Ultra Trail Snowdonia 2021 Summary #UTS

Josh Bakker-Dyos

Persistent rain, low cloud, poor visibility, mud, bogs, wet rocks, climbs and descents that made even the most adapted legs scream in pain, yes, that was Ultra Trail Snowdonia 2021.

Missing in 2020 due to the dreaded ‘C’ word, the UTS returned in 2021 to Capel Curig as part of the Ultra Trail World Tour and supported by Hoka One One to confirm the dream of Michael Jones of Apex Running – A big UTMB style weekend of racing in the heart of Wales.

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With distances of 50km, 100km and the whopping 165km, one word was touted pretty much everywhere all weekend, brutal! And it was… A savage weekend of racing but as Michael says, ‘beautifully beyond belief, savage beyond reason.’

Despite the rain, despite the lack of views, Wales was a stunning playground for trail running. Let’s be clear here, there is no ‘easy’ running at UTS. The 50km is a wonderfully challenging route that may well have surprised many with some of its technical challenges, particularly the climb from Ogwen up to Carnedd Dafydd, compensated for what could be then considered a ‘relatively’ easy run in to the finish via Lyn Cowlyd and Blaen-Y-Nant.

The 100km route followed the early miles of the UTS50 all the way to Pen-Y-Pass but then headed along the Miners’ Track for an extended loop to return via the Pyg Track heading off to Y Garn, a loop around Tryfan and then head up to Carnedd Dafydd via a different route to the 50km and then follow the same run in to the finish.

The 165km is well, just a monster! As expected, it created carnage amongst the competitors. It’s a relentless beasting of mind and body that passes through the whole of Snowdonia. The 100km and 50km routes all utilizing sections of this all-encompassing journey but only the 165km giving the full perspective of how beautiful and hard the Welsh mountains are. As with all races at UTS, it started and concluded in Capel Curig. Heading off to Blaenau Ffestiniog, Croesor it then picked up the 50km and 100km routes to Pen-Y-Pass. Nantmoor, Moel Hebdog, Llyn-y-Gadair and then after Yr Wyddfa it followed the Snowdon Ranger Path for an extended loop before returning via the Snowdon Massif and Pyg Track to Pen-y-Pass. From here, the 100km and 165km routes were identical all the way back to Capel Curig.

Tremayne Dill Cowdry summed it up:
“45 hours to do just over 100 miles and every minute of that was a hard slog.
Mountains, bog, wet rock, tough nav on a marked course, sleep deprivation, mist, rain and the terrain!! Very little was even runnable. I can’t imagine a 100 miler more difficult than that. Easily the hardest I’ve done and definitely the hardest in the UK. I was going ok although I would have happily dropped given the chance but my feet succumb to the permanent wet and I had to hobble the last 20-ish miles…

Stunning landscape

As with all races, someone has to cross the line first, and of course there was stunning performances all weekend. However, the real sense of achievement came firstly from toeing the line and being in with a chance of completing a journey. The second came from completing the journey. Every medal was hard earned.

Josh Bakker-Dyos

In the 165km event, Josh Bakker-Dyos lead from the start and while many expected him to blow up, so fast was his pace, he never did. He was relentless and consistent crossing the line in 28:51:43. It was easy to say, ‘he made it look easy!’ But for every other runner who crossed the 165km line, it was very clear, there was nothing easy on this route! Toby Hazelwood was less than 60-minutes behind in second, 29:45:17, another stunning run! Adam Jeffs rounded the podium with 34:09:54. Alice Sheldon and Becky Wightman were the only female finishers, 45:09:55 and 47:41:06 their hard-earned efforts stopping the clock – a brutal two nights and days out in the Welsh mountains. Only 32 completed the race.

Mark Darbyshire

The 100km route was won, but not dominated by Lakeland 100 champ, Mark Darbyshire ahead of Josh Wade and Jack Scott. Mark crossed in 14:25:47 with 14:33:36 going to second. It was 16:02:05 elapsed before the third crossed the line. Sarah Stavely (21:41:03) won the women’s race with Kajsa Holgersson and Julie Finn in second and third, 22:28:49 and 22:44:53.

Lauren Woodwiss

Harry Jones flew around the UTS 50 route and looked as strong at the finish as when he started, his 6:13:33 a stunning time. It was 6:56:54 elapsed before second place Will Simmons crossed ahead of Spencer Shaw in 7:14:53. Lauren Woodwiss, like Jones, lead from the start dictating an excellent pace over the 50km route and completed her journey in an excellent 7:54:18. Celia Waring placed second in 8:36:18 and Abelone Lyng from Norway, moved up from outside the top-10 women to eventually finish third in 8:43:16 after sprinting for the line ahead of Jenna Shail who was just 13-seconds behind.

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Abelone Lyng

As Capel Curig slowly returned to some normality on Sunday, it was easy to see that the UTS will become one of the ultimate trail running events not only in the UK but the world. It may not have all the glamour and glitz of Chamonix and the UTMB. It’s a much more grass roots event, some would say a ‘true’ trail running event. Ultimately though, Wales was the hero of the weekend offering stunning routes. This landscape combined with the vision of Michael Jones of Apex Running and a team of dedicated volunteers and supporters will make UTS a ‘one to do!’ However, if you are thinking about the 165 event? Think long hard and without doubt, train hard, it’s a beautifully brutal beast.

‘beautifully beyond belief, savage beyond reason.’

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

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Ultra Trail Snowdonia 2021 Preview

Coronavirus pretty much wiped out the 2020 racing calendar and unfortunately, UTS was a casualty at the 11th hour. Gladly, UTS returns for 2021 bigger and better than ever… Supported by Hoka One One® and now part of the Ultra-Trail® World Tour, UTS is the UK’s answer to other big European ultras! Learn more about the Ultra-Trail® World Tour HERE.

Michael Jones of Apex Running Co is a runner himself, so, he has understood the need and desire to race, but also abide by government guidelines and provide a safe race – a thankless task for anyone. Michael has been positive though, always looking ahead, planning and working within government guidelines to bring a safe and stunning weekend of racing to Wales.

Three events that show Snowdonia at its best. The 50km has a 14-hour cut-off, the 100km 33-hours and the 165km a whopping 50-hour limit. Needless to say, 3 very tough events in a tough and challenging part of the world. Covering an area of 827 square miles and established in 1951, Snowdonia is the second largest National Park in the UK and home to the highest peaks in the UK outside of Scotland. From its 37 miles of beautiful beaches where you can surf, to rugged, ridge-laden mountain peaks and an array of pristine lakes inbetween: there is something to please every outdoor enthusiast here! Keen to learn a bit more about beautiful Snowdonia? A great place to start is the Snowdonia National Park Authority website HERE.

The 165km event is the main event of the weekend starting at 11am on Friday 10th September. A route that starts and finishes in Capel Curig, it’s a monster of a challenge.

The schedule for the weekend is HERE

UTS Facebook HERE

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Each distance features 3300/6700/10,000m+ elevation gain, on predominantly technical mountain trails. This makes UTS one of, if not THE toughest Ultra-Trail® events in the world. UTS isn’t just challenging for the sake of it though. With routes that explore Snowdonia’s most scenic valleys, rugged peaks and epic landscapes, these race routes are truly the most beautiful in the UK!

Entry lists are available to view via the UTS website. While most entrants are from the UK, there is a multinational feel with Poland, Sweden, Norway, South Africa, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, New Zealand, Portugal, Czech Republic, Australia, Spain, USA, Germany, Netherlands and more… listed on the start sheets.

The UTS 165 is the stand-out and flagship event offering a stunningly brutal and beautiful tour of the Snowdonia National Park. Starting in Capel Curig, the route takes in the most notable peaks of north Wales.

UTS 100 has technical trails, epic views and is a highlight tour of north Wales.

Arguably, the UTS 50 is an entry level race but still requires respect for the challenges that Wales and its mountains can bring.

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Pyrenees Stage Run 2021 – Stage 7

All good things come to an end. Yesterday, stage 7 concluded the 2021 Pyrenees Stage Run. In stage racing, the last day is often an easy victory run allowing participants to relax, tick off easy miles and cruise in to the finish and conclusion of the race. Not so at the PSR, stage 7 from Esterri d’Àneu to Salardú was tough one!

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On paper, considering what had gone before, 32.8km’s and 2300m+ didn’t seem over scary. However, on inspection of the maps and discussions at the race briefing, it was clear that the middle section of the route would reduce runners to crawling pace.

An 0700 start allowed more time to complete the distance and after an easy km, the route then proceeded to head up firstly via Pas del Corro ski station at 6.8km and 1947m. From here, there was some easy trail and then at just before 11km, single-track turned into extremely technical boulder hopping all the way up to Coll de Baisero at 2739m.

The fun wasn’t over though, a steep descent down a couloir and then more boulders and technical terrain.

Visually stunning, mentally exhausting and technically demanding, this section of the PSR was a highlight. Cloud hung over the mountain giving a magical feel. The landscape, views, mountain vistas and lakes were magical. Lasting just 6km, this section of the route was taking 2-3 hours, yes, it was that demanding.

Refugio de Saboredo at 2310m and 18.5km covered signified a key marker and from here, the run in to the finish in Salardú was easy and pretty much all downhill.

The Aigüestortes I Estanys de Sant Maurici National Park, Vall de Cabanes and Vall d”Aran was the star of the day and each runner well and truly earned the finishing medal.

The PSR is all about enjoyment, exclusivity, good times, sharing a journey and an experience. That was clear to see with how everyone congratulated and applauded each and every finish, first or last.

In any run or race there are winners and the “Tuga Canarias” team of Gilberto Molina and Carmelo Gonzalez dominated the week with a total time of  38h 22m. In second position were the Belgians “The Ultrazzz” of Wim Debbaut, Thomas Swankaert and Kurt Dhont completed in  40h 5m with “The Sigobros Century” team of Jesús and Mario Delgado totalling 41h 54m for third.

The women’s category was dominated from start to finish by Czechs Marcela Mikulecka and Petra Buresova “Runsport Team” who finished with 45h 23m, they also placed 5th overall. In second place were the English Jeanette Rogers and Kerrianne Rogers (mother and daughter) from “Running Holidays France” team with 56h 35m

The final winners in the mixed category were the German team “Black Forest” of Steffen Rothe and Kathrin Litterst who had an unexpected end with a fast run to win overall by just 1-minute in 46h19m. Jaroslaw and Natalia Haczyk from Poland (team “BeerRunners”) placed second after leading all week with 46h 20m. Dutch “B-Running” with Bastian Mathijssen and Birgit Van Bockxmeer placed third with 48h 41m.

Now attention turns to 2022 and the next running of the PSR. One thing is for sure, the edition will be highly anticipated. There is something very special about travelling by foot covering 240 km’s through the Pyrenees and the PSR team do a great job of making the experience a special one. A stunning route and great organisation, this is a run not to be missed!

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https://iancorless.photoshelter.com/gallery-collection/Pyrenees-Stage-Run-2021/C0000vD_jVbFNfuI

You can find all the information about the PSR in the website of the race, https://psr.run, together with the videos, photographs and results of the stages.

The Pyrenees Stage Run would not be possible without the main sponsorship of Turga Active Wear, Garmin, Puigcerdà, Encamp (And) Vall del Madriu-Perafita-Claror and bifree sports.

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

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Pyrenees Stage Run 2021 – Stage 6

It was the penultimate day of the 2021 Pyrenees Stage Run, 26.6km with 1820m+ starting in Tavascan and concluding in Esterri d’Àneu.

Crossing the last part of the Pallars Sobirà region to face Vall d’Aran, past participants had enthusiastically proclaimed that this was a spectacular day, and they were correct.

The early 6km of climbing to La Pleta del Prat (1720m) were mostly on forest trails, however, from the ski station, the landscape opened up offering stunning views of the surrounding mountains. The highlights of the day were the lakes of Estany de Mascarida and Collada dels Tres Estanys.

The highpoint of the day coming at 2646m and with it scree slopes, rope sections and after Collada dels Tres Estanys some small chained sections.

It was a wow day, the landscape truly spectacular.

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Pont de Graus and Unarre broke up the long 16km downhill to the finish that would sap tired legs.

Parc Naturel de L’Ailt Pirineu gave way to Parc Nacional d”Aigüestortes I Estany de Sant Maurici and the finish in Esterri d’Àneu was a welcome conclusion to a beautiful day.

Tomorrow, stage 7 will conclude the PSR and while the runners bodies will welcome the conclusion of a tough 240km journey, there is already a hint of sadness that this experience is coming to close.

The PSR is most definitely a run experience that gives an all encompassing run journey through a remarkable part of the world. Of course, there are those who will finish first, but this 7-day journey feels much more like a run than a race.

The PSR can be followed live through the website of the race, https://psr.run, and every day a video and photographs of the stages will be published on their social networks.

The Pyrenees Stage Run would not be possible without the main sponsorship of Turga Active Wear, Garmin, Puigcerdà, Encamp (And) Vall del Madriu-Perafita-Claror and bifree sports.

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

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Pyrenees Stage Run 2021 – Stage 5

Stage 5 of the 2021 Pyrenees Stage Run may well just be the ‘best’ one. Of course, it’s all subjective and when all stage have their highlights, it’s hard to choose. However, if you love tough mountain days, stage 5 is a doozy!

The predicted bad weather came early with persistent rain and at times, strong winds. However, it didn’t deter from the type 2 fun, actually, it added to it!

Leaving Arinsal, it was straight climb all the way to the Refugi Compadreose (2260m) and the first aid station. It was here the rain came and the temperature dropped with just 5km covered.

A short flat section and then the climb to Portella de Baiau at 2756m and the highest point of the PSR. The terrain was challenging, slippery and difficult – just perfect! The lakes providing some visual splendour in the great wet mist.

The scree descent was a highlight of the day, however, for some, it would be terrifying… It’s like skiing on rocks!

Rolling terrain, technical single-track and finally the next aid station at La Molinassa (1806m) with 16km covered. The elapsed time on watches reflecting how difficult the run so far had been.

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Now easy running all the way to Àreu aid station and 24.7km.

From here, the Coll de Tudela beckoned at 2240m, a straight VK (vertical kilometre) in 5km. Just perfect at 25kmm in a 40km day.

From the summit the run down to Boldís Sobirà at 1488m was non-technical and arguably some of the easiest running of the day. Over the next 4km, there was some small rollercoaster terrain before the sharp, steep and technical drop to the line at Tavascan (1140m) – what a day!

The PSR can be followed live through the website of the race, https://psr.run, and every day a video and photographs of the stages will be published on their social networks.

Tomorrow, stage 6 is 26.34km with 1635m+ crossing the Natural Park of Alt Pirineu in the middle of magnificent forests, and ending up to Esterri d’Aneu, close to the National Park of Aigüestortes i Sant Maurici.

The Pyrenees Stage Run would not be possible without the main sponsorship of Turga Active Wear, Garmin, Puigcerdà, Encamp (And) Vall del Madriu-Perafita-Claror and bifree sports.

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

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Pyrenees Stage Run 2021 – Stage 4

Stage 4 of the 2021 Pyrenees Stage Run was just 20km but with 1700m+. Certainly, the shorter distance was welcome after yesterday’s long day of 47km.

A later start allowed for more sleep and recovery, again, extremely welcome.

Departing Encamp at 0830 the stage concluded in Arinsal with two peaks to climb over. It was a day of mostly single-track, at times a little technical and often within dense tree cover. The sun occasionally broke through and when the trees allowed, views could be absorbed of the surrounding mountains and Ordino.

As in the previous days, the usual protagonists dictated the pace, however, there was a definite feeling of this being a transition stage… Recovery from the previous 3-days and a re-charge for the challenging 3-days to come.

The competition continues to be dominated by much margin for the “Tuga Canarias” team (Gilberto Molina and Carmelo Gonzalez) in the men’s category, followed by a great fight for the 2nd position between the “The Sigobros Century” teams (the brothers Jesús and Mario Delgado). and the Belgians “The Ultrazzz” (Wim Debbaut, Thomas Swankaert and Kurt Dhont). 

In female category the Czechs Marcela Mikulecka and Petra Buresova “Runsport Team” dominate, followed by the English Jeanette Rogers and Kerrianne Rogers from “Running Holidays France”. 

Finally, in the mixed category, the classification has been clarified in favour of the Polish team “BeerRunners” (Jaroslaw and Natalia Haczyk), followed by the Germans “Black Forest” (Steffen Rothe and Kathrin Litterst) and the Dutch “B-Running” (Bastian Mathijssen and Birgit Van Bockxmeer).

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An early finish (cut off 1430 in Arinsal) allowed for a relaxing afternoon and the opportunity to take transport (arranged by the race) to visit Andorra or go to a spa. For many though, the opportunity to relax, sleep, eat and hydrate was the best option.

At all time, the PSR team are on hand and they are handling logistics perfectly keeping everyone up-to-date of all that is happening and the relevant timescales. Hotels have been excellent and the food ideal for hungry stage runners. It is very much a running holiday and the mood and atmosphere is one of fun and enjoyment. I am sure it is why so many come back to the PSR for more than one edition.

Tomorrow’s stage 5 from Arinsal to Tavascan is a beautiful day and with 40km to cover and 2680m+ it will be a challenge. Notably from Àreu there is a VK (1000m+) to the Coll de Tudlea at 2240m.

The PSR can be followed live through the website of the race, https://psr.run, and every day a video and photographs of the stages will be published on their social networks.

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

Follow on:

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Pyrenees Stage Run 2021 – Stage 3

The longest day of the race travelling from Puigcerdà to Encamp in Andorra. A tough and challenging 47.5km with 2600m+ over some stunning and remarkable terrain that would leave the runners weary from the effort but rejuvenated by the views.

The early km’s were easy but soon the trail pointed to the sky and by 18km’s Guils-Fontanera had been passed and Refugi de Malniu opened up the gateway to the try challenges of this stage.

The climb to Portella D’Engorgs at 2696m sapping the energy of all only to be followed by a descent to Cabana D’Esparvers at 2060m and then another climb to 2543m and Coll de L’Illa. Looking at the profile, one may think that the final 15km is all downhill… Think again, it’s a challenging run with many false flats and technical terrain only to sap the legs and energy before the arrival in Andorra.

The day was always going to be feared and rightly so, 47km is never an easy run, even when fresh, let alone after already a couple of challenging days. The weather forecast also was less than favorable with storms and rain forecast for the afternoon, gladly it only arrived at 4pm and lasted for 30-minutes.

Relentless in beauty, the stage had it all with wide open valleys, technical single-track, tough and hard climbs and leg busting descents. It was a day to survive for many, the promise of an easier 20km stage the day after.

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As in the previous days, the results were the same, “Tuga Canarias” team of Gilberto Molina and Carmelo Gonzalez once again won. However, second place went to “The Ultrazzz” team of Wim Debbaut, Thomas Swankaert and Kurt Dhont with Jesús and Mario Delgado of the “The Sigobros Century” placing 3rd.

In the female category, Marcela Mikulecka and Petra Buresova of “Runsport Team” dominated followed by mother and daughter, Jeanette Rogers and Kerrianne Rogers of “Running Holidays France.”  

Jaroslaw and Natalia Haczyk of “BeerRunners” lead the mixed category ahead of “B-Running” team Bastian Mathijssen and Birgit Van Bockxmeer are followed by Steffen Rothe i Kathrin Litterst of “Black Forest.” 

The Pyrenees Stage Run would not be possible without the main sponsorship of Turga Active Wear, Garmin, Puigcerdà, Encamp (And) Vall del Madriu-Perafita-Claror and bifree sports.

Stage 4 is just 20k but with 1900m+.

The PSR can be followed live through the website of the race, https://psr.run, and every day a video and photographs of the stages will be published on their social networks.

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

Follow on:

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Pyrenees Stage Run 2021 – Stages 1 and 2

The Pyrenees Stage Run 2021 got underway yesterday, Sunday August 29th from Ribes de Freser. The challenge? 240km over 7-days allowing participants to fully appreciate the beauty of the Pyrenees. 

A linear route, the journey concludes in Salardú with a 32.8km distance and 2300m+ 

Running in teams of 2 or 3 participants, the Pyrenees Stage Run arguably is a running holiday, with tough and challenging days and then relaxing post-race with a shower, bed, fresh clothes and excellent dinner each evening.

Stage 1 concluding in Queralbs after 34.3km and 2180m+ with highlights of Emprius de Pardines, Balandrau at 2585m (the highest point peak of the day), Col de Tres Pics, Coma de Vaca and finally Santuari de Núria before the drop to Queralbs. It was a successful day with all runners achieving the cut-off times. However, as always happens in any run,, injury hit forcing one runner not to make the start for day 2.

The ‘Tuna Canarias’ team of Gilberto Molina and Carmel Gonzales dictated the pace over the challenging terrain in Capçaleres del Ter I Freser Natural Park. A highlight of the day was the panoramic views from Balandrau Peak. Passing Refugio de Montaña the temptation to stop, take a cold drink and snack may well be tempting distraction but the Santuari dr Núria was waiting and then the finish.

Stage 2 started with the Cremella train journey back to the finish line of day 1 and a relatively late start of 0815. The 37,4km that lay ahead with 1700m+ was in comparison to stage 1, ‘easy’ running!

Concluding in Puigcerdà the route was almost 100% GR11 track with little technicality but some stunning views. 

Starting with a climb over the first 7km to Collet De Les Barraques, the route then dropped down to Can Fosses at 10km and the second lowest elevation point of the day. The following 12km was all about gently climbing  to Coll de la Creu de Meians at 1992m via the pretty town of Dòrria. Coll Marcer followed and then the route dropped to Vilallobent before 5km of road to the stage 2 conclusion in the capital of Cerdanya, Puigercerdà.

The race is so far it is dominated by “Tuga Canarias” team of Gilberto Molina and Carmelo Gonzalez. Jesús and Mario Delgado of the “The Sigobros Century” follow and the “The Ultrazzz” team of Wim Debbaut, Thomas Swankaert and Kurt Dhont are 3rd in the in the men’s category. 

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In the female category, Marcela Mikulecka and Petra Buresova of “Runsport Team” have a strong lead after another excellent day, followed by mother and daughter, Jeanette Rogers and Kerrianne Rogers of “Running Holidays France.” 

Finally, in the mixed category Jaroslaw and Natalia Haczyk of “BeerRunners” lead “B-Running” team Bastian Mathijssen and Birgit Van Bockxmeer are followed by Steffen Rothe i Kathrin Litterst of “Black Forest.” 

The Pyrenees Stage Run would not be possible without the main sponsorship of Turga Active WearGarminPuigcerdàEncamp (And), Vall del Madriu-Perafita-Claror and the organisation of bifree sports.

The event enters Andorra on Tuesday for stage 3, the longest of the race at 47km and 2600m+ The runners have 12 hours to finish the route.

The PSR can be followed live through the website of the race, https://psr.run, and every day a video and photographs of the stages will be published on their social networks.

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

Follow on:

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Twitter – @talkultra

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Episode 218 – The Chamonix Tapes 6 – Emily Hawgood and Petter Engdahl

Welcome to ‘The Chamonix Tapes’ an inside look at the adidas Terrex Team during the 2021 UTMB.

Starting on Tuesday August 24th and running through to Sunday August 29th, there will be a daily podcast release for your audio pleasure.
In The Chamonix Tapes 6, we speak with Emily Hawgood and Petter Engdahl.

“This summer has been amazing, from not being able to travel to being here in the Alps for 2-months has been superb! The big goal for this Summer has been OCC. So far the adidas Terrex Team support has exceeded my expectations… The team is growing and we will have some really good years ahead of us, adidas Terrex have the aim to move the boundaries of trail running in a new area of professionalism without losing the sport ethos.” – Petter Engdahl

Show links:


Website HERE

Spotify HERE  

ITunes HERE  

iOS HERE

Android HERE  

Web player HERE  

Libsyn – HERE   

Tunein – HERE

Episode 217 – The Chamonix Tapes 5 – Robbie Simpson

Welcome to ‘The Chamonix Tapes’ an inside look at the adidas Terrex Team during the 2021 UTMB.

Starting on Tuesday August 24th and running through to Sunday August 29th, there will be a daily podcast release for your audio pleasure.
In The Chamonix Tapes 5, we speak with Robbie Simpson.

“I have always like road and I think there is a place for that… But, I am keen to move towards trail and longer distance events. That feeling of running up a mountain on a smooth or technical trail is magical.”

Show links:


Website HERE

Spotify HERE  

ITunes HERE  

iOS HERE

Android HERE  

Web player HERE  

Libsyn – HERE   

Tunein – HERE