RED-S Syndrome – What Athletes Need to Know

Mimmi Kotka (far left) at the start of the 2020 Transgrancanaria – (c)iancorless.com

Mimmi Kotka broke silence just last week after a string of below par performances and has acknowledged it is time to take a break from sport. In an open and honest post on social media, she clarifies:

“I have been suffering with my body since the end of 2018. I have finally connected the dots between my low immune system, anaemia, fatigue, stomach problems, lack of menstrual period, inability to run fast and my body always running in reserve: it is RED- S, Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport.”

Now for many, RED-S may well be a new term, however, the list of symptoms and problems Mimmi lists are not. In recent years we have witnessed the rise of many a runner, particularly in the ultra-world for them only to slowly disappear.

Caroline Chaverot at Limone Extreme, Italy – (c)iancorless.com

Recently, Caroline Chaverot, a dominant force and some would have said unbeatable in trail running, slowly removed herself from the sport with a string of below expectation performances. In an interview with Damian Hall for IRunFar, Caroline said, “…I want to be better. Everyone else is training a lot, so I will train like them.’ Maybe I did too much? Or maybe too soon? If training becomes like a competition, then you get tired. I probably trained too hard and fast.”

The story of Geoff Roes and his dominance, for a period over the 100-mile distance, who now runs for fun, forever fighting a battle with fatigue. “It seems like I take two steps forward and one step back. I can’t really do what I want physically, I still get pretty fatigued.” said Roes talking with Justin Mock in an article on IRunFar dating back to just April 2020.

To be clear, I am not saying that Caroline or Geoff had RED-S, I am merely pointing out that our sport, the challenges it brings, without close attention can be far more negative than positive. No runner or athlete intends to get RED-S or OTS, quite the contrary. As Mimmi says:

 “I never had the intention to lose weight, nor do I have an eating disorder. I ended up with RED-S by mistake.”

The great thing about trail and ultrarunning is that it is a sport for all. All body types are welcomed and RED-S can happen to anyone at anytime. It can creep up without your realising.

“But a mysterious training condition is suddenly plaguing its ranks, robbing a generation of top athletes of their talents and forcing victims to wonder: Is it possible to love this sport too much?”

Mike Wolfe at The Rut, he is co race director with Mike Foote – (c)iancorless.com

The above is from an article, “Running on Empty” by Meaghen Brown that starts with the story of Mike Wolfe at the 2012 Transvulcania. I was there, I witnessed the day unfold. The article goes on to say:

“The past seven years have seen the rise and decline of at least a dozen elite competitors, including Anna Frost, who won the women’s division of the North Face Endurance Championship in 2011; Anton Krupicka, two-time winner of the Leadville 100; Geoff Roes, who set a new record at the 2010 Western States 100; and Kyle Skaggs, who demolished the Hardrock 100 record in 2008. Each of them reached the pinnacle of the sport only to mysteriously struggle to repeat their best results. Transvulcania was the start of Wolfe’s own precipitous fall.”

Now the context of the above article was OTS, (Overtraining Syndrome,) but the similarities with RED-S are noticeable.

What is RED-S?

Relative energy deficiency in sport, known as `RED-S `is the result of insufficient caloric intake and/or excessive energy expenditure. For Mimmi, it was the latter, excessive energy expenditure. The condition can alter physiological systems such as metabolism, menstrual function, bone health, immunity, protein synthesis, and cardiovascular and psychological health.

For many, RED-S was known as the Female Athlete Triad and is often directly related to not eating appropriately for the amount of energy one extends. This can be a particular problem for the ultra-distance runner. “Furthermore, the RED-S model includes both male and female athletes – so if you are a male athlete, please do not stop reading! Low energy availability can impact male and female exercisers of all levels and of all ages.”

Food restriction is a worrying scenario, both for male and female athletes. A simple analogy is taking a car and restricting the fuel you add to the car. Do not add enough fuel and the car will eventually grind to a halt, the body is no different. While the condition was often thought to be one for female athletes, medical professionals are now seeing similarity in male athletes and the usage of the RED-S term now applies to male and female.

Mimmi continues to write, “I have plunged myself into this condition over the last few years. I have simply put in more and more hours of training without adjusting my calories accordingly, dragging me towards incredible fatigue.”

Mimmi was eating healthy and good quantities, however, the balance was off. Her training volume was too high and calorie intake insufficient. It was not an eating disorder of any sorts, more a miscalculation of energy burnt/ calories in.

Mimmi, was the winner of CCC and TDS and for a period of time, was considered unstoppable. A force to be reckoned with. But as she says, since 2018 she has continually suffered to find the same performance levels. This in turn brings a negative cycle that only perpetuates the problem.

I will train more.

I will lose weight.

Two common scenarios that gradually add more issues and one cannot ignore pressure from peers, fans and sponsors. In the case of Mimmi, she trained more to get better. She had no intention to lose weight.

While eating habits are an indicator of RED-S, the overall picture is much more complex and of course, the differences between male and female are marked.

The BMJ (British Medical Journal) list several key notable factors as an indicator, the first is missed periods or no menstrual cycle. Now of course, this is specific to women, but what other factors should be considered?

Stress Fractures.

Low BMI.

Strange eating habits.

Increase training.

Inability to recover.

The long-term impact if unchecked can be devastating with affects on the health system staying with the body for the rest of the athletes life.

When hormone levels are altered, the impact is potentially far reaching and why it may be common to know and understand that immunity is impacted, recovery, growth, concentration and an impact on endurance, the cardio vascular system can also be impacted which could lead to heart disease.

This is not a condition just for the “elite” of the sport, quite the opposite. We look up to our idols and we copy them. We hear stories of mega training sessions, we hear about fasted runs and we hear stories of specific diets to maintain race weight… A picture builds and is one that many try to copy and emulate. For some and in the case of Mimmi, it was about being fitter, therefore adding more training. But for others, the pressure to be thin is very real and fad diets contribute leaving a myriad of question marks that few find the answer to.

Going back to the car analogy, sports people need energy and that energy comes from food full of nutrients and variety. One should not have a troublesome relationship with food but unfortunately, sport is littered with athletes who do. How often have you heard someone say, “I need to run to earn my calories!” 

This mindset is the start of a potential problem and it needs checking.

As Mimmi says in her honest post:

“…I’ve dragged myself deeper and deeper into this condition during the last years. Just loaded on more training hours, not adjusting my calories accordingly and slugged through incredible fatigue. Being able to ignore the physical body is what makes a good ultra runner but it’s also what brought me down.”

Nutrition specialist, Dr Nicky Keay confirms in an article, “Fundamentally there is a mismatch between food intake (in terms of both energy and micronutrients) and the demand for nutrition required to cover expenditure, both of exercise training and for basic “housekeeping” tasks in the body to maintain health. If there is insufficient energy availability, then the body switches into an energy saving mode. This “go slow” mode has implications for hormone production and metabolic processes, which impacts all systems throughout the body.”

We train to get fitter, faster and stronger. But a complete athlete should look at all aspects to make a perfect picture. Food and nutrition is a key building block and without it there will be an inability to improve as expected in response to training and the risk of injury will increase. It´s a downward spiral we have seen all too often in the sport of ultra-running.

Counting calories rarely has a benefit in the long-term, however, in the short term, keeping a training diary that records food intake v expenditure can be useful. If an athlete consumes fewer than 2500/2000 calories (male/female) after taking energy expenditure in to account, your intake is likely to be inadequate

There are many fad diets out there but find a balance with nutritious food that has plenty of variety. Periodise food intake to coincide with training. For example, there is a time and a place for carbohydrate. Equally protein and fats. Eat fresh, minimally processed foods that include plenty of servings of vegetables and fresh fruit. Try not to avoid certain food groups unless advised otherwise by a medical professional and if vegan or vegetarian make sure you understand how to maximise calories paying attention to Protein, Fat, B12, Iron, Zinc, Calcium, Iodine and D Vitamin. “The No Meat Athlete Cookbook” by Matt Frazier is a great resource for all sports people

Post exercise, make sure you replenish your body with protein and carbohydrate. Protein will help repair lean muscle and carbohydrate will help restore glycogen for the next training session. How much carbohydrate you eat depends on what training you have coming up… This is where the help of a coach and nutritionist will help keep you honest.

Be sensible with training volume, less is sometime more!

To conclude, who is at risk of RED-S?

The reality is, RED-S can occur in any age or level of athlete but the greatest risk comes for those who are involved in sports that require high power. Power to weight ratio is a fickle beast and those most at risk are cyclists, climbers, triathletes, runners – yes, runners!

Ultimately, find a healthy balance between training, nutrition and rest. Go through the warning signs below and be honest with yourself. If in doubt, ease back, eat healthy and seek the advice of professionals who can help get you back on the correct path.

Warning signs:

  1. Fatigue
  2. Illness
  3. Repeated injury
  4. Mood changes
  5. Broken sleep
  6. Below par performances
  7. and of course, an unhealthy relationship with food.

 

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SCOTT Kinabalu Ultra RC Review

I recently reviewed the new SCOTT Supertrac RC 2 (here) and I was excited. I had been using the original Supertrac as a regular shoe when going to the mountains, particularly when on technical terrain. Although I loved the shoe, there were just a couple of niggle points. Gladly those niggle points were removed in the RC 2 and I went on to say:

“The Supertrac RC 2 is a great shoe and for anyone who loved the original Supertrac RC, I think now they will have an even bigger smile on their face. For those who were tempted by the black and yellow shoes previously but decided that the toe box was too narrow, the cushioning compromised or the feel was a little flat, you should now go back and check these out. It’s rare I compare shoes to other brands and models, however, for those who have read my reviews, they will know that VJ Sport are my ‘go-to’ shoes for the mountains, be that the XTRM or MAXx models. Now, I firmly believe that Scott have a shoe that can compete.” 

Several months on, the RC 2 has only got better and I am now looking to get another pair, I have really given my current pair some abuse. Gladly, I was able to share the workload on the RC 2 with the Kinabalu Ultra RC, also a new shoe.

I received the RC 2 and Kinabalu Ultra RC at the same time and on first impressions, it appeared they were the same shoe but with two major differences. The upper and outsole.

I was wrong.

Don’t get me wrong, there are great similarities between both shoes and it is fair to say, if you like the RC 2 then you will like the Kinabalu Ultra RC and vice versa.

So, what are the differences?

The RC 2 is designed for the mountains with an aggressive outsole using radial traction, a new and extremely durable upper by Schoeller called Coldblack® and a 3XDRY® material. Cushioning is 22.5mm at the rear and 17.5mm at the front providing a drop of 5mm. It’s a great shoe when you need grip and durability in tough terrain. But, if you were out for a long run and trail, the RC 2 would probably be too aggressive…

Step in the Kinabalu Ultra RC.

The RC badge connects the RC 2 and the Kinabalu Ultra RC and confirms a build quality and attention to detail. RC quite simply confirms that this is the ‘best’ that we have to offer.

I have used many Kinabalu shoes by SCOTT (HERE) in the past and I have liked them. If you have tried them, you may agree or disagree? However, whatever your experience of a Kinabalu you have had in the past, please forget it. This new incarnation has nothing to do with the previous incarnations, even the Kinabalu RC 2 (here).

The black and yellow look confirms the ‘new’ shoes pedigree and as stated, on first look, it appears very similar to the RC 2.

The upper is much more breathable on the Kinabalu Ultra RC with an ultra-mesh that allows yellow to show through and the outsole is very different with a less aggressive hybrid traction. Notably, to fulfilling the ‘ultra’ intentions of the shoe, cushioning is 29mm at the rear and 21mm at the front providing a more relaxed 8mm drop.

THE SHOE

Sizing is true to size but like the RC 2 model, I use an EU 44 which should be UK9.5, on the inside of the shoe it says UK9. So, just make sure on fit when purchasing.

Interestingly, there is only 2g difference in weight between the RC 2 and Kinabalu Ultra RC with both shows just under 300g for an EU44.

Foothold is really superb. When you slide your foot in the shoe, there is immediate comfort and hold. This comes from the engineered tongue which is amazingly comfortable, the lacing which can be really pulled tight to hold the foot secure and also the way the lace eyelets are placed. There is also the option to lock-lace or similar with the inclusion of an additional eyelet. The tongue does not have a sock-like fit which surprised me, however, after extended use (400km) I have had no issues at all, on the contrary. The upper, tongue and lacing configuration hold the foot wonderfully tight. Although the Kinabalu Ultra RC is not intended for technical terrain, the shoe handles it surprisingly well, especially when switching and changing direction, a credit to the upper, lacing and foothold.

The heel area is padded, snug and importantly when climbing does not allow for any slipping.

Notably, the toe box is wider allowing a little more toe splay. Toe protection is minimal echoing the shoes intention of non-technical trail.

Cushioning is notable. Kinetic foam, eRide midsole, rock plate and a racing footbed make these shoes wonderful for long runs. SCOTT have always used eRide (rocker) to help with technique and cadence.

The outsole is a classic trail grip that provides enough traction when running a variety of terrain, be that hard pack dirt, gravel or rock. In the middle of the outsole, grip is removed. There is an emphasis here that this is a shoe that tempts you to go faster.

IN USE

I firmly believe that SCOTT have pushed to a new level with the RC 2 and this new incarnation of the Kinabalu.

If I was only to purchase two shoes, the SCOTT’s would be high up on the list. They complement each other perfectly, the RC 2 for hard, tough, technical mountain days and the Kinabalu Ultra RC for less technical and challenging trail days.

Comfort level is high for 1-hour fast runs and day-long adventures. Feel for the ground is great. Cushioning has life and provides great energy return. The upper is breathable, light and durable.

The outsole performed as expected offering grip then required on rocks, tree roots and trail both in the dry and wet conditions. This is not a shoe for mud!

Despite the shoes intentions, they handle technical trail superbly well. This is a credit to the tongue and lacing; it really does hold the foot securely providing a reassuring hold that provides confidence.

The Kinabalu Ultra RC has wider toe box but it is not super wide. Depending on your needs, you’d have to try them on and see if they provide the room you require. In my opinion, they feel very similar to the RC 2 which is great for me, but I wonder with the ‘ultra’ intentions if the toe box could be a little wider?.

CONCLUSIONS

The Kinabalu Ultra RC is a great shoe for any trail run and I include more technical runs too. It is not for mud! Quite simply, in conjunction with the Supertrac RC 2, SCOTT have produced two shoes that cover a plethora of uses. Although the name ‘ultra’ suggests that this shoe is just for long runs, I would most definitely say no. It’s light, responsive and wonderful on 1-hour trail runs; they feel fast. When running longer, the added cushioning, rock plate and 8mm drop provides all-day comfort. I have over 400km in mine, the uppers are in great condition, the outsole is still good and the comfort level is as good, if not better than when I first used them 3-months ago (June 2020)

Salomon Rondane 100 Race Summary – 2020

‘We want as many runners as possible to enjoy Norwegian wilderness and Norwegian mountains.’

All images copyright iancorless.com - all rights reserved.

Established in 1962, the Rondane National Park is the oldest national park in Norway. Covering 963 square km’s, the park contains ten peaks above 2000m, the highest peak being Rondeslottet at 2178m.

Folldal, an old mining village, is the hub for the race with the start and finishing taking place in the same location.

Race day started at 0500 and it was clear from the clear skies that a beautiful day lay ahead for the runners. Maybe too good some would say… 

Although a chill penetrated the early morning air, the arrival of the sun and the early miles warmed the runners up quickly and by the 10-mile point, the format of the racing that would come started to take shape.

Pre-race favourite, Sebastian Krogvig did not hold back early on, opening up a 12-minute lead over the hot favourite, Paul Ogier with 10-miles covered.

For the women, Molly Bazilchuk eased herself in to the day, allowing the early miles to save energy and settle, knowing that a big day lay ahead. She was shadowed by Katrine Andersen.

By 0900, with 4-hours covered, the day was already hot and with a long and tough race ahead, the early miles were best taken easy. With five key aid stations, Nygruva, Dørålseter, Straumbu, Breijøseter and Grimsbu, an ability to be self-sufficient for long periods is an essential characteristic of this race.

A land full of reindeer, mining heritage and traces from the last ice-age, Rondane  provides an opportunity to experience 2000m summits that are very unique and it contast to Jotunheimen, completely different both in look and feel.

At Nygruva, Sebastian was well ahead of the predicted pace and although there had been much talk of 20-hours winning the race, based on the first aid station, sub 16 looked possible. Paul Ogier, running his first 100-mile race had recced all but 5km of the 100 route and with that experience, he paced himself allowing Sebastian to run his own race. Behind, Marius Stengle-Håkonsen, Elvind E Gjøystdal, Staffan Bengtsson, Vegard Triseth and Samuel Fredriksson chased.

Molly, was now taking hold of the women´s race and making her way through the men´s race as was Liv Richter.

Marius Stengle-Håkonsen

Dørålglupen, a wonderful gully of rocks was a significant marker in the race and now Sebastian and Molly were showing there strength. By the aid station Dørålster, Sebastian had opened a lead of over 45-minutes on Paul.

Molly pushing up Dørålglupen

Molly was more metronimic, steady and slowly stretching the elastic over the competition. Liv equally looked relaxed using her poles to climb and descend. Inger Aarberg was looking strong, Katrine Anderson looked to paying a price for the early pace with Molly and Kari Forbrigd, Gro Siljan Hjuske and Inger Haugland looked ready for the long fight ahead.

At all times, the landscape was rewarding the runners with spectacular views. Nestles between rolling mountains, the green landscape was broken with single-track, gravel roads and lakes. The intense blue sky contrasting nicely.

Straumbu was a significant aid point and for many, the key aid before the night section with drop bags available. Sebastian arrived but it was clear that all was not well. Post-race he would confirm that his legs had never felt better, but he had somehow managed to get his electrolyte blance wrong… Sitting in a chair, his heart raced. On medical advice, he withdrew from the race.

Paul Ogier now took the reigns at the front. He looked relaxed leaving the aid station and as he climbed through the forest with the golden sun leaving the day, he looked set for Rondane victory. Marius Stengle-Håkonsen pursued, as did Staffan Bengtsson and Elvind E Gjøystdal.

But Molly was looking increasingly strong with the passing of time and it was clear that the predicted overall podium slot was in contention. Behind, Liv and Inger were having a close battle.

Night is always tough. The leaving of one day, the body naturally craves sleep and rest, for the 100 runner, night time is something to be endured, pushed through and the welcome of a new day brings new life. Luckily, Norwegian nights are not as long as in other places!

Paul and Molly would not welcome the new light on the course, they would both finish their runs in darkness, 20:59:23 and 22:39:07 respectively. Marius would split them in 2nd place overall in 21:42:29. For Molly, it was a 3rd overall placing; an incredible run.

Staffan Bengtsson rounded out the male podium in 24:00:02, placing 4th overall.

Liv fought hard for her 2nd place in 25:26:27…. So hard, she collapsed at the finish and was taken to hospital with a potential stress fracture or kidney issues. It was later confirmd to be kidney issues brought on by a hot day, dehydration and well, running 100-miles! Inger Aaberg completed the women´s podium in 27:33:42.

Coronavirus has stopped racing globally, the impact has been huge. But here, in Norway, a relatively low-key race brought a fierce battle over a truly incredible and beautiful course. 

How beautiful? Well, in some respects, the story of one participant sums it up. He unfortunately took a tumble on the rocks and broke his ankle. After receiving medical attention, he waited for a helicopter rescue and cheered on the runners. Due to demands on the five helicopters that cover the area, he had a long wait… Finally, when back in Folldal, race director Erik Haugland, apologised for the delay. The response was clear, ´Don´t be silly… If you are going to break an ankle, I did it in a perfect place. The scenery was incredible, the waether glorious and I got to cheer on the competitors. I will be back next year!´

Full results are available at racetracker.no

VIEW THE RACE IMAGES HERE

IMAGES CAN BE PURCHASED HERE

Top 5 Male and Female:

  1. Paul Ogier
  2. Marius Stengle-Håkonsen
  3. Staffan Bengtsson
  4. Elvind  E Gjøystdal
  5. Sanuel Fredriksson

 

  1. Molly Bazilchuk
  2. Liv Richter
  3. Inger Aaberg
  4. Kari Forbrigd
  5. Gro Siljan Hjuske

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Episode 194 – Beth Pascall – Sabrina Stanley and Tom Evans

Episode 194 – Is a packed show with Beth Pascall talking about her incredible Bob Graham Round. Sabrina Stanley discusses her new FKT for the Nolans 14 and Tom Evans talks 13:41 for 5km and how that fits in to training for ultras.
*****
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NEWS
FKT’s posted on last show:
* Franco Colle new FKT on Monte Rosa from Gressoney
* Nadir Maguet – Gran Paradiso FKT 2:02:32
* Erik Clavery GR10 9 days 9 hours and a few minutes
* Davide Magnini Ortles FKT 2:18:15
* Kim Collison 24h Lakes achieves 78 Peaks
* Sabrina Verjeee Wainwrights (wishes not to claim)
* Dylan Bowman Loowit Trail 5:11:49
* Josh Pulattie Oregon Coast Trail 12 days 10 hours 25 min
* Candice Burt Tahoe Rim Trail 2 days 12 hours 47 min
* John Kelly Pennine Way 2 days 16 hours 40 min
* Sarah Hansel (57:43) & Joey Campanelli (41:00) for Nolans 14
* Tom Hollins Dales Mountain 30 (130 miles, 30 summits) 41 hrs
*Adam Kimble new FKT on Tahoe Rim Trail, USA
*Damian Hall new FKT for the Pennine Way, UK
*Adam Jacobs new FKT for Hertfordshire Way, UK
*Carla Molinaro new FKT for the JOGLE, UK
*Beth Pascall new FKT for the Bob Graham Round, UK and set 5th fastest time.
NEW UPDATE:
Rhys Jenkins sets new FKT on the Wales Coastal Path #fkt! 870 miles. Time TBC but 20 days 9hrs 35 mins – 2hr 20mins off the record.
Lindsey Ulrich new FKT Pacific Crest Trail
Marilyne Marchand-Gouin new FKT Clorado Trail
Mikaela Osler new FKT Colorado Trail
Wouter Berghuijs new FKT Via Alpina Switzerland
Christof Teuscher new FKT Eagles 33
Check FKT website for latest updates https://fastestknowntime.com/
*****
INTERVIEW : BETH PASCALL
*****
INTERVIEW : SABRINA STANLEY
*****
INTERVIEW : TOM EVANS
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Please listen to the INTERVIEWS – please follow the show
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Tips for the Trail – Sea To Summit Ultra Light Sleeping Mat (Extra Small)

A good nights sleep is essential when racing a multi-day adventure if out fastpacking. Without sleep, our ability to recover is compromised and eventually, sleep deprivation will impact on performance, mental strength and even one’s appetite.

Carrying a sleeping mat is essential, however, the weight of the mat is crucial. In most scenarios, we want the lightest possible that is suitable for the conditions that we are running and also provides excellent comfort.

There are many options available on the market and recently I have been testing the Sea To Summit Ultra Light Mat (extra small) which has impressed me in several key areas:

  1. Easy to inflate and default.
  2. Small pack size.
  3. Very lightweight.
  4. Extremely comfortable.
  5. Durable.

Finding a sleeping mat that provides this level of comfort in such a small pack size and weight has been a revelation. I was initially concerned that an extra small mat would be too small… Not the case, this mat has exceeded my expectations.

Under 300g in weight made with 400 TPU Nylon, the mat is durable and hardy to all conditions. The 132 Air Sprung Cells react as one would hope to body weight and provide a supremely comfortable night. In simple terms, the cells don not flatten out under hipbones or shoulders.The addition of a stuff sack and an Air Stream is a nice touch but comes with an additional weight penalty of 40-45g.

Read more Tips for the Trail HERE

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Rondane 100 2020 Race Preview

Many areas of Scandinavia have been very fortunate amidst the Coronavirus Pandemic to see a return to racing. The iconic Besseggen took place in June and in the following weeks, we have witnessed races, albeit low-key with restrictions appear.

Now, on August 15th,  the Rondane 100 will take place (also a 50 mile event) with reduced capacity and sold out races.

The 2020 edition will no doubt be different to other editions, but race director, Erik Haugland and his team have been working hard to put on an event that complies with all the necessary protocols in these challenging times without ruining the integrity of the event and the experience of the runners. 

‘We want as many as possible to enjoy Norwegian wilderness and Norwegian mountains.’

 Covering 963 square km’s, Rondane National Park is the oldest national park in Norway, established in 1962. The park contains ten peaks above 2000m, an excellent run challenge in itself! The highest peak being Rondeslottet at 2178m.

With a mild climate, the terrain is unique, especially above the tree line where little grows; lichen, rocks and a barren landscape.

Folldal, an old mining village, is the hub for the race activity with the Rondane 100 starting and finishing here. Dovre and Alvdal Vestfjell frame the village. 

Photo ©abelonelyng – http://www.abelonelyng.com

A long and tough race, the race provides an opportunity to experience 2000m summits, a land full of reindeer, mining heritage and traces from the last ice-age.

‘We have used our own trail running experience and created a race in our own beautiful backyard. A tribute to stunning nature, majestic mountains, to trail running and ultrarunning culture.’

A 4-hour drive from Oslo and a 7-hour drive from Bergen, Folldal and the Rondane 100 is a race that is easily accessed from outside of Norway, with many flights daily from Europe, however, for 2020, the Rondane races will mainly have only Scandinavian participants due to global restrictions on travel.

Photo ©abelonelyng – http://www.abelonelyng.com

The main event gets underway at 0500 on Saturday August 15th – Rondane 100 will take place on 85% path, minimal gravel road and almost no tarmac.

There are five key aid stations, Nygruva, Dørålseter, Straumbu, Breijøseter and Grimsbu. The race concludes at 1800 hours on Sunday 16th.

A full list of participants is available HERE 

Photo ©abelonelyng – http://www.abelonelyng.com

WOMEN

Molly Bazilchuk heads up the women’s race and many consider her a top-tip for the overall podium. Molly has won Ultra Tour Monte Rosa, EcoTrail Oslo and placed 14th at CCC.

Lena-Britt Johansen won Lofoten Ultra Trail 100 in 2017 and won the 50-mile event in 2019, no doubt a strong challenger for the podium in Rondane. Inger Haugland has experience 24-hours on a track and has placed 2nd at Black River 100 mile race.

Liss Vallestrand has won Sora Moria 100 and is experienced over 24-hours. A hot favourite in Rondane.

Elisabeth Angermund-Vik also comes to the race with a great pedigree over the 60km distance, however, the 100 will be a test. The same applies for Inger Aaberg, a 3rd place at Honindal Rundt a  good indicator though.

Katrine Andersen placed 2nd at the Cumbria Way Ultra (73 miles) in the UK, which shows the long game is part of her repertoire. 

Gro Silijan Hjukse has won Nordmarka 100km and placed well at Soria Moria. Liv Richter is another one to watch after winning Backyard Ultra Norway and placing 7th at Ultra Trail Capetown in 2018. 

MEN

Close to 100 men will contest the Rondane 100 with only 7 runners coming from outside of Norway. 

Erik-Sebastien Krogvig is the Norwegian National Champion and comes to Rondane with excellent results from Lavaredo where he placed 3rd and 3rd at Honindal Rundt. 

Vegard Triseth has won Sora Moria 100 2019 and placed 2nd in 2020. That experience will be invaluable over the Rondane 100.

Paul Ogier from France could well break up the Norwegian party with a string of top results, notably victory at EcoTrail Also 50km and Honindal Rundt. He has placed 18th at CCC and 6th at the tough High Trail Vanoise – one to watch!

Rondane 100 ambassador Aasmund Kjøllmoen Steien is a successful biathlete and who comes to Rondane with no experience of ultra-trail running… May he surprise us?

Patrick Stangbye is also one to watch along with his Sky Blazer team members, however, in any 100-mile race there are no guarantees. Anything can happen and that is what makes the racing so exciting.

The only thing to do is tune in on August 15/16 and watch the action unfold.

Rondane 100 Facebook HERE

Rondane 100 Instagram @rondane100

For live updates of the race in real time, tune in to @abelonely on Instagram. Her blow-by-blow account of the 100-mile race will be availble on IG story.

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Tips for the Trail – Katadyn BeFree 600ml Soft Flask

Katadyn BeFree Water Filter bottle

Running long, fastpacking or journeying for multiple days, either racing or training, and the need for water is a constant problem. It’s impossible to carry all that you would need and therefore, one must either resort to one of the following options:

  • Getting support from friends or using aid stations.
  • Purchasing from shops when possible.
  • Taking water from the trail.

In many scenarios, the latter option is often the ONLY option. However, how can you be safe knowing that the water you will drink, will not cause any issues or onward problems?

Step in the Katadyn BeFree.

With a capacity of 600ml, it is possible to access water from anywhere, filter it through the BeFree filter and then be confident that you are drinking safe water.

“The Filter removes bacteria, cysts and sediment with its pore size of 0.1 micron (0.0001mm). The output is up to 2L/min. and the capacity up to 1000L, depending on the water quality. 100% PVC and BPA free. “

Lightweight (59g), portable, ideal for on the go and easy to clean. The Katadyn BeFree is an essential item for any adventure.

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Tips for the Trail – Attaching a Front Pack or Camera Bag to a running pack.

Fastpacking, multi-day adventures or running stage races like Marathon des Sables, often need creative ideas for adding not only extra storage space, but storage that is accessible, ‘on-the-go!’

Some brands actually produce Front Packs that work in conjunction with a specific pack.

However, I have always prepared to use a pack I prefer, that is comfortable, has the storage I need, fits well and then I customise as per my needs.

In this post I will show you how to add a Front Pack to any (within reason) running or hiking backpack by using ‘Anchor Links’ by Peak Design.

You will need the

Anchor Links

4 x zip ties

scissors

lighter

Front Pack.

What Front Pack?

This is all down to personal needs. But consider weight, durability, ease of attachment and something that is specific to your needs. For the demonstration, I am using a camera bag made by Lowepro.

If you needed a simple storage pouch with easy access, I regularly use a Peak Design Field Pouch.

Peak Design Field Pouch attached to a Montane Pack when Fastpacking in Nepal.

Detail to show how the Anchor and Link work.

Detail for securing the bottom of the Front Pack and reduce bounce.

Attaching a Front Pack is an excellent way to add ‘on-the-go’ storage and access to any pack. It is simple, relatively inexpensive and of course, if not needed, removable.

Hope you have found this Tip for the Trail useful!

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Episode 193 – Damian Hall Pennine Way FKT

Episode 193 – Has a great an interview with Damian Hall on his Pennine Way FKT.
*****
Talk Ultra is now on Tunein – just another way to make the show available for those who prefer not to use iTunes – HERE  You can download the Tunein APP HERE
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*****
ARTICLES:
Read about Fastpacking HERE
A review of the NEMO Hornet 1P Tent HERE
FREEDOM in a Pandemic HERE
Shoe reviews of the VJ Sport IROCK 3 HERE and the inov-8 TERRAULTRA G270 HERE
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Tips for the TRAIL:

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NEWS:
FKT’s posted on last show:
* Franco Colle new FKT on Monte Rosa from Gressoney
* Nadir Maguet – Gran Paradiso FKT 2:02:32
* Erik Clavery GR10 9 days 9 hours and a few minutes
* Davide Magnini Ortles FKT 2:18:15
* Kim Collison 24h Lakes achieves 78 Peaks
* Sabrina Verjeee Wainwrights (wishes not to claim)
* Dylan Bowman Loowit Trail 5:11:49
* Josh Pulattie Oregon Coast Trail 12 days 10 hours 25 min
* Candice Burt Tahoe Rim Trail 2 days 12 hours 47 min
* John Kelly Pennine Way 2 days 16 hours 40 min
* Sarah Hansel (57:43) & Joey Campanelli (41:00) for Nolans 14
* Tom Hollins Dales Mountain 30 (130 miles, 30 summits) 41 hrs
UPDATE:
Adam Kimble new FKT on Tahoe Rim Trail, USA
Damian Hall new FKT for the Pennine Way, UK
Adam Jacobs new FKT for Hertfordshire Way, UK
Carla Molinaro new FKT for the JOGLE, UK
Beth Pascall new FKT for the Bob Graham Round, UK and set 5th fastest time.
Check FKT website for latest updates https://fastestknowntime.com/
In other news…
Asif Amirat in the UK is still creating a stir with his 100-marathons in 100-days. Many have been questioning his runs and becoming very vocal on social media. I have reached out to Asif for an interview. At first he was cooperative, however, after I asked several probing questions, he blocked me on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.
RACES:
Montreux Trail Running Festival – Switzerland COMPLETED
Full results are online here https://montreuxtrail.livetrail.net/ in the main event 112km Jean-Philippe Tschumi and Ragna Debats were crowned champions. Remy Bonnet and Maud Mathys won the 30km.
Speedgoat 50k – USA COMPLETED
Noah Brautigam pipped Hatden Hawks and Anthony Costales to the top slot with Michel Hummel placing 6th on GC and winning the women’s race. Kristina Trystad-Saari and Lelly Wolf were 2nd and 3rd.
Fjallmaraton – Sweden – COMPLETED
Simen Hjalmar Wästlund (Norway) took a surprise victory of UTMB Champion, Pau Capell. In 3rd, Johan Lantz. Times8:50:04, 0:04:49 and 9:35:38.
Azara Garcia took the top slot for the women and placed 9th overall in 10:37:52. Anna Carlsson and Lena Trillelv were 2nd and 3rd.
In the 43km, Tove Alexandersson and Olle Kalered took the top slots
Rondane 100 – Norway – August 15h
Pyrenees Stage Run – Spain (now postponed to 2021)
Marathon des Sables – Morocco (now postponed to 2021)

*****

Top ultramarathon runner Damian Hall has set a new record time for the 268-mile Pennine Way – while also cleaning the trail of litter at the same time.

The 44-year-old inov-8 ambassador completed the iconic route from Kirk Yetholm in the Scottish Borders to Edale, Derbyshire, which includes a section along Hadrian’s Wall, in an incredible time of 61 hours 34 minutes, beating the previous record by more than three hours.

The Pennine Way is Great Britain’s oldest – and arguably toughest – National Trail. Much of it is over remote, boggy hills, with a total ascent that exceeds the height of Mount Everest.

Popular with hikers, who usually complete it in 16-19 days, Hall did it in just two-and-a-half, battling sleep exhaustion and all manner of tough weather conditions along the way.

Damian and his team of pacers also helped clean the famous trail of litter as they ran, stuffing it in their packs before handing it to support team members at road crossing meet-up points.

“I feel overwhelmed, really. I remember writing about Mike Hartley’s 1989 record in the Pennine Way guidebook before I got into running and thinking ‘That’s insane, I could never do that!’It was a huge team effort and I couldn’t have made it happen without the support of my road crew, pacers and the people we met along the way. I had the inevitable low spells, but the incredible team got me through them. I felt hugely motivated by three things and had FFF written on my arm in permanent marker as a reminder. They stood for Family, Friends, Future – the latter relating to our need to protect the planet. There wasn’t lots of litter on the trails, but we picked up anything we saw. The road support crew did likewise from the places they met me at along the way. Also, the whole attempt has been certified as ‘carbon negative’ by Our Carbon, as has all my running and my family’s lifestyle for 2020.”

The record Hall beat had previously been set just a week earlier by his friend John Kelly (64 hours 46 minutes); an American ultramarathon runner now based in England. Listen to John Kelly on EP182 HERE – Before that it had stood unbeaten for 31 years, belonging to legend of the long-distance running sport, Mike Hartley, who ran 65 hours 20 minutes in 1989. Kelly ran the route south to north, starting in Edale, while Hall followed in the footsteps of Hartley by doing it north to south. Either way, the route is regarded as one of the toughest in the UK.

Damian, has achieved a great deal in recent year’s and notably finished 5th at UTMB as well as setting other FKT’s. This FKT was fuelled without animal products or plastic waste, while raising more than £4,000 on a JustGiving page for Greenpeace UK.

*****
INTERVIEW : DAMIAN HALL
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*****
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Importantly, go to iTunes and subscribe so that you automatically get our show when it’s released we are also available on Stitcher for iOS, Android and Web Player and now Tunein. We are also on Spotify too.
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Please support Talk Ultra by becoming a Patron at www.patreon.com/talkultra and THANKS to all our Patrons who support us. Rand Haley and Simon Darmody get a mention on the show here for ‘Becoming 100k Runners’ with a high-tier Patronage.
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FREEDOM in a Pandemic

Another summit in Norway with Abelone.

In recent weeks, as restrictions on travel, social distancing and borders open, it has somehow felt that living in the times of a Pandemic is a little like toeing the line at Big’s Backyard Ultra. Instead of running loops around a yard, we wake up each morning for another loop of 24-hours not knowing where the finish line is and when it will come.

Covid-19 for us runners is a very unique ultramarathon.

In all honesty, I do believe that ultra-runners are somehow better adapted for the challenges that a Pandemic brings. Mental fortitude and resilience have come to the fore and when restrictions were really tough, runners rallied with running at home. Virtual suddenly became the next big thing. It filled a gap and brought people together from all over the world in a mutual coming together to enjoy a love of sport and community.

The impact on work has been huge for all and the consequences of this will continue on for months and years on personal levels and business. It’s a sad time.

But early on, I accepted that 2020 would be a wipe out. Being somewhat of an OCD character, this took a little time to adjust too. My year of work was planned out. The schedule was timetabled and suddenly, it was gone… What was full, soon became empty. I have felt my moods swing with positivity and at times I have wanted to put my head in my hands.

But quarantine and social distancing, in all honesty, was no big deal for me. I actually feel that I have social distanced most of my life and sport has only reaffirmed that.

Yes, I enjoy the company of friends. Yes, I enjoy a trail run with company. Yes, I enjoy a beer and a meal with others and yes, I have missed my family.

The summit os Slogen, Norway in July with Abelone.

But I am good alone, in isolation and finding my own footing. Time on the trail has always allowed me to switch off, think, contemplate, plan, work out problems, come up with solutions and form ideas.

When running with others, I am often asked, ‘Are you ok? You are quiet!’

‘I am perfect; I am just out of the office and soaking up the time,’ often my reply. 

In recent months, or should I say for the whole of 2020 so far, I have immersed myself in a new life in Norway with my girlfriend, Abelone.

Little did we both know in February after being at The Coastal Challenge in Costa Rica that we would spend 24/7 for the coming months together. I laughed early on saying, ‘Well, this is one way to find out if this relationship will work!’

It has been the best thing to come from a Pandemic.

FREEDOM is something I always had being self-employed but the freedom to do ‘my’ adventures was dictated by travel and a hectic work schedule. Freedom often only really came in the middle of the year when I would block off some time in Summer and then December, which I would treat as sacred and my opportunity to explore and adventure.

2020 has seen my diary flipped with little or no work and constant adventure. 

Here is Scandinavia, we were very lucky with Covid (exception coming from Sweden who handled things differently,) particularly in Norway, cases were low, death rates were low and although social distancing was required, our freedom was not impacted. In all honesty, many locals confirmed that the trails in Norway had never had so many people on them in March, April and May. No doubt helped by some amazing weather. 

Scandinavians love the outdoor life and Covid only emphasized the need for space, outdoor adventure and exercise. A wonderful mental and physical prescription that all doctors should prescribe. 

I am used to travelling when I like, eating in restaurants, meeting friends when I want, and I am used to being surrounded by people at a race. Some would say I was free.

But was I?

August is here and I am now looking back at social interactions in 2020 since March and lockdown.

  • I have seen no family.
  • I have seen 4 friends in Norway.
  • I have run on the trails with Abelone and one other person who we had to social distance with.
  • I have interacted with 3 members of Abelone’s family.

And that is it…

So, my freedom was and is still certainly impacted upon and I relish the opportunity to hug a friend, travel back to the UK and see my Mum and my son and equally embrace them like never before.

But no work has allowed me a freedom of time, not financial, to do what I want.

Adventure is on the doorstep for us all.

Now, here in Norway we have a pretty big doorstep. At a third larger than the UK, getting around Norway can take a while but with just 5.5 million people in contrast to 66 million, finding space and social distancing is no problem. Hardanger, Stranda, Romsdal, and Jotunheimen have all been on our list and even 1,2 or 3-day adventures from home have become regular.

Just yesterday, we ran 15km from home, wild camped in an isolated location and then ran 15km home.

I have always been a lone wolf with adventure. At best, I have shared an experience with just one or two others. I like my pace, my schedule and my itinerary and am somewhat inflexible, yes stubborn with changes and I do like to plan. I can see Abelone roll her eyes now…!

Photo ©JanNyka

The escape of outdoor life has always provided me with an energy. I even got that with my work, often hiking out for hours on a trail to sit and wait, alone, for runners to come. 

So, what am I saying?

The Pandemic is rubbish, for sure. Is it going away? I hope so, as soon as possible, but as I said at the beginning, currently we are all running loops at Big’s Backyard Ultra and nobody knows how many loops are to go and when the finishing will come. 

One thing we do have, albeit at varying levels depending on where one lives in the world, is freedom to explore from home. So, embrace what you have and do not think or focus on what you do not have or what you cannot do.

It’s no surprise that FKT’s have never been more popular. 

Many have said, ‘I cannot wait for life to return to normal!’ I agree to a certain extent, normal would be good… But then again, was normal good?

Will life ever be ‘normal’ again, or, are we looking at a new normal?

I don’t have answers.

But I will keep running the loops and enjoy the newfound freedom I have for now.

*****

Have you found freedom in 2020? I would love to know.

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