RAIDLIGHT’S GILET RESPONSIV 8L PACK REVIEW

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Niandi Carmont recently ran the Compressport Trail Menorca, an 85km race on the island of Menorca, Spain. Knowing the race would be semi self-sufficient, the need for a comfortable hydration system would be required. RaidLight stepped in and provided the new RAIDLIGHT GILET RESPONSIV 8L vest so that it could be tested in a ‘real’ situation. On first looks it would be easy to think that this pack is female specific, apparently no. It also comes with a hint of blue for those gentlemen who are not in touch with their feminine side.

RaidLight say:

The Responsiv 8L is a combination of bag/vest. Lightweight and ergonomic.

The Responsiv 8L race vest allows you to carry essentials and hydrate with ease, with the bonus of being ultra light at only 160 grams!

The bag has recently been awarded the prestigious Janus Design Award (2015), awarded by the Institute of French Design

 

Hydration is always an issue when you compete in a self-sufficient or semi self-sufficient trail race or even when training. There are multiple ways of carrying energy drinks and water but what most of us look for is a system that is:

  • Hassle-free – no fumbling around, fidgeting or groping
  • Provides easy access – you can hydrate easily on tricky technical sections of a course or when fatigued in the latter stages of a long trail race
  • Is quick and efficient – you can refill quickly when passing through the feed stations, wasting as little time and energy as possible
  • Is comfortable – no chafing, no bouncing, no sloshing, no leaking
  • Allows you to manage your water supply efficiently and gauge how much water/energy drink remains until the next feed station

Raidlight’s new Gilet Responsiv 8L ticks all the above boxes for me. It’s a great little pack.

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What I like:

  • It comes in 2 sizes: Small/Medium & Large/Extra Large. I used the smaller version as it’s probably more suited to the female body type and lighter runners. It also comes in grey/ pink! For the men, grey/ blue.

gilet-responsiv-8l

  • The vest is equipped with 2 micrometric adjustment systems; I have seen this before on a pair of TNF Shoes called the Boa and a TNF pack. This system provides for an even more “customized” fit. These are located on either side just under the arm openings. So there is no messing around with dangling straps and buckles to tighten. Basically, as you remove items from the pack (food, water and so on) you can adjust the pack in minute detail so that it remains close to the body.

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  • It weighs just 160g and that is ultra-light!
  • Designed to be used with RaidLight’s new soft flasks (optional extra) which come in 2 sizes either 350ml or 600ml. So depending on how far apart the feed stations are on a course and what your own personal hydration needs are, you can use either one or the other or a combination of both. The RaidLight soft flasks are also equipped with straws which make drinking on the go extremely practical. The flasks fit comfortably into the 2 front pockets and are extremely easy to remove and slip back in. I found the straws a little distracting as they came close to my face, however, on the shoulder straps, two access holes are available should you use a bladder (the pipe would feed through these on the left or right). I found that I could push the soft flask straws in here. Perfect!

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  • The pack is made of a breathable flat-seamed mesh (thermal adhesive), which doesn’t chafe and please note ladies it is very pleasant to wear over a t-shirt, a sleeveless tank or even a crop top.
  • The stability is reinforced with two pectoral buckles on the front of the pack

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  • The stash pocket on the back can be used to carry a bladder (Velcro strap supplied) or mandatory race kit. I used it to carry a survival blanket, a mobile phone, a lightweight wind stopper and some extra food

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  • There are two tiny pockets underneath the main soft flask pockets; they can be used for lip balm, sunscreen, gels, tissue paper and gels/ food. For me, this is where the pack fails and needs greater improvement. I personally found I had too little room for ‘on the go’ nutrition and I used a lightweight fuel belt to store additional energy.

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I would recommend using the Gilet Responsiv 8L for any self-sufficient race or training run. It’s ideal for short outing and longer runs but I do think the lack of food storage impacts on its use for very long self-sufficient runs. If you are racing with adequate feed stations and the opportunity to replenish liquid and food, then it’s a great pack. For me it was ideal on the Trail Menorca Costa Sud, an 85km trail race with 7 feed stations, relatively hot weather (36°C) and a course which is technical in parts but without any major difficulties. Importantly ladies, this pack is one of the most comfortable I have tried. I don’t have big boobs but as you will know, anything that doesn’t sit comfortable is a real problem. The Raidlight was great in this area and gents; you have nothing to worry about. If it works for us ladies, it will work for you too!

CONCLUSION

This is a neat little product by RaidLight that works for men and ladies. Importantly, this pack is really comfortable for ladies and the option of two different sizes (S/M, L/XL) means that you can get a pack that fits you! This can also be fine tuned with the micrometric adjustment systems. The downside is on the go access to food/ gels as storage is minimal.

The vest will be available in June 2015.

Go to RaidLIght HERE to find out more

Beat The Heat (Part Two) – Marc Laithwaite

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Exercise in the heat can place a lot of strain upon your body, if you’re used to cooler climates. For this reason, many elite athletes will spend time acclimatising to the higher temperature. Acclimatisation can require up to 14 days, so what if you’re an amateur athlete traveling abroad for an endurance event, who can’t afford to travel 3 weeks before the event?

This is part 2 of our ‘exercise in the heat’ blog series. Last week we explained why exercise in the heat is such a problem (you can read by clicking the coaching articles link at the top of the page and then scrolling down through past blogs). In this week’s blog, I’ll explain how you can acclimatise before you travel and highlight the key physiological changes that take place, as a consequence of acclimatisation.

It’s a bit cold up North, so acclimatising might be difficult!!

Okay, if you live in the North of the UK and you’re traveling abroad to race, then you might be struggling to understand how you can possibly acclimatise. I use the term ‘North of UK’ as we all know that in the South of the UK, the temperature rarely drops below 18c. I’ve never traveled further South than Birmingham, but I hear they wear shorts and flip-flops pretty much year round.

In simple terms, to acclimatise before traveling, you need to make yourself hot and encourage sweating when you train. There are really easy ways to do this:

  1. Wear extra clothing
  2. Run on a treadmill or cycle indoors and turn up the heat
  3. Spend time in a sauna or steam room on a daily basis

I’d recommend you start doing this from 2 weeks out, but you need to do it consistently. Ideally it should be on a daily basis. There’s plenty of evidence to suggest that the above methods can help acclimatise you before travelling to warmer climates.

General guidelines:

  1. If you’re exercising outdoors, wearing extra clothing will lead to a higher sweat rate, so make sure you hydrate during the session. The same can be said for indoor running or cycling, make sure you are hydrating throughout.
  2. You should expect it to affect performance to some extent. If you use a power meter when cycling or you run at specific speeds on the treadmill, you should expect your power of speed to be a little lower than normal. If you’re temperature is higher, attempting to maintain the same intensity as usual could result in you being exhausted by the finish of the session!
  3. Try to progress the sessions in terms of exposure and intensity. For example, if you ride indoors, gradually turn up the temperature over a 7 day period and gradually build up the volume and intensity of the session. Don’t simply crank up the heat on day 1 and ride the full session as you’d expect to in cooler temperatures.
  4. The same rule applies for the sauna and steam room. Start with 10-15 minutes and gradually build your time to 30-45 minutes. Take a drink into the sauna or steam room with you to ensure you are hydrating adequately.

What are the physiological changes that take place?

There are a couple of key changes that take place when you are forced to sweat at a high rate:

The first is an expansion of plasma volume, this refers to an increase in the amount of blood plasma. Last week we explained that blood is made up of plasma (the fluid part) and cells. As you sweat, you lose plasma, which then thickens the blood. Part of the acclimatisation process in as increase in plasma, which means your blood is thinner. By increasing your plasma volume, this also means that you have more blood in general. The amount of cells doesn’t change, but the fluid component is increased, thereby increasing the overall blood volume. This is handy when your blood has to supply both muscles and skin, as discussed last week.

The second key change is a reduction in salt loss. Early in the acclimatisation process, your sweat contains a high amount of sodium. As the acclimatisation process progresses, your body retains sodium by reducing the amount lost in sweat. In simple terms, your sweat becomes less salty. If you’re acclimatising over a 2 week period, lick your skin every day and see if you can taste the change. It’s not socially acceptable to lick someone else’s skin.

As stated earlier, for these 2 changes to occur, you simply need to encourage a high sweat rate when training. The more you sweat, the more these changes will occur. Be sensible, reduce the intensity of the training session and gradually build up heat exposure over the 2 week period.

Until then, stay cool.

About Marc:

Sports Science lecturer for 10 years at St Helens HE College.

2004 established The Endurance Coach LTD sports science and coaching business. Worked with British Cycling as physiology support 2008-2008. Previous Triathlon England Regional Academy Head Coach, North West.

In 2006 established Epic Events Management LTD. Now one of the largest event companies in the NW, organising a range of triathlon, swimming and cycling events. EPIC EVENTS also encompasses Montane Trail 26 and Petzl Night Runner events.

In 2010 established Montane Lakeland 50 & 100 LTD. This has now become the UKs leading ultra distance trail running event.

In 2010 established The Endurance Store triathlon, trail running and open water swimming store. Based in Appley Bridge, Wigan, we are the North West’s community store, organising and supporting local athletes and local events.

Check out the endurance store HERE

Endurance Store Logo

COMPRESSPORT TRAIL MENORCA CAMI DE CAVALLS 2015 – Day One

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The fourth edition of the COMPRESSPORT TRAIL MENORCA CAMI DE CAVALLS 2015 started on Friday May 15th at 0800 in the town of Ciutadella.

A weekend of racing and on Friday it was the 185km (0800 and 1200 start) and the 100km event that got underway.

Menorca literally threw everything at the runners in regard to weather – cloud, sun, wind, rain, thunderstorms and the occasional flash of lightening.

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One thing remained constant though, the beauty of the surroundings and the stunning coastline.

As I write, the 185km is still taking place and the 85km event started at 0800 Saturday May 16th.

Cami de Cavalls map

Casey Morgan from the UK won the 100km event in a new course record – 8:57 (tbc) and we will update with a ladies result asap.

We will update with a series of reports and times as more information becomes available. For now, please enjoy a selection of images (many more to follow) from day one of COMPRESSPORT TRAIL MENORCA CAMI DE CAVALLS 2015. 

Website – http://www.trailmenorca.com

Beat The Heat ( Part One) – Marc Laithwaite

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This week we’re starting a series of articles titled ‘environmental physiology’. We’re going to open with a 2 part series relating to exercise in the heat (I say 2 parts, but who knows what could happen by next week). Following that, we’ll take a look at altitude training and potential benefits.

But before we go on, why not catch up on our seven part series of posts on RACE DAY NUTRITION HERE

Too Hot? Call The Police & Fireman…

Exercise in the heat can place a lot of strain upon your body, if you’re used to cooler climates. For this reason, many elite athletes will spend time acclimatising to the higher temperature. Acclimatisation can require up to 14 days, so what if you’re an amateur athlete travelling abroad for an endurance event, who can’t afford to travel 3 weeks before the event? Well this blog is quite timely for me, as I’m off to Lanzarote in less than 4 weeks for the Ironman triathlon and potentially, it could be very hot. There’s probably quite a few people reading this blog who are traveling abroad this year to take part in triathlon or running events in hot places. The purpose of this blog is to explain simple ways, which you can acclimate your body beforehand and explain the physiological changes, which take place to improve your performance.

Too hot? You Make A Dragon Want To Retire Man…

In a nutshell, when you exercise in hot climates, your core temperature rises and your performance suffers. If your core temperature rises too much, it could potentially be lethal, so your brain is pretty quick to try and stop that happening, by persuading you to stop!

How do we reduce core temperature?

There 2 main ways, the first is ‘convection’ and the second is ‘sweat evaporation’.

Convection

Think about a car radiator, it’s positioned right at the front of the car as that’s where the wind hits it when you’re driving. Heat is generated in the engine, this in turn heats the water which is then pumped to the radiator. The wind hits the radiator, cools the water and the cool water goes back into the engine to pick up more heat. This cycle continues, to keep removing heat from the engine, which is why it’s important to keep the fluid topped up or your car will overheat! The human body works the same way, heat is generated in the engine and your blood then picks up the heat. The blood is pumped to the coolest part of the body (the skin), where the wind hits it and cools the blood. It then returns back into the engine to pick up more heat and the cycle continues.

If the wind is blowing against your skin whilst you exercise, convection may well be enough to keep you cool and maintain a normal body temperature. It’s easier to do this when cycling, compared to running, as your speed is generally higher, so the wind chill is greater. Runners will notice that treadmill running leads to more sweating than running outside as the air temperature is generally warmer, but also you’re not moving, so there’s no air flow past the skin and therefore no wind chill or convection. The same can be said about indoor cycling or using a turbo trainer, especially if you don’t have a fan blowing.

Let’s use the treadmill running or turbo cycling scenarios as an example. If there’s no air flow past your skin to cool the blood, then in effect, you pump hot blood to the skin surface, it doesn’t get cooled, so the hot blood goes back into the engine / core. That’s a sure fire way to overheat. This is the same as leaving your car engine running on a hot day, whilst stuck in a traffic jam. If you’re not moving, there’s no wind hitting the radiator, so convection cooling can’t happen.

Sweating

Sweating is based on ‘evaporation’. Water from your body cells makes it’s way to the skin and as the hot blood arrives, the heat is passed from the blood into the water droplets (leaving the blood cool). The heated water on your skin, evaporates into the air like water from a boiling pan and takes the heat with it. If you’re running on a treadmill and there’s no convection, you need another method of getting rid of heat, so the sweating and evaporation will kick in.

It’s important to recognise that ‘evaporation’ removes the heat, so any sweat on your skin, clothing or floor, serves no purpose other than to lead to dehydration. 

Convection and sweating don’t compliment each other too well

If you’re racing in hot weather, convection isn’t enough so you’ll also sweat to keep your temperature down. As you sweat, you lose fluid from your body and this leads to a drop in blood plasma (plasma is the fluid/water component of blood). The problem is that you need a lot of blood for convection to work well. When you’re exercising, blood is pumped to the exercising muscles and what’s left is pumped to the vital organs. So what happens when you then need to pump extra blood to the skin to cool down? Do you reduce blood flow to the muscles and vital organs? It sounds like a great idea to keep you cool, but where is this extra blood coming from? As if that wasn’t bad enough, you’re now sweating and the amount of blood you have is dropping. So not only do you have to supply muscles, organs and the skin, you’ve got less and less blood available as sweating continues.

Blood is made up of plasma (fluid) and cells (red/white/platelets). When you sweat, you lose plasma, but not cells. This means that the total amount of blood is reduced and it also gets thicker (same number of cells but less fluid). 

What does this mean in terms of performance?

As you’ve probably guessed already, this isn’t good for performance. Heart rate is generally higher for any level of exercise. This is due to the fact that you’re trying to pump blood to all areas of your body and your total blood volume is dropping. Your cardiovascular system is therefore working overtime, trying to match the demand with a struggling supply. Due to fluid and salt losses, your body becomes dehydrated and cells cannot function correctly. We’ve mentioned previously that salt is required for transporting fluid throughout the body and as high amount of salt can be lost in sweating, this mechanism is impaired.

Something of great importance, which is less frequently discussed, is the change in substrate utilisation. Whilst the exact mechanism is still under question, it’s pretty clear that you use more carbohydrates and therefore empty your glycogen stores more quickly when exercising in the heat. The simple explanation is that that there’s a lack of ‘spare blood’ going to the muscles, due to the fact it’s going to the skin for cooling. Fat metabolism requires more oxygen than carbohydrate metabolism so there’s a switch from fat to carbohydrate. This may also be explained by a switch from ‘slow twitch’ to ‘fast twitch’ fibres, which use less oxygen.

All in all, this isn’t looking too good. We’ve got an ever-decreasing blood volume, which is being pulled in several different directions. We’ve got decreasing salt levels and an onset of dehydration. We’ve got a heart rate which is significantly higher than it should be for the intensity we’re exercising at and to cap it all off, we’re running out of carbohydrates at a faster rate than normal.

Don’t worry help is at hand. Next week we’ll discuss how acclimatisation helps you to deal with the issues and explain the physiological changes responsible.

Until then, stay cool.

– Marc

About Marc:

Sports Science lecturer for 10 years at St Helens HE College.

2004 established The Endurance Coach LTD sports science and coaching business. Worked with British Cycling as physiology support 2008-2008. Previous Triathlon England Regional Academy Head Coach, North West.

In 2006 established Epic Events Management LTD. Now one of the largest event companies in the NW, organising a range of triathlon, swimming and cycling events. EPIC EVENTS also encompasses Montane Trail 26 and Petzl Night Runner events.

In 2010 established Montane Lakeland 50 & 100 LTD. This has now become the UKs leading ultra distance trail running event.

In 2010 established The Endurance Store triathlon, trail running and open water swimming store. Based in Appley Bridge, Wigan, we are the North West’s community store, organising and supporting local athletes and local events.

Check out the endurance store HERE

Endurance Store Logo

COMPRESSPORT TRAIL MENORCA CAMI DE CAVALLS 2015 PREVIEW

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Following on from Transvulcania, attention this coming weekend turns to Zegama-Aizkorri and Menorca for the COMPRESSPORT TRAIL MENORCA CAMI DE CAVALLS 2015. 

Cami de Cavalls map

The Menorca Cami De Cavalls takes place on 15, 16 and 17th May on the beautiful island of Menorca. A series of races are offered that provide all those involved to see the beauty of this majestic island.

The island is known for its collection of megalithic stone monuments: navetes, taules and talaiots, which speak of a very early prehistoric human activity. Some of the earliest culture on Menorca was influenced by other Mediterranean cultures, including the Greek Minoans of ancient Crete . For example the use of inverted plastered timber columns at Knossos is thought to have influenced the population of Menorca imitating this practice. The location of Menorca in the middle of the western Mediterranean was a staging point for different cultures since prehistoric times. This Balearic Island has a mix of colonial and local architecture. Menorca’s cuisine is dominated by the Mediterranean diet, which is known to be very healthy. Whilst many of the locals have adopted modern attitudes they still uphold certain old traditions.

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As a small island, large sporting events are seldom seen. However, in recent years, a couple of sport events have managed to gather hundreds of participants; Extreme Man Menorca triathlon and the single-staged ultra marathon race Trail Menorca Cami de Cavalls.

 

The TMCDC embraces the small island and utilizes the trails to full affect offering a series of races (five in total) that allow runners to participate in a race of 32km or a traverse of the whole island in 185km.

 

TMCDC 185km

Trail Menorca Cami de Cavalls (TMCdC) is an ultra distance of 185,3 km and a positive slope of 2,863 m where each runner will discover their limits and enjoy an idyllic landscape on this island in the Mediterranean Sea, you will find beaches, cliffs, and incredible views.

 

TMCN 100km

The Trail Costa Nord (TMCN) explores the North of Menorca over a distance of 100 km. A positive incline of 1796m, runners will discover precious places in Menorca, beautiful trails and incredible views.

 

TMCS 85km

In the Trail Menorca Costa Sud (TMCS) you will visit beaches of white sand lapped by turquoise water and enjoy ravines and forests.

 

TCS 55km

The Trail Costa Nord (TMCN) provides an opportunity to discover Menorca’s wilder side; high cliffs, constantly changing terrain and beaches that leave you speechless.

 

TCN 32km

32 km Trekking Costa Nord (TCN) runs through the beautiful scenery of the Parc Natural de s’Albufera des Grau.

 

The first edition of the race was held in May 2012 with 270 participants. In recent years the amount of participants has been continuously increasing with 287 in 2013 and 646 in 2014. The 2015 edition will once again se the race reach a new level with a strong participation from respected trail, ultra and mountain runners such as:

 

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ELISABET BARNES – 1st Marathon des Sables 2015

EMMA ROCA – results here

VANESSA RUIZ – Winner Trail Menorca CDC 2014

JAVIER CASTILLO– 3rd Utratrail Collserola 2014

JOEL JALLE CASADEMONT – 2nd Yukon Arctic Ultra 2105, 1st Goldsteig Projekt 500 2014, 5th spine race 2014

EUGENI ROSELLO – winner Spine race 2013, winner VCUF 2014/2013

SERGI COTS – Winner VCUF 2014 (made same finish time with Eugeni)- Third Ultra trail Catalan Cup 2014

IGNASI RIURO – Winner (team) and world record at Oxfam Trail Walker 2015

RAMON GARCIA – 4rt Trail Menorca CDC 2014 – Winner Tabernes Ultratrail 2015

JORGE IVAN CANO BERRIO

DANIEL ALFONSO ZUBIETA

VIVIAN ANDREA ALVAREZ FORERO

AYDE RAIDA SOTO QUISPE

BARBARA KOCH RAMIREZ 

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Course records are as follows:

 

TCDCZigor Iturrieta 21:10:04 and Laia Diez Fontanet 27:16:33

TCNXavier Garcia 10:12:01 and Marta Comas 11:35:11

TCS Joan Noguera 8:03:31 and Brigitte Eggerling 9:53:28

TCN Paco Arnau 2:34:22 and Maria Fiol 3:18:30

TCSJuan Jose Mateos 5:17:36 and Daniela Carolina Moreno 6:42:37

 

 

The racing starts on Friday at 0800 for the TMCDC and TMCN – you can see a full race program HERE

 

I will be working on the race capturing images and stories so please follow on this website, via Twitter @talkultra on Facebook at facebook.com/iancorlessphotography and on Instagram @iancorlessphotography

 

Race website HERE

Race Day Nutrition (Part Seven) – Marc Laithwaite

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Last week we introduced specific products used during endurance events and how they can fulfil your requirements in terms of nutrition intake.

There are 3 common sports products used during endurance racing:

  1. Drinks powders
  2. Gels
  3. Bars

This week, we’ll check out bars and gels.

What’s in them?

Unsurprisingly, gels tend to contain maltodextrin and glucose, similar to the drinks. In fact, gels are simply condensed energy drinks. They were originally designed to be carried on events where you could access only water, as a source of energy. The thickness of the gel will dictate how much energy they contain. Some gels are very thick and sticky and these contain more energy than the ones which are a thinner, more watery solution. This is based upon the simple principles we discussed a couple of weeks ago, relating to hypo, iso and hypertonic solutions.

As an example, a 41g power gel original contains approximately 27g of carbohydrate. Remember the 60g rule? That means 2 of these gels per hour would be pretty close to target intake. The remaining 14g of the gel is fluid (41g – 27g = 14g) so we can calculate the gel thickness as follows:

Total weight = 41g
Carbohydrate content = 27g
27/41 = 0.66, Therefore this gel is a 66% solution (27 is 66% of 41)

The purpose of that calculation is simply to highlight that gels are extremely ‘hypertonic’, remember that isotonic is a 7% solution. Being hypertonic is not a problem, the more hypertonic the more energy it provides, but it does mean that you need to take fluid with them.

In past blogs we stated that you should aim for no more than 10% solutions, so that means 270ml of water drank with 27g of carbohydrate will be correct, 270 / 27 = 10. It’s important to do the calculation based on the 27g of carbohydrate in the gel, not the 41g total weight of the gel. Technically if you drink 270ml the solution will actually be less that 10% as there’s already 14g of fluid in the gel as stated above. As a practical guide think about a 500ml drinks bottle generally used for cycling, it’s half of one of those with every power gel.

What about Isogels

There are ISOGELS on the market, SIS and High5 make popular versions. By adding more fluid to the gel and reducing the carbohydrate content they can reduce the thickness of the gel solution.

The first thing of note is that they contain less carbohydrate, so you’d need to take more of them every hour. They contain in the region of 22-24g of carbohydrate per gel, so that means you’d be taking almost 3 per hour to get your energy, rather than 2 power gels. That’s a lot of gels to carry if you’re racing long distances.

But ISOGELS are isotonic, so you don’t need water, right?

HIGH5 Isogel
Total weight = 66g
Carbohydrate content = 24g
24/66 = 0.36, Therefore this gel is a 36% solution (24 is 36% of 66)

SIS GO Isogel
Total weight = 66g
Carbohydrate content = 22g
22/66 = 0.33, Therefore this gel is a 33% solution (22 is 33% of 66)

So we said above and in previous blogs that isotonic solutions are 7%. The solutions for the ISOGELS above are 33% and 36%, this is not isotonic, it’s hypertonic. I may be missing something here, so I did phone High5 and ask. They couldn’t answer the question but stated that ‘they were more isotonic than other gels’. I’m not sure that is technically true, as none of them are anywhere near 7%. That’s a bit like me saying I’m tall and when questioned about by lack of height, I reply by stating ‘I’m more tall than Ste Hilton’. Whilst that may be true, it doesn’t make me tall…

Key points:

1. You DO need to drink water with ISO gels
2. If you don’t know Ste, that joke is completely lost

If there’s 24g of carbohydrate in a 66g gel, then you need to take 240ml of water for a 10% solution (240ml / 24g = 10%). However, there is already 42g of fluid in there (66g gel – 24g carbohydrate = 42g fluid). Based on this, 200ml would be sufficient, that’s still more than a third of a 500ml drinks bottle.

What about energy bars?

Bars are an alternative source of carbohydrate. They generally contains things like oats, rice, wheat etc with added sugar syrups such as glucose or fructose. In terms of ‘solutions’ a gel is solid food, so it needs mixing with a significant amount of water to digest and absorb effectively.

As an example, a powerbar energize bar (others are available!!) weighs in as follows:

Bar weight = 55g
Carbohydrate = 39g
Fat = 2g
Protein = 6g

In terms of carbohydrate content, you’d need 1.5 bars per hour to get your 60g intake. If you add up the content weight 39g + 2g + 6g = 47g. We stated that the bar weighed 55g, so there is some fluid in there also plus some other little bits to make the weight up to 55g. If you drank a full 500ml bottle of water with every bar, that would give you just less than 9% solution which is ideal (47/500 = 0.9). That means a full 750ml bottle and 1.5 powerbars per hour would be pretty much on target (remember all bars are different, these calculations are for powerbar energize).

Salt intake

We discussed sweating and hydration last week, which included salt intake. As a recap, salt and sodium are 2 different things. Salt is 40% sodium and 60% chloride. You need to know this as some products give ‘salt’ content and others give ‘sodium’ content. Remember also from last week we said that you are likely to sweat up to 1g of sodium per hour (1000mg). There’s multiple thoughts on salt replacement, regarding how much and whether you need it. I’m not going to go into depth on the matter because this is meant to be a simple and easy to read blog. If it’s warm and you sweat a fair bit, aim for 500-1000mg SODIUM per hour. If you take a bit too much, you’ll just sweat it out anyhow so don’t overly panic.

Let’s presume that you are aiming to take all of your energy by using sports gels or bars. So remember, our targets are 60g of carbohydrate per hour and 500-1000mg of sodium per hour, presuming its warm and you sweat. Here are some options:

SIS GO Isotonic Gel

Includes 22 grams of carbohydrate
Sodium = negligible

High5 Isogel

Includes 24 grams of carbohydrate
Sodium = negligible

Powergel

Includes 27g of carbohydrate
Sodium = 205mg
2-3 Powergels per hour would give you 410-615mg of sodium, we stated that 500mg was a starting target.

Powerbar Energize

Includes 39g of carbohydrate
Sodium = 192mg
1.5 Powerbar Energize per hour as suggested above, would give you 288mg of sodium, half of that provided by intake of 2-3 Powerbar gels per hour. They really don’t make this easy!!

Some key points:

  1. The amount of carbohydrate in gels and bars varies widely
  2. You need to drink water with all gels and bars for correct absorption
  3. Isotonic gels don’t exist (unless I’ve missed something)
  4. Sodium content varies widely in bars and gels and is often not included

I hope that basic overview helps you to practically apply what you’ve learned over recent weeks, feel free to call into the store and we can talk you through it before your big day.

– Marc

About Marc:

Sports Science lecturer for 10 years at St Helens HE College.

2004 established The Endurance Coach LTD sports science and coaching business. Worked with British Cycling as physiology support 2008-2008. Previous Triathlon England Regional Academy Head Coach, North West.

In 2006 established Epic Events Management LTD. Now one of the largest event companies in the NW, organising a range of triathlon, swimming and cycling events. EPIC EVENTS also encompasses Montane Trail 26 and Petzl Night Runner events.

In 2010 established Montane Lakeland 50 & 100 LTD. This has now become the UKs leading ultra distance trail running event.

In 2010 established The Endurance Store triathlon, trail running and open water swimming store. Based in Appley Bridge, Wigan, we are the North West’s community store, organising and supporting local athletes and local events.

Check out the endurance store HERE

Endurance Store Logo

Great Lakeland 3 Day #GL3D – Day One

©iancorless.com_GL3D2015-5794

What a day… the 2015 GL3D started in glorious sunshine but in true Lakeland condition, conditions deteriorated pretty quickly.

Strong winds, rain and snow made every race tough for the respective categories: Elite, A, B, C and walkers. At times the temperatures were a reported -10 on the tops in the wind

Here is a selection of images to summarise the day. A full set of stage and overall results will be uploaded in due course.

 

All images ©iancorless.com – all rights reserved Images are available to purchase at iancorless.photoshelter.com

Episode 86 – Browning Yates Cracknell Barnes

Ep86

Episode 86 of Talk Ultra is a packed show. We speak with Jeff Browning about victrory at the controversial Ultra fiord. Michele Yates provides a great Talk Training by discussing running and pregnancy. We also catch up with Elisabet Barnes and James Cracknell who ran impressive times at London Marathon. The News, a Blog, Up and Coming Races and Speed Golf Karl Meltzer is back!
00:15:22 NEWS
 
Help Nepal – Nepal images ‘FACES of NEPAL’ – order a print and all funds donated to Nepal charities http://iancorless.org/2015/04/28/nepal-appeal-nepalearthquake/
 
3-Peaks UK
Ricky Lightfoot 2:51
Andrew Davies 2:53
Andrew Fallas 2:57
Helen Bonsor 3:27
Anna Lupton 3:34
Caitlin Rice 3:39
Fellsman UK
Adam Perry 10:23
Jez Bragg 10:44
Konrad Rawlik 10:57
Jasmin Paris 11:09 CR
Mary Gillie 13:02
Carol Morgan 14:13
Highland Fling
Matt Laye 7:04
Paul Navesy 7:06
Donnie Campbell 7:17 one week after winning Iznik Ultra
Rachel Campbell 8:42
Caroline McKay 8:55
Nicole Adams Hendry 8:59
Iznik Ultra

130km

Donnie Campbell 13:23:50
Mahmut Yavuz 14:31:20
Aykut Celikbas 14:48:29
Zoe Salt 15:14:37
Mariyla Niklova 19:29:45
Ingrid Qualizza 19:43:49

80km

Emmanuel Gault 6:45:25
Girondel Benoit 7:26:10
Tanzer Dursun 8:40:36
Alessia De Matteis 9:03:53
ElenaPolyakova 10:48:57
Coraline Chapatte 11:34:37
46km *update to results 21st April – unfortunately Jose De Pablo received a time penalty as he did not carry mandatory kit, new results are in bold.
Jose De Pablo 4:03:29 *Benoit Laval 4:19:03
Benoit Laval 4:19:03 *Duygun Yurteri 4:28:15
Duygun Yurteri 4:28:15 *Jose De Pablo 4:28:29
Catarina Scamelli 5:03:44
Ziliz Cancilar 5:04:55
Martine Nolan 5:09:44
Ultrafijord full results Here
100mile
Jeff Browning 24:25:39
Candice Burt 37:12:15
100k
Fernando Nazario de Rezende 16:50:20
Krissy Moehl 19:31:27
70k
Xavier Thevenard 8:46:00
Manuela Vilaseca 11:45:00
Transvulcania is next week!
 
London Marathon
MDS ladies winner Elisabet Barnes ran sub 3 (just) and we caught up with her on her post MDS run and as she prepares for running in Menorca – http://www.trailmenorca.com
00:36:07 INTERVIEW
 
Elisabet Barnes
Also running at VLM was Olympian James Cracknell who ran 2:50 as he prepares for Richterveld Wildrun in South Africa and Badwater
 
00:48:28 INTERVIEW
 
James Cracknell
00:58:31 BLOG
 
01:00:34 INTERVIEW
 
Jeff Browning recently won the Ultra fiord race. It was a race not without controversy… we just had to catch up and find out all about it!
 
02:05:03 TALK TRAINING
 
Michele Yates talks all about pregnancy, running and how you come back to not only running but racing and winning just months after giving birth!
02:41:35 UP & COMING RACES

Australia

New South Wales

WildEndurance 100km Team Challenge | 100 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

WildEndurance 50km Team Challenge | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

WildEndurance event | 100 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Northern Territory

TRACK Outback Race | 520 kilometers | May 06, 2015 | website

Queensland

Mt Mee Classic Trail 66 km Teams race | 66 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

The Great Wheelbarrow Race – Mareeba to Dimbulah | 104 kilometers | May 15, 2015 | website

Victoria

Wilsons Prom 100 – 100km | 100 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Wilsons Prom 100 – 60 km | 60 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Wilsons Prom 100 – 80 km | 80 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Austria

Über Drüber UltraMarathon | 63 kilometers | May 14, 2015 | website

Canada

Alberta

Run for the Braggin’ Rights | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Run for the Braggin’ Rights – Relay | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

British Columbia

Island Runner Elk/Beaver Ultras – 100K | 100 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Island Runner Elk/Beaver Ultras – 50K | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Island Runner Elk/Beaver Ultras – 50 Miles | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

The North Face Dirty Feet Kal Park 50 | 50 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

Ontario

Seaton Trail 50 km Trail | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Chile

Atacama Xtreme 100 Miles | 100 miles | May 15, 2015 | website

Atacama Xtreme 50 km | 50 kilometers | May 15, 2015 | website

Atacama Xtreme 50 Miles | 50 miles | May 15, 2015 | website

China

Trail de la Grande Muraille de Chine | 73 kilometers | May 08, 2015 | website

Denmark

Hovedstaden

Salomon Hammer Trail Bornholm -100 Miles | 100 miles | May 01, 2015 | website

Salomon Hammer Trail Bornholm – 50 km | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Salomon Hammer Trail Bornholm – 50 miles | 50 miles | May 01, 2015 | website

France

Ardèche

Trail l’Ardéchois – 57 km | 57 kilometers | May 01, 2015 | website

Ultra Trail l’Ardéchois | 98 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Drôme

Challenge du Val de Drôme | 148 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Les Aventuriers de la Drôme | 65 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Les Aventuriers du Bout de Drôme | 105 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Haute-Loire

Ultra Techni Trail de Tiranges | 50 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

Nord

100 km de Steenwerck | 100 kilometers | May 14, 2015 | website

Oise

Trail’Oise – 60 km | 60 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

Pyrénées-Atlantiques

Euskal Trails – Ultra Trail | 130 kilometers | May 15, 2015 | website

Trail des Villages | 80 kilometers | May 15, 2015 | website

Trail Gourmand | 50 kilometers | May 15, 2015 | website

Rhône

Ultra des Coursières | 103 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Savoie

Nivolet – Revard | 51 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Seine-Maritime

Tour du Pays de Caux | 88 kilometers | May 14, 2015 | website

Yonne

The Trail 110 | 110 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

The Trail 63 | 65 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

The Trail 85 | 85 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Germany

Baden-Württemberg

Stromberg Extrem 54,4 KM | 54 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

Rhineland-Palatinate

Bärenfels 50 km Trail | 50 kilometers | May 01, 2015 | website

Saar-Hunsrück-Supertrail | 128 kilometers | May 14, 2015 | website

Saarland

RAG-Hartfüßler – Trail 58 km | 58 kilometers | May 10, 2015 | website

Schleswig-Holstein

Steinburg – Ultra – Marathon 50 km | 50 kilometers | May 14, 2015 | website

Thuringia

GutsMuths-Rennsteiglauf Super Marathon | 72 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | websiteGreece

Doliho Ultra-Marathon | 255 kilometers | May 01, 2015 | website

Euchidios Athlos 107.5 Km | 107 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Euchidios Hyper-Athlos 215 km | 215 kilometers | May 08, 2015 | website

Indonesia

Volcans de l’Extrême | 164 kilometers | May 07, 2015 | website

Ireland

Munster

The Irish Trail 60 km | 60 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

The Irish Trail 85 km | 85 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Italy

Liguria

Gran Trail Rensen | 62 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

Lombardy

Laggo Maggiore Trail | 52 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

UMS Ultramaratona Milano Sanremo | 280 kilometers | May 01, 2015 | website

Sardinia

Sardinia Trail | 90 kilometers | May 08, 2015 | website

Kazakhstan

Tengri Ultra Trail 50 km | 50 kilometers | May 10, 2015 | website

Madagascar

Semi Trail des Ô Plateaux | 65 kilometers | May 01, 2015 | website

Ultra Trail des Ô Plateaux | 130 kilometers | May 01, 2015 | website

Malta

Eco Gozo Ultra 55k | 55 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Martinique

Tchimbé Raid | 91 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Mauritius

Royal Raid 80 km | 80 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Mayotte

Mahoraid | 70 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Poland

Portugal

Ultra-Trail de Sesimbra | 60 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

Spain

Andalusia

La Legión 101 km | 101 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Balearic Islands

Trail Menorca Cami de Cavalls | 185 kilometers | May 15, 2015 | website

Trail Menorca Cami de Cavalls Costa Nord | 100 kilometers | May 15, 2015 | website

Basque Country

Apuko Long Trail – 65 Km | 60 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Ultra Trail Apuko Extreme | 90 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Canary Islands

Transvulcania Ultramaratón | 73 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Castile and León

101 Peregrinos | 101 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Madrid

Sunrise Trail Ultra International | 68 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Valencian Community

CSP-115 | 118 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

MIM Marató i Mitja | 63 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Switzerland

Berne

Bielersee XXL 100 Meilen | 100 miles | May 15, 2015 | website

United Kingdom

Argyll and Bute

Kintyre Way Ultra Run | 66 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Kintyre Way Ultra Run – Tayinloan – Campbeltown | 35 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

County of Pembrokeshire

Coastal Trail Series – Pembrokeshire – Ultra | 34 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Greater London

Thames Path 100 | 100 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Hampshire

XNRG Pony Express Ultra | 60 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Isle of Wight

Isle of Wight Challenge | 106 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Isle of Wight Challenge – Half Island | 56 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Oxfordshire

T60 Nigh Race | 60 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Wiltshire

Marlborough Downs Challenge – 33 mile | 33 miles | May 10, 2015 | website

Worcestershire

Malvern Hills 105 Mile Ultra | 105 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Malvern Hills 34 Mile Ultra | 34 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Malvern Hills 44 Mile Ultra | 44 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Malvern Hills 52 Mile Ultra | 53 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

USA

Alabama

Run for Kids Challenge 50K Trail Race | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Arizona

Sinister Night 54K Trail Run | 54 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

California

Armstrong Redwoods 50K | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Badwater Salton Sea | 81 miles | May 03, 2015 | website

Canyons 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Cinderella Trail Run 50 km (May) | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Golden Gate Relay | 191 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Gold Rush 50K | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Me-Ow Quads | 104 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Me-Ow Siamese | 42 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Miwok 100K Trail Race | 100 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Nirvana Ultra Big Bear 100K | 100 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Nirvana Ultra Big Bear 100 Mile | 100 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Nirvana Ultra Big Bear 50K | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Nirvana Ultra Big Bear 50 Mile | 50 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

PCT50 Trail Run | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Quicksilver 100K Endurance Run | 100 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Quicksilver 50K Endurance Run | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Whoos in El Moro Race Spring Edition 50K | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Wild Wild West 50K Ultra | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Colorado

Cimarron 50k Endurance Run | 50 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

Collegiate Peaks 50M Trail Run | 50 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Falcon 50 | 50 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Greenland Trail 50k | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Quad Rock 50 | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Florida

Palm Bluff Trail Race and Ultra “Margaritas & Manure” 50K | 50 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

Palm Bluff Trail Race and Ultra “Margaritas & Manure” 50M | 50 miles | May 03, 2015 | website

Georgia

Cruel Jewel 100 | 100 miles | May 15, 2015 | website

Cruel Jewel 50 Mile Race | 50 miles | May 15, 2015 | website

Wildwood Games – 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | May 03, 2015 | website

Indiana

DWD Gnaw Bone 50K | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

DWD Gnaw Bone 50M | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Kansas

Heartland 50 Mile Spring Race | 50 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Rock On! Lake Perry 50K | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Maine

Big A 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Massachusetts

Ragnar Relay Cape Cod | 186 miles | May 08, 2015 | website

Wapack and Back Trail Races 50 Miles | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Nevada

50K | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

50M | 50 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Ride the Wind 100M | 100 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Ride the Wind 50M | 50 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

New Jersey

3 Days at the Fair – 50K | 50 kilometers | May 14, 2015 | website

New Mexico

Cactus to Cloud Trail 50K Run | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

New York

Long Island Greenbelt Trail 50k | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Rock The Ridge 50-Mile Endurance Challenge | 50 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

The North Face Endurance Challenge New York 50k | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

The North Face Endurance Challenge New York 50 Mile | 50 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

North Carolina

OBX Ultramarathon | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Race Across North Carolina – Border to Border (10 Marathons) | 267 miles | May 13, 2015 | website

Race Across North Carolina – Heart of NC (4 Marathons) | 106 miles | May 13, 2015 | website

Ohio

50’s For Yo Momma 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

50’s For Yo Momma 50 Mile Trail Run | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Oregon

McDonald Forest 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Smith Rock Ascent 50K | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Pennsylvania

Glacier Ridge Trail Ultramarathon – 50K | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Glacier Ridge Trail Ultramarathon – 50 Miles | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Rhode Island

Rhode Island Red 50K | 50 kilometers | May 10, 2015 | website

Rhode Island Red 50M | 50 miles | May 10, 2015 | website

South Carolina

Oconee 50k | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Race Across South Carolina – Border to Border (4 Marathons) | 123 miles | May 07, 2015 | website

Wambaw Swamp Stomp 50 Miler Trail Run and Relay | 50 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Xterra Myrtle Beach 50 km Trail Run | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Tennessee

Rock/Creek Thunder Rock 100 Mile Trail Race | 100 miles | May 15, 2015 | website

Strolling Jim 40 Mile Run | 40 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Utah

Red Rock Relay Moab Edition | 63 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

Vermont

PEAK Ultra Marathon – 200 Miles | 200 miles | May 14, 2015 | website

PEAK Ultra Marathon – 500 Miles | 500 miles | May 07, 2015 | website

Virginia

Biffledinked 10 x 5k | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Biffledinked 10 x 5k 2 Person Relay | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Singletrack Maniac 50k Trail Run | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Washington

Grand Ridge 50K Trail Run (May) | 50 kilometers | May 02, 2015 | website

Lost Lake 50K | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Washington D.C.

Relay | 150 miles | May 02, 2015 | website

Wisconsin

Ice Age Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | May 09, 2015 | website

Ice Age Trail 50M | 50 miles | May 09, 2015 | website

02:47:50 CLOSE
02:51:20
LINKS:

Race Day Nutrition (Part Six) – Marc Laithwaite

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Having discussed carbohydrate, fluid and salt intake, I thought it would be prudent to focus a little more on application. We’ll take a look at the specific products used during endurance events and whether they can fulfil your requirements in terms of nutrition intake.

There are 3 common sports products used during endurance racing:

  1. Drinks powders
  2. Gels
  3. Bars

Aside from the ‘big 3’ there is also a selection of jelly shots or chews, in addition to traditional favourites such as jelly babies, malt loaf, flapjack and bananas. For the purpose of this blog, we’re going to focus on the big 3 and examine what they provide and what’s the difference between them?

Energy Drinks

Energy drinks generally come in powder form and you mix with water to create a solution. In past blogs we’ve discussed the isotonic issue and how it impacts upon digestion. Based upon that, a 10% solution or less is ideal (7% is isotonic). To create a 10% solution, mix 60g of powder in 600ml of water.

What’s in the powder?

Almost all energy powders are maltodextrin, this is a ‘glucose polymer’ and made up of between 3-17 pieces of glucose in a chain. It is very rapidly absorbed (almost as quickly as pure glucose) and therefore gives a rapid sugar spike and insulin response (good if you need it during racing, but not good if you don’t need it, such as steady training or just using during the day as part of your diet). All energy drinks tend to be based on maltodextrin, but they often have small amounts of glucose and fructose.

Electrolytes

We discussed sweating and hydration last week, which included salt intake. You can go back and read in full if you wish, but as a recap, salt and sodium are 2 different things. Salt is 40% sodium and 60% chloride. You need to know this as some products give ‘salt’ content and others give ‘sodium’ content. Remember also from last week we said that you are likely to sweat up to 1g of sodium per hour (1000mg). There’s multiple thoughts on salt replacement, regarding how much and whether you need it. I’m not going to go into depth on the matter because this is meant to be a simple and easy to read blog. If it’s warm and you sweat a fair bit, aim for 500-1000mg SODIUM per hour. If you take a bit too much, you’ll just sweat it out anyhow so don’t overly panic.

Let’s presume that you are aiming to take all of your energy by using sports drinks. So remember, our targets are 60g of carbohydrate per hour and 500-1000mg of sodium per hour, presuming its warm and you sweat. Here are some options:


SIS GO Electrolyte 60 grams of powder

Includes 55 grams of carbohydrate, primarily maltodextrin

360mg sodium

 

Powerbar Iso Active 60 grams of powder

53 grams of carbohydrate, primarily maltodextrin

756mg sodium

 

H5 Energy Source 60 grams of powder

57g of carbohydrate, includes maltodextrin, but 33% fructose

312mg sodium

 

H5 Energy Source Xtrem 60 grams of powder

57g of carbohydrate 33% fructose

306mg sodium

Approx. 175mg caffeine

 

Some key points:

  1. We said your target is 60g of carbohydrate, not 60g of powder, but as you can see above, 95% of the powder which goes into your bottle, is actual carbohydrate.
  1. The sodium levels vary quite widely, you can see that Powerbar Iso Active has considerably more than others (756mg) and is the only one to fall within the 500-100mg range.
  1. H5 Energy Source is the only one which uses fructose in large quantities. They use a 2:1 formula (66% maltodextrin and 33% fructose). The reason for this is that the 60g per hour rule is based on the fact that only 60g of GLUCOSE can be absorbed per hour (maltodextrin is a glucose chain). However, that doesn’t account for fructose, which is absorbed in a different manner. So basically, if you take 90g of powder per hour, that contains 60g glucose (the maximum amount of glucose you can absorb) and 30g fructose which is absorbed separately. You can use this drink to take on more carbohydrate per hour than the normal guidelines.
  1. H5 Extrem also has caffeine, approx 175mg per 60g powder. To put that into perspective a pro-plus tablet has 50mg and a filter coffee has between 50-100mg per cup. People think caffeine is a ‘pick up’ or ‘kick’, when in fact it’s real purpose is a pain killer. Caffeine can mask your effort if taken in significant quantities, it changes your perception by acting on the nervous system to make things feel easier.


What about electrolyte tablets?


H5 Zero Tabs 4g tablet

260mg sodium

Power Bar 4g tablet

250mg sodium


Some key points:

The electrolyte tablets don’t contain any energy, they are purely flavoured salt replacement. If you’re drinking a bottle every hour in warm weather and sweating, then you probably need to double them in the bottle. If you’re using energy gels and bars to get your ‘energy’ during your event, you could use the electrolyte tablets to reach your sodium target. You can generally always get water during a race, so add 2 tabs to each bottle and drinks throughout the hour in addition to taking your gels and or bars.

I hope that basic overview of drinks helps you to practically apply what you’ve learned over recent weeks, feel free to call into the store and we can talk you through it before your big day.

Next week we’ll look at energy bars and gels, which one’s to choose to best suit your needs, that’s part 7, honestly the end is in sight.

– Marc

About Marc:

Sports Science lecturer for 10 years at St Helens HE College.

2004 established The Endurance Coach LTD sports science and coaching business. Worked with British Cycling as physiology support 2008-2008. Previous Triathlon England Regional Academy Head Coach, North West.

In 2006 established Epic Events Management LTD. Now one of the largest event companies in the NW, organising a range of triathlon, swimming and cycling events. EPIC EVENTS also encompasses Montane Trail 26 and Petzl Night Runner events.

In 2010 established Montane Lakeland 50 & 100 LTD. This has now become the UKs leading ultra distance trail running event.

In 2010 established The Endurance Store triathlon, trail running and open water swimming store. Based in Appley Bridge, Wigan, we are the North West’s community store, organising and supporting local athletes and local events.

Check out the endurance store HERE

Endurance Store Logo

Zoe Salt – Ladies winner race report Iznik Ultra

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Zoe Salt may not be a name that you know… however, a little look back to 2013 and you will see that Zoe placed 3rd (behind Meghan Hicks and Jo Meek) at the Marathon des Sables. It’s a podium place that didn’t get the recognition it deserved. Fast forward to 2015 and Zoe has now won the 130km Iznik Ultra and in the process placed 4th overall. In the coming weeks, Zoe is preparing for Transvulcania La Palma, she knows full well that the racing in La Palma will be very different to the racing in Turkey. Here Zoe writes about her Turkish experience.

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I arrived in Istanbul. It’s not quite the West, it’s not quite the East, and it is different, special and unique. Minarets dominate the skyline as the sun begins to set.

I am a kid in a sweet shop – literally! Turkish delight and Baklava abound.

Friday – I awake to the exotic sound of the call to prayer. The sun has come out and it is gorgeous! From the breakfast room at the top of our hotel we realise how enormous Istanbul is (14.4million people). It stretches out in every direction towards and beyond the horizon. From the ferry crossing we can still see its sprawl an hour after leaving the port of Yenikapi. But enough sightseeing – I really should try to sleep!

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Arriving in Yalova everything is much calmer. Driving to Iznik reveals some of the terrain we are likely to be encountering in a few hours…. Namely hills. Panic. They look a lot bigger than Muswell Hill… Must try and sleep…

The race village is already buzzing when we arrive. Where is my list?

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  1. Register – check!
  2. Kit – check!
  3. Nerves – check!
  4. Food – check!
  5. Water – check!
  6. Pin number to t-shirt – check!
  7. Change t-shirt – check!
  8. Pin number to new t-shirt – check!
  9. Eat – check!
  10. Take photo of incredible sunset over the lake – check!

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Then to bed to try and sleep…. count sheep…. count breathing…. so that’ll be no sleeping then….

We leave for the midnight start, which is completely new to me – way past my bedtime. It is cold. I already have on a fleece top, gloves and balaclava … should I put my jacket on? That will require a re-pin of the number. But surely even cold-blooded me will be running in a t-shirt when the sun comes out? No. Leave it alone. Number is on t-shirt. 11:50pm I think I’ll put my number on my fluorescent vest. Re pin!

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11:55pm on the start line. Vaguely distracted as a little Labrador puppy comes to see me off! And soon we are on our way into the darkness of Iznik. Within a few metres I am on my own, so I speed up to follow someone as my worst fear is getting lost in the dark. It turns out that this is another of my unnecessary stresses as there are markers every 50’ish’ meters – foolproof even for me! We run through miles and miles of olive groves and trees full of blossom. It is so quiet. Then bam! I am confronted with what in the dark seems to be a near vertical climb. Have I packed climbing shoes or rope? My calves are burning. And this is only a smallish hill, according to the course profile! Just as I’m worrying about the big hills to come, a certain Mr Corless runs past me backwards taking pictures!

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Dawn arrives and with it the wonderful call to prayer. As the sun rises over the hills, bathing the landscape in beautiful colours, I reach the halfway point and am told by the race director that the most picturesque part of the race is still to come.

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I have caught up with Mariya Niklova and Alper Dalkilic. I like having them in sight, especially as we are hounded by packs of dogs, some baring teeth. I run behind them for miles, them pulling away, me catching up, until eventually, around 72km they slow enough and I pass them. I’m on my own and the uphill begins again. Up, up, up… when do we go down again? I see a runner in front and I am spurred on. Up, up, up – how high is this going? I pass the runner. I have no idea how far it is to the next checkpoint as my watch has died. I’m wondering if this is a metaphor. Finally I start descending. It seems like an eternity to the next aid station. The dirt track gives way to a paved road, a few right turns into a village and there is the checkpoint! I ask a man how many girls are ahead of me and he replies ‘Three.’ My heart drops. ‘Three girls?’ I repeat.

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He laughs.

I obviously give him a confused look and he says ‘Three people.’ I’m obviously still giving my best confused face as he repeats in very slow English, as if it is me whose first language is not English, ‘THREE. MEN. IN. FRONT. YOU. ARE. 4th’ Well, this I don’t believe so I laugh along with them, eat a bit of orange while they kindly fill my water bottle and am off again.

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Up, up, up again. I see no other runners but the scenery is as promised. The hills offer views of distant snow-capped mountains. In the foreground a lake, its surrounding fields and minarets marking each village and town. How I manage to resist the urge to stop to take pictures I will never know. Wild tortoises, goats and their shepherds, dogs and toads surround me. I feel like David Attenborough!

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I keep looking behind me. Where is everyone else? I feel like I’m travelling in reverse. Surely others should be overtaking me? I keep going. Plodding. Finally I reach the last checkpoint. I stick my head under the village fountain because I am so hot! The villagers come out and cheer. It is an incredible atmosphere – I will appreciate it more later!

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It’s downhill, at least for a bit then the uphill starts again! Where is Iznik? I could see it before but now I’m back in the trees and the lake has vanished. I come to a puddle I can see no way around. It’s quite big but I know it’s not the lake! I put one foot in and half my leg disappears. At least it’s cold! Back on track and it’s now downhill. Iznik finally comes into sight; I keep looking behind me as I feel like I’m barely moving. Still nobody else in sight! A bicycle that escorts me to the finish meets me. I work out it’s about a mile left to go. I concentrate and dream of my legs carrying me a little more. Eventually I cross the finish line…. 4th overall and the ladies winner.

Presented with a lovely ceramic medal, I try to say, ‘this is nice, I am from the *Potteries’ (the *Potteries – known as Stoke on Trent in the UK) but now it is they who look on, confusingly at me…!

Iznik Ultra – Check!

View the Iznik Ultra race images HERE

Iznik Ultra report on RUNULTRA HERE