Matterhorn Ultraks 46k 2016 Race Summary and Images– Skyrunner® World Series

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The Matterhorn provides a stunning backdrop for Switzerland’s Matterhorn Ultraks race, a 46km Skyrunning race with 3600m of positive and negative gain. Now in its 4th edition, the race once again is in the Skyrunner® World Series – a magical race that provides a circular journey that starts and concludes in the picture postcard mountain town of Zermatt.

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The day started well with wispy white clouds penetrating the blue of the sky, we all knew though that it wasn’t going to last… with 2 hours of running the sky turned grey, the rain arrived and low mist enveloped the mountains; the beautiful Matterhorn was gone!

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Wild expansive space, high mountains and the 3100m Gornergrat provides the high point of the race and the first indication of how this mountain game of chess was going to play out. Christian Mathys was a surprise arrival pushing the pace closely followed by Marc Lauenstein (pre-race favourite) and Nepalese runner, Tirtha Tamang.

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In the ladies’ race, Megan Kimmel from the USA was already dictating the race and the pace opening up a substantial gap on a chasing Elisa Desco from Italy and Michaela Mertova who was looking very strong.

It’s a brutal opening 14km to open any race and as such, those opening km’s can be decisive in who crosses the finish line first.

Megan Kimmel from the USA ran hard from the gun in 2015 setting the pace against a world-class field, “Anytime you get the rhythm in the up, the down, or the flat, the body is abruptly put into one of these other actions.  It is steep enough to grind you to a walk on a lot of the uphill and has fair bits of technical descent.”

A 1000m drop from the summit is broken by a small climb at Riffelalp and then Furi follows at 24km at 1880m. Two short sharp climbs follow, the first to Schwarzsee at 2583m and approximately 28km covered. Here Mathys was leading Tamang and Launstein followed minutes behind. It was difficult to tell if Lauenstein was going through a bad patch, he just smiled and pushed on.

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Kimmel picks up her race, “I was comfortably leading the race for the first 30k. When I mean comfortable, I mean it seemed fairly effortless in a racing sense.  I was moving with the terrain on the uphill’s and I was holding back on the descents because it was a long race with a lot of transitions.” Kimmel’s lead was substantial and she was running her own race. Behind, barring an accident, the other ladies were running for 2nd.

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A drop down to 2200m from Schwarzsee was followed with another 500m+ climb and then what follows is mostly a flat runnable plateau that gently weaves up, down and left to right all the way to Trift. Lauenstein had taken the lead now and was flying, Mathys chased but the gap was opening up with every minute that passed.

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A short kick up of 100 to 200m follows Trift and then a fast and furious drop of almost 1000m over a distance of 6km leads to the finish line in Zermatt and the assembled crowds. Lauenstein sealed victory in 4:47:01, just a few minutes outside Kilian Jornet’s course record. Mathy’s held on for an excellent 2nd in 5:51:56 and Tamang placed 3rd in 4:53:03. Once again Hassan Ait Chaou ran an excellent 4th place and last year’s winner and course designer, Martin Anthamatten finished 6th.

Kimmel, the 2015 Dolomites SkyRace winner, after strongly leading the ladies race for the whole race, clinched victory with 20+-minute lead to Michaela Mertova, their respective times 5:23:15 and 5:46:21. Cilia Chiron backed up her great Dolomites SkyRace performance with 3rd and Oihana Kortazar placed 4th. Elisa Desco who had run in 2nd place did not finish due to a fall.

Skyrunning is not just about the uphill and more often than not, it’s the downhill that determines the winner. Today was all about patience and consistency. Racing is often a mental journey as much physical, Kimmel and Lauenstein today proved this at the Matterhorn.

Results for all race HERE


Thanks to the support of our Partner Migu Xempower, Sponsor Alpina Watches and Official Pool Suppliers, Scott RunningCompressport and Salomon.

About Skyrunner® World Series
Skyrunning was founded in 1992 by Italian Marino Giacometti, President of the International Skyrunning Federation which sanctions the discipline worldwide and sports the tagline:
Less cloud. More sky.

The Skyrunner® World Series was launched in 2004 and has grown to represent the peak of outdoor running defined by altitude and technicality. In 2016, the Series, composed of four disciplines, features 23 races in 15 venues on three continents.

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La Sportiva BUSHIDO Review

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La Sportiva have been making shoes for a long time, 80+ years! So it feels somewhat crazy that it’s only now that I have slipped on a pair of La Sportiva shoes for a test. I travel a great deal, particularly in Italy and it’s fair to say that Italians are loyal to the Italian brand that are based just outside Canazei in the Dolomites. Adding to the irony, I have driven past the La Sportiva factory many times on my way to the Dolomites SkyRace, year after year.

To provide a perspective of the foothold (pun intended) that the brand has in this area, La Sportiva shoes are the ‘norm’ and yes, even Salomon take 2nd place. The brand is that big!

I digress, needless to say, 80+ years of history and a desire to bring technical footwear to consumers so we can enjoy the playground is the heritage that La Sportiva trade on.

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The BUSHIDO shoe (which means way of the warrior) is not a new shoe, not at all. But it is a popular shoe and one that I have been recommended time and time again. So, finally I took the plunge and grabbed a pair.

Like all shoes, different colour ways are available and the BUSHIDO comes in a pretty cool looking black and yellow. I unfortunately got a pair of turquoise and orange (?) – not my favourite colours. Oh vanity…

The BUSHIDO doesn’t look light and at 300g (give or take) they are certainly at the heavier end of shoes that I wear. But then again, everything is relative, this shoe looks like it means business and therefore, as in the way of the warrior, maybe the build quality and weight needs to reflect that?

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Slipping the shoe on I was really surprised with the hold the shoe had on my foot. It has a gusseted tongue which La Sportiva call an ‘Internal Slip-On Construction’ and I have to say that the BUSHIDO comes close to Salomon’s ‘Endofit’ as witnessed on the ‘Sense’ range for example. This is a huge compliment to the La Sportiva shoe. I test and wear shoes all the time and Salomon is still the benchmark in terms of how a shoe holds a foot.

Standing up things didn’t feel right? I did my usual walk around, flex the forefoot, bounce around a little and then I stopped. I asked myself the question internally, ‘are these shoes neutral and what is the drop?’

I checked – 6mm drop and neutral.

After running over 100 miles in these shoes I still really question these facts. The BUSHIDO for me does not feel neutral. Actually, I would almost go as far to say that they have a pretty aggressive arch support. I noticed it immediately and the more I ran in the shoes, the more I noticed it.

A 6mm drop should have had me feeling comfortable mid to forefoot striking but no, I felt as though the heal of the shoe was getting in the way. I haven’t had a low drop shoe feel this way before. It may well come from the 13mm to 19mm cushioning at the front and the rear? Yes, the BUSHIDO is a cushioned shoe. The Scott Kinabalu Supertrac (for example) has plenty of cushioning, loads of grip and an 8mm drop and they feel considerably ‘lower’ than the BUSHIDO. I use 8mm drop day-to-day and for long runs and I regularly use and run in 4mm drop for shorter/ faster sessions. However, the BUSHIDO never felt like a 6mm drop. I have found it difficult to pinpoint why but at all times I felt the heel was too pronounced.

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Running at first felt somewhat awkward and cumbersome with the shoe lacking flex and feel. It’s rare these days that shoe feels so stiff out of the box. I thought, a few runs and they will soften up. They never did…

I have to say, I was on a slippery slope. I had waited to try the BUSHIDO for quite some time and with every run I was realising that I disliked them more and more.

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The build quality is somewhat bullet proof: good toe protection in a TPU toe cap, a dual density compressed rock guard in the midsole, a TPU shank and IPS (impact brake system) and my conclusion? This shoe is completely over engineered and just doesn’t allow me to feel or enjoy the trail in a way that a good shoe should. For a ‘neutral’ shoe I felt as though I was being ‘guided’ with every foot strike as though my mind and my foot were saying, ‘let’s do this’ and then the BUSHIDO would step in and shout at me, ‘NO – YOU ARE DOING THIS!’

This relationship wasn’t going to last.

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The outsole is unique with round edges and has two different sections, black and white. In simple terms it’s two different compounds that provide grip on a multitude of surfaces. This works well on dry trail, rocks and gnarly terrain and they grip well on wet rock. However, the outsole won’t handle mud – it’s just not aggressive enough. The black compound is sticky and grips whereas the white compound is more durable provide traction for off camber and irregular trail. Underneath all this you may well just see a flicker of blue? This is the rock plate which protects you (and your foot) from anything sharp, irregular or nasty. Like I said this shoe is bullet proof but all of the above and 13/19mm cushioning make for an unresponsive shoe which lacks feel.

The TPU cradle adds to the problem. This cradle wraps up into the midsole and holds the foot firm. It provides a cradle which the foot sits in. This for me is not really a ‘neutral’ shoe. I want my foot to be free and neutral – not guided.

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In the rear of the shoe you can see a little orange piece of plastic which is called ‘STB Control’ – again, the word ‘control’ – I think you are beginning to realise that the BUSHIDO is fighting me and my feet. Also at the rear is another cage like system that holds my heel. More stability, more support designed to hold the foot and stop it rolling or losing control.

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The upper is soft and breathable and as I mentioned has the gusseted fit which really is the high point of the shoe. There are no seams so you could, if you wish, go sockless. The tongue is slightly padded adding to the comfort and should you really want to pull your laces tight, this will add some additional protection.

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On the sides of the upper there is some reinforcement going into the lace zone and the lace section is additionally reinforced allowing laces to be pulled as tight or as loose as possible. This area follows the theme of the shoe in my opinion – stability, reinforcement and guiding.

The heel cup is tight and secure and is too high potentially causing an issue on the achilles. My left heel rubbed on run one and continued to rub on every run after causing me to add some protection for the test runs.

The toe box has a narrower and more precision fit which works really well for me. The BUSHIDO is designed for the mountains and I don’t want my toes moving left to right when I need reassurance. Of course, if you need a wider toe box this may well not suit you so make sure you try them. Toe protection is excellent.

I wear a UK9.5 and these shoes were true to size. I think it would be easy to think that the BUSHIDO sizes small on first impressions but I would say no! The shoe is designed to fit and hold your foot and so therefore, my advice would be start off with like-for-like sizes and see how you get on.

In conclusion, I have to say that the BUSHIDO and myself just didn’t get on. The shoe has loads of pluses, in particular the sock like fit. On paper I should have liked the shoe – 6mm drop and neutral fit rings all the correct bells. But no! The BUSHIDO at all times felt over engineered, too supportive, lacking feel and I have to say, of all the shoes I have tested in the last few years, this is one shoe that I won’t go back to.

But, many runners out there like this shoe so maybe I am the odd one out? If you are looking for a durable shoe, with loads of protection, a low ‘ish’ drop and plenty of security and guidance – this is the shoe for you… the BUSHIDO does all these things well, maybe too well?

 

Specs from La Sportiva

Weight 300g

Upper AirMesh/ Thermal Adhesive Microfiber/ High Frequency Welded Ripstop/ TPU Toe Cap

Lining Mesh/ Highly breathable lateral mesh inserts/ Stretch AirMesh Tongue

Rear/ Front Cushioning 19mm/ 13mm

Drop 6mm

Cushioning midsole 32A

Midsole Compression Molded MEMlex/ 1.5mm Dual-Density compressed EVA Rock-Guard in forefoot/ TPU Shank Dual-Density FriXion® XT V-Groove™ with Impact Brake System™

With performance driven design, the Bushido is perfect for technical terrain and provides added stability over stones, roots and branches on the trail.  The “STB Control” construction utilizes a TPU frame that wraps under foot to provide maximum stability, responsiveness, and reduce overall weight.

  • Internal slip-on construction fits the foot like a sock without causing excessive pressure.
  • Outsole lugs have rounded edges and wrap over the midsole to provide added traction and enhance stability on off camber terrain.

La Sportiva website HERE

DRUGS in Mountain, Ultra and Trail #EPO #UTMB

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Last week and the week before, EPO, DOPING and the UTMB was the hot topic after Gonzalo Callisto’s positive test. Everyone was talking about it… this week it’s all gone quiet. That can’t happen! You can catch up on my posts below.

Post 1 UTMB faces positive EPO test HERE

Post 2 Michel Poletti HERE

Post 3 IAAF HERE

Post 4 Update IAAF and Catherine Poletti HERE

Post 5 Gonzalo Calisto statement HERE

Post 6 ITRA statement HERE

There are far too many questions unanswered, there are far too many people being quiet and if we want to eradicate doping from Mountain, Ultra and Trail running – we need to keep talking and discussing.

I was approached by Outside Magazine and they asked me a few questions. I am pretty sure that what gets used or published will be an edited version and with that in mind here are my thoughts, un-edited.

In light of the latest news from UTMB, what you think this positive test means for the sport? 

One has to embrace the positive test as a good thing as it confirms that preventative measures against doping are working. This positive was an ‘in competition’ test which only confirms the need for out of competition testing and blood passports. Of course, the answer is always that testing is too expensive. We have to act now and be proactive. I don’t have the answers but I do feel that we could start to address certain issues that would help. Maybe it’s time that we ask (for example) the top 100 male and top 50 female runners as listed on ITRA to pay for a regular medical? Sage Canaday recently released a full report on his medical status to ‘prove’ he is clean; that’s a good thing! (See below). Athletes of course may well say that they can’t afford it but this is where sponsors come in maybe? We cannot keep making excuses as to why we can’t but find ways to make sure we can! We are at the very early stages of doping in our sport and if we don’t act now it will only become worse and God forbid, we could end up like cycling or athletics.

Do you think doping is really becoming something to worry about, or is this a case of an outlier?

We need to worry, yes! This is not the first positive test, it maybe a high profile conviction, but it would be foolish to think that this is an isolated incident.

Are people starting to talk about doping more in ultarunning than before? Or maybe a better way of asking this is how are the athletes you know, talking about this subject and what it means for the sport?

I certainly have witnessed more discussion about doping and of course this was highlighted at the end of 2015 at San Francisco 50. This was a moment when the sport really looked at itself and many questions were asked. It actually became quite nasty at times and I think a sense of perspective was lost. For example, WMRA (World Mountain Running Association) and Skyrunning have been testing athletes for many years. They have very much paved the way but they acknowledge they can only do so much. In competition testing costs 1000’s of euros or dollars for one event and of course, only urine can be tested. Many say it takes an idiot to to be caught ‘in competition’ but it happens. I go back to blood passports – we really need them for elite, professional and sponsored runners. Some races do not have a ‘PED’ policy and San Francisco highlighted the need for races and RD’s to address this in the rules of the race. Western States for example has re-written its race rules to say that any runner who has had a positive conviction cannot race. Many runners have asked for a lifetime ban for any positive test and they have been vocal about this. I personally am reluctant to go down this route… I do believe that mistakes can happen in drug testing but I am not an expert. This creates a whole new debate and raises questions about the lasting effects of a doping program. For example, we used to have two positive tests and out, I liked that but apparently that has been deemed unfair?

Are people starting to test more for doping than in previous years? What has this looked like?

As mentioned previously, WMRA and Skyrunning have been testing for many years but not at all events. Skyrunning for example had its World Championships in Spain in July, they had three events, VK, SKY and ULTRA and WADA performed tests at all three race distances. The problem comes, once again with cost. At the Skyrunning World Championships, 12 athletes were tested. The make and female winner in each category (making 6) and then 6random tests. Let’s assume testing at an event is $10,000 – who pays? Do we add a surcharge on every runners entry fee? Does that race find a sponsor to cover the cost? Do we rely on a wealthy donor or do we approach all the major brands in the sport and say, you must pay! It’s a complex matter and this is why doping control is a rarity in contrast to the norm. Let’s look at races such as Speedgoat 50k, Run Rabbit Run and San Francisco 50 – these races have some substantial prize money, in some scenarios it could mean a pay check of $10,000+ for a win. Yet nobody has any idea if the winner is clean? Moving away from trail running and looking at ultra road running, Comrades in South Africa has huge prize money and it has a very chequered past with doping: Max King, Ellie Greenwood, Sage Canaday and Michael Wardian (amongst others) have all witnessed the impact of it first hand.

What is your own experience with testing?

I attend races as a photographer and a journalist so in reality, I have little experience of the drug testing process. However, I am a media partner for Skyrunning and I have been present and seen the processes undertaken at several major events where doping control has been in place by WADA. For example, I was at the Skyrunning World Champions on July, 22, 23rd and 24th. I also experienced doping control at Limone Extreme in 2015 and Mont-Blanc 80k in 2014 amongst others.

Do you think the tests, or the conversation about doping in general in ultras is lacking? What could be done better?

Certainly the positive test of Gonzalo Calisto has raised some major flaws in the communication process. I have done extensive research over the last weeks and my conclusions have been quite worrying. I will elaborate:

  • Gonzalo Calisto was tested after placing 5th at UTMB by French drug control – AFLD In August 2015.

  • AFLD have a written policy that a positive test is given to (in this case) the runner within three weeks.

  • The runner is then entitled to appeal and ask for a B sample test.

  • This process can then go backwards and forwards for several weeks and in this scenario (as I understand it) months. Don’t get me wrong, the runner has rights and it’s only fair that he or she has every opportunity to clear his or her name.

  • In June 2016 the IAAF released its current banned list.

  • On July 18/19th British Ultrarunner Robbie Britton noticed that Gonzalo Calisto was convicted of EPO and banned till March 2017.

  • I picked up the case and contacted UTWT and UTMB directly and asked were they aware of this conviction? I later found out, no!

  • Within 12 hours, UTMB released a press release disqualifying Gonzalo Calisto of doping.

The above raised so many questions for me:

1. How was it possible that Gonzalo Calisto had tested positive but UTMB did not know?

2. Why was his period of exclusion dated till March 2017 when he had been tested in August 2015?

3. Why had the IAAF only published this in June 2016?

I asked questions of the UTMB and the IAAF. In both scenarios they were both helpful. 

1. To cut a long story short it would appear that when an athlete is tested positive, the testing control, in this scenario AFLD, are not required to inform the race. REALLY? A race has a runner place 5th, the runner is tested, the runner is found guilty, due process is run and then a positive is confirmed and a sanction is put in place without the race being told…. C’mon that HAS to change! Had it not been for the eagle eyes of Robbie Britton and me grabbing the bull by the horns, nobody ‘may’ have known?

2. IAAF explained the ‘due process’ to me and although they were not able to supply specifics, they did say that these things can often take much longer than we would all like and that 6 months is not unusual. Considering Calisto was tested on the last day of August, that potentially could take us to February or March the following year.

3. The IAAF then confirmed that an error had been made! As I pointed out to them, why was Calisto banned till March 2017? The answer: Calisto’s ban and records were amended from a memo dated March 2016 and it was therefore human error. Calisto’s ban dates actually run from March 2016 to March 2018. This coincided with point 2 above and a lengthy due process where one assumes Calisto tried to clear his name.

4. From the March conviction, Calisto’s records then entered the IAAF system and his conviction was uploaded to the ‘sanctioned athletes’ list in June 2016.

5. The IAAF confirmed to me that AFLD did not have to notify UTMB of a conviction but they would look into it?

So, for UTMB to be aware that an athlete had cheated at a previous edition of their race it would appear that the only option open to them is to check daily on the IAAF website for any additions to the sanctioned athlete list.

 

I could go on…

Why do you think the sport has stayed clean for so long, and what might be changing that would compel people to cheat? 

The sport hasn’t been clean for so long. That is a naive viewpoint. Doping has existed in trail running for ages but if you don’t have testing or a blood passport, how would you know that…? I like to use an example and I must be clear here, I don’t doubt the integrity of the runner I use as an example. Karl Meltzer, my co-host for Talk Ultra podcast has won more 100 mile races than anyone. He has even won Run Rabbit Run and he took home $10,000+ He has been running ULTRA’s for 20+ years. You know how many times he has been tested for PED use?  NEVER. Need I say more… This is why our sport has bean ‘clean’ for so long, no testing!

For the most part it seems like the conversation around doping in ultras is relatively new, and also that cheating might be a new thing too. Do you think there’s a chance for race directors, athletes, etc. to get out in front of this and keep the sport clean before it becomes the kind of large-scale issue it is in some other sports?

The Calisto case has raised eyebrows, we need to latch on to that momentum and we need to consider many of my points above but let’s be clear, Calisto is not the first!

On a final note we need to keep this discussion open, we need to keep asking questions and we need to find answers and solutions. It’s too easy to say it’s too expensive, too difficult and so on. We could start by:

  • Blood passports for runners
  • Regular in and out of competition testing
  • Positive results MUST be sent to a race or RD as soon as possible if a positive test came from a race.
  • IAAF need to find a way to communicate ‘new’ sanctioned athletes to the relevant sport discipline. This is where ITRA or maybe an athlete commission could be set up.

We, as runners, journalists, sponsors and so on must be loud and clear that doping is not welcome and we must do all we can to work together. In the Calisto case I have still not seen or heard any public statement from his sponsors, Movistar and Compressport. Compressport did contact me to say that they were ‘looking into it!’ What does that mean…? They also said that Callisto’s sponsorship with Compressport was with a local distributor and not the International division. As far as I am concerned, local or International, Calisto is still representing a brand and that brand gains attention. And also what about the races that Calisto has run and placed in in post August 2015?  The IAAF now confirms the suspension dates back to that time and until March 2018. Not one word, not one public statement from any race that I have seen… do these races condone doping? What about the runners who placed top 5 or top 10 only to loose a place… come on, speak up!

Update August 12th and Compressport respond


A great place to start is here, Sage Canaday has just recently posted his results online for all to see. Let’s lead by example!

SageDopingReport

I welcome your thoughts!

RUNNING BEYOND BOOK now available on pre-order

Book Cover

I am pleased to say that my new book, RUNNING BEYOND is now available on pre-order at Amazon (HERE). English version will be available November 3rd and Spanish, Italian, German and US versions will be available tbc.

Foreword is by Kilian Jornet.

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“Ian has been there to witness the stories. He knows the sport, he practices it and he has been involved in many different aspects, all of which provides him with a great overview. He has the strength and character to work many hours, even practicing his own ultra with cameras in order to capture the emotions and the passion from inside the sport. Ian has immense enthusiasm, and his commitment to following a race knows no bounds.” – Kilian Jornet

****

RUNNING BEYOND BOOK

by Ian Corless

Foreword by Kilian Jornet

Published by Aurum Press

Available in the UK from November 3rd 2016

Translated into French, Spanish, Italian and German (release dates to follow)

“Ian has been documenting trail running since I can remember. His images, writing and podcasts have played a major role in showcasing our sport and growing it into the global sport it has become today… Ian is extremely passionate and really understands what trail running is about, and this you can see in his incredible images. Ian’s images capture the runners emotion; the natural beauty and race atmosphere – making me want to put on my shoes and head out the door for a run. Running Beyond is a must get book for all trail runners.”

– Ryan Sandes

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ITRA release statement on #EPO positive for Gonzalo Calisto

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This morning I posted the long awaited statement from Gonzalo Calisto after testing positive for EPO at the 2015 UTMB. If you are new to the story, please read the posts below.

Post 1 UTMB faces positive EPO test HERE

Post 2 Michel Poletti HERE

Post 3 IAAF HERE

Post 4 Update IAAF and Catherine Poletti HERE

Post 5 Gonzalo Calisto statement HERE

Today, I have now received a statement and clarification from ITRA into the process that Gonzalo Calisto has gone through:

July 25th 2016

PREAMBLE

On June 29th  2016*, the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) published on its web-site in newsletter 174 a list of athletes who had been sanctioned for doping. On this list figures M. Gonzalo CALISTO for a positive test of EPO on August 29th 2015 at the finish of the  UTMB®.

ITRA HEALTH POLICY

The term  «health policy» designates actions which  aim at increasing the prevention and the protection of the health of the sportspersons.

The ITRA, in particular, offers organisers the chance of setting up a preventative action concerning health matters. This action has neither the vocation nor the competence to be a substitute for  current national and/or international regulations regarding the anti-doping fight but has the aim of strengthening the medical supervision within the framework of the health security plan set up by the organisation. This action is led by a Medical Counsel, uniquely made up of doctors, who are able to take advice from experts of their choice and who are charged with giving consultative advice to the Race Jury on the medical state of participants.

More information about the ITRA health policy : http://itra.run/page/261/Politique_sante.html

HISTORY AND CHRONOLOGY OF THE ITRA’S HEALTH POLICY

Within the framework of the health policy set up by the ITRA, M. Gonzalo CALISTO submitted a first blood sample on May 28th 2015 at 13:077 (World Trail-Running Championships in Annecy (France) organised by the IAU in collaboration with the ITRA)

M. Gonzalo CALISTO’s  haematological profile presented several abnormal values which led to the athlete being summoned, on May 29th 2015, before the start of the race, to a meet with the event’s medical commission of 2 doctors and an expert from the Association «Athletes For Transparency» with a more specific responsibility for aspects concerning the anti-doping fight.

The Ecuadorian origin of M. Gonzalo CALISTO, which according to scientific literature, maybe be responsible for specific haematological profiles (Quito, altitude of 2850m), as well as the argument put forward by the athlete of having very regular exposure to very high altitudes  (>5500m) were retained to classify his haematological profile  as  « atypical » (rather than « abnormal ») and so authorised him to take the start of the race for the World trail-Running Championships in Annecy.

The information relating to  M. Gonzalo CALISTO’s  « atypical » profile was transmitted by telephone on May 29th 2015 to an organisation responsible for the anti-doping fight. The two possible options were retained by  the Association «Athletes For Transparency» to explain this « atypical » profile knowing that a specific genetical profile or the taking of EPO were then evoked.

The « atypical » profile of the athlete was once again brought up in a telephone conversation in June 2015 (no precise date) with an organisation responsible for the anti-doping fight.

M. Gonzalo CALISTO submitted a second blood sample on August 27th 2015 at 13:45 before the start of the UTMB® within the framework of the ITRA’s Health policy. His haematological profile once again showed several abnormalities.

With the reason, of the always possible specific genetic profile linked to his Ecuadorian origins, the athlete’s haematological profile was again classed as « atypical » and he was authorised to take the start of the UTMB®.

The ITRA learnt, on August 29th 2015 the urinary anti-doping tests at the finish had been able to specifically target M. Gonzalo CALISTO.

On April 21st 2016 information relating to  M. Gonzalo CALISTO were sent by email to the Association «Athletes For Transparency» by an organisation in charge of the anti-doping fight.

THE ITRA’S MANAGEMENT OF A POSITIVE TEST

The role of the ITRA following a positive test is:

–          To ensure the disqualification of M. Gonzalo CALISTO from events in which he would have been able to participate in during the period of disqualification  (as from August 19th, 2015).

–          To ensure the non-participation in any race which is a member of the ITRA during the period of  M. Gonzalo CALISTO’s period of suspension, from March 17th 2016 to March 17th 2018. (The start of the period of sanction (March 17th 2016) is determined by the “test authority” in relation to the provisional suspension, interviews, appeals made by the athlete, etc….)

Patrick BASSET – President of the ITRA Health Commission

Pierre SALLET – President of the Association Athletes For Transparency

ITRA performance profile – Gonzalo Calisto HERE


ITRAperformanceprofile

******

I would welcome clarification and statements from Gonzalo Callisto’s sponsors, MOVISTAR and COMPRESSPORT. I would welcome clarification from races that Gonzalo Calisto participated in after August 2015 – how will they proceed?

As usual I welcome your thoughts in this story and process

Dolomites SKYRACE 2016 Race Summary and Images – Skyrunner® World Series

©iancorless.com_DOLOMITESVK2016-3808

At 22km long with 10km uphill and 12km downhill The Dolomites SkyRace is a tough Skyrunning race that perfectly shows the ethos of the sport – start low, get high and then return as quickly as possible. Piz Boe at 3152m is the high point of the course and what follows is a technical descent to the starting town of Canazei.

Kilian Jornet and Megan Kimmel hold the current course, their times 2:00:11 and 2:25:57 recorded in 2013 and 2015 respectively.

Starting in Piazza Marconi, Canazei at 0830, 4 hours 30 minutes are allocated for participants to complete the course.

©iancorless.com_DOLOMITESVK2016-4143

From the gun Aritz Egea dictated the pace and lead a chasing trio of 2015 champion Tadei Pivk, Stian Overgaard and Martin Anthamatten. On the slopes leading up Piz Boe, Egea was relegated to 4th and a battle was on for victory.

©iancorless.com_DOLOMITESVK2016-3852

At the summit, Pivk took the lead and descended without fear as Anthamatten and Overgaard chased.

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Pivk was too strong though crossing the line in 2:03. Overgaard in his first Skyrunning race placed 3rd in 2:04 and 2015 Matterhorn Ultraks champion, Anthamatten placed 3rd.

©iancorless.com_DOLOMITESVK2016-4213

In the ladies’ race, Laura Orgue was always going to be the lady to beat, the only question mark would come on her ability to descend from the summit of Piz Boe… easier this year she broke her leg in a skiing accident.

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We should have no questions! From the beginning Orgue pushed the pace and the only lady in close contention was Elisa Desco. Orgue summited first and then held that lead all the way to the line besting Desco by 2-minutes, 2:28 to 2:30.

©iancorless.com_DOLOMITESVK2016-4130

Surprise of the day came in the ladies 3rd place, Celia Chiron who ran an incredible 2:32. Pre-race favourites Yngvild Kaspersen finished 5th and post-race said, “I had bad feelings today and my legs were just heavy.” It was a similar story for 2016 Transvulcania champion, Ida Nilsson.

©iancorless.com_DOLOMITESVK2016-4312

Attention now turns to this coming weekend, the Skyrunning World Championships will take place in Spain with VK, SKY and ULTRA races


Thanks to the support of our Partner Migu Xempower, Sponsor Alpina Watches and Official Pool Suppliers, Scott RunningCompressport and Salomon.

About Skyrunner® World Series
Skyrunning was founded in 1992 by Italian Marino Giacometti, President of the International Skyrunning Federation which sanctions the discipline worldwide and sports the tagline:
Less cloud. More sky.

The Skyrunner® World Series was launched in 2004 and has grown to represent the peak of outdoor running defined by altitude and technicality. In 2016, the Series, composed of four disciplines, features 23 races in 15 venues on three continents.

iancorless.com is the official photographer and media partner for the Skyrunner® World Series Follow on:

Social Media Logos

Facebook/iancorlessphotography
Twitter (@talkultra)
Instagram (@iancorlessphotography) 

Follow the Skyrunner® World Series on social media platforms

Facebook.com/skyrunning
Twitter @skyrunning_com
Instagram @skyrunning

Dolomites SkyRace 2016 Race Preview – Skyrunner® World Series

©iancorless.com_DolomitesSkyRace2015-2169It’s a classic, no doubt about it and as such the Dolomites SkyRace personifies the ethos of the pure and simple act of starting low racing high and returning as quickly as possible – Skyrunning!

©iancorless.com_DolomitesSkyRace2015-2571

The race is 22km long with 10km uphill and 12km downhill. Depending on the weather, the route may or may not have snow which only adds to the complexity of the terrain. The route changes constantly and on the ascent the runners must fight gravity trying to reach the high point of the course, Piz Boe at 3152m.

©iancorless.com_DolomitesSkyRace2015-1920

From the summit, runners must defy gravity and drop like a stone with no fear, this race is often won on the descent!

©iancorless.com_DolomitesSkyRace2015-1723

Piazza Marconi, Canazei is the start and finish point and 4 hours 30 minutes are allocated for participants to complete the course. Course records currently stand with Kilian Jornet and Megan Kimmel. Their times 2:00:11 and 2:25:57 recorded in 2013 and 2015 respectively.

Dolomites Skyrace

Added interest can be noted in the record for the ascent and descent, a key feature of this race. Augusti Roc Amador and Laura Orgue have recorded 1:16:47 and 1:29:30 of the ascent and Fabio Bonfanti and Angela Mudge hold the records for the descent, 00:43:35 and 00:58:47.

In 2015 Tadei Pivk (2:02:47) beat Ionut Zinca and Pascal Egli to the top of the podium. In the ladies’ race, Megan Kimmel (2:25:57) beat Laura Orgue and Elisa Desco with a stunning descent and a course record time.

What is in store for 2016?

©iancorless.com_DolomitesSkyRace2015-1913

As one would expect, the line up in both the men’s and lady’s fields is stunning. Tadei Pivk heads up the men’s field after his victory in 2015 and his SWS 2015 title. He has been racing regularly in Italy and was the winner at Livigno SkyMarathon recently. However, he did play 5th at Zegama-Aizkorri.

©iancorless.com_Rut2015-0043

Tadei will definitely not have things his own way. A last minute entry by Remi Bonnet will almost certainly raise the Italians eyebrows. Remi raced the VK in Val D’Isere this past weekend and placed 3rd (28 seconds off the lead), not a position he is used to but he has been nursing an injury and may well not be in full shape in Canazei? That said, he is a formidable competitor over the SKY distance.

©iancorless.com_ITT2015-9355

Manuel Merillas, 4th at Zegama-Aizkorri always races consistently well over the SKY distance and almost certainly he will contest the top 5 and more than likely the podium. 

 

Marc Casal Mir, 2nd on the SWS ranking is a consistent performer but has never made the podium in Canazei. For sure he will be in contention but more likely in the top 10.

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Andre Jonsson has been somewhat of a revelation in 2016, he goes out hard, puts it all on the line and races full on. He currently lies 3rd on the SWS 2016 ranking.

Martin Anthamatten will also be one to watch, he had a great result at Matterhorn Ultraks and in the USA at the RUT series of races. The Dolomites will suit him!

©iancorless.com_DolomitesSkyRace2015-1837

Saul Antonio Padua may well be the first to the top but he always falters on the descent, a key element of the Dolomites race, I wonder, this year can he string the two together?

©iancorless.com_HTV2016-3243

Other top names to watch out for are Francois Gonon, Alexis Sevennec, Aritz Egea, Dmityr Mityaev, Jan Magrit Sole, Hassan Ait Chaou, Daniel Garcia Gomez, Jessed Hernandez, Nil Cardona, Hector Haines and many more.

©iancorless.com_DolomitesSkyRace2015-2162

With Megan Kimmel missing from the race, Laura Orgue heads up the ladies race after a stunning performance in 2015. Laura’s only problem may well come on the descent… over the winter months she picked up an injury and the Dolomites SkyRace will be the first big test.

©iancorless.com_DolomitesSkyRace2015-2299

Laura though will have some serious competition from her Salomon teammates, Yngvild Kaspersen and Ida Nilsson. These two ladies are currently on fire and based on recent results they could take the top two spots? Yngvild won Zegama-Aizkorri and then went on the place 2nd at Mt Marathon in Alaska – for me, she is the favourite.

©iancorless.com_Transvulcania2016-5475

Ida had a stunning Transvulcania Ultramarathon has gone from strength-to-strength. Ironically, Transvulcania was a long way for Ida, the shorter distance will suit her running history. It’s going to be exciting!

©iancorless.com_DolomitesSkyRace2015-2244Elisa Desco, 3rd in 2015 is back on form after injury and victory in Livigno. Elisa has the up and down game and without doubt is likely champion on Sunday.

©iancorless.com_ITT2015-8847

2015 Zegama-Aizkorri champion, Azara Garcia has been looking for a return to form after prolonged injury and the Dolomites SkyRace may well be the opportunity to for her gain maximum points and challenge for the SWS ranking.
©iancorless.com_IMG_2179Zegama14

Maite Maiora has also had injury but if she is fit she will definitely be a contender for the podium. Maite races hard with 100% commitment in 2014 she placed 3rd behind Laura Orgue and Emelie Forsberg.

Marta Molist currently lies 2nd on the SWS ranking and she will be looking to gain valuable points, however, Russian Ekaterina Mityaev will be looking to topple the Spanish runner.

Ragna Debats and Sheila Alves heads up the other likely contenders for the top 5 followed by Aitziber Ibarbia, Eva Maria Moreda Gabaldon, Celia Chiron and of course, we may well have a few last minute entries…

Watch this space!

Dolomites_vertical

Kicking off proceedings on Friday, runners will take on the Dolomites Vertical Kiolmeter®. Starting at 0930 in Cisates just a short walk from the center of Canazei, runners will depart in groups of 20 with a time gap of 4-minutes separating the groups. Groups are categorized with slower runners departing early and elite runners departing last.

At 1100 the top runners as specified by the SWS ranking will depart.

Runners depart at an altitude of 1450m and reach the high point of Spiz 2465m with a total distance of 2.4km in length. The Dolomites VK is considered one of the toughest on the circuit due to the short, steep course and underfoot, much of the terrain is grass. Poles are not essential but recommended.

Course records date back to 2015 and 2014 when Philip Gotsch ran an incredible 32:38 and Laura Orgue ran 38:14.

©iancorless.com_Rut2015-5214

Ferran Teixido heads up the men’s race field and he currently leads the SWS ranking however, he did have a below par performance at Face Bellevarde in Val d’Isere. Francois Gonon, Nejc Kuhar, Marco Moletto, Jan Margarit, Dimitry Mityaeva, Mirko Cocco and Oriol Cardona Coll will push the Andorran runner all the way to the line. As is always the case in Italy and on the VK circuit, La Sportiva will send a strong and deep field. Urban Zemmer if confirmed running of course will be a clear favourite along with Remi Bonnet and Saul Antonio Padua.

©iancorless.com_Rut2015-5299

Laura Orgue heads up the ladies’ field and is the current course record holder but will have strong competition from Maite Maiora and Yngvild Kaspersen. Ekaterina Mityaeva, Maria Zorroza and Aitziber Ibarbia will provide competition but the ladies start list is definitely impacted by the Skyrunning World Championships that will take place the following weekend.


Thanks to the support of our Partner Migu Xempower, Sponsor Alpina Watches and Official Pool Suppliers, Scott RunningCompressport and Salomon.

About Skyrunner® World Series
Skyrunning was founded in 1992 by Italian Marino Giacometti, President of the International Skyrunning Federation which sanctions the discipline worldwide and sports the tagline:
Less cloud. More sky.

The Skyrunner® World Series was launched in 2004 and has grown to represent the peak of outdoor running defined by altitude and technicality. In 2016, the Series, composed of four disciplines, features 23 races in 15 venues on three continents.

iancorless.com is the official photographer and media partner for the Skyrunner® World Series Follow on:

Social Media Logos

Facebook/iancorlessphotography
Twitter (@talkultra)
Instagram (@iancorlessphotography) 

Follow the Skyrunner® World Series on social media platforms

Facebook.com/skyrunning
Twitter @skyrunning_com
Instagram @skyrunning

Is running about social media or running?

Why do you race?

  1. Are you looking to achieve new goals?
  2. Are you looking to enhance your life?
  3. Are you looking to push yourself to a limit?

Maybe, it is all those things….

However, racing (and life) today is very different to say just 5-years ago. Social media has changed all that. Our lives are shared daily, hourly or by the minute in some cases.

Is racing about ‘the selfie?’

Mariepaule Pierson here takes a look at the ‘race report’ and provides an enlightening insight into why we run…. THE BLOG!

Dear friends and Facebook followers, I cannot thank you enough for the support you have provided me in my times of need, as this mostly faithful account will show.

As you know, I attempted the infamous Parish Walk on a remote Island of the Irish Sea, cut off from all civilisation for as much as 2 or 3 days a year when the weather is more adverse than an English summer. Their flag is a mess of three human legs, quartered and reassembled in a grotesque spurred star; at least I knew the score, should I fail to finish.

 

Bracing myself for the task ahead, involving a trip to Gatwick in the not-so-early hours of Friday morning, I just made it in time on the pavement outside my house, amazed by the sheer strength of human resilience so early into the day before a race event. Luckily, I still had Wi-Fi connection and hypothermia was only just a mere possibility on the scale of unlikely disasters ahead.

As soon as the car arrived, I felt a surge of gratitude. My lack of training had not been in vain. Here I was, stepping in the front passenger seat, treated like a VIP even before proving my worth over the coming days, while three brave athletes were narrowly confined on the backseat, feeble squashed morning thoracic cages sacrificing their airspace for my comfort. As you, my trusted FB friends, know it well, this kind of incredible support you can get from complete strangers is what life is all about, the likes and encouragement messages without which hardly any one save the hardest hardened survivor can even consider doing any sporting event at all.

In any case, we reached Gatwick, and thereupon, the Isle of Man. Digging very deep within myself, and in spite of the absence of blisters or joint pain, or even the dreaded dehydration which is so prevalent on low cost airlines, I made it to the luggage reclaim and we piled up in the car, this time using every bit of mental strength remaining to take my place in the rear seat. In such conditions, when team work is essential for survival, it is the unconditional support of one’s fellow compatriots, even though we were in effect not far from asylum seekers from three different countries, which sustains one.

 

The traversée of the Island was no mean feat. The 10 miles from the airport to Peel, with luggage in tow, as well as the necessary water, food and supplies for the Parish Walk the following day and night, were only achieved thanks to the clarity of mind and sharpness of spirit of our driver, who, well ensconced at the wheel, allowed us a little detour via Snaefell, the highest mountain and the (only) summit higher than 2,000 feet on the Isle of Man, at 2,034 feet above sea level. The summit is crowned by a railway station, cafe and several communications masts. And, let’s add for the sake of accuracy, by a statue of Joey Dunlop, motorcyclist icon who won the Isle of Man TT 26 times. My poor suffering knees will bear witness of the truth of this brutal ascent. Grass, sheep, even a cloud, nothing would stop us from reaching the café at the top, and we gave it our all, throwing caution to the air and risking everything for the foggy lack of breath-taking view, limbs screaming for relief, hands numb from the unforgiving dampness of the wind… this will be a loosening up stroll I will never forget.

I agree, I hadn’t trained enough. My fault entirely. Only on small occasions had I managed a whole day without internet, and had not done a multiday event in months. God knows where I found the inner strength to stay nearly a whole day and a half without social media, but sometimes the unsurmountable difficulty, the exhaustion, the grandiose scenery, make you forget all your misery for a last surge of raging resolve. The hotel didn’t have Wi-Fi and the island, although a financial tax haven, on a purely telecom basis, is inhospitable and social media averse. We decided on the sheer shock of the revelation, to gather our resources and share our remaining data. Eyes sore from straining on tiny screens, fingers swollen to twice their size and numb from typing digits and letters, neck and shoulders in need of deep tissue massage from the relentless effort of looking down on our devices, oh the pain and mental blistering. But it was all worth it. We were connected! We could all sit at the breakfast table the next morning, typing to each other via our mobiles, communication restored! I had felt so alone, but the memories of those dark times are fading in the light of the amazing connectedness we all felt. Thank you again, my FB friends, for your likes and oohs and aahs and wonders and words of encouragement and congratulations. This would not have been possible without your faithful and deep addiction to other people’s news feed.

The next day was the 85 miles’ parish walk, then we flew back to London without incident.

We would love your feedback. Let us know does this post ring true for you, are you the blogger, are you the reader, are you the participant….

Why do you run?

Episode 113 – Cape Wrath Ultra and Northern Traverse

A_GRAVATAR

This is Episode 113 of Talk Ultra and We have a show with a selection of audio from participants who took part in the 8-day, 400km Cape Wrath Ultra (Ita Marzotto, Jenny Davis, Louise Watson, Luke Robertson, Richard Beard and Ted Kristensson)and the 190-mile, single stage, Northern Traverse (Angela White, Clare Turton and Eoin Keith). We have the news and Niandi Carmont co-hosts.

NEWS

COMRADES

Men

  1. David Gatebe 5:18:18 new record
  2. Ludic Mamabolo 5:24:05
  3. Bongmusa Mthembu 5:26:39

notable 8th – Max King 5:37:27

  1. Charge Bosman 6:25:55
  2. Caroline Wostmann 6:30:44
  3. Kajsa Berg 6:39:04

2 Americans in the top-10, Sarah Bard 4th in 6:42 and Colleen De Reuck (aged 50) 7th 6:50:21

ULTRA SKYMARATHON MADEIRA – HERE

Men

  1. Cristofer Clemente 6:00 new CR
  2. Dimitrios Theodorakakos 6:09
  3. Luis Fernanndeez 6:11
  1. Gemma Arenas 6:58
  2. Hillary Allen 7:13
  3. Anna Frost 7:17

all ladies under Stevie Kremer’s 7:33 from 2015

GOLDEN GATE DIRTY THIRTY

Men

  1. Chris Vargo 4:30
  2. Josh Arthur 4:54
  3. Jason Schlarb 4:55
  1. Alicia Shay 5:30
  2. Clare Gallagher 5:46
  3. Taylor Nowin 5:58

GRAND UNION CANAL RACE

Andy Jordan 25:49 ahead of Barry Miller 27:22 and Ian Thomas 27:43

Cass Chisolh, 1st lady and 4th overall 29:25, Katherine Ganly 31:49 and Georgina Harrison 32:05

Rob Young – marathonmanUK has started his Transcontinental run record (2766 miles) on May 14th. He started with an 81 mile day 1…. He is now in Missouri HERE

Damian Hall set a FKT for the South West Coast Path in the uk – 10 days, 15 hours and 18 minutes

Francois d’Haene set a new FKT on the GR20 in Corsica, breaking the old record by 1 hour – 31 hours 6 minutes

Cape Wrath Ultra HERE

  1. Marcu Scotney 41:40:50
  2. Thomas Adams 45:59:20
  3. Pavel Paloncy 52:22:38
  1. Ita Marzotto 66:53:12
  2. Louise Staples 68:02:02
  3. Laura Watson 68:42:11

INTERVIEW audio from Cape Wrath Ultra

Northern Traverse HERE

  1. Eoin Keith 51:38:15
  2. John Knapp 57:08:29
  3. Tim Laney 58:41:00
  1. Anne Greeen 86:34:31
  2. Hisayo Kalahari 87:57:54
  3. Angela White 88:27:07
  4. Angela’s charity:

Follow at: http://pushboundaries.co.uk/

Donate at https://www.justgiving.com/PushingBoundaries/

Facebook:  www.facebook.com/PushBoundaries

INTERVIEW audio from Northern Traverse

UP & COMING RACES

Australia

Queensland

Endura 50K | 50 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Gold Coast 50 Miler | 50 miles | June 11, 2016 | website

Runners ConneXion 100 km | 100 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Austria

100km Wien | 100 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

50km Wien | 50 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Scenic 100 | 100 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Scenic 55 | 55 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Bulgaria

Vitosha 100km Mountain Super Trail | 100 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Canada

British Columbia

55K Ultra | 55 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Vancouver 100 km | 100 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Vancouver 50 km | 50 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Vancouver 62.5 km | 62 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Vancouver 75.8 km | 75 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Vancouver 87.9 km | 87 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Ontario

100 Km | 100 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

50 km | 50 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

50 Km | 50 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Ultimate Canuck | 92 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Chile

Ultra Trail Putaendo – 60 km | 60 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Ultra Trail Putaendo – 80 km | 80 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

China

Gobi March 2016 | 250 kilometers | June 19, 2016 | website

Czech Republic

Krakonosova Stovka 100 km | 100 kilometers | June 17, 2016 | website

France

Alpes-Maritimes

La Grande Courasse | 61 kilometers | June 12, 2016 | website

Aube

Team Trail Intermarché | 180 kilometers | June 24, 2016 | website

Troyes à l’aube de l’enfer d’Éric Peters | 180 kilometers | June 24, 2016 | website

Bouches-du-Rhône

Grand Raid de Camargue | 100 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Cantal

Ultra-Trail Puy Mary Aurillac | 105 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Drôme

Les Drayes du Vercors 60 km | 60 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Essonne

Relais Trail du Gâtinais | 66 kilometers | June 19, 2016 | website

Trail 91 km | 91 kilometers | June 19, 2016 | website

Haute-Loire

100 km | 100 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Le Grand Trail du Saint Jacques | 71 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Hautes-Alpes

Trans Écrins | 80 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Haute-Savoie

80km du Mont-Blanc | 80 kilometers | June 24, 2016 | website

L’esprit Angolon | 60 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Trail des Crêtes du Chablais – 70 km | 70 kilometers | June 19, 2016 | website

Hautes-Pyrénées

Aneto trail de la Haute – Bigorre | 50 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Hérault

6666 Occitane | 105 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Grand Raid 6666 | 110 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Lozère

Aubrac Circus Trail | 55 kilometers | June 19, 2016 | website

Manche

Défi des Barjos | 65 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Défi des Grands Barjos | 115 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

La 1/2 Barjo | 50 kilometers | June 19, 2016 | website

La Barjo | 100 kilometers | June 19, 2016 | website

Raid de l’Archange | 270 kilometers | June 19, 2016 | website

Morbihan

Grand Raid 56 Golfe du Morbihan | 177 kilometers | June 24, 2016 | website

Pas-de-Calais

Trail des Coteaux de l’AA- 55 km | 55 kilometers | June 12, 2016 | website

Pyrénées-Atlantiques

Montan’Aspe : la Piste Noire | 50 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Saône-et-Loire

tour du canton | 60 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Var

Entre les deux rives | 57 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Grand Tour du Verdon | 83 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Vosges

Le Grand Trail de la Vallée des Lacs | 85 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Le trail de la Vallée des Lacs – Trail Long | 55 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Germany

Bavaria

Supertrail | 60 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

SuperTrail XL | 79 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Ultratrail | 100 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Hesse

Oxfam Trailwalker Deutschland | 100 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Rhineland-Palatinate

Eifel Ultramarathon | 51 kilometers | June 12, 2016 | website

Ireland

Connacht

Forest Marathon – 100 km | 100 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Forest Marathon – 50 km | 50 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Kildare

Stonemad Multi Stage Marathon – Day 1 Ultra Marathon | 62 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Stonemad Multi Stage Marathon – Day 2 Ultra Marathon | 55 kilometers | June 19, 2016 | website

Wicklow

Celtic 6 Day Stage Race 133K | 133 kilometers | June 20, 2016 | website

Celtic 6 Day Stage Race 210km | 210 kilometers | June 20, 2016 | website

Italy

Friuli-Venezia Giulia

Magraid | 100 kilometers | June 17, 2016 | website

Liguria

Avatrail – 54 km | 54 kilometers | June 19, 2016 | website

Puglia

Ultramaratona del Gargano | 50 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Veneto

103 km | 103 kilometers | June 10, 2016 | website

53 km | 53 kilometers | June 10, 2016 | website

Lavaredo Ultra Trail | 119 kilometers | June 24, 2016 | website

Japan

100 km | 100 kilometers | June 12, 2016 | website

100 km | 100 kilometers | June 12, 2016 | website

71 km | 71 kilometers | June 12, 2016 | website

72 km | 72 kilometers | June 12, 2016 | website

Namibia

Richtersveld Wildrun | 200 kilometers | June 13, 2016 | website

Netherlands

Gelderland

55 km | 55 kilometers | June 19, 2016 | website

Norway

UltraBirken | 55 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Portugal

Ultramaratona Caminhos do Tejo – 144 km | 144 kilometers | June 10, 2016 | website

Ultramaratona Caminhos do Tejo – 57 km | 57 kilometers | June 10, 2016 | website

Réunion

Grand Raid 97.4 | 100 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Serbia

100 km Run Palic | 100 kilometers | June 19, 2016 | website

Slovakia

Štefánik Trail | 140 kilometers | June 10, 2016 | website

Spain

Canary Islands

Tenerife Bluetrail 60 km | 59 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Tenerife Bluetrail 94 km | 94 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Catalonia

Cadí Ultra Trail | 80 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Volta Cerdanya Ultraresistència – VCUR 122K | 122 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Madrid

Gran Trail Peñalara | 110 kilometers | June 24, 2016 | website

Gran Trail Peñalara 60km | 60 kilometers | June 24, 2016 | website

Oxfam Intermón Spain – Madrid | 100 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Sweden

Jättelångt | 68 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Switzerland

Berne

100km run Biel | 100 kilometers | June 10, 2016 | website

Neuchâtel

Trail de l’Absinthe | 75 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Ticino

Scenic Trail – 54 km | 54 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

United Kingdom

Cambridgeshire

Pathfinder March | 46 miles | June 18, 2016 | website

Cornwall

Endurancelife Classic Quarter Ultra Marathon | 49 miles | June 11, 2016 | website

County Borough of Conwy

V3K Ultra Extreme | 89 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

V3K Ultra Marathon | 53 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Cumbria

The Wall Ultramarathon – Challenger | 69 miles | June 18, 2016 | website

The Wall Ultramarathon – Expert | 69 miles | June 18, 2016 | website

The Wall Ultramarathon – Relay | 69 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Three Rings of Shap | 100 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

East Dunbartonshire

West Highland Way race | 153 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

East Sussex

South Downs Way 100 | 100 miles | June 11, 2016 | website

Gloucestershire

Cheltenham Circular Ultimate Challenge | 78 kilometers | June 19, 2016 | website

Northern Ireland

Mourne Way Ultra Marathon | 84 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

USA

California

50M | 50 miles | June 11, 2016 | website

Big Basin Trail Run 50 km | 50 kilometers | June 12, 2016 | website

Burton Creek Trail Run 50K | 50 kilometers | June 19, 2016 | website

Canyon Meadow 50 km Trail Run (May) | 50 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Rodeo Valley Trail Run Spring 50K | 50 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Shadow of the Giants 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Georgia

50K | 50 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Idaho

River of No Return 108K Endurance Run | 108 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

River of No Return 50K Endurance Run | 50 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Indiana

50K | 50 kilometers | June 12, 2016 | website

Kansas

50k Relay | 50 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

50k Solo | 50 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Maine

6-Pack (6 Person) | 200 miles | June 24, 2016 | website

Standard Relay Team (7-12 Person) | 200 miles | June 24, 2016 | website

Ultra Relay Team (4-6 Person) | 200 miles | June 24, 2016 | website

Maryland

Mason-Dixon Trail Longest Day 100K Challenge | 100 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Massachusetts

Vegan Power 50K | 50 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Michigan

40 mile through-the-night run | 40 miles | June 17, 2016 | website

North Country Trail Relay | 63 miles | June 11, 2016 | website

Montana

50K | 50 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

50 Mile | 50 miles | June 18, 2016 | website

50 Mile Relay | 50 miles | June 18, 2016 | website

Nebraska

187 miles | 187 miles | June 11, 2016 | website

187 miles Relay | 187 miles | June 11, 2016 | website

New Mexico

Angel Fire Endurance 100 Mile Run | 100 miles | June 11, 2016 | website

Angel Fire Endurance 50K Run | 50 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Angel Fire Endurance 50 Mile Run | 50 miles | June 11, 2016 | website

New York

50K Green Race Relay | 50 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Manitou’s Revenge Ultramarathon and Relay | 54 miles | June 18, 2016 | website

North Carolina

Bethel Hill Moonlight Boogie 50 Mile | 50 miles | June 11, 2016 | website

Ohio

Mohican Trail 100M Trail Run | 100 miles | June 18, 2016 | website

Mohican Trail 50M Trail Run | 50 miles | June 18, 2016 | website

Oregon

100K | 100 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

50K | 50 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Mary’s Peak 50K Trail Running Race | 50 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

Relay | 170 miles | June 17, 2016 | website

Relay | 200 miles | June 17, 2016 | website

Pennsylvania

Laurel Highlands Ultra’s 50 K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | June 11, 2016 | website

Laurel Highlands Ultra’s 77 Mile Trail Run | 77 miles | June 11, 2016 | website

Rachel Carson Trail Challenge | 34 miles | June 18, 2016 | website

South Dakota

Black Hills 100 Mile | 100 miles | June 24, 2016 | website

Tennessee

Chattanooga Mountains Stage Race | 60 miles | June 17, 2016 | website

Utah

100 Mile | 100 miles | June 17, 2016 | website

50K | 50 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

50 Mile | 50 miles | June 18, 2016 | website

Ragnar Relay Wasatch Back | 192 miles | June 17, 2016 | website

Virginia

Eastern Divide Ultra | 50 kilometers | June 18, 2016 | website

OSS/CIA 50 Mile Night Run | 50 miles | June 11, 2016 | website

Washington

Echo Valley 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | June 12, 2016 | website

Echo Valley 50 Mile Trail Run | 50 miles | June 12, 2016 | website

Emory Corwine Memorial Ruck Race | 50 miles | June 18, 2016 | website

Kaniksu 50 | 50 miles | June 18, 2016 | website

Rattlesnake Ridge Run 50K | 50 kilometers | June 19, 2016 | website

West Virginia

Highlands Sky 40 Mile Trail Run | 40 miles | June 18, 2016 | website

Wisconsin

Ahnapee Summer Solstice 50 Mile Relay Run | 50 miles | June 18, 2016 | website

Ragnar Relay Chicago | 194 miles | June 10, 2016 | website

Wyoming

Bighorn Trail 100 Mile Endurance Run | 100 miles | June 17, 2016 | website

Bighorn Trail 50K Endurance Run | 50 kilometers | June 17, 2016 | website

Bighorn Trail 50 Mile Endurance Run | 50 miles | June 17, 2016 | website

CLOSE

 

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Northern Traverse 2016 – Day 2 Summary

©iancorless.com_NorthernTraverse2016-8563

“We seek him here, we seek him there,

Those photographers seek him everywhere.

Is he in heaven? — Is he in hell?

That damned, elusive Eoin Keith”

– a mis-quoted Baroness Emma Orczy

Eoin Keith is on fire, he is blasting through checkpoints and burning up the trail. I tried to catch him this morning and missed by about 10-minutes at Nine Stands. I even expected a faster pace and navigated ahead on the trail so that I could run towards him…. a lack of 3G failed me and when I finally goy an update on my tracker it told me the bad news. Eoin had passed but by the narrowest of margins.

I remained on the higher ground and was blasted by the strong icy winds to John Knapp and Matt Neale come through. The front three are relatively equally spaced at the time of writing (1400 Tuesday), Eoin is probably getting close to Richmond? If only I could get 3G.

The 190 mile journey is taking its toll and runners are now spread over a large area, the last runner is David Taylor (I believe) and he is climbing out of Patterdale – puts Eoin Keith’s pace into perspective.

Day 2 conditions are good with great visibility, just a strong, cold wind to contend with.

Ship will be a key aid station in the coming hours and evening for the back markers, equally, Richmond important for the from markers.

How long will Eoin Keith stay in Richmond? My guess, not long… Robin Hood Bay is starting to appear quite close

Follow the race live on tacking HERE

Check outage race website http://www.northerntraverse.com

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