Kaci Lickteig – Dreams Do Come True on IRUN4ULTRA

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 ‘Western States definitely was the race of my life. Everything came together so perfectly that day. I had a once in a lifetime race day experience. I had only dreamed of winning Western States and wanted some day for that to happen. All the stars aligned and I could win. To be among the winners list is surreal…I admire and respect all those women and men who have won. It’s such an honour to have my name listed as a winner of Western States 100.’

Kaci Lickteig ran her first ultra in 2012 aged 25-years. A small lady, she does pack a punch. It’s all wonderfully echoed by her nickname ‘Pixie Ninja’ – that sums up Kaci in a nutshell.

Some may say, 3rd time is a charm. It certainly is the case with Western States 100. The rise of this lady has been gradual but logical – 6th in 2014, 2nd in 2015 and yes, you’ve guessed it, top spot in 2016. The ‘WSER’ is rolling course, which begins in Squaw Valley, California. It climbs more than 5500m and descends nearly 7000m before reaching the finish in Auburn some 100-miles later. It’s the ‘Grail of Trail!’

Read the full article on IRUN4ULTRA HERE

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Episode 127 – Mario Fraioli and Stephanie Howe Violett

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Episode 127 of Talk Ultra is here with an in-depth talk with coach Mario Fraioli and Stephanie Howe Violett who is back after injury, not only with a ladies’ win, but an outright victory at Bandera 100k and a slot for Western States. Niandi is going me as co-host.

00:01:28 Show Start

New Year and Talk Ultra needs your help! 

We are five year’s old this January and as a show we are proud that we have produced a wealth of content for free. The show will always be free! However, demands on time, production costs, editing really impact on Talk Ultra, therefore, if you love the show please help us out. We have set up a Patreon page and we are offering some great benefits for Patrons you can even join us on the show! This is the easiest way to support Talk Ultra and help us continue to create! 

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RUNNING BEYOND BOOK is travelling the world many thanks for the support in purchasing the book. You can get a signed copy HERE. We mentioned in the last show about Running Beyond Event which will take place 3, 4 and 5th March in London, plans are progressing for that… in addition, Niandi and myself will now be in Amsterdam on Feb 3rd, 4th and 5th for a Trails in Motion event and Running Beyond book signing with Mud Sweat and Trails and I will be also going to Sofia in Bulgaria on the 17th, 18th and 19th March for a trail, mountain and Skyrunning expo.

00:14:17 NEWS

Bandera 100K

Steph Howe Violett 9:08 chicken the field and earned a WSER slot, Camille Herron 9:29 was 2nd and Nicole Kalogeropoulus was 3rd 10:06

Justin Ricks was 1st male and 2nd overall in 9:13, Jeff Ball 9:21 and Joel Frost Tift 3rd in 9:33

I caught up with Stephanie to talk about her great return to form after a year of injury, operations and fractures.

00:23:01 INTERVIEW with Stephanie Howe Violett

Hong Kong 100

Nuria Picas 11:18:57 2nd Linming Chen, 3rd Marie McNaughton, 4th Fuzhao Xiang, 5th Rachel Campbell

Yanqiao Yun 9:35:11 2n Daniel Jung, 3rd Sage Canaday, 4th Didrik Hermansen, 5th Tim Tollefson

In the UK The Spine is underway just as the snow and ice arrived.

On the last show we had an interview with Caroline Boller and with a new year starting and many of you planning a racing year, I thought it would be a good idea to catch up with Caroline’s coach, Mario Fraioli, and find out his thoughts on how to approach training and planning.

01:16:39 INTERVIEW with Mario Fraioli

UP & COMING RACES

Antartica

Antarctic Ice 100k | 100 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

Argentina

Columbia Cruce de los Andes | 90 kilometers | February 01, 2017 | website

Cambodia

Bayon Trail Angkor 64 km | 64 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

Ultra Trail d’Angkor 128 km | 128 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

Canada

Alberta

River Valley Revenge 50K | 50 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

Chile

El Cruce Columbia | 103 kilometers | February 01, 2017 | website

France

Dordogne

53 km | 53 kilometers | January 29, 2017 | website

53 km Relais (17+26+10) | 53 kilometers | January 29, 2017 | website

Essonne

Raid 28 | 80 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

Semiraid 28 | 50 kilometers | January 22, 2017 | website

Ultra Raid 28 | 120 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

Eure

47 km | 50 kilometers | January 30, 2017 | website

Tarn

La Ronde Givrée | 62 kilometers | January 29, 2017 | website

Germany

Bavaria

Chiemsee-Ultramarathon Januar | 108 kilometers | January 28, 2017 | website

Schwabacher Winter Ultra | 56 kilometers | January 22, 2017 | website

Brandenburg

HallenMarathon 50km Ultra-Lauf | 50 kilometers | January 22, 2017 | website

Hesse

Rodgau 50km Ultramarathon | 50 kilometers | January 28, 2017 | website

Greece

1000K | 1000 kilometers | February 02, 2017 | website

1000 miles | 1000 miles | February 02, 2017 | website

Hong-Kong

Green Power Hike 50K | 50 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

Kenya

Kimbia Kenya 100 km | 100 kilometers | February 03, 2017 | website

Kimbia Kenya 50 km | 50 kilometers | February 03, 2017 | website

New Zealand

Ian Priest Memorial Ultra Marathon | 60 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

The James Mountain Stampede Ultra | 50 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

Oman

Wadi Bih Run | 72 kilometers | February 03, 2017 | website

Portugal

Ultra Trilhos dos Abutres | 50 kilometers | January 28, 2017 | website

Réunion

Transvolcano | 52 kilometers | January 22, 2017 | website

United Kingdom

Lancashire

Marmot Dark Mountains™ – Elite Course | 53 kilometers | January 28, 2017 | website

USA

Alabama

Mountain Mist 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | January 28, 2017 | website

Arizona

100 Mile Trail Run | 100 miles | January 21, 2017 | website

50K | 50 kilometers | January 28, 2017 | website

50M | 50 miles | January 28, 2017 | website

52K | 52 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

52 Mile | 52 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

California

Crystal Springs 50 Km Trail Run | 50 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

Folsom South Side Trail 38 Mile Run | 38 miles | January 28, 2017 | website

Folsom South Side Trail 50K Run | 50 kilometers | January 28, 2017 | website

Colorado

Frozen Dead Guy 50km | 50 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

Florida

55K Ultra Individual Marathon (34.2 miles) | 55 kilometers | January 28, 2017 | website

55K Ultra Relay (each leg is 3.1 miles x 11 legs = 34.2 miles) | 55 kilometers | January 28, 2017 | website

Clearwater Distance 50K Ultra | 50 kilometers | January 22, 2017 | website

IRONHEAD BROTHERS RELAY | 100 miles | January 28, 2017 | website

Skydive Ultra 100M Run | 100 miles | January 28, 2017 | website

Skydive Ultra 150M Run | 150 miles | January 28, 2017 | website

Skydive Ultra 200M Run | 200 miles | January 28, 2017 | website

Skydive Ultra 50 km Run | 50 kilometers | January 28, 2017 | website

Skydive Ultra 50M Run | 50 miles | January 28, 2017 | website

Minnesota

Arrowhead 135 mile Winter Ultramarathon | 135 miles | January 30, 2017 | website

New York

100 Miler | 100 miles | January 28, 2017 | website

50 Miler | 50 miles | January 28, 2017 | website

North Carolina

50K | 50 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

50 Mile Relay | 50 miles | January 21, 2017 | website

North Carolina Fat Ass 50k | 50 kilometers | January 28, 2017 | website

Ohio

Run for Regis 50K | 50 kilometers | January 28, 2017 | website

Winter Buckeye Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | January 29, 2017 | website

Oklahoma

2-Person 50K Relay | 50 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

Texas

50K | 50 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

Horseshoe Trail Run 50k | 50 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

Utah

Snowshoe Festival 50K | 50 kilometers | January 28, 2017 | website

Washington

50K | 50 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

50K | 50 kilometers | January 21, 2017 | website

Virgin Islands (USA)

St. Croix Scenic 50 km | 50 kilometers | January 22, 2017 | website

St. Croix Scenic 50 Mile | 50 miles | January 22, 2017 | website

02:22:57 Close

02:30:30

 

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Caroline Boller 50-Mile Trail Record In-Depth Interview

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Photo credit © Anthony Stasulli

In December 2016, female ultra-running in the USA hit a purple patch. Two Ann Trason records fell, Gina Slaby set a new outright 100-mile record lowering Trason’s 13:47:41 to 13:45:49 at Deserts Solstice Invitational and Caroline Boller lowered the USA 50-mile trail record to 5:48:01 at Brazos Bend. Caroline, aged 42-years is a Brit living in the USA and has only been running ultra’s for 4-years. I caught up with her to find out about this stunning run.

Ian: I’m joined by Caroline Boller and she’s Americas 50-mile fastest runner on the trails. How are you doing Caroline?

Caroline Boller: I’m doing very well thank you Ian.

Ian: So how does it feel running 50 miles super-fast and breaking a record that was set by Ann Trason, I mean come on, that pretty damn good isn’t it?

Caroline: Well it was a very good day, I was determined to have fun, it was my birthday so that helped to keep a positive mind-set, it was better day than I expected.

Ian: Yes, I mean what was Ann’s record 6:14 and change and you run 5:48:01, now, we have got a say that this is not on the same course and of course there’s many variables that come in with a trail record because the elevation gain, the type of surface that you’re running on but still it’s 50-miles and you’ve got to run it damn quick. What’s the thought process going in to a race like this, did you ever have a record at the back of your mind?

Caroline: The set up was more of a mark to see could if I go as fast as that and possibly faster on this course which is quite a fast course. I did have the record in mind, at the same time it was more of a personal challenge to me to try and see if I could get out there and just see how fast could I run on a trail surface; on a course that’s conducive to fast times. I thought I could probably run it sub-six on a good day, the trail was as described and then I got out there and was just having a fantastic day.

Whenever you go that fast in a 50-mile race or a long race like that you know there’s always a danger that it’s going to catch back up to you and I was willing to take that gamble and it paid off, and it doesn’t always work out like that but on this day, it did and it turned in to a great day because of it.

Ian: There’s so many things that come in into this type of performance and I’ve mentioned it before on my podcast and I’m going to go back to Ian Sherman’s win at Rocky Raccoon. Where the stars align, the weather’s perfect, the course is perfect, the person is perfect and it results in a perfect performance and arguably one can say that is how world records, course records, life time performance bests come. Do you feel that for you it was one of those days where everything just aligned?

Caroline: Well it definitely was a good day the conditions were amazing, the conditions can be quite difficult down there because it is essentially a swamp and even in the winter you can have– quite aside from the wild life there’s alligators and mosquitoes and things like that, which if you don’t like that sort of thing can throw you of a bit, but the weather was really good. It can be very humid there and we didn’t have a tone humidity in the air or at least I didn’t feel it, and the weather was quite cool.

It can also be quite warm even in December, so having an over cast day, a day that was very cool and was cool throughout. There was a little bit of wind for the second and the third loop course, three loops and second and the third loop we were buffeted a little bit by wind in some of the exposed sections of the course, but those sections were limited; I would say it was a total of maybe four or five miles throughout the whole race.

And so, I don’t think it affected me too much and I just enjoyed it and it’s one of those days where I just went in with a positive attitude. Like I said that helped me to overcome when it became tough, because it did get tough and I’m just thankful that it came together as it did because it’s very easy to give back all those early fast miles at the end and the fact that, that didn’t happen too much, I think I lost a couple of minutes from that last loop and that’s it. And other than that, my splits were very consistent throughout and yes it just came together well on the day.

Ian: Tell me about the pigs?

Caroline: The pigs were completely unexpected. I was running, it was in the first couple of miles and we’d just done a turn back and there quite a lot of runners at that point because we’d only just come out at the start right, and so I wasn’t the only one who was intimidated by these pigs but I could hear this noise in the brush and it was very loud, multiple animals snorting and you just don’t know what’s going to come out of the bushes. I was sort of thinking, no what could this be, I’m expecting it to be wild boar which is quite a bit bigger and has horns, they are much more aggressive and instead it was these pigs, they were wild pigs but they came out and they were maybe a dozen or so of them.

They came out right in front of me on the trail, just a few feet away and they streamed across the trail – stunning! If I had been there or if anyone had been there they would have completely been wiped out by this stampeding heard, but at the same time there’s part of me going, “They are so cute.” There were little baby piglets in there too, so cute. It could have been quite a different story from my racing day because you could still hear them in the brush even after the main group had passed and I thought no, I’m just going to have to chance it and go for it and I did and I was lucky enough that I did not get taken out by the pigs, I don’t think anybody did which is excellent news.

Ian: Brilliant! I was reading your report about the race and one of the things that interested me was in the latter stages of the report, you said that you felt as though there was always another runner in front of you and that you were running in second and chasing that runner, and that other runner may very well have been Ann Trason. Does visualization and mind games play a big part of getting a good performance out of yourself.

Caroline: It definitely does! The races where I am very mindful of keeping a positive attitude and of reinforcing that, in my mind I keep saying things to encourage myself and to tell myself that it’s going well – just keep at it! I sat to myself. ‘just stay there you don’t want to lose all that ground.’ Having that visualization of weather, a real runner or not, so, in this scenario I was just visualizing Ann Trason in front of me, and just following her lead which was quite fun.

In the end of the race I had a runner behind me, I passed him at about mile 45 and I was imagining that he was close on my heels and going to pass and I thought it would be quite fun to finish the race first overall, that was definitely motivating for me as well.

Ian: That must have been Michael? If I remember correctly, he was running the 100-mile race but dropped down to the 50?

Caroline: He had dropped down a couple of days before the race as he had come down with a cold, on the day he raced the 50.

Ian: On a course like this where you’re coming across other runners, how helpful is that in terms of motivation as well?

Caroline: Well the nice thing about a loop style course is that you do of course see a great deal of people. There are quite a lot of out and back sections from the course as well and you would see a lot of the same runners as you’re going around and they were all very encouraging, it makes it much more interesting! Instead of sort of just having a flat expansive road or trail, there was always something to be anticipating, I’ve got an aid station coming up here, I’m going to see my crew here, look I’ve seen that person again and they are having a strong day it’s good for them, try and encourage them on and there was always something to look at, always something to keep my mind engaged which was great.

Ian: What I find interesting is you consider yourself a rank amateur but you just set this time and that would indicate the opposite. How does that fit in your mind set?

Caroline: Well it is very hard for me to reconcile it too because I came to running later in life. I didn’t start until I was about 38, so for me it’s just been four years of plugging away. I feel that I’m only just sort of getting a handle on how to do it properly and I still don’t think I have a lot of it figured out. I mean I have yet to have a successful 100-mile race. I’m always optimistic that there’s a lot of better races still in me and I can perform better. Maybe it’s more of a personal view of myself that I’m never quite satisfied and I always want to be pushing for more.

I also see so many of these amazing women out there and of course the men too. Sometimes they make it look so effortless. Sometimes they get it right all the time and I don’t. I mean, I have races where I’ll have a good race and then I’ll have a bad race. I don’t have a ton of consistency. I do still think of myself as somebody who’s working out. I’m not quite there yet.

Ian: But in running terms you’re still in primary school, aren’t you? Because you’re only running for four years.

Caroline: Yes, that’s the hope [laughter], because I’m also 42, so you never know. At some point age catches up with you but then you see runners that are running well into their late 40s, early 50s, mid 50s and beyond. They’re so inspirational, so I know there’s more life in the legs yet.

Ian: I think age is just a number. There’s a point where you do go over a certain point and then you will get slower, but I don’t think at 42 that you’re not past the opportunities of achieving better results. You’re coached by Mario Fraioli, what does that bring to the package and how much do you learn from him?

Caroline: Well, Mario has a wealth of experience at all distances. He’s traditionally been someone who has focused on marathon and below distances with his athletes, but he also coaches ultra-runners.

The thing that appeals to me about that is that I’m keen to continue my progression on the speed end of things as well as on the endurance end of things. Mario is good at making sure that both of those aspects are covered going into any race. I feel like I don’t lose a ton of speed even when I’m training for something like a 50-mile, or 100K, or beyond that – the speed is there and it just takes a little bit of another thing if I want to then run a marathon or a 50K or something that requires quite a bit more speed and turnover.

Ian: In terms of the training that he gives you, does it look very much like a marathon training plan or do you feel as though it’s an ultra-training plan?

Caroline: Well it depends what I’m training for because I do still run marathons. When I’m training for a marathon, it is a very classic training cycle for a marathon, although I’m not very good I have to say at timing my marathons. I rarely take the opportunity to fully get me dialled in for a marathon. I tend to sort of jump into these things, and he goes, “Well, you’ve only got six weeks, so there’s not that much we can really do but we can try.” I think he’d probably love to see if I could plan it out a bit more. I am impulsive sometimes and just feel like racing.

Mario does work with me on that. But then when I’m training for an ultra, like when he was training me for Western States, the training is completely different. I mean I’m out there doing almost exclusively doing hilly, or trail runs, and lots and lots more elevation. Just even an emphasis on hill repeats climbing power, that kind of thing. Just very different, it looks very different than a marathon training cycle.

Ian: A good proportion of speed work and endurance work?

Caroline: Yes, definitely! I always keep the speed work in there. Even when we’re training for something like Western States, the speed work is always in there. It just looks a little bit different. For a marathon, if it’s a flat marathon that I’m training for, then he wants me to try and get the maximum leg turnover and speed that I can, so I’m going out and try to find the fastest surface that I can do it on. Whereas if I’m training for something like Western States, that’s not going to help me that much, so I need to do that type of work on the trail or on a hilly road, something that pushes me to maintain leg turnover at the same time as packing climbs and combining those two aspects.

Ian: When we talk about an endurance side of your training, what’s a longer run for you?

Photo credit to ©Paul Nelson

Photo credit to Paul Nelson

Caroline: If I’m training for something like 100-mile, usually I’ll try and get a 30-mile (ish) training run in there but I’ll also probably jump into a 50K and possibly 100K as well in advance to sort of get those miles in my legs. It’s not like I’m going out every weekend and cranking out 28, 30 miles. That’s just too much. We must pick the right times to do that in the cycle that is going to help me to progress. But if I’m training for something that is shorter, I mean, I didn’t anticipate doing Brazos Bend the 50-miler, or JFK 50-miler which I just did three weeks apart… I did these only on the back of the fact that I had a disappointing World Champs for the 50K road in Doha.

I knew the fitness was there. I sort of just had a long run in Doha… I had an asthma attack and it was awful. I believe in that fitness and I knew it was there, but even that training I wouldn’t say was ideal for what I tried to do both at JFK and at Brazos Bend. Again, probably if I plan these things out a little bit better maybe I could possibly improve. I don’t know. We’ll see!

Ian: You are being very modest because you were second at JFK, running 6:32. Like you say, you were at the 50K World Championships. It may have not gone the way that you wanted it to, but the point is you were there and you were representing your country. I think your best result at Western States was eighth, is that right?

Caroline: Yes.

Ian: Eighth at western states. A lot of people would be going, “I was eighth at Western States,” and, “I’m eighth at Western States.” I would probably be more impressed with your eighth at Western States than maybe your 50-mile run, but that maybe is just the geek side of me.

Caroline: [laughs]

Ian:  Western States being Western States. Where does that fit into the big picture? Because it’s fantastic to run a fast 50-miler and to beat a legend like Ann Trason. Of course, that moment in time is now documented and you will be remembered for history of running as being the person to the set that time. But also, the geeky ultra-running side of me and the ultra-running world would be impressed with a WSER 8th.

Caroline: Well yes. For me personally, and I am thrilled to have been in the top 10 because every year that race is incredibly competitive. I mean, the women who run that I have the utmost respect for, and at the same time I am always wanting to get the best performance out of myself and I don’t feel that I’ve had that on that course yet. I feel like I’ve had a very disappointing last 20, 25 miles both times that I ran it.

Particularly this year, it was a very difficult pill to swallow because I felt good. I ran a slightly more aggressive race than I had the year before. I came in well ahead of where I had been the year before at Forest Hill. I mean basically I passed a lot of the ladies’ in the Canyons and I was in third place… for something like 40-miles of Western States.

I thought this is coming together for me and then it just all fell apart. I just found that I didn’t have anything left. I don’t know if that’s physical, mental or a combination of both but I’m not satisfied with the way that those last miles went for me and I’d like to go back and do it better.

Ian: Yes.

Caroline: That’s something to me personally, that I’m not happy with. It’s nothing about the other ladies, you know?

Ian: Where do you go from here because you finished 12th at Western States this year. Your automatic qualification is not there; you’re going to have to go to a golden ticket race and get an entry. So how does that work? Is that a priority for you to pinpoint one of these golden ticket races and get a place?

Caroline: It is, but probably not for 2017.

Ian: Okay.

Caroline: I have realized that I am trying to do it all in a year and every year that comes around, I race everything from half marathons on the road, to 100-milers.

Ian: Yeah.

Caroline: Maybe I would be best served by focusing and spending one year, being a bit more specific about what I’m doing, and then come back to the trail so I feel that I can probably have a better performance. I’ve never done a 100k on the road so I’d like to do a 100k on the road. I’m mulling over whether I jump into Comrades because I think that’s always been a bucket list to me and I think it would be fantastic and suit my skill set fairly well, and then also I’ve got this bee in my bonnet about trying to run a sub 2:40 marathon. I think I can but I think I can only do that if it hasn’t been a year working focused on trail running. I don’t know what my 2017 calendar looks like for sure, because as I said I’m always one who jumps into something based on how the last race went. I’m bad at planning these things.

Ian: Okay.

Caroline: But I sort of feel like 2017 would be a great year for me to focus on a little bit more similar type of races and then focus back on the trail maybe for 2018 and see if I can have a fast race.

Ian: You’ve been 3rd at Bandera before, so that’s obviously gone well. I think what you’re saying makes sense to me and I used the term before that you’re primary school runner in terms of running. What I mean by that is you’ve only got four-years of running and of course to run well, and to run in the way that you want to run for a 100-miler takes a little bit of time and even though you’ve placed well at States maybe the transition to go into top five does mean you need more running of different types before you can nail Western States?

So, with 2016 at an end it certainly sounds as though you’re not quite sure what your targets are for this year so what happens now in this period? Is it just about recovery, speaking with your coach? Maybe looking at the calendar and deciding how to bring your training together and setting those A-races for next year?

Caroline: Yes. I will talk with Mario and we’ll go through some ideas. I’m sure he’s got some ideas as well but I know he always sort of wants to hear what excites me and what gets me fired up. Then he’ll tell me if he thinks that if I do certain races maybe they’re a bit too close together or maybe I should pick 2 out of those 3 to do, or something like that and sort of help to shape it for me. He also knows that I quite like doing races close together in a block. Like three close races together in a row.

Usually by the time the third one comes around my body is ready for it and that’s often where I have my best performance so that’s something that I like. It’s a bit unusual, some people focus on one or two big races a year and they want to make sure there’s plenty of recovery in between, but that’s something that works for me. For the time being, I’m taking it very easy now but I’m quite keen to get back to it because I’m feeling alright, you know. My body’s recovering quite well.

Ian: Yes. Well you have good weather in California?

Caroline: Yes. California, we’re very lucky it’s always lovely here. I don’t mind running in the rain though, the rainy days I find it very refreshing. So, I’ll probably still be out there doing reasonable number of miles and maintaining fitness. But maybe, maybe not as focused as it has been the last two months.

Ian: Okay, so I’m going to finish off with a question. I’m glad you’re not sitting opposite me so you can’t throw anything at me. [laughs]

You’ve just broken an Ann Trason record and Ann Trason won the Western States 14 times. Any chance of you going to Western States and getting 14 victories?

Caroline: No, I don’t. No! No! I have so much respect for Ann. I honestly don’t think that anybody is ever going to repeat that. It’s just an outstanding accomplishment. And I don’t even think there’s a chance. If I ever was lucky enough to have a strong podium finish at Western States I think I’d have to hang up my hat and say, “thank you very much. That was lovely.” I’m onto new things now. Love the race. Absolutely love it. I will always want to get there and support runners, volunteers whatever it takes to be part of it but boy! The dedication to win fourteen times. Oh! Wow! Just absolutely awestruck by that.

Ian: Caroline it’s been excellent speaking to you. Many, many congratulations on this record. I hope you manage to sit down with your coach, sort your year out and I hope to see you back to Western States and see you move up the ranking.

Caroline: Thank you very much for having me Ian.

Ultra Signup Results for Caroline HERE

©Myles Smythe of Michigan Bluff Photography

©Myles Smythe of Michigan Bluff Photography

Support on PATREON HERE

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Jim Walmsley’s Record Breaking 2016 on I RUN 4 ULTRA

 

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In 2017 I am pleased to say that I will be writing regularly for I RUN 4 ULTRA with two or three submissions per month. My first article was about:

PETE KOSTELNICK – RUNNING ACROSS THE USA read the article HERE

My second article is about

JIM WALMSLEY’S RECORD BREAKING YEAR OF 2016

As years go, 2016 has been a cracker in the world of ultra-running. Pete Kostelnick ran Across the USA in a record time. Karl ‘Speedgoat’ Meltzer set a new ‘FKT’ on the Appalachian Trail, Zach Miller broke the TNF 50 course record with a trail blazing run and Jim Walmsley has turned heads with a display of hard and fast running that has left many wondering, what does 2017 hold for this sport?

Read the full article on I RUN 4 ULTRA HERE

REVIEW of 2016 in Trail, Mountain, Ultra and Skyrunning

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As a year comes to end, it’s always nice to be able to look back and appreciate some of the highlights that all come together that allows one to decide if it was a good or bad year. For me personally, 2016 was a cracker and I am truly thankful for all the opportunities that came up.

Looking back and deciding on what a highlight is, is of course a tricky thing. It’s very personal and it also requires a great memory. So, I will declare right from the off that these are ‘my’ highlights and yes, I am going to miss some key performances, runners, experiences and so on that should be in the list. So, please feel free to comment and remind me.

It would make sense to start in January and move through to December in a logical way… I am not going to do that, I am writing this off the cuff.

Jim Walmsley has been on fire in 2016 and ironically, despite an amazing run and course record at JFK50, FKT’s for the Rim-to-Rim and Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim in the Grand Canyon and countless other victories, it will be his Western States performance that well and truly cements Jim as one of the most exciting runners to rise in 2016. He said pre Western States that he was there to win and win with a course record. He flew along the trails and at one point was almost 30-minutes under the record. As he passed 90-miles everyone was re-writing the history books and then boom! Jim went off course. I caught up with a full and in-depth interview with Jim and you can listen to that HERE and read it HERE. Jim for many is the male Ultra-runner of the Year with victories at Stagecoach Line 55km, Franklin Mountains Trail Run, Lake Sonoma, Mesquite Canyon, Moab Red Hot 55k, Bandera 100k and the recent JFK50. 2017 is going to be a very exciting one.

Rob Young set off on a journey Across the USA looking for a new record, fame, glory and an opportunity to raise a load of money for charity. Somewhere along the way he lost a grasp of reality, perspective and ruined what was a remarkable story be cheating and deceiving the whole ultra running community. Ultimately, Rob is a story of an individual who tried to do good and maybe we should ask what went wrong rather than preach about his morals.

That brings me on to Mark Vaz. What is it with FKT’s and delusional behaviour? Mark seemed to think that running from Land’s End to John O’Groats 31-hours quicker than anyone else for the 860-mile journey was a good idea. It’s not even a convincing lie. As many pointed out, the god of ultra -running, Yiannis Kouros, couldn’t have done it as quick as Mr. Vaz claimed… oh dear!

Pete Kostelnick by contrast embraced the FKT concept and showed the world that the claims made by Rob Young are possible by smashing a 30+ year old Guinness record out of the ether by running Across the USA a full 4-days quicker than anyone else. As records go, this is an absolute doozy and when you look deep and hard into this 40+ day journey, you soon start to understand the difficulty and complexity of running 70+ miles a day. You can listen to an in-depth interview with Pete HERE and read the story HERE. In addition, we must also add to this story, Pete’s incredible and record breaking run at Badwater 135. This achievement has been overshadowed by the USA run but as a stand alone run, it’s also a cracker.

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Karl Meltzer did it, he finally completed the Appalachian Trail in a new record breaking time after failing on two previous occasions.  His time was some 10-hours quicker than Scott Jurek’s set in 2015, however, Karl did run in the opposite direction and has said, post run, he feels that they are two records. Notably, Karl helped Scott in 2015 and Scott helped Karl in 2016. It’s a remarkable story and one that truly reflects our sport of ultra-running. Karl’s record of 45-days, 22-hours and 38-minutes now sits in the record books and well and truly establishes Karl as one of ‘the’ greatest ultra-runners in the world. This is also backed up with his 38 100-mile victories and 5 victories at Hardrock 100. Listen to the in-depth interview HERE and read HERE

Talking of Hardrock 100, Kilian Jornet and Jason Schlarb held hands and crossed the line together in 2016. It was a wonderful moment that split the ultra-running audience in two. Some would have preferred a race to the line while others discussed the wonderful gesture and statement this moment made. Whichever camp you sit in, it was back-to-back victories for Kilian and a career defining moment for Jason Schlarb. Something he discussed in my in-depth interview HERE. For equality, we also need to mention Anna Frost nailing a back-to-back ladies victory. As I understand it, these three Musketeers will all return in 2017.

Aaron Denberg got a bee in his bonnet about Hardrock 100 lottery and decided to create a law suit. Many believe Mr. Denberg makes some good points but questioned if his approach was the correct one? Hardrock 100 released statements and have since removed the payment of a fee by each runner to enter the lottery, something which was apparently illegal! This will run and run (pardon the pun) but ultimately, is Hardrock a victim of it’s own success?

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Caroline Chaverot for me, without doubt, female ultra-runner of the year. This French lady has been on fire all the way from victory in Transgrancanaria early in the year to a most recent win in Hong Kong on December 2nd. Along the way, Caroline won UTMB, became Skyrunning World Champion for the ultra distance and won the IAU World Trail Championships in Portugal. Add to these incredible results, victories at Madirea Island Ultra Trail, Mont-Blanc 80km and the UTWT world title for 2016 and I lower my head and bow to Queen Caroline. Plus she has made the lottery for Hardrock in 2017… exciting!

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Adam Campbell survives a horrific fall and not only lives to tell the tale but has a remarkable recovery, listen to the interview HERE and read HERE

Lizzy Hawker sneaked from under the radar and once again picked up the gauntlet testing her personal boundaries and voyage of self-discovery. After years of injury, Lizzy completed the GHT (Great Himalayan Trail). A 1600km, east to west journey across Nepal. It was, as Lizzy promised, a “beautiful, rough, hard and unforgettable journey”. It was about many things, but also about trying to raise money to give opportunities to Nepali runners, particularly girls, for whom one chance can be a catalyst for much wider change.

Damian Hall set a new FKT on the UK’s South West Coast Path 10-hours, 15-minutes and 18-seconds for the 630-mile jaunt.

Jeff Browning, what a year…! Winner Hurt 100, 3rd at Western States, 4th at Hardrock 100 and 4th at Run Rabbit Run – that is some year, the WSER/Hardrock double a stand out and fastest combined time.

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Kilian Jornet won Hardrock 100 and attempted to summit Everest. The Summits Of My Life project continues on into 2017 after Kilian and his team decided to pull the plug on a 2016 attempt as weather detonated.

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Emelie Forsberg was quiet in 2016 after damaging her ACL and having an operation, she did however return to Trofeo Kima and put the record straight with a victory… she hopes the course record will come in 2018 when the race will take place once again. Emelie discussed her injury HERE

Beth Pascall went from strength-to-strength in 2016 and elevated the Lakeland 100 (UK) record to a whole new level by placing 4th overall. Listen to her interview HERE

Zach Miller did what he always does and lead from the front. At UTMB many predicted, me included, that it was going to be a story of glorious victory with a stunning ‘off-the-front’ performance or carnage with a monumental blow-up! In reality it was both, the blow-up came and he somehow managed to hold on for grim death to still get a top-10 place, he will win this race one day! Jump forward to December and Zach did it again at San Francisco 50. This time he had company and many are saying that ‘this’ race was one of the highlights of the year as Zach and Hayden Hawks traded blows at the front. Zach won with a course record and he took home the $10,000 prize. Hayden finished just 2-minutes back. Note that name! If you want to know what it’s like to put it ALL on the line, take a look at Zach’s final 2-minutes of that incredible 5:56:03 run.

Andrew Miller became the youngest winner of the iconic Western States and today, myself and so many others still know very little about this 20-year old. Certainly, Jim Walmsley had an impact on the kudos and plaudits that Andrew should have received. Running 15:39:36 at WSER takes some doing but I can’t help but think that Biology and chemistry are a priority as Andrew starts his sophomore year at Northern Arizona University. He will be back at WSER in 2017!

Kaci Lickteig has been nailing it and nailing it and finally got the Western States victory that she has longed for and then contrasted it with victory at the Bear 100. You can listen to Kaci’s post Western States interview HERE

Andrea Huser runs and races it would appear ‘every’ weekend. She is relentless. As I understand it, Andrea raced on thirteen occasions but I may have missed some/ She had victories at Raid de La Reunion Swiss Irontrail T201 Eiger Ultratrail 101km, Lavaredo, Trail d’Albertville, Trail Des Allobroges and Maxi-Race Annecy. Phew… any other year and the lack of Caroline Chaverot and Andrea would be female ultra-runner of the year.

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Luis Alberto Hernando won Transvulcania, became Skyrunning World Champion for the ultra distance and became IAU World Trail Champion. That is a solid year and Luis has raced less having become a Dad. Had his feet not fallen apart at UTMB, he may well have been in the running with Jim for male ultra-runner of the year.

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Diego Pazos is a name to watch and has surprised many in 2016. He’s my heads-up for the future. He had a notable result at Transgrancanaria early in 2016 but what followed was quite incredible, his victory at Mont-Blanc 80km a highlight!

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Didrik Hermansen won Transgrancanaria and then placed 2nd at Western States. That is solid and shows real diversity. What will 2017 hold for him? Listen HERE and as Sondre corrects me, Didrik ran 6:45 and 6:38 for 100k.

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Running Beyond Book was released in October and November to a worldwide audience and has been translated into Spanish, Italian, German, Swedish and of course is available in English. Containing 240-pages, this large coffee table books documents the sport of trail, ultra, mountain and skyrunning in images and words, HERE

Dan Lawson (UK) won the IAU 24 Hour European Championships in 2016 with a distance of 261.843 kilometres (162.702 mi).

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Jasmin Paris has elevated herself to a whole new level in 2016. This quiet and shy fell runner set new records for the UK’s ‘Rounds’ and in the process placed 6th at UTMB (her first 100) won Tromso SkyRace, won Glencoe Skyline, became the Skyrunner World Series Extreme Champion 2016 and in addition to countless other races, also placed on the podium at the Skyrunning World Championships for the ultra distance behind Caroline Chaverot. Interviews with Jasmin Paris HERE, HERE, HERE and HERE

Joe Grant set a new record on the 14’ers in 31-days by cycling between trailheads and then summiting all the 14’ers (50+ of them) on foot to then return back to his cycle and then continue on his journey. He was self-sufficient for the whole trip. “I did set a speed record, but that wasn’t my goal,” says Grant, 33, an accomplished ultrarunner who finished second at the 2012 Hardrock 100. “The goal was to challenge myself and see the state, although the previous record served as a reference for how long I could take.” taken from trailrunningmag.

Megan Hicks also completed a ’14’ journey, the Nolans 14 in Colorado. She completed the journey in 57:19:19 to the summit of the 14th peak and then completed the journey back to the Fish Hatchery Trailhead in under 60-hours – 59:36. Her time is the fastest ever completed by a woman.

Nicky Spinks continues to inspire and while she may have lost her ‘Round’ records to Jasmin Paris, she went on to set a new benchmark with a record for a double Bob Graham Round – Nick is an inspiration! You can listen to an interview with her HERE

Ludovic Pommeret ran the most controlled and impressive UTMB ever moving from not being in contention to slowly but surely ticking off the runners ahead and taking the crown at the largest ultra in the world. Add to this victory four other victories and Ludovic is one to keep an eye on in ’17.’

Caroline Boller set new American Trail 50-mile record 5:48:01

Gina Slaby set new female 100-mile WR 13:45:49 for ‘any’ surface, Anne Trason had the previous record of  13:47:41 set in the early 90’s.

Skyline Scotland achieved a first with Glencoe Skyline achieving Skyrunner World Status in the Extreme category and as such, the 2016 edition of the race had arguably one of the best fields assembled on UK soil for a mountain race. HERE

Jon Albon transitioned from obstacle racing (something he still does and excels at) to Skyrunning and won the 2016 Skyrunner World Series Extreme category. We are going to see more of him in 2017! HERE

Samantha Gash ran across India in a project called ‘Run India’ as a means to create awareness and raise money. Covering over 3000km you can listen to her story in episode 125 of Talk Ultra out on Friday 16th December.

Ida Nilsson started the year with a win in Transvulcania, she took victory at The Rut and then in early December won San Francisco 50. Without doubt, Ida is a star of the future. Listen to Ida talk about Transvulcania HERE

Stu Leaney breaks Michael Wardian’s 50km treadmill record by just 7-seconds

Mina Guli ran 40-marathons across 7 deserts on 7 continents in 7 weeks to raise awareness for water, listen to the interview HERE

Jason Schlarb started his year by prepping for Hardrock 100 by skiing the course, listen to the interview HERE

Skyrunning and the world series (SWS) elevated to new heights with an increased circuit that traveled the globe and the addition of the new Extreme series.

And finally (maybe), Donnie Campbell just recently set a new Winter Ramsay Round record to finish a very solid year!

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So what have I missed? 

I am well aware that I will have missed some key performances in 2016 and I welcome you commenting and letting me know. Of course, many performances, races or experiences will resonate on a personal level for you. I can think of many British performances that are worthy of a nod – Jo Meek’s 2nd at the CCC, Paul Giblin 5th at Western States, Joasia Zakrzewski’s medal at the 100k World Champs for example.

Be great to hear from you…

Western States 100 and Hardrock 100 Lottery Draws for 2017

WESTERN STATES 100

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See you Squaw… it’s the term and phrase that so many want to here and the only guaranteed entries are for those who place top-10 (male and female) in the previous edition and those who gain places via the Golden Ticket races, UTWT and Ultrarunning Race Series.

Golden Ticket Races

  • January 7th — Bandera 100k
  • February 4th — Sean O’Brian 100k
  • February 18th — Black Canyon 100k
  • March 25th — Gorge Waterfalls
  • April 1st — Georgia Death Race
  • April 15th — Lake Sonoma 50-miles

Of the 20 top-10 male and females from 2016, 19 will return, the only person not to accept a place is Didrik Hermansen who placed 2nd in 16:16:08. That’s a surprise for me as WSER suits this fast runner.

The men’s returning list is as follows:

  1. Andrew Miller
  2. Will not return
  3. Jeff Browning
  4. Thomas Lorblanchet
  5. Paul Giblin
  6. Ian Sharman
  7. Chris Mocko
  8. Kyle Pietari
  9. Chris DeNucci
  10. Jesse Haynes

The times for those returning 9 vary from 15:39:36 to 17:12:30.

The ladies’ returning list is as follows:

  1. Kaci Lickteig
  2. Amy Sproson
  3. Devon Yanko
  4. Amanda Basham
  5. Alissa St Laurent
  6. Meghan Arbogast
  7. Bethany Patterson
  8. Maggie Guteri
  9. Jodee Adams Moore
  10. Erika Lindland

The times for those returning 10 vary from 17:57:59 to 21:07:40.

Notable entries for 2017 come from ‘Automatics’ (notes here) in addition to the top-10 men/women come from Golden Ticket Races, 6 slots from UTWT and as listed on the WSER Automatics page.

WSER lottery statistics are here

But 250 runners were drawn HERE on December 3rd with 117 automatics. The waitlist is HERE.

The 2017 WSER entrants list is HERE with 332 entries.

Notable names on pre-lottery were:

  • Jonas Buud
  • Zach Bitter
  • Ryan Sandes
  • Michael Wardian
  • Stephanie Case

Jim Walmsley needs to qualify; I think we can expect him to crush a Golden Ticket race to confirm his 2017 WSER slot.

Other slots:

  • 24 tickets will come from the Golden ticket races,
  • 6 from UTWT
  • 2 places from the Ultraruning Race Series. These slots will go to the top male and female as of April 30th 2017.

HARDROCK 100

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Well, Jason Schlarb and Kilian Jornet crossed the line hand-in-hand and they have both confirmed they will return in 2017 to dance once again in the San Juan’s. The only other person guaranteed a slot is Anna Frost – she will be back!

Information HERE.

Hardrock, despite being a small race increasingly is becoming THE race people want to do and that is reflected in almost 2000 applications for 2017.

Entry is down to a lottery but the lottery is broken down into divisions as follows:

  • ‘Veterans’ – Runners who have finished more than 5 times.
  • ’Everyone Else’ – runners who have completed 1-4 times.
  • ‘Nevers’ – As the name implies, runners who have never finished Hardrock.

Hardrock 100 usually has around 150 starters, 2016 edition had 152 and I understand the 2017 edition will be just less than 150.

So, who’s in?

  • Caroline Chaverot is a huge draw and I have to say her attendance in the San Juan is an
  • exciting prospect. For me, Caroline has been THE ultra-runner of 2016.
  • Darcy Piceu missed 2016 and as a 3-time winner, she is the one that ‘Frosty’ will most
  • fear and the one that will always challenge for the victory.
  • Nathalie Mauclair has won UTMB and excelled at Raid de la Reunion.

Other notable names for the ladies’ – Darla Askew, Rachel Bucklin, Bethany Lewis,

Betsy Kalmeyer and Betsy Nye.

The men’s race is an interesting one with some old and new names.

  • Joe Grant is back again to the race he loves, boy does he have some luck with the lottery.
  • Mike Foote was 2nd at the 2015 Hardrock.
  • Iker Karrera 9th at Hardrock in 2015 but he’s a podium contender for sure.
  • Karl Meltzer has been there, done it and won it. This will be a breeze after the AT!
  • Adam Campbell, wow, does he have some motivation to be back!
  • Mike Wardian just runs and runs and runs, Hardrock will be an interesting one.
  • But the biggest interest will come with Zach Miller. We could see fireworks!

Full Entrants List HERE

We can expect other top ranked men to contest this list and then of course there is the ‘waitlisted’ men and ladies who will have a chance to run. HERE.

Jim Walmsley – Western Sates and Beyond Interview

Earlier this year, off the back of a stunning run at Lake Sonoma, Jim Walmsley said he was going to go to Western States, his first 100, and not only win it but potentially set a new course record. It was quite the statement and of course it turned heads. What followed was one of those golden days on the trail when Jim looked to float over the course. With every step he creeped under the old Western States course record. A new record looked almost certain until disaster struck…

I caught up with Jim just a week after the 2016 Western States and delved into his mind about maybe one of the most memorable runs of the year.

The Interview

IAN: I’m joined by Jim Walmsley after an incredible, memorable, inspiring, heart-wrenching, everything Western States. How do you feel Jim? Do you feel good?

Jim Walmsley: Right now? or during the race?

IAN: No, now that you’ve had an opportunity to recover.

Jim Walmsley: Now is going good. I started shuffling again. I called just my shuffle recovery. It’s what I try doing until my legs start coming back to me a little bit, I have started that process things are good. Yes.

IAN: Yes. Okay, before Western States, a lot of people particularly over in Europe and in the UK won’t have really known who you are. You were definitely a dark horse. People in the sport like myself who look at names and follow trends were looking at you. In all honesty some of the claims that you made prior to Western States, were very bold.

I love it when somebody comes into a race and they say, “You know what, I’m going to go hard, I’m going to go for the course record and that’s it.” And deep down you think brilliant, absolutely brilliant I hope he does it. But the reality is, he’s possibly going to crash and burn. Up until about 92 miles it looked like you were just going to make probably one of the most memorable Western States ever. First of all, what gave you the confidence to be so bold with your predictions?

Jim Walmsley: First and foremost, it was my training; it had been going so well. I did a big 50-mile race in April and I ended up getting a course record at Lake Sonoma 50 mile. A lot of big guys have run that in the past. Basically, I felt like I’d only built off of that. As far as confidence wise I knew I was more fit than I ever have been at least in my ultra-career.

I could feel in my training runs that faster paces were feeling more comfortable. I thought I would surrounded myself with a good team to go on a Western States and go knock that out. I guess the other thing with it being my first hundred, it’s one of those things that everybody has got to make that jump from whether it be 50 mile or 100K up to a 100-mile distance. That’s the next benchmark of distance up. I mean, everybody’s got to do it, some people do great with it, some people don’t but I think my journey had been ready to make that jump.

IAN: If we look back at your results and really from my perspective looking at your results they only really go back one year. Back to say May 2015 where you ran Don’t Fence Me In Trail 30K, and then you did Speedgoat, and then you won JFK, 3rd at Moab, 5th at Lake Sonoma, 1st at Black Out Night Run 13K, then Flagstaff Extreme Pine.

There’s a whole list of other races but for me when I was looking at the race there was a couple of significant results. JFK 50 miler you won that in 2014, 2015 Bandera 100K and then of course that Lake Sonoma run in April. You look and you think, “Wow. This guy is fast.” But like you’ve just said, fast at 50 miles and then coming to the 100-mile distance is a big difference. How did you prepare yourself physically for the unknown?

Jim Walmsley: I start knocking out the most miles I’ve ever tried before Lake Sonoma, I did my first 140 mile weeks not sure what that is in kilometres.

IAN: It’s a long way, 200+K.

Jim Walmsley: Okay. Yes. It’s 200K thereabout, and then from Lake Sonoma up to Western States my big training block ended up being back-to-back 140 mile weeks, followed by 120 and a 100, and then I went into my taper for two weeks. The first 120-mile week I did all in single runs. Probably the point where I knew I was feeling really good was when I was climbing and running really good at the Grand Canyon. I have a loop I do in Grand Canyon. I go down Bradenton it’s about seven to nine miles of mostly downhill and then you come back up South Kaibab, it’s about a seven mile up hill and then you finish on a four-mile flat kind of finish so it’s about a 21-mile loop.

That went really well, but then the next day I did a big workout on or just by Pace in Arizona. That was 30 mile run with 8,000 feet of vert up and down. That was huge back-to-back days, even at the end of that week I still did a long run with a bunch of the marathoners in town. I think this one might have been the one that I ran with Andrew Lemoncello, he’s a Scottish guy that lives in Flagstaff. I think we came through in like 2:01 for 20 miles but we went out in the first half and maybe like 65 mins. We were really cooking on the second half, kind of finish that big long run that week end was super huge. That was one of the main things too is that long run in my training it has just became comfortable to start running those 20 miles in about 2 hours. Things were really clicking.

IAN: I mean 120, 140 mile weeks that is huge. How do you maximize your recovery from those types of training sessions? Is that something that you’ve built upon year-on-year or have you just suddenly pushed the envelope and find that you can adapt to it?

Jim Walmsley: In high school I ran 90 miles a week for the last two years, I was a big mileage kid when I was young. But then I look around even less than that in college. I had won 1500 oriented coach. It’s been the first time where I felt comfortable to try to add on more miles and experiment with that. The only main thing I really did to try to help out with recovery, I started trying to take just calories and proteins stuff right immediately after races. I just have a little recovery shake after a run. That’s all I really added in after Lake Sonoma for the most part it’s just kind of being a bit lucky of staying healthy because I wasn’t sure what was going to happen.

IAN: The recovery side of things seem to be working well. Is there anything else that you did in terms of nutrition? Anything that you’ve found out that works well for you or if you are just eating the normal healthy balanced diet?

Jim Walmsley: I mean, that is the only thing that I have changed recently. The other thing is I don’t eat meat but it’s not dietary reasons, it’s just a whole bunch of reasons of why I don’t necessarily want to support a lot of those bigger companies in the industry here in the US. I don’t eat meat for good and for bad but I don’t worry about making up that protein deficit. A lot of people think that I need to make it up somehow. I just eat whatever, I mean I do eat a lot! I eat a ton of junk food. I kind of joke that the amount of junk food I do eat and processed sugar actually gives me just a super rock solid stomach on race day. I’m taking a bunch of gels and a bunch of processed sugar on race day and I eat a lot of that pretty regularly. It almost helps me with having a more solid stomach on race day.

IAN: Okay, you’re very much booking the trends of the moment of low GI and low sugar and going paleo. You’re old school?

Jim Walmsley: Yes, I guess I am?

IAN: Okay, let’s talk about the race, Western States. You were very bold with your pre-race predictions and that puts a big target on your back. I don’t think I’m wrong in saying this, but I think a lot of the favourites for the race, respected the fact that you said what you were going to do. You did sort of say that you would try and take it easy early on. That didn’t really seem to happen. Sage Canaday and David Laney and yourself were pushing right from the start. Did you feel comfortable with that?

Jim Walmsley: Yes. I did feel comfortable with it. I was probably 30 something place at the first climb. I was trying to just slow down, walk and almost even stop a lot on the first climb out of Squaw Valley, to try to basically get some of the other favourites to get rolling and kind of run their own race. I mean I could see them and they were looking back a lot.

It was just one of those things where I felt it was almost pointless to slow down more and more and more, because I was either going to run their race, or my game plan would be to try to go off a feel and start running some splits. Those splits that we initially had started with the course record splits. Can’t understand how those felt, if they felt easy, if they felt hard and kind of base things off the feel from that.

IAN: Yes. I mean, it’s unusual in ultra-running for somebody to come into a race with an idea of splits with a real intention of breaking the record. Course records tend to come because it just turns out to be one of those days, when everything clicks and everything aligns and then course records happen.

You’re almost bringing into this marathon running perspective we’re it’s easier and more consistent to run the minute mile pace, because the terrain is more uniform, more predictable, whereas here, Western States. You’ve got elevation, you’ve got trail, you’ve got heat, you’ve got so many variables, but yet you seem to be very well planned and very well controlled that’s quite unusual.

Jim Walmsley: Well, how I did it was… I’ve never ran a marathon, but it’s a little different than just splits. Between each aid station I had average pace that I needed to hit, for that section. It was very course dependent and terrain dependent. I figured things were at least close enough, when you’re going four mile splits.

If you’re going up a hill, it’s okay to lose some time on that. That’s how I based it off, then it kind of ended up being where I was just able to taking chunks and chunk off of those average splits that I already had.

IAN: Now, the other thing that you seem to be taking in your stride and I loved the retro shirt look…. The heat! You’d obviously come into this race acclimatized to the heat. Was that something that you’d really concentrated on?

Jim Walmsley: I’m originally from Phoenix Arizona. I live in Flagstaff, which is about two and a half miles north. I have lived in flagstaff for the last year. But before that, I lived in Colorado, California and Montana. A little cooler, but as far as heat, I know I can handle it. I know I can run really well in it. But the main question was whether I can handle running in the heat all day, during the middle of the day. WSER was going to be the first big test. Being from Phoenix there’s a lot of people that have their little tricks and tips to stay a little bit cooler on their arms. I kind of pick up on those, just kind of keeping your wrists cool, always staying wet. I wore a hat and sunglasses the whole time.

IAN: Yes.

Jim Walmsley: I think both of those contribute to a perception that it’s a little cooler. I try to keep my shoulders covered with the crop top shirt I had, rather than going on with singlet with skinnier shoulder bands. The shirt in general was kind of it held water better, the holes helped ventilation and then, it also helped with sun protection. Yes. You’re just trying to find different elements of what’s making you hotter and trying to mitigate those, and then always staying wet. If you see a creek lie down in the creek, it’s worth that time.

IAN: Yes. You went out to WSER for a running camp, is that correct?

Jim Walmsley: Yes, it is.

IAN: Was that a double edged sword? Or it was an opportunity to be on a training camp, an opportunity to go and heat acclimatise and also to get some training in?

Jim Walmsley: It was really nice weather, as opposed to anything uncomfortable. I wasn’t getting out on the actual Western States trails. It was more run in the Tahoe Rim Trail and a couple trails more in the Flume trail and stuff, but I hadn’t really spent time like that out in Tahoe. It’s just this wonderful beautiful place that was really awesome to do for sure.

I really enjoyed working with John Fitzgerald and Stan Myers, now at the mountain post running camp. The initial debate was whether I go back to Flagstaff for two weeks and then come back, or whether I stay out there… I had a couple friends that were supposed to do the Broken Arrow race in between those two weeks, and they ended up both dropping out, or scratching and not doing it.

But, I had made plans to just stay out there and kind of stuck with trying to stay out there. After that, I think next year I would really like to stay in Flagstaff, stay where I can get some bigger climbing consistently, because I just know that all the different runs where I live. I can just really dial it in on what I want to focus on most.

IAN: Yes, I see the logic in being in Flagstaff and then it’s easy to go down to Phoenix. I guess.

Jim Walmsley: Yes. Phoenix or if you want to get in a big running day the Tetons. I like heat training in the canyon because it gets pretty high and then also it has a similar reflection of the heat down there off of the rocks. The rocks really release a lot of heat out of them and make it feel a lot hotter than what it might– the ambient temperature might be.

IAN: Yes. Let’s go back to the race. By the time you got to half way, you had around about 20 minutes under the course record. Everybody was getting super excited and of course it was that 50:50 scenario. Is this going to be the most incredible run? Or at any point is he going to blow up and it certainly didn’t look like you were going to blow up? You were keeping yourself cool, like you said you put in plenty of water on yourself. You were submerging yourself in the rivers and water whenever you possibly could. You did almost end up going for a bit of a long swim… Do you want to just touch on what happened there? I mean, that was what, mile 70 something?

Jim Walmsley: It was mile 78, 79. I heard that Rob Crow last year swam across and that was the fastest most efficient way to cross the river. I started holding on to the rope and paddling with one arm and then, before I knew it, I gave it a couple swim strokes to get across. And then, before I knew it like I looked the rope was right there on my left and then it was 7 to 8 feet away and I couldn’t reach it. It became basically me against the river. You have this life vest on which is great that keeps your float but at the same time, it’s a big old kite in the current and it really pulls you downstream.

I think actually Rob totally ran passed the life vest which might help swimming if he did swim. I’ll definitely keep my hand on the rope next year. I basically started to get swept downstream. Eventually, I had to try to basically figure out how I can get some floating on some rocks.

Then there was that boat that came out and they posted a video online. I guess that boat wasn’t part of the race at all. It was a spectator and they weren’t supposed to be down there. They had different separate safety boats that they weren’t worried about it in this situation. But at the same time, people’s reactions were dramatic at the time. But probably the biggest thing from that is the one bottle… I had two bottles when I got in the river and I filled one at the aid station on the bank before the river and that’s the one that ended up floating off down the river. I didn’t have any water going up from the river up to Green Gate which is only a 1.8 mile climb out but it’s really exposed in the sun and then it is a steep climb and just not having something to drink there, was a little rough and I just took my time… I think that’s the one split that I did lose I think a minute or two.

IAN: Yes. I was going to say, I think probably by the time you were in America River you had to run about 30, 32 minutes under the course record. By the time you got a Green Gate you’d probably given away about five or six minutes but I guess that was with the swim as well.

Jim Walmsley: Yes, part of us just maintaining composure. You just need to maintain composure and make sure that you don’t over exert if something like that does happen. It’s all just relaxing, take your time it’s not a big deal. I think at that point course record starts really playing more and more of a factor and almost working out where I have time.

IAN: Was your plan to have that big buffer of say 30 minutes or 20 minutes? Whatever it might have been so that you could slow down… because you anticipated slowing down, because one of the things that I always think of in these scenarios is you actually only need to beat the old record by one second. You don’t need 30 minutes. Where you just having an amazing day?

Jim Walmsley: No. I don’t think any of that was pre-planned at all. If you told me that I was going to be even 20 minutes up on the course record at any time. I think I would have had a laugh… that would be a pretty good day. I remember seeing my crew ready to the station and just going like I’m trying to slow down but I’m trying to run comfortable and this is just comfortable… I know I’m running too fast based on time and stuff but at the same time I feel like I’m running easy and I’m running comfortable. I was just trying to go with that.

IAN: I remember speaking to Ian Sharman when he had that amazing run on Rocky Racoon, Timmy Olson re Western States, Rob Krar re Western States, Kilian Jornet with this countless records. I’ve often said there is one day for every runner where everything aligns and it becomes the perfect run. Sharman has gone back to the Rocky Racoon and never found the same day and the same form that he had when he did that blistering 100-mile time. I just wonder for you, was this that day? Was this that time when everything was aligned apart from the 92-mile void of going off course? We’ll come into that. But do you think now looking back that it was just the most incredible day?

Jim Walmsley: It definitely was an incredible day. Whether I’m going to be able to replicate this next year or in the future, I’m not sure? I think I have to approach it as why shouldn’t I be able to? But that was one of the first things of reflecting on the race is just, I don’t know if I’ll ever have… because so many little things have to go right. In nutrition, your stomach there is so many just unknown valuables. I didn’t step and twist an ankle or anything. I don’t know if I will ever have as good of a chance as that to break the course record again.

At the same time, I was able to take away a lot of experience, a lot of tips from the course. I know I’m going to be planning to go out there probably for a week earlier in the year to very much scout the course and make sure I’m getting everything on detail right about what I want to do for 2017. I think I can meticulously attack it next year. It will be interesting. I don’t know about trying to get another half hour up on the record though…

IAN: [laughs] I mean, sometimes you can’t plan these things. I think the thing is you went into this race saying that you’re going for the course record. The fact that you got 30 minutes under the course record is significant and it shows that your form, shows your ability is there. You said sometimes you can’t account for certain things that happen on race day… so tell us about the disaster.

Tell us about going off course and I know obviously you didn’t realize that you’d gone off course, otherwise you’d have turned around pretty damn quickly. But what was the point where you realized, “Shit, I’ve gone the wrong way.” Then was it panic, distress? What happened?

Jim Walmsley: It was probably three and a half miles after Bar Aid station that I really had the sinking feeling that I missed the turn. I ended up probably going on another three-quarter of a mile to the actual highway because at that point I could see it. I could see a hill and I’m on such an obvious dirt road at the time. I was like maybe this section is just much less marked than most the other course but things started to not make sense and that sinking feeling started getting in my stomach. I think it started with missing this turn off –  it’s this huge wide like 20 to 25-foot dirt road that two cars can totally pass on and then you go up this little tiny trail to the left. I was told it was about three miles past the aid station. In reality, I think it was about two and a quarter or two and a half. That’s about three to four minutes’ difference, probably closer to four minutes’ difference?

I just wasn’t looking for the left at that moment! I remember seeing three miles and going, “Crap, the turn should be right here”. Then after that I’m like, “All right. I haven’t seen a flag in a little while”. I thought, I’m going to give it another half mile and just look for flags. I wasn’t seeing any flags, at that point that was the three-and-a-half-mile mark of “oh crap, this might not be good”. But at the same time I was able to see were the road I was on connects with the high way that I’m supposed to get to. I was just like trust it, hopefully it works out, it might not, but hopefully it works out. I wasn’t able to convince myself to turn around yet. It’s a really hard thing to do when you’re having that day.

I think when I got to the road and I stop and I look down the road. There’s a bunch of cars parked on that road that you can see as you’re approaching it too. There’s a ton of cars up here maybe there is an aid station? But I think it’s a recreation area where a bunch of just random cars parked. Yes. It was when I really popped out on the road that I just had this demoralizing feeling of I had missed something. I wouldn’t tell you what the trail was marked when I went passed it, because obviously I didn’t see it. Initially, people were saying that flags might have gotten pulled, from what I’ve heard flags weren’t pulled. The 2nd and 3rd runner made the turn…?

IAN: Yes.

Jim Walmsley: Both of them made the turn with the same flagging that was there… but I missed the turn. But at the same time I’ve also seen heard other things… some guy posted that he remarked it? He was running back to Brown Bar Aid Station. He saw Andrew Miller and he knew that it was going to be Andrew Miller’s day, sort of thing. It was one of those things that chronologically doesn’t make tons of sense. It was really odd; I just don’t know… All I can say is that I had my head down and was just trying to crank away. I think I was still running under nine minute miles at that point. I was moving really well. Yes, I can’t explain why I missed that turn necessarily other than; I don’t think I was looking for it yet.

IAN: When you back tracked and when back to the turn point you obviously would have seen the marking of the direction you should have gone. Was the marking good then when you managed to re-navigate yourself back?

Jim Walmsley: Yes. They re-flagged everything and they made it extremely obvious and well-marked by the time I got back there and saw it for the first time.

IAN: Right. Is that because they knew you had gone off-course?

Jim Walmsley: Yes. They just exaggerated the left hand turn a lot more because I ended up going of course. Basically, everyone else had it very, very, well marked by the time they hit that.

IAN: Right. By the time you got back to that point, how much time had you lost?

Jim Walmsley: I don’t know… probably one of my biggest regrets about it is I really felt the competitive side of me really quit when I came out on Highway 49. I wished I had more fire and hunger in me. I wish I had hit highway 49 and just turned around, and said, “I’m not letting this ruining my day”, I wish I had attacked it a lot more. The information I had at the time was that I was only 12 minutes up. I was only 15 minutes under course record. In reality I was still about 25 to 30 minutes up on the course record, almost a full hour ahead of second place. Hearing that now – that part really sucks of just how missed informed I was. Having everybody… or should I say, thinking that everybody was so close, and then knowing that I went off the trail by a mile and a half or two miles.

That really crushed me, just crushed my spirits. My reality at the time was, I’m not winning, I’m not getting a course record, this whole sinking feeling. I just need to take a break really quick, try to get your composure again and refocus. At that point I was just not doing good. I was out of calories completely, it just became a negative, I thought I’m going to just walk it back to the next aid station. Between some of the medical staff, and the two photographers that found me on highway 49, I’m actually friends with them. They just encouraged me to start walking back. At the time I’m not a hundred percent sure I would have made that decision by myself. But in retrospect I’m really glad I did. As far as competing for top three or top 10. It just wasn’t what I was hoping for at the time.

IAN: It’s interesting, I can’t imagine the frustration.

Jim Walmsley: It was just wasn’t important to me of how things were going, how things went. Yes. I ended up winning two of the golden races, or golden ticket races, to get in the Western States. To race in the Western States is not a big — I don’t view it as a big deal, obviously it is. I feel very capable of racing back in next year. Top 10 in that stuff just — It was more.

IAN: You wanted to win?

Jim Walmsley: I definitely wanted to win.

IAN: Yes. You wanted to win.

Jim Walmsley: Those spirits were crushed.

IAN: Yes. Once the win wasn’t there I guess it was a case of second is not good enough, third is not good enough…

Jim Walmsley: A little bit, but I don’t know, I was in the lead for so long it’s just… I guess maybe at the time second, third wasn’t enough, but I don’t know, it become just making it more manageable, or whatever… I don’t know?

IAN: I had to look at your river splits. It seems as though from that point where you started to back track that you hardly run a step. I was looking at it and I was trying analyse it. Of course, you’ve gone in many ways explaining to what your thought process was. It’s easy for me for me from the outside looking in and thinking why didn’t you just run and chase down? You had that 30-minute buffer, or maybe 25 minutes’ buffer.

Jim Walmsley: Yes. The information I had was 15 minutes.

IAN: Was it just mentally so demoralizing for you that you just couldn’t get yourself back onto your game, or was it other factors? Yes, mentally you’ve been crushed, but also you were lacking the energy. Maybe you had burned yourself out a little bit? I’m just trying to get an insight into the mind of what it was like at that point.

Jim Walmsley: Yes. I would say mentally I was crushed. But then between taking a little bit of a break and mentally not focussed, somewhere I was just not wanting it any more. My muscles and body started really wanting to be done. Just the walking and trying to jog after that was extremely difficult. After that moment and realizing that everything slipped away. Yes. I definitely did bonk after that. I think if that didn’t happen I absolutely don’t think I would have bonked. But it’s one of those things… I think the mental thing had to happen first, and then my body soon followed that… it was just extremely hard to rally.

When I got back to my crew and stuff, they could see I was just completely demoralized. They were totally okay with just walking it in with me. That just became my game plan. At that point it became about the silver buckle more than anything. Not being out there for the longest period time it just became just one step at a time, and we’ll just get to the finish and we’ll take those positives.

IAN: You got the buckle, and that’s super important.

Jim Walmsley: I think this also goes back to in retrospect of ”Now I think about the race”. That is one of my bigger regrets of it. I wish I did react better mentally, and then I did go and actually try to still race again. I do regret that a bit.

IAN: What I’m interested in here is the duality of you as a person, because I think pre-race a rookie 100-mile runner saying, “I’m going to go to Western States and I’m going to go for the course record.” Of course people in the community look and think, “Who’s this guy? Gees, who’s he to say this?” But then what I’ve witnessed afterwards, and what I’m witnessing now in this interview is an incredible humility, an incredible respect, there’s no bitterness. You’re not actually bitter, you’re not questioning course marking. You’re questioning you not noticing the course marking, but you’re not blaming anybody. You’re only blaming yourself I think that’s absolutely fantastic.

I think that would really warm you to the audience. Have you thought in depth about that process of how you’ve handled pre-race and post-race?

Jim Walmsley: Well, I totally get how pre-race it rubs people the wrong way, but just pre-race and post-race I feel like I’m honest guy and I’ll tell you my goals and what I think I can do pretty blatantly. Pre-race too I would also say it’s a mental approach of trying to convince myself that I can do it. It’s also mental tricks with myself of, “I can do this.” Saying that out loud, saying that publicly does set up for a lot of scrutiny, but at the same time I think that goes so far as far as mentally how you’re going to be in the race and making you tougher to stick to that.

Post-race, I would like to think that I’m just being me and being honest. I don’t think getting bitter about things is going to make anything better or positive. At the end of the day, it was an amazing run. It was an amazing experience. It was a great adventure. I finished my first hundred. There are so many positives to still take away from that day. As an athlete, I think two things are important as well, one, short term memory loss. You get to forget about it and move on as far as bad things that happen like that especially in running. That’s part of our sport. I think most people can relate to making a wrong turn at one time or another.

IAN: For sure. They just don’t make it 92 miles into Western States when looking to set the course record. [laughs]

Jim Walmsley: It’s pretty tough when that happens for sure, yes. The other thing too about being a more competitive athlete is I think you have to focus and build off of the positives rather than beat yourself up about the negatives. I don’t think it’s beneficial for you to dwell on the mistakes. I think it’s beneficial to say, “Look, you did this really well.” One of the biggest things that I am extremely happy about that I think I can take forward into a lot more races is just how well I did in that heat. I think I surprised myself a little bit with that. It was almost 30 degrees warmer than 2012 when Tim Olsen ran his course record.

Yes, little things like that are huge just building off of those and it’s all a process. It’s a learning process, but it’s something that I want to make a career. Yes, it’s going to building off of this to hopefully running even better next year.

IAN: The next question is you had 93 miles of really good running where you were functioning the way that you wanted to in your first hundred-mile race. It was a complete learning curve, and it was an incredible learning curve. You were almost… it was almost a textbook run. Is there anything that you’ve learned that will improve your running for next year? Other than a recce of the course and making sure you know where to turn is. But physically, if you’ve done 120, 140 mile weeks, you can’t really add anymore volume? Will there be more speed work? How will you reflect on this and improve, or maybe you don’t need to improve, what you just need is another repeat performance like this year?

Jim Walmsley: Yes, you’re spot on with that. The biggest thing is going to be able to try to at least replicate what I was able to do in my training next year. With those 140 mile weeks, one of the weeks was 22,500 feet of vert. One thing personally, I think I can do a bit more consistently is getting out to that Grand Canyon and run in it maybe twice a week instead of just once a week. It’s huge to be able to do those long, long down hills. I know it’s something I’m very interested in. I’ve done it once, and it completely punted me on this day. We called it double tapping South Kaibab. South Kaibab is the steepest trail in the Grand Canyon, and basically FKTs go through South Kaibab because it’s just shorter, but it’s steeper.

My friend and I we went down it, up it, and then one more time down it, and up it. It ended up being over 11,000-foot vert day in less than 30 miles. It was just a massive, massive day. I think that was much earlier in the year, but I think focusing days like that. You can only train as hard as you can recover, and it’s a lot about mitigating stress in other parts to your life so that you can recover better on the running stress. Yes, I think a really important part of this year was that I was able to do longer tempo runs that I haven’t been doing since I’ve gotten into ultras in the last 2 years.

I am doing these long runs with a lot of the marathoners in town. If some of these guys they’re like, “Hey, I got this workout today, anybody want to hop in?” I just say like, “Yes, I’ll do that with you.” They’re not planned workouts, but hopping in with guys that are doing sessions works out. That’s been really beneficial as well in getting that foot speed going. That’s where like I’m running these splits and I’m trying to slow down, but look I’m efficient and I don’t feel like I’m over exerting. I think that’s how those things happen. It’s just foot speed wise, I was so prepared almost where things were just butter smooth and I was able to chip away at it a couple of minutes you’d split.

IAN: It was an incredible run, and it was an inspiring run. You have the Ultra community just sitting there aghast at the performance. The question is now, where do you go from here? Obviously a priority will be getting qualification for Western States next year. I quite like the way that you said that’s not really an issue. That’s that confidence side of you that I really like. You’ll prepare yourself, you’ll choose your race, you’ll get your slot, and I’m convinced you will be at Western States next year. Now, with this run, people have got an eye on you. I’m sure races are sending you some invites to attend their races. Where do you go from here? What’s lined up for the rest of 2016?

Jim Walmsley: Well, I was just really hoping that I would nail a hundred miles out of a hundred miles, or 100.2 out of 100.2 miles at Western States, because one of the biggest things is I do want to travel on. I do want to take opportunities to do all these great races across the world but the way that things went this year and my own personality and just realizing what I can do at Western States, 2017 is totally going to be about… at least giving it one more shot of having that perfect day. Maybe things fall apart again and I need to step back and maybe I’ll revisit it in a couple of years but it’s going to definitely build towards that. Right now, I’m trying to stay pretty disciplined and not put on too many races on my plate.

It’s extremely easy to do that. I don’t want to fall into the trap that a great deal of runners fall into. No matter what happens, because sometimes its injury, sometimes it’s over-training syndrome, but people are stereo-typing that all the elites are getting into this over-training syndrome. I don’t think that’s quite accurate. I think if you do look at the marathon world, their training is so much harder for so much longer.

You just don’t see that topic come up in that side of the sport. This year though, I kind of have a little bit of a gap right now, what I’m going to be racing. I’m taking advantage of it. I’m taking some really good down time. I’m going to try to get little things that had been bothering me for the last six months fixed and be hopefully healthy.

I’m going to try holding out until JFK to do another big race, but at the same time my plan for this year is to try to do a really big block of training in the fall and try to pull out a JFK North Face San Francisco Double. They are two weeks apart, they’re both 50 Milers which JFK being first in November and then the North Face 50 in San Francisco being the first weekend in December. I would like to try doing that double and seeing how that goes.

IAN: Okay, big difference in prize money between those two races.

Jim Walmsley: Yes. Yes, a little bit.

IAN: You’re not tempted by the Run Rabbit Run 100 for the prize money?

Jim Walmsley: I definitely am. I’ve been talking to the race director and it was even something on my radar before this. Run Rabbit Run this year though hinders that block of training and this is the biggest reason not to do it this year…  I guess what I’m saying is I want to do the double, I want to try to win both.

To get in the fitness required to be competitive and to recover so fast and then to run again, you’re talking a couple months of big mileage, hard running training to get ready for JFK where it’s not going to dig you in that big of a hole that it takes weeks and weeks to get out of that sort of thing but I want to be able to recover quick and then be able to race in two weeks.

That’s the biggest reason not to do Run Rabbit Run. The other thing I guess is what’s maybe keeping me from falling down that slippery slope is I’m kind of hoping a contract works out soon but we’ll see.

IAN: How’s that process going? I’m assuming that with you saying that there’s been some interest.

Jim Walmsley: Yes. Things are really positive. There’s definitely interest which more than that I ended up getting an agent because when I’m contacting these companies, it’s more in ultra-world. It’s kind of a weird thing because athletes are a lot of times trying to contact companies to ask for sponsorship, ask for this and that. A lot of times what I found out is I’m getting connected with the wrong people or people too low on the totem pole to really make decisions.

They’re like, “Look, we just have to wait until the end of the year” sort of thing. I ended up getting an agent after the race. The best part about that is that he’s able to work with people much higher up that if they want a contract done, they’ll get a contract done now instead of waiting until the end of the year when most people are renewing their contracts and stuff.

IAN: Well, it’s an exciting time. Certainly, the ultra-community is going to be very interested to see what happens over the coming months and year right up to Western States 2017. I just want to thank you so much for giving us an hour of your time and talking in depth about what has been quite an inspirational Western States.

Post Western States, Jim went on to set a Rim-to-Rim record in the Grand Canyon and a Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim record, smashing the previous record set by Rob Krar to a new level of  5:55:20 – 26-minutes faster than Krar’s 6:21:47. As Jim eluded to in my interview, his main objective for the end of the season was the ‘double’ at JFK50 and San Francisco 50. Just last weekend, the first race took place. Jim ran the JFK50 and smashed the old course record setting a new time of 5:21:28. The stars are aligning for Jim Walmsley, San Francisco and a potential huge pay day awaits… Is Jim Walmsley the next big thing in the ultra world?

 

Episode 114 of Talk Ultra – Kaci Lickteig, Jim Walmsley and Joanna Williams

A_GRAVATAR

This is Episode 114 of Talk Ultra and we have two interviews from Western States – Ladies champion Kaci Lickteig and the incredible Jim Walmsley who looked to break all WSER records only to go off course at 92 miles. We also speak with Joanna Williams, the outright winner from South Africa’s Richtersveld Transfrontier Wildrun. We have the news, ultra chat and Ryan Sandes co-hosts!

00:16:46 NEWS

WESTERN STATES

Andrew Miller 15:39

Didrik Hermansen 16:16

Jeff Browning 16:30

notable Paul Giblin from UK 5th 16:53

Kaci Lickteig 17:57 4th fastest lady ever

Amy Sproson 18:54

Devon Yanko 19:10

00:27:42 INTERVIEW KACI LICKTEIG

RICHTERSVELD TRANSFRONTIER WILDRUN

Results:

Joanna Williams 22:23:01

Tobias Mews 22:42:00

Dawid Kaswarie 23:07:34

Daniel Meyes 25:18:20

Linda Doke 25:43:52

John Cuff 26:41:19

Ryno Bakkes 26:52:04

Elisabet Barnes 27:01:56

Christiaan Vorster 27:23:19

Stephen Cunliffe 28:23:19

01:04:45  INTERVIEW with JOANNA WILLIAMS

BIG RED RUN

Results:

Elisabet Barnes 19:47:39

Jamie Hildage 20:54:34

Andy Dubois 21:25:02

Top 3 ladies:

Elisabet Barnes 19:47:39

Helen Durand 23:35:04

Anna Bennett 25:54:10

Top 3 men:

Jamie Hildage 20:54:34

Andy Dubois 21:25:02

Braddan Johnson 22:29:18

*Audio for Big Red Run to follow in the next show

LAVAREDO

Andy Symonds 12:15:06 new CR

Gediminas Grinius 12:23:06

Javi Dominguez 12:36:45

Andrea Huser 14:32:39

Uxue Fraile 15:13:09

Fernanda Maciel 15:20:57

MONT BLANC 80K

Caroline Chaverot 11:40 (winner Transgrancanaria)

Diego Pazos 10:52 (3rd at Transgrancanaria)

MOUNT MARATHON

David Norris 41:26 broke KJ’s record from last year by 22 secs

Nick Elson

Eric Strabel

Christy Marvin 51:02

Yngvild Kaspersen

Denali Forager Stabel

WMRA in Slovenia

Annie Conway from UK world champ! ahead of Antonella Confortola and Lucija Krkoc

Alessandro Rambaidini beat Marco De Gasperi and Mitja Kosovelj

Robert Young of the U.K. appears to have succumbed to a foot injury somewhere around Indianapolis, falling short in his attempt at a Guinness world record for the transcontinental run. The tracker has not moved since June 17. Though no concrete resolution was reached on the claims of cheating, the run’s final week was mired in controversy and is likely to remain a polarising topic? “Skins’ are investigating… HERE

Timmy Olson – American Tarzan. Discovery Channel HERE When Tim gets low on energy, he goes into his trademark “Animal Mode,” and enters the “Pain Cave” to get through it – training which will serve him well in the jungle!”

Coming up – Hardrock 100, High Trail Vanoise, Dolomites SkyRace and the Skyrunning World Champs

02:14:00 INTERVIEW JIM WALMSLEY

UP & COMING RACES

Andorra

Celestrail | 83 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Ronda dels Cims | 170 kilometers | July 15, 2016 | website

Ultra mític | 112 kilometers | July 15, 2016 | website

Australia

Queensland

1&1/2 | 63 kilometers | July 08, 2016 | website

3 Marathons in 3 Days | 126 kilometers | July 08, 2016 | website

3 Marathons in 3 Days | 126 kilometers | July 08, 2016 | website

Gold Coast Kokoda Challenge | 96 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Victoria

You Yangs 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | July 17, 2016 | website

Belgium

Wallonia

La Chouffe Trail 50 km | 50 kilometers | July 17, 2016 | website

Brazil

Ultraaratona dos Perdidos | 105 kilometers | July 15, 2016 | website

Bulgaria

65km Tryavna Ultra | 65 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Canada

Alberta

Sinister 7 Ultra | 100 miles | July 09, 2016 | website

British Columbia

Broken Goat 50K | 50 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Ontario

The North Face Endurance Challenge Ontario 50 Km | 50 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

The North Face Endurance Challenge Ontario 50 Mile | 50 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

Quebec

50 km | 50 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Finland

Lapland

NUTS Midnight Sun Trail Ultra 125 km | 125 kilometers | July 15, 2016 | website

NUTS Midnight Sun Trail Ultra 55K | 55 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

France

Corrèze

L’EDFi du Lac | 100 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Le Tour du Cardant | 65 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Finistère

100 km de Cléder | 100 kilometers | July 10, 2016 | website

57 km | 57 kilometers | July 10, 2016 | website

Gard

Grand trail Stevenson 110 km | 110 kilometers | July 17, 2016 | website

Grand trail Stevenson 126 km | 126 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Grand trail Stevenson 144 km | 144 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Grand trail Stevenson 179 km | 179 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Grand trail Stevenson 224 km | 224 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Grand trail Stevenson 55 km | 55 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Grand trail Stevenson 59 km | 59 kilometers | July 18, 2016 | website

Grand trail Stevenson 65 km | 65 kilometers | July 17, 2016 | website

Haute-Corse

Restonica Trail – 69 km | 69 kilometers | July 09, 2016 | website

Ultra Trail di Corsica | 110 kilometers | July 07, 2016 | website

Haute-Loire

Le Puy-en-Velay – Conques (Juillet) | 208 kilometers | July 07, 2016 | website

Haut-Rhin

Trail du Pays Welche | 50 kilometers | July 10, 2016 | website

Isère

La Grande Course | 65 kilometers | July 14, 2016 | website

Jura

L’intégrale | 120 kilometers | July 14, 2016 | website

Relais de 2 coureurs | 120 kilometers | July 14, 2016 | website

Pyrénées-Atlantiques

Grand trail de la Vallée d’Ossau | 73 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Savoie

Grand Parcours | 64 kilometers | July 10, 2016 | website

Ice Trail Tarentaise Val d’Isère | 65 kilometers | July 10, 2016 | website

Germany

Bavaria

Chiemsee-Ultramarathon Juli | 108 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Rhineland-Palatinate

Bärenfels Ultra Trail | 64 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Greece

Kronion Ultra | 70 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Iceland

Laugavegur Ultra Marathon | 55 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Italy

Piedmont

BUT – 85 km | 85 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Veneto

Asolo 100 km | 100 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Asolo 50 km | 50 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Japan

Oxfam Trailwalker Japan | 100 kilometers | July 09, 2016 | website

Madagascar

Racing Madagascar | 150 kilometers | July 19, 2016 | website

Mauritius

Trail des 7 Couleurs | 120 kilometers | July 09, 2016 | website

Norway

Hornindal Rundt 75 km | 75 kilometers | July 09, 2016 | website

Ultra NORWAY Race | 160 kilometers | July 08, 2016 | website

Poland

TriCity Trail 80+ | 80 kilometers | July 10, 2016 | website

Portugal

Ultra 75 km | 75 kilometers | July 10, 2016 | website

Romania

Marathon 7500 Elite | 90 kilometers | July 15, 2016 | website

Singapore

50 km | 50 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Slovakia

Nízkotatranská stíhačka | 100 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

South Africa

Rhodes Trail Run | 52 kilometers | July 09, 2016 | website

Spain

Andalusia

Al Andalus Ultimate Trail | 230 kilometers | July 11, 2016 | website

Ultra Sierra Nevada | 103 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

USN Trail | 62 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Aragon

Distancia Maratón – 111 km | 111 kilometers | July 07, 2016 | website

Distancia Media Maratón – 66 km | 66 kilometers | July 07, 2016 | website

Basque Country

Ehunmilak | 168 kilometers | July 08, 2016 | website

G2handiak | 88 kilometers | July 08, 2016 | website

Cantabria

Trail La Herradura de Campoo – 55 km | 55 kilometers | July 17, 2016 | website

Trail La Herradura de Campoo – Trail Etapas 28+32 | 60 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Sweden

GAX 100 miles | 100 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

Swedish Alpine Ultra | 107 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Switzerland

Berne

Eiger Ultra Trail E101 | 101 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Eiger Ultra Trail E51 | 51 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Valais

La traversée | 61 kilometers | July 10, 2016 | website

X-Alpine | 111 kilometers | July 09, 2016 | website

Turkey

80K Ultra Maraton | 80 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Erciyes Ultra Sky Trail 64k-3000m+ | 64 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

United Kingdom

Buckinghamshire

Chiltern Ultra Challenge “Intro” 50km Ultra | 50 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Essex

Saffron Trail Ultra | 70 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

Glasgow City

Clyde Stride Ultra Marathon | 40 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

Kent

The 50 Mile Challenge | 52 miles | July 10, 2016 | website

Oxfordshire

Race to the Stones | 100 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Shropshire

Wenlock Olympian Run | 50 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

Wenlock Olympian Walk | 50 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

Somerset

Ham & Lyme 100k | 100 kilometers | July 09, 2016 | website

Ham & Lyme 50k | 50 kilometers | July 09, 2016 | website

USA

California

Badwater 135 | 135 miles | July 18, 2016 | website

CTR Lake Chabot Train Run 50 km (Jul) | 50 kilometers | July 17, 2016 | website

Golden Gate Trail Run 50 km (summer) | 50 kilometers | July 09, 2016 | website

Mt. Disappointment 50K Endurance Run | 50 kilometers | July 09, 2016 | website

Mt. Disappointment 50 Mile Endurance Run | 50 miles | July 09, 2016 | website

Pacifica 50 km | 50 kilometers | July 10, 2016 | website

Rancho Canada del Oro and Calero Park 50K | 50 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Colorado

Hardrock 100 Endurance Run | 100 miles | July 15, 2016 | website

Leadville Silver Rush 50 | 50 miles | July 10, 2016 | website

Sheep Mountain 50 Mile Endurance Run | 51 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

Idaho

Beaverhead 100K Endurance Run | 100 kilometers | July 09, 2016 | website

Beaverhead 50K Endurance Run | 50 kilometers | July 09, 2016 | website

McCall Trailrunning 40 Mile Classic | 40 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

Illinois

Calumet Region trail Relay | 40 miles | July 17, 2016 | website

Indiana

110 Miles HIgh School (up to 7 runners) | 110 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

110 Miles Open (5-7 runners) | 110 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

110 Miles Superhuman (2 runners) | 110 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

110 Miles Ultra (3-4 runners) | 110 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

55 Miles Open (5-7 runners) | 55 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

55 Miles Superhuman (2 runners) | 55 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

55 Miles The Gump (1 runner) | 55 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

55 Miles Ultra (3-4 4unners) | 55 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

Kansas

Honey Badger 100 Mile Ultra Road Race | 100 miles | July 09, 2016 | website

Psycho Psummer 50K | 50 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Maryland

Catoctin 50k Trail Run | 50 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Massachusetts

The Rock Run | 50 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

Montana

50 Mile | 50 miles | July 15, 2016 | website

Devil’s Backbone 50 Miles | 50 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

Seeley Lake 50K | 50 kilometers | July 15, 2016 | website

Thunderbolt Creek 50 Km | 50 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Nevada

Tahoe Rim Trail 100M | 100 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

Tahoe Rim Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Tahoe Rim Trail 50M | 50 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

Ohio

Buckeye Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | July 09, 2016 | website

Oregon

50K | 50 kilometers | July 10, 2016 | website

Mt Hood Pacific Crest Trail Ultramarathon | 50 miles | July 09, 2016 | website

Relay | 69 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

Texas

Muleshoe Bend – 60k | 60 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Utah

Skyline Mountain 50 Trail Run | 50 miles | July 09, 2016 | website

Speedgoat 50K Ultra Marathon | 50 kilometers | July 09, 2016 | website

Ultra Adventures Capitol Reef 100 Mile | 100 miles | July 09, 2016 | website

Ultra Adventures Capitol Reef 50K | 50 kilometers | July 10, 2016 | website

Ultra Adventures Capitol Reef 50 Mile | 50 miles | July 10, 2016 | website

Vermont

Vermont 100k Endurance Race | 100 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Vermont 100 Mile Endurance Race | 100 miles | July 16, 2016 | website

Washington

Grey Rock 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | July 09, 2016 | website

Ragnar Relay Northwest Passage | 190 miles | July 15, 2016 | website

Wild Woman Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | July 16, 2016 | website

Wisconsin

DWD Devil’s Lake 50K | 50 kilometers | July 09, 2016 | website

DWD Devil’s Lake 50M | 50 miles | July 09, 2016 | website

03:10:46 CLOSE

Many thanks to Ryan Sandes for co-hosting this show.

 

03:14:23

ITunes http://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/talk-ultra/id497318073

Stitcher You can listen on iOS HERE, Android HERE or via a web player HERE

Libsyn – feed://talkultra.libsyn.com/rss

Website – talkultra.com

WIN! a signed copy of TRAIL BLAZER by Ryan Sandes

RyanSandes book

I caught up with Ryan Sandes for the latest episode of TALK ULTRA podcast (you can listen HERE) episode 107.

We discussed at length Ryan’s career, his difficult 2015 season and of course his book, TRAIL BLAZER (available on Amazon here).

In the interview, Ryan asked a question, ‘what was the second desert race I won?’

To be in with a chance of winning a signed copy of the book, please comment below with an answer. All correct answers will be added to a hat and a winner drawn in April.

Good luck!

Episode 102 – Sally McRae, Mike Bialick, Mark Gillett

A_GRAVATAR

This is Episode 102 of Talk Ultra. Happy Christmas everyone! We speak with Mike Bialick about that storming 100 mile run, Sally McRae talks all about her running and finding balance and we have a tribute to fellow photographer, Mark Gillett who sadly passed away. Niandi co-hosts.

00:01:31 Show Start

00:19:10 NEWS

Divinio San Francisco, walking the streets of La Palma HERE

Running the Caldera de Taburiente rim, Roques de los Muchachos HERE

DESERT SOLSTICE INVITATIONAL

Zach Bitter ran 11:40:55 for 100-miles – he went through 50 in 5:33 and 100k in 6:58 he broke his own 100 record by 7min but missed the world record which is still a good chunk of time away.

Katalin Nagy dropped from the 24-hour but won the 100 in 14:48 and set a US Track record for 200k in 19:19:05

BARCELONA 24HR

Well done to Marco Consani winning ‪#‎barcelona24‬ with 256km (159miles) course record and PB. Now that’s awesome and a long way!

RUN CLEAN, GET DIRTY – http://runcleangetdirty.org/athletes/

00:37:08 INTERVIEW  with MARK GILLETT

00:52:41 INTERVIEW with MIKE BIALICK

02:19:30 INTERVIEW with SALLY McRAE

UP & COMING RACES

Australia

New South Wales

Narrabeen All Nighter 100 km | 100 kilometers | January 02, 2016 | website

Germany

Bavaria

Chiemsee-Ultramarathon Dezember | 108 kilometers | December 30, 2015 | website

Hong-Kong

Tsuen Wan, Ta Shek Wu, Fo Tan | 115 kilometers | January 01, 2016 | website

Ultra Trail Tai Mo Shan | 162 kilometers | January 01, 2016 | website

Yuen Long, Ta Shek Wu, Fo Tan | 50 kilometers | January 02, 2016 | website

Nepal

50 km | 50 kilometers | January 02, 2016 | website

78 km | 78 kilometers | January 02, 2016 | website

The North Face® Kathmandu Ultra 50km | 50 kilometers | January 02, 2016 | website

The North Face® Kathmandu Ultra 80km | 78 kilometers | January 02, 2016 | website

Netherlands

Limburg

SMU-Loop | 58 kilometers | January 02, 2016 | website

South Africa

Festival of Running 100 Mile Race | 100 miles | January 01, 2016 | website

Sri Lanka

50 km | 50 kilometers | December 27, 2015 | website

USA

Alabama

Recover from the Holidays | 50 kilometers | December 31, 2015 | website

California

Woodside 50 km | 50 kilometers | December 27, 2015 | website

Woodside Trail 50km Run | 50 kilometers | December 27, 2015 | website

Florida

Croom Zoom 100 Km Run | 100 kilometers | January 02, 2016 | website

Croom Zoom 50 Km Run | 50 kilometers | January 02, 2016 | website

Louisiana

Wild Azalea Trail Challenge 50 | 50 miles | January 02, 2016 | website

Michigan

Yankee Winter Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | January 02, 2016 | website

North Carolina

Salem Lakeshore Frosty 50k | 50 kilometers | January 02, 2016 | website

Salem Lakeshore Frosty 50k | 50 kilometers | January 02, 2016 | website

Salem Lakeshore Frosty 50k Relay | 50 kilometers | January 02, 2016 | website

Salem Lakeshore Frosty 50k Relay | 50 kilometers | January 02, 2016 | website

Salem Lake Shore Frosty Fifty | 50 kilometers | January 02, 2016 | website

Tennessee

100K | 100 kilometers | January 02, 2016 | website

100 Miler | 100 miles | January 02, 2016 | website

50K | 50 kilometers | January 02, 2016 | website

Texas

50K | 50 kilometers | December 26, 2015 | website

Virginia

Boyers Furnace | 40 miles | December 26, 2015 | website

Redeye 50 km | 50 kilometers | January 01, 2016 | website

Wisconsin

Tuscobia Winter Ultramarathon 150 Mile Run | 150 miles | January 08, 2016 | website

02:19:28 CLOSE 

Finally we want to thank you for all the support over the last 12-months. Difficult to believe that another year has passed. We wish you all a very Merry Christmas and we hope 2016 is awesome!

02:22:52

ITunes http://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/talk-ultra/id497318073

Libsyn – feed://talkultra.libsyn.com/rss

Website – talkultra.com