ultra | 34 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Malvern Hills 44 Mile Ultra | 44 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Malvern Hills 52 Mile Ultra | 53 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

USA

Alabama

Run for Kids Challenge 50K Trail Race | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Arizona

Sinister Night 54K Trail Run | 54 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

California

Armstrong Redwoods 50K | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Badwater Salton Sea | 81 miles | May 03, 2015 | website

Canyons 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Cinderella Trail Run 50 km (May) | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Golden Gate Relay | 191 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Gold Rush 50K | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Me-Ow Quads | 104 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Me-Ow Siamese | 42 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Miwok 100K Trail Race | 100 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Nirvana Ultra Big Bear 100K | 100 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Nirvana Ultra Big Bear 100 Mile | 100 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Nirvana Ultra Big Bear 50K | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Nirvana Ultra Big Bear 50 Mile | 50 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

PCT50 Trail Run | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Quicksilver 100K Endurance Run | 100 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Quicksilver 50K Endurance Run | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Whoos in El Moro Race Spring Edition 50K | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Wild Wild West 50K Ultra | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Colorado

Cimarron 50k Endurance Run | 50 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

Collegiate Peaks 50M Trail Run | 50 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Falcon 50 | 50 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Greenland Trail 50k | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Quad Rock 50 | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Florida

Palm Bluff Trail Race and Ultra “Margaritas & Manure” 50K | 50 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

Palm Bluff Trail Race and Ultra “Margaritas & Manure” 50M | 50 miles | May 03, 2015 | website

Georgia

Cruel Jewel 100 | 100 miles | May 15, 2015 | website

Cruel Jewel 50 Mile Race | 50 miles | May 15, 2015 | website

Wildwood Games – 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

Indiana

DWD Gnaw Bone 50K | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

DWD Gnaw Bone 50M | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Kansas

Heartland 50 Mile Spring Race | 50 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Rock On! Lake Perry 50K | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Maine

Big A 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Massachusetts

Ragnar Relay Cape Cod | 186 miles | May 08, 2015 | website

Wapack and Back Trail Races 50 Miles | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Nevada

50K | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

50M | 50 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Ride the Wind 100M | 100 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Ride the Wind 50M | 50 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

New Jersey

3 Days at the Fair – 50K | 50 kilometers | May 14, 2015 | website

New Mexico

Cactus to Cloud Trail 50K Run | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

New York

Long Island Greenbelt Trail 50k | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Rock The Ridge 50-Mile Endurance Challenge | 50 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

The North Face Endurance Challenge New York 50k | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

The North Face Endurance Challenge New York 50 Mile | 50 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

North Carolina

OBX Ultramarathon | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Race Across North Carolina – Border to Border (10 Marathons) | 267 miles | May 13, 2015 | website

Race Across North Carolina – Heart of NC (4 Marathons) | 106 miles | May 13, 2015 | website

Ohio

50’s For Yo Momma 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

50’s For Yo Momma 50 Mile Trail Run | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Oregon

McDonald Forest 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Smith Rock Ascent 50K | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Pennsylvania

Glacier Ridge Trail Ultramarathon – 50K | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Glacier Ridge Trail Ultramarathon – 50 Miles | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Rhode Island

Rhode Island Red 50K | 50 kilometers | May 10, 2015 | website

Rhode Island Red 50M | 50 miles | May 10, 2015 | website

South Carolina

Oconee 50k | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Race Across South Carolina – Border to Border (4 Marathons) | 123 miles | May 07, 2015 | website

Wambaw Swamp Stomp 50 Miler Trail Run and Relay | 50 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Xterra Myrtle Beach 50 km Trail Run | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Tennessee

Rock/Creek Thunder Rock 100 Mile Trail Race | 100 miles | May 15, 2015 | website

Strolling Jim 40 Mile Run | 40 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Utah

Red Rock Relay Moab Edition | 63 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Vermont

PEAK Ultra Marathon – 200 Miles | 200 miles | May 14, 2015 | website

PEAK Ultra Marathon – 500 Miles | 500 miles | May 07, 2015 | website

Virginia

Biffledinked 10 x 5k | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Biffledinked 10 x 5k 2 Person Relay | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Singletrack Maniac 50k Trail Run | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Washington

Grand Ridge 50K Trail Run (May) | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Lost Lake 50K | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Washington D.C.

Relay | 150 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Wisconsin

Ice Age Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Ice Age Trail 50M | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

02:47:50 CLOSE
02:51:20
LINKS:

What is Trail Running…?

What is Trail Running?

It’s a simple question huh, ‘What is Trail Running…?’

But for you, me and all those people you know and share the trails with, the answers are different. For some it’s peace, others it’s serenity and yes, it can be an escape! But what is trail running for you?

Read what others think trail running is on RUNULTRA and why not contribute your own thoughts by adding to this page or the RUNULTRA page (here).

Read the full article HERE

run-ultra-logo

Race Day Nutrition (Part Four) – Marc Laithwaite

©iancorless.com_MDS2015Day1-9809

So last week (part three HERE) we discussed carbohydrate absorption and the role of insulin, this week, we are going to look at how to take foods on board whilst competing, to avoid stomach problems and maximise performance.

I’m having issues getting energy, what’s the solution?

Your stomach and gut acts a little like a sieve. If you pour water into it, the water passes straight through without any problems. If you pour a milkshake into the same sieve, it will pass through, but will take a little more time and will slowly drip. If you throw solid food into a sieve, it stays exactly where it is. The only way to pass solid food through a sieve would be to mix it up with water and make a thin enough solution, which could then start to drip through.

The solution which enters your stomach, is therefore very important in terms of performance. During endurance events, we eat and drink to get energy, but if the food sits in your stomach, then you aren’t actually getting any energy into your bloodstream. Not only are you receiving less energy, you are also likely to get some kind of stomach problems.

Isotonic is just the tonic

Isotonic refers to a solution which is a similar concentration to fluids in the body. Solutions of 7% are generally referred to as isotonic, this means that 7g of carbohydrate in 100ml of water is isotonic. You can count grams and millilitres as the same thing, so the calculation is simple, 100ml / 7g = 7%.

Drinks bottles generally come in 2 different sizes, 500ml and 750ml so based on the 100ml / 7g rule, the calculations would be as follows:

500ml water + 35g carbohydrate = Isotonic

750ml water + 52.5g carbohydrate = Isotonic

Some solutions are less concentrated than isotonic fluids. For example, water has no carbohydrate in it and no calories, this is classed as hypotonic (hypo = low / less than). Solutions which are more concentrated than isotonic fluids, are classed as hypertonic (hyper = high / more than). An example of a hypertonic solution would be a smoothie.

That’s fine for drinks but what about solid food?

Many athletes choose to eat solid food during their event. As stated above, anything which is above 7% solution is hypertonic. Therefore, all energy bars and solid food is hypertonic. This means that if you wish to absorb solid food effectively, you must add sufficient water to make a 7% solution. For example, a standard energy bar is approximately 50-60g in total weight. We said earlier that 7g in 100ml of fluid would be a 7% solution, so that means you would have to drink 7-800ml of water with each energy bar to make at isotonic solution (56g is 7% of 800ml). In ultra running events, there’s often solid food such as sandwiches at feed stations, so get into the habit of estimating the portion size, e.g. what does 60g of cheese sandwich look like! Eating sandwiches, pasta and cake can very quickly result in a large mass of food gathering in your stomach. As for gels, they work the same way. A single gel contains 20-30g of carbohydrate (you need to read the packet). A gel with 21g would require 300ml to make a 7% solution.

Why is solution an issue?

Taking energy bars, gels and other solid food provides energy, but you have to take a lot of fluid to create an isotonic solution in your stomach. If you fail to take sufficient fluid you will have a thick ‘hypertonic’ solution in your stomach which may not digest and may well lead to stomach problems.

Don’t forget the 60g per hour rule

As we’ve said in previous blogs, it’s unlikely that you can absorb more than 60g per hour of carbohydrate so eating too much food can have a negative impact upon digestion. Eating too much may lead to food gathering in the stomach and leading to feelings of bloating or sickness. The carbohydrate ‘maltodextrin’ seems particularly prone to doing this and all carbohydrate drinks and gels tend to consist of maltodextrin (pretty much every energy drink on the market is the same, it’s flavoured maltodextrin).

It’s known that when you get an accumulation of carbohydrate in the stomach, due to excess food intake, the body is forced to dilute the solution. The strong solution sitting in the stomach starts to draw water other parts of the the body, into the stomach, to dilute the solution and aid digestion and absorption. This action of drawing fluid into the stomach is termed ‘osmosis’.

It’s important to remember that if you do take too much energy, coupled with a lack of fluid, not only are you likely to get stomach issues, the energy will also fail to reach your blood stream and exercising muscles where it is needed. In simple terms, more food may provide you with less energy.

Practical advice:

  1. You need to stick to the 60g limit for carbohydrate intake
  2. A solution of 7% is not always attainable, aim for 10% as a minimum start point for intake:

60g energy powder + 600ml water per hour
60g energy bar + 600ml water per hour
60g of gels (2-3) + 600ml water per hour

  1. You can mix the above, e.g. 30g carbohydrate powder and 30g gels every hour, plus 600ml of water.
  2. Think about what’s the easiest to calculate and what the easiest to obtain during the event. Knowing how much energy is in drinks which are handed up at aid stations or adding your own powder on the go is not really feasible so gels and bars are often simpler to use and to quantify. In truth, you really have no idea what’s being handed up in the drinks bottles, so water is always the safe option.
  3. Feeding is easier when cycling compared to running, so if you’re doing Ironman triathlon, the bike feeding is critical to set you up for the run. If you’re running an ultra, the slower pace can help, but little and often applies.
  4. Little and frequent works best for digestion. A gel every 20-30 minutes or half a bar every 30 minutes is better than a full bar every hour. You still need to drink the correct amount of water to account for solution.
  5. Drinking water only with bars and gels has the benefits of ‘freshening your mouth’. Energy drinks, gels and bars can leave you with a constant sticky taste.

What about the food content?

There is circumstantial evidence to suggest that eating too much carbohydrate may also impact upon digestion and potential stomach problems. If you are prone to stomach issues, then gels with a higher fat content may well work best. There are some very scientific high fat gels on the market, mainly in the US, but if you Google for peanut butter flavour gels, that’s a simple option and you can easily get those in the UK. If you don’t like peanut butter flavour, there’s not much option!

The final step

Ok, so here’s your homework. Go and purchase gels or bars, which you intend to use for your event and take a look at the wrapper. What’s the total weight in grams of the product and what does the content add up to? Remember, a gel may have added water, so a 40g gel may contain 20g of carbohydrate. Don’t just use the actual product weight, you need to check the weight of the ingredients and use that as your gauge. Work out how many you will need and how often you will eat them. If your event uses specific products e.g. Ironman use Powerbar, it’s a lot easier to use these on the day and save yourself the hassle of carrying a lot of product.

Hydration?

That’s coming next week

About Marc:

Sports Science lecturer for 10 years at St Helens HE College.

2004 established The Endurance Coach LTD sports science and coaching business. Worked with British Cycling as physiology support 2008-2008. Previous Triathlon England Regional Academy Head Coach, North West.

In 2006 established Epic Events Management LTD. Now one of the largest event companies in the NW, organising a range of triathlon, swimming and cycling events. EPIC EVENTS also encompasses Montane Trail 26 and Petzl Night Runner events.

In 2010 established Montane Lakeland 50 & 100 LTD. This has now become the UKs leading ultra distance trail running event.

In 2010 established The Endurance Store triathlon, trail running and open water swimming store. Based in Appley Bridge, Wigan, we are the North West’s community store, organising and supporting local athletes and local events.

Check out the endurance store HERE

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Race Day Nutrition (Part Two) – Marc Laithwaite

©iancorless.com_TCC2015_Day1-9778

So last week (Part One Here)we finished by talking about how many calories you use during an event and how to make a quick calculation of fat and carbohydrate contributions. To recap, we said:

80/20: If you are struggling to ride 50 miles / run 15 miles even when fuelling yourself throughout, then apply the 80/20 rule. That means 80% of your fuel is carbohydrate and 20% is fat.

65/35: If you can ride 50 miles / run 15 miles comfortably using fuel, then apply the 65/35 rule. That means 65% of your fuel is carbohydrate and 20% is fat.

50/50: If you can ride 50 miles / run 15 miles comfortably without using any fuel whatsoever, then apply the 50/50 rule. That means 50% of your fuel is carbohydrate and 50% is fat.

Let’s give ourselves a simple scenario. Tom is 43, weighs 82 kg and is racing Ironman triathlon, he falls into the 65/35 category and his main objective is to complete the event without major disaster and to run as much of the marathon as possible. When Tom is riding at his Ironman pace, he is using 820 Kcal per hour, so the calculation works like this:

Fat contribution:  820 Kcal x 35% = 287 Kcal

Carbohydrate contribution: 820 Kcal x 65% = 533 Kcal

Step 1: Discard the Fat

The calories which come from fat do not need to be replaced, even the leanest athlete has ample fat stores for the longest endurance events. Step 1 is therefore to discard the Kcal from fat and focus on the carbohydrate contribution. Carbohydrates is the fuel which must be replaced!

Step 2: Focus on the carbohydrate

For Tom, our calculated figure is 533 Kcal of carbohydrate per hour, so this is our target to replace during the ride. It’s often easier to work in grams as most foods are also measured in grams. Each gram of carbohydrate contains 4 Kcal, so we calculate grams of carbohydrate as follows:

533 Kcal per hour / 4 = 133 grams per hour

Step 3: Apply the maximal intake rule

You may remember from the last couple of weeks, we discussed that the maximum amount of carbohydrate you can take during exercise is 60g per hour. Tom is using 133 grams per hour (just to clarify, that’s not excessive and is realistic). If the maximum Tom can take is 60g per hour, that means there’s 73 grams (133-60) that he’s losing and can’t be replaced every hour.

Step 4: Work out the race total

Tom’s bike time is estimated to be 6.5 hours. If he’s losing 73 grams of carbohydrate per hour which can’t be replaced, what does that add up to over the total bike ride? Well, the calculation is simple: 6.5 x 73 = 474.5 grams. That means that Tom will lose 474.5 grams of carbohydrate, which he can’t replace, by the end of the 6.5 hour bike ride.

Step 5: Work out your time to collapse

The big figure missing here is the actual amount you have got stored in your body, is losing 474.5 grams a big problem? The average human stores 400 grams of carbohydrate stored in the muscles,  and 100g is stored in the liver. There’s also approx 25g circulating in your blood at any given time. For the astute amongst you, the problem has already struck you squarely between the eyes. Tom, sadly, will not be running the majority of the Ironman marathon.

Does this happen in the real world?

Definitely, take a look at the photo below. This is some data for an Ironman athlete taken this week, male veteran, approx 68 kg with a long history of endurance competition. There’s 12 minutes of data on the screen, the first column shows the power output (watts) and the third column shows time in minutes. Prior to this the rider warmed up for 10 minutes at 100-120 watts. Now look at columns 11, 13 and 14 on the far right hand side, they show Kcal per hour, fat% and carbohydrate%. Consider that 120/150/170 watts is not high intensity, despite that and the previous warm up, you can see that the carbohydrate use is very high. Take into account that our athlete is only 68 kg and that Kcal per hour will be greater in larger athletes.

IMG_0534

Would these fugures be similar for running?

Yes, pretty much. The Kcal usage is slightly higher when running at a similar intensity, but the fat usage tends to be a little higher also. I’d suggest that the fat usage is slightly higher as running requires less ‘fast twitch’ fibre contribution, cycling requires a cretain amount of ‘stregth’. Running intensity also tends to be a bit more consistent. Cycling can be hard on the uphill and then rest and freewheel on the downhill, but running is less so.

Should Tom withdraw his entry right now?

Hang on… we know that people can ride the full Ironman bike and then run the marathon. We also know that people run 100 miles, so there’s got to be a catch, these calculations can’t be correct. Will Tom be completely depleted of all carbohydrate even when taking in the recommended 60g every hour?

No, indeed he won’t and the calculations are not so clear cut as above. Your body is pretty clever so it will make some changes along the way to help you out. Throughout the event, your metabolism will switch, so it’s reasonable to suggest that by the time the bike has ended, 50-60% of Tom’s energy will come from fat, rather than the 35% contribution at the start point. That means he’ll only be using half the amount of carbohydrate every hour, compared to when he started.

That’s good right?

In some ways yes it is, it’s saving your carbohydrate stores by halving the amount used every hour. But you need to consider why this change occurs. Your body switches to use a larger amount of fat because it’s ‘RUNNING OUT OF CARBOHYDRATE’ so whilst every cloud does have a silver lining, let’s not look too positively on this change.

As most people struggle to metabolise fat, having to rely upon it will lead to a drop in pace and performance. If we continue our theme of ‘clouds and silver linings’, at least the slower pace means you will be using less Kcal per hour (slower pace = less energy required) so that also helps to reduce the amount of carbohydrate required.

Is anyone else getting concerned here or is it just me?

It’s ok, there is an answer. The 2 key areas for improvement are economy (Kcal per hour) and substrate ulilisation (fat or carbohydrate). If you are aerobically fit, you will be more economical than most people. In fact, for endurance performance, economy is perhaps the most important thing. We can define economy very simply as ‘how much energy do you need to ride or run at any given speed?’

If you take your unfit pub mates for a run, you may well trot along at 8 minutes per mile and hold a comfortable conversation. Your mate on the other hand, may be breathing like a bulldog in a hot car, blowing out of most parts of his body. He will be using far more energy, require far more oxygen and use far more calories. People are like cars, some can go a long way using only a small amount of fuel and some require a regular filling due to their poor economy.

The second thing to consider is substrate utilisation. This simply refers to the relative contributions of fat and carbohydrate towards your total energy need. We’ve discussed this above and in pretty much every blog in the last 6 weeks, so hopefully you’re already familiar with this concept. If more of your energy comes from fat, you’re less likely to run out of carbohydrate. The best athletes in the world require a small amount of energy (Kcal) to ride or run at race speed. If a large chunk of that energy requirement comes from fat, their total carbohydrate use is very small indeed.

The new Tom… we can rebuild him

By making changes to Tom’s training and diet, the new version arrives for the Ironman triathlon using only 700Kcal per hour and 55% is being provided by fat. A quick maths calculation reveals the following:

1. He’s using 315 Kcal of carbohydrate per hour on the bike, compared to the previous figure of 533

2. With his intake of 60 grams per hour (240 Kcal), he now only has a deficit of 75 Kcal per hour compared previously with 292 Kcal (73 grams)

3. As a consequence, Tom runs the whole marathon and Tom becomes a LEGEND…..

Do you want to become a legend? If so, do the calculations and work it out for yourself, then let’s go forwards from here.

– Marc Laithwaite

About Marc:

Sports Science lecturer for 10 years at St Helens HE College.

2004 established The Endurance Coach LTD sports science and coaching business. Worked with British Cycling as physiology support 2008-2008. Previous Triathlon England Regional Academy Head Coach, North West.

In 2006 established Epic Events Management LTD. Now one of the largest event companies in the NW, organising a range of triathlon, swimming and cycling events. EPIC EVENTS also encompasses Montane Trail 26 and Petzl Night Runner events.

In 2010 established Montane Lakeland 50 & 100 LTD. This has now become the UKs leading ultra distance trail running event.

In 2010 established The Endurance Store triathlon, trail running and open water swimming store. Based in Appley Bridge, Wigan, we are the North West’s community store, organising and supporting local athletes and local events.

Check out the endurance store HERE

Endurance Store Logo