Hypothermia – Be Prepared!

Yading SkyRace China, 2018.

Hypothermia and Hyperthermia

They sound the same, don’t they? But don’t be confused. In the following two articles we will clearly explain the differences and do our best to inform you how to avoid it and what to do should it happen.

This article will be about Hypothermia but before we begin, lets provide an initial explanation to avoid confusion.

Hypothermia – Refers to the cooling of the human body which in severe cases can result in death.

Hyperthermia – Refers to the elevated temperature of the human body due to a failure of thermoregulation and in severe cases can result in death.

The bodies core temperature is normally around 37 deg C. When the core temperature drops, Hypothermia starts to set in. A drop of below 35 deg C signifies mild conditions whereas anything below 33 deg C is considered severe.

“Hypothermia occurs when an individual’s core body temperature decreases to a level where muscular and cerebral functions become impaired. The most common cause of this loss of body temperature is exposure to cold and/or wet conditions. When exposed to cold conditions, the body can lose heat through a variety of routes. These include conduction (contact with cold or wet objects, such as snow or wet clothing), convection (heat being carried away from the body by wind, i.e., wind chill) and evaporation (sweating and respiration). Once the body’s core temperature begins to drop, the symptoms of hypothermia will begin to appear.”

Grainger.com

Let’s be clear here, conditions on the trail, fell or mountain don’t necessarily need to be bad for Hypothermia to set in. Running and moving fast creates heat and a runner can generate a great deal of heat in a short space of time. Imagine a scenario where you are moving fast, and you have been travelling this way for say 2-hours. You are warm, no hot! You are a little fatigued, hungry, a little dehydrated and then disaster happens…. you fall and twist an ankle.

Wear the correct layers to keep warm. Protect the extremities, hands, feet and head.

Suddenly moving becomes impossible and you start to cool.

I probably don’t need to elaborate too much here as it’s very easy to see and visualize the scenario that follows.

Low blood sugar, low energy a cooling body and mild Hypothermia starts to set in. Conditions do not need to be bad or inclement for this to happen! However, bad weather only adds to the situation and can speed up any decline. Imagine the scenario where conditions are bad – rain, wind, snow, ice, windchill and so on. The Hypothermia process is then escalated and speeded up rapidly requiring much faster action from the individual who is impacted by the conditions and those around who can provide help.

As the body cools, certain things start to happen and in mountain running we always warn runners of the possible signs of Hypothermia – Mumbles Grumbles and Stumbles.

A good water poof layer with taped seams and hood is essential.

Look out for:

An inability to make decisions.

Shivering.

Confusion.

A reduction of consciousness.

Slurred words.

Unusual behavior.

In severe cases any shivering may well stop and you will see visual signs of change such as blue lips.

A space blanket is an essential item for any kit list.

ACT QUICKLY

Grainger.com
  • Speed is of the essence with Hypothermia as mild conditions can spread quickly and before you know it, they can become severe and critical quite quickly.
  • If you have additional clothing (you should have, see a post on mandatory equipment) put as many layers on as possible including hat, gloves, warm base layer and windproof. If you or the person are wet from rain, ideally you would remove wet layers and replace with dry.
  • Ideally eat sweet foods. Avoid coffee, tea, and alcohol, If the victim can swallow without danger, give him/her warm, sweet liquids to drink.
  • Place warm objects and add heat/ layers next to the victim’s head, neck, chest, and groin.
  • If possible, get off the mountain or out of the bad conditions as soon as possible. If this is not possible, try to find shelter. If you are unable to move add as many layers as possible and seek assistance from the emergency services. A personal tracker such as Garmin InReach is a great addition to a mobile phone when out in remote and isolated environments.
  • Keep a potential Hypothermia case awake if you are looking after someone. If you are suffering from Hypothermia, do everything possible to avoid losing consciousness.

Of course, the above is not a comprehensive and fool-proof guide as mountain conditions and the condition of the casualty should indicate what action to take.

Do not try to evacuate a severe on unconscious casualty. Seek the services of the professionals with an emergency call.

weather.gov

All the above can be avoided with good mountain practice and skills.

The recent trend and desire to move fast and light is all well and good providing that you can move fast. However, when you can’t move fast, that is when problems arise. Personal responsibility, self-awareness and an understanding of the challenge, terrain, and weather, at minimum, requires you take stock of the situation before departing on any adventure and always think of the worst-case scenario.

Ask, ‘Do I have enough items with me should I become immobilized in bad weather and need to wait for rescue or help?’ If the answer is no, you need to reassess your equipment.

Mandatory kit should be something that you take with you on all your adventures, particularly on mountain journeys when in remote and isolated places, be that in training or racing. The more extreme the terrain, conditions or risk of adversity, the more equipment you should take.

Also remember that altitude and going high can impact in multiple ways. For example, it may be warm and sunny in the valley, but the higher you go, weather systems can change completely. For every 100m of elevation gain, temperature can drop by 0.65 (+/-) degrees. 1000m of elevation gain could see 10 degrees cooler temperatures, add wind and other inclement conditions and suddenly, without the right equipment, you are in a difficult situation. Be prepared!

Mamores VK Scotland

As a minimum carry with you: Read winter kit list.

  • A pack that can carry at least 1ltr of liquid with capacity for mandatory kit
  • Waterproof jacket and trousers to protect from the elements
  • A base layer Top and bottom) ideally merino wool.
  • A down or primaloft jacket that will retain heat/ warmth in wet conditions.
  • Hat
  • Gloves
  • Buff
  • Space Blanket
  • Liquid
  • Compass (know how to use it)
  • Map (know how to read it)
  • Whistle
  • Mobile phone
  • Spare food – energy bars or similar.

for more extreme conditions, consider the following:

  • Bivvy bag
  • Sleeping bag
  • Spot tracker or similar
  • Stove such as a Jetboil
  • Dehydrated meal

The above to some of you may sound extreme, believe me, when you need the above, you will really need them, and you will be more than thankful that you have them with you. Also understand clothing, how it works, how to layer, what garments are best in what conditions. Educate yourself on the pros and cons.

Good Practice

Be prepared!

Ideally always go to the mountains or remote challenging locations with company – buddy up!

Check the weather and make a sensible decision based on you, your ability, your objectives, and skill level.

Know the route that you are taking and tell a friend or family member where you are going, when you are going and when you anticipate returning.

Have a contingency plan with options to shorten or abort a route with quick and easy escape routes.

Have a mobile phone that is charged and contains relevant contact numbers for emergency services.

Can you read a map, take a bearing or do you have a phone or GPS device that will give you a location? This will be essential when requiring help. If you can provide a grid reference you will be rescued far quicker when a rescue party that needs to search for you. what3words is a phone app for this and is better then nothing in an emergency. OS Locate possibly a better option as it provides grid reference.

Look after each other and look after others on the mountain.

Know whistle signals – six blasts every minute signifies an emergency.

Hypothermia can happen to anyone, even the most experienced runners or mountaineers. However, if you are sensible, have the necessary equipment and understand your ability and the ability of those around you, the risk of Hypothermia should be reduced greatly.

In the next article we will look at Hyperthermia.

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

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VJ Sport ULTRA Shoe – Shoe Review

Ok A new shoe by VJ Sport is an exciting thing. I will be clear from the very start, VJ Sport produce, in my opinion, currently the three best shoes for fell, skyrunning, mountain and longer-distance trail/ mountain races. I have said time and time again and I will repeat it here, the iRock 3, XTRM and MAXx are a trio of shoes that provide a perfect weapon choice for specific terrain and distance. Although the three shoes are very obviously from the same family, (they look very similar) – They all have ‘Fitlock,’ they all have amazingly durable Kevlar uppers and they all have the amazing Butyl rubber (albeit in different size lugs) outsole that VJ are renowned for, but they do not all fit the same, have the same cushioning or have the same drop. The iRock 3 is narrower, has more precision and aggressive lugs, the XTRM sits between the iRock 3 and the MAXx and the MAXx has been the more recent shoe, offering a wider fit and more cushioning for longer distance trail and mountain races. There is no getting away from the fact that longer-distance races, basically when time on feet is longer, the need for ‘more’ in a shoe can be preferable, but it does depend on the runner. Up until now, the MAXx was the only option from VJ Sport with extra cushioning.

Step in the ULTRA.

As the name suggests, the new ULTRA from VJ Sport is here to address the need and requirement for a trail/ mountain shoe that is ideal for any distance but will come in to its own when going beyond 50km and longer. With the recent announcement by inov-8 of the Trailfly Ultra G 300 Max, there is obviously a change happening in the mountain shoe world, VJ and inov-8 have never made shoes with so much cushioning before!

I am fortunate to have had the ULTRA for 5 weeks now and have tried them out on a multitude of terrain and conditions.

The ULTRA immediately looks like a VJ Sport shoe, it has all the usual characteristics, notably the upper and Fitlock. Turning the shoe over, the Butyl outsole is there. But on closer look and inspection, notable things stand out:

  • More cushioning.
  • Different Fitlock.
  • Wider toe box.
  • Different lacing configuration.
  • Different outsole.
  • Different width and shape to the outsole.
  • Heal box more padded.

But first, let’s look at the width of the shoe from the outsole.

The ULTRA outsole is wider from front to back and noticeably in the mid foot, clearly emphasising that this shoe is designed for less technical and more cruise like trails and rocky terrain. The lugs are comparable to the MAXx at 4mm but you see how the outsole is completely different. This wide last also compensates for the higher stack height from the cushioning. This makes the shoe feel considerably less like a ‘Max’ shoe and that is a real benefit.

The ULTRA cushioning was anticipated to be a step up from the MAXx (10mm/16mm) both at the front and rear and designed to provide a more plush and forgiving ride over longer distances. With 27mm at the front and 33mm at the rear of EVA, this isn’t just a step up from the MAXx, it’s another world! We are in ‘Hoka’ territory with this cushioning. Like the MAXx, the ULTRA has a 6mm drop which on a personal level, is a surprise, I expected 8mm. However, 6mm sits nicely and may well keep more runners happy.

The Fitlock, a key characteristic of VJ Shoes and one of the standout USP’s that make VJ so good, is here on the ULTRA but has a different look compared to the MAXx. The MAXx is a harder plastic whereas the ULTRA is lighter and a less aggressive. It’s softer and more flexible and therefore adapts to the foot better.

The heel box on iRock, XTRM and MAXx is quite minimal and really grips the heel, here with the ULTRA, the cushioning/ padding is a little more noticeable but not at the compromise of a firm hold. Your foot really sits inside and is snug and secure.

The upper is classic VJ Sport mixing Kevlar and Nylon (22/78%) to provide a durable and breathable upper. Toe protection is similar to the MAXx but the whole upper package feels like a step up with similar breathability but better durability.

The laminated overlays, while not the same, are comparable with the MAXx but very different to the XTRM and iRock which has stitched on and heavily reinforced layers to reflect the harsh terrain that they will be used in.

The lacing configuration is slightly different to the MAXx but still has the trusted firm and reassured hold that one expects from VJ Sport and Fitlock. There are the extra eyelets for lock-lacing or similar.

The weight of the shoe is a wow, my MAXx in an EU44/ UK9.5 weigh 313g, the ULTRA with considerably more cushioning weighs 286g – I am actually not sure how VJ Sport have made this shoe so much more lighter? Obviously the Fitlock is different and a saving can be made there, but still…? Compare this to the recent offering from inov-8 HERE and each shoe is 100g lighter… So, 200g a pair! Just imagine on an ultra adding 200g to every full cadence, it’s a huge difference and why the inov-8 felt so heavy.

The rear of the MAXx and ULTRA are quite similar, certainly in regard to the overlays, but the noticeable difference is more cushioning in the sole and additional padding for the heel.

The outsole is significantly different. I have already mentioned how from front to rear, the ULTRA has a much wider last, but it also has a different lug layout. On the MAXx it is Butyl rubber all over. The ULTRA is a mix allowing the softer yellow cushioning to penetrate and mix with the lugs designed to provide a more cushioned feel. It is very noticeably difference to the MAXx. There is no compromise on lugs or grip and the new layout with enhanced lug pattern has more grip.

While not a complete departure for VJ Sport, the ULTRA really is something different and only shows how the brand are listening to the customer to bring all they they love from the other shoes and produce something that is designed for longer outings without losing what makes a VJ Sport shoe great. The ULTRA with 27mm/ 33mm cushioning is a head turner, particularly when one considers the MAXx which was ‘the’ cushioned VJ Sport trail shoe was 10mm/ 16mm.

IN USE

I have had the shoes for five weeks and accumulated nearly 300km on them.

The feel of the ULTRA is very similar to the MAXx when slipping on with a noticeable extra room at the front. The lacing is reassured and with the Fitlock, just perfect. It really is my favourite lacing method of any shoe brand. The heel area is noticeably more padded and comes a little higher than the MAXx. The hold of instep and around the Navicular bone is unique and reassured. I found after 50-miles that my foot really started to bed inside the shoe and what was already comfortable, became more so. Particularly around the heal area. On longer runs, I also found the additional toe room welcome.

Sizing is inline with iRock, XTRM and MAXx. I use UK9.5/EU44 in all my VJ Sport shoes but I will hint at a word of caution, this ULTRA ‘may’ size a little smaller. So just be careful, I definitely feel a little less length in comparison to my MAXx but I still have used a UK9.5 with no issues. Read here about how a shoe should fit.

The wider last is really noticeable and provides a much more stable platform on any terrain. It has really grown on me… They are great on snow! Depending on ones individual run style, shoes with a narrower last, as seen on the iRock, XTRM and MAXx can cause some inward foot roll, even with the Fitlock. This is considerably less noticeable on the ULTRA. An important consideration with the extra height from the cushioning too.

Grip is as one expects from VJ Sport, it is superb on trails, wet or dry rocks and obviously, with a less aggressive lug, grip in mud is compromised when it is deep and sloppy.

My first run was intentionally a road run of 14km. I wanted to really feel what that 27mm/33mm cushioning felt like… NOT what I expected! I was really expecting some floaty, bouncy, marshmallow like propulsion with the shoe almost collapsing under my feet and then recoiling and throwing me forward. I got none of this, they felt firm. I said to myself, “new shoe, it will soften,” 14km later, no, still quite a firm feel and I was struggling to believe the 27/33 claim. To be fair, road use in the ULTRA should probably be limited as the Butyl outsole will wear. On my third road run, I started to feel a change and while not bouncy soft, I was feeling a difference both in overall comfort and energy return.

An initial trail run with a mixture of frozen ground, tree roots, rocks, a little snow and occasional ice felt similar to the feel on the road. I need to be clear, it’s not that there is anything wrong with the feel or the cushioning of the ULTRA, it’s just not what I expected from a shoe with 27/33mm of EVA. Surely, the whole purpose of so much cushioning is that it feels cushioned and allows one to run longer with more comfort? But, the more I have run in the shoe, the better the feel has come. Certainly, with over 100km in the shoes, they had bed in and that normal VJ feel has started to come. When in mud and softer terrain, the shoe had the usual VJ traits.

Despite a high stack height, the shoes do not feel like a Max shoe, on the contrary, I questioned ‘if’ there is so much cushioning? VJ have confirmed that there is. On technical terrain, the wider last compensates for the cushioning and while not as agile as a MAXx or XTRM, the ULTRA still has loads of confidence and reassurance on the rough stuff and technical terrain. Arguably, the ULTRA is the best Max cushioned shoe I have tried on trail which has considerably less roll and instability. The ULTRA really does feel like a beefed up MAXx which is superb and consistent with the VJ line-up. No point in changing what works, just adapt it. The control in the ULTRA comes from several factors: 1. The firmer cushioning stops the shoe compressing and collapsing and becoming unstable and therefore roll to the left and right is less. 2. The wider last helps provide a more stable platform on which to land. 3. The VJ Fitlock is awesome and really holds the foot. 4. Flex, particularly in the propulsive phase is till good despite additional cushioning.

with 230km use.

The upper had all the secure and familiar VJ Sport feel and the new Fitlock was holding my foot stable just as the previous incarnations. A notable feel difference comes from the wider toe box and the overall wider feel of the outsole. The heel box is really secure and a confidence booster when climbing. Despite the cushioning, the propulsive phase (flex behind the metatarsals) is still pretty good and reassuring providing some bounce and return when picking up the tempo.

The more I have run in the ULTRA, the better they have become. This not unusual for a VJ shoe, I had a similar feeling with the MAXx. Ultimately, if you like VJ shoes, need more cushioning and wider toe box, the ULTRA is going to make you very happy.

INITIAL SUMMARY

I am a huge VJ Sport fan and the ULTRA is a great addition to the line-up that carries on the tradition of great foot hold with Fitlock and the stand-out Butyl outsole grip. The added cushioning now answers the calling from consumers for a shoe that is ideal for really long ultras be that on trail or in the mountains. Having said that, the shoe works great on shorter runs too, it is just less nimble, particularly in comparison to an XTRM. The cushioning will not be for everyone, but that is fine, it provides an option! For someone who has avoided Max cushioned shoes since 2012 (read here) the ULTRA has made me re-look at my relationship with a heavily cushioned shoe and while I wouldn’t wear them all the time, the option to have them for longer outings is one that I have enjoyed. The cushioning is not as cushioned (soft) as other cushioned shoes, it has a firmer feel initially but does soften with more use. It’s not floaty/ bouncing cushioning, but firmer with a more controlled bounce and this is crucial for me on trail, there is considerably less roll and less of a ‘high’ feel. The wider last also considerably helps providing a secure platform on which to land, only enhanced by the excellent VJ grip. The wider toe box will also be appreciated by many. I feel that the ULTRA is a mountain shoe and therefore more designed for the tougher races that mixes challenging terrain with distance. UTMB a prime example.

Ultimately, the VJ Sport ULTRA is a really solid mountain ultra shoe that is well built, has great foot hold and has one of, if not the best outsoles out there. They are also light! Highly recommended.

To clarify, the shoes were provided to test, as are all the shoes that I review. But this is not a paid review.

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

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adidas Terrex Two Ultra Parley Shoe Review

The adidas Terrex Two Ultra Parley is not a new shoe, I first received mine in March 2020 and currently I am about to start wearing a third pair of the shoe. So, I have plenty of miles on these ‘adi’ shoes to give a real overview of the pros and cons fromm this three stripe Terrex shoe.

Firstly, a little perspective, adidas, and particularly the Terrex arm of the brand are making huge changes and development to make its mark on the trail and ultra-world. In 2019, I worked closely with adidas at UTMB following the Terrex Team take on multiple races at the Super Bowl of the trail and ultrarunning scene. You can read my in-depth analysis HERE.

Want to WIN a pair of adidas Terrex Two Ultra Parley ? One Patreon supporter will be drawn at random on April 12th to win a pair. Support me on Patreon HERE for as little as £3.00.

Quite simply, adidas Terrex are taking the trail scene by storm, we have witnessed this recently with Ruth Croft winning Tarawera outright and runners such as Tom Evans making the podium at Western States and Luis Alberto Hernando winning CCC. The list of results is endless but one significant importance is how adidas are listening to the athletes and developing apparel and shoes to fulfil the needs of the runners. Notably, the recent launch of the Terrex Speed Ultra HERE had a two-year development with specific feedback from Tom Evans to ensure the shoe ticked all the right boxes. And what a shoe it is!

So, the Terrex Two Ultra Parley fits nicely into this new development of the brand and at the same times sets out some really surprising and new credentials. In 2020, T3 Magazine (a tech magazine) actually awarded the Terrex Two Ultra Parley King of the Mountains (and valleys) in the T3 Awards 2020.

The Parley refers to the ecological aspect of the shoe and notably why the shoe has been applauded. When large brands like adidas consider the sustainability and environmental impact, that can only be a good thing in the long run, pardon the pun!

Parley Ocean Plastic™ is a material created from upcycled plastic waste that is intercepted from beaches and coastal communities before reaching the ocean

Roughly 11 plastic bottles are used to make the Terrex Two Ultra Parley; Parley Ocean Plastic™ is a material created from upcycled plastic waste that is intercepted from beaches and coastal communities before reaching the ocean… It is used as a replacement for virgin plastic in the making of adidas x Parley products.

Ultimately a really great thing!

The shoe is distinctive and grabs the eye. All my shoes have been the blue coloured as pictured but for 2021 there is a cool Gold/Black/White version that is a real eye catcher. If you need a more sedate show, there is also a Black/ Grey/ Blue version.

adidas Terrex athlete, Yngvild Kaspersen on location in Norway.

The standout feature of the upper is the seamless sock-like Primeknit upper with an exceptionally close-fitting top (just like a pair of socks) that helps reduce debris entering the top of the shoe. There is no tongue, the upper is all one piece and the laces pass through the upper via reinforced eyelets. Where the tongue would be there are reinforced raised areas of padding that remove pressure on the Navicular bone when tightening the laces. The top of this area is raised with the number 320 prominent – the weight in grams of a UK8.5.

The upper is relatively free of overlays with some reinforcement coming at the front for a toe bumper, the toe box is wide and spacious, and an orange area around the heel. The is a tab at the back which clearly shouts the ‘Parley’ element of the shoe. Below the stretchy shoe/ sock top, where the foot enters, the heel area is very well padded – arguably one of the most padded heels I have felt on a shoe.

Boost midsole is a wow! One thing adidas do know is road shoes and the responsive Boost has been hailed worldwide for its responsive feel, energy return and comfort. Here on the Terrex Two Ultra Parley that Boost is 23mm at the front and 29mm at the rear providing a 6mm drop shoe of floaty, cushioned bounce. You can see the 23/29 on the shoe embedded into a very prominent orange reinforced area that wraps around the shoe from two third back on the outside and beyond halfway on the inside of the shoe – this adds support and structure.

The outsole is made by Continental who make excellent rubber that really does provide great grip. The outsole covers the whole of the shoe with no visible inserts or inlays and the grip is made of well-spaced lugs that are not prominent. I don’t have an exact lug size, but they are almost certainly around 4mm. This helps to understand the shoes intended use: dry trails, single-track and yes, even some road.

I feel the shoes size large and gladly I had the option to fine-tune my sizing with the Terrex Two Ultra Parley. My first pair was a standard EU44/ UK9.5 which worked fine but given the option to try a EU43.5/ UK9, this is my preferred size. I believe my design for this is based on my comment below in ‘Notable Comments.’

UK9 is 335g.

IN USE

As stated, I am on my third pair of the Terrex Two Ultra Parley and over 1000 km’s of use. First and foremost, the upper is extremely durable. They have had a fair share of wet, ice, snow and mud and apart from them being engrained with dirt, there is no visible wear. I am impressed. That all important bend area behind the metatarsals when in the propulsive phase, looks like new… That is a rarity! Most shoes, no matter how good eventually show some failure here, not the Terrex Two Ultra Parley. The upper is one of the stars being recycled from Ocean Plastic and this may well be one of the attributes of why it is so durable? However, there is a downside… I think they arguably the hottest/ warmest uppers I have ever used. In winter, great, they have helped kept my feet toasty. But in Spring and Summer, the Terrex Two Ultra Parley is a really hot shoe.

The sock-like upper really is quite remarkable. You slide the shoe on like socks, adjust the upper section so that they sit firmly around/ below the ankle and wow, I have socks on! Standing up, you immediately feel the stack height and 23/29mm Boost cushioning compress under your weight – you immediately know the ride is going to be bouncy.

The lacing only has 4 eyelets on each side and gladly, they sit well away from the key flex point when in the propulsive phase and toeing off. Unlike conventional eyelets, they are not holes that you pass the lace through, they are like mini tunnels with an entry and exit point. There is no tongue making this sock-like fit the ‘most’ sock-like of any shoe I have tested. There are two reinforced areas that sit below the number 320 which are designed to take pressure off the Navicular bone when lacing up the shoes.

The toe box is wide and spacious and allows for plenty of toe splay with light reinforcement.

Boost cushioning is superb. As soon as you toe off, you feel the cushioning compress and propel you forward. As you land it repeats the process and before you know it, you are bounding down the trail feeling the benefit of the 23/29 energy return. Without doubt, the Terrex Two Ultra Parley is a shoe for hard trail that is not too technical. This is also confirmed by the excellent Continental outsole which has dry trail lugs.

NOTABLE COMMENTS

The Terrex Two Ultra Parley run like road shoes and as such, they just want to fly along without complication. Rocks are fine, tree routes are fine but once you get into constant technicality and direction changes, the Terrex Two Ultra Parley doesn’t handle this well. There are several reasons for this: 1. The stack height has you high off the ground and therefore you lose that close connection with the terrain. 2. While the sock-like upper is incredibly comfortable and awesome, the lack of structure and reinforcement does allow one’s foot to move, especially when the trail gets technical. 3. The lacing is great, but again, technical terrain shows a flaw in the shoes ability to hold the foot tight and secure, particularly around the instep. This is one area I need secure on technical terrain. 4. The wider toe box adds to the ability for the foot to move.

Running downhill, the cushioning is superb but again, the upper and lack of a firm hold, can allow the foot to move.

Going uphill, the hold from the heel is excellent.

With the above comments in mind, you may well think I am being negative of the Terrex Two Ultra Parley. No, not at all. It’s a great shoe BUT it has limitations and with 1000km in two pairs, I know what those limitations are, for me anyway.

I grab the Terrex Two Ultra Parley when I am off for a cruise like trail run on groomed single-track. I don’t own road shoes, and the Terrex Two Ultra Parley have been perfect for 10, 20, 30km or longer road runs. They are a great shoe for those easier recovery days but equally, they can really shift and create pace if you want them too. They are an excellent road-to-trail shoe but be warned, too much road will wear the Continental outsole down.

SUMMARY

Ultimately, with 23/29 Boost cushioning, a wide toe box, sock-like upper and the lacing system, the Terrex Two Ultra Parley is designed for long trail runs on non-technical terrain when comfort and good energy return is a primary concern.

RRP £160

Website here.

To clarify, the shoes were provided to test, as are all the shoes that I review. But this is not a paid review.

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. 

Please support me on Patreon HERE.

Follow on:

Instagram – @iancorlessphotography

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facebook.com/iancorlessphotography

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adidas Terrex Speed Ultra Shoe Review

I review a great deal of shoes. In the last 12-months alone, I have worked my way through over 20 different pairs and models. In all honesty, running shoes these days are generally all good. Yes, some are better than others but it’s all personal, what works for one, may not work for another. There are so many variables; drop, cushioning, support or the lack of it, toe box width, lacing, upper and I could go on.

Read about : How to find your running shoe size and fit

HERE

So, if the shoes are neutral, I am pretty much always able to run in the shoe irrespective of the toe box width and drop. Actually, I like switching drops and currently, I use 0 drop through to a very rare 12mm (which is. Winter stud) drop. In regard to toe box, if I am running on technical terrain, I much prefer a narrow/ precision fit which gives me an assured control, by contrast, when running longer and on less technical terrain, a wider toe box provides more toe splay and comfort.

I guess what I am saying, no one shoe does all things!

Recently, a couple of shoes have excited and the latest is the adidas Terrex Speed Ultra.

I first heard rumblings of this new shoe well over a year ago, good friend, Tom Evans and adidas Terrex athlete was involved in the design process and it was clear, via his results, that a fast, light and responsive trail running shoe was coming. A win at Tarawera in New Zealand and 3rd place at the iconic Western States set the stage. 

I have to say, I always love getting new shoes. Opening the box of the Terrex Speed Ultra was a real surprise, the colour way and look was really impressive.

Tom Evans

I messaged Tom, “I have got the Speed Ultra!”

“…they are 2 years in the making!! And one of the main reasons I joined Terrex! Hope you like them, I’m SO happy with how they turned out!” was the reply.

FIRST IMPRESSIONS

The colour way was an instant eye catcher (a black and white version is also available) with a mix yellow, greens, grey, black, white and a flash of pink. adidas list the colour as, Cloud White / Solar Yellow / Matte Silver.

Cloud White / Crystal White / Core Black

On the side is a ‘240’ which signifies the weight (typically for a UK8.5) and trust me, these are the lightest most ‘floaty’ trail running shoes I have had the pleasure to hold. Incredible!

The upper is seamless and like a fine sieve used in a Michelin star restaurant with minimalist overlay at the toe, the side and the heel. The drop is stated in the side, 8mm.

Inside the shoe, there is another layer which adds more structure, it’s super thin and its pattern can be seen from the outside of the shoe, particularly at the front where you see lines that move around to the side of the shoe.

The cushioning is solid at the front and as you move to the rear of the shoe, you get to see the ‘bubble’ like boost. ‘Lightstrike’ is written in the cushioning. Lightsrike provides energy return, cushions every stride and provides comfort over the long-haul of an ultra. Cushioning is 18mm at the front and 26mm rear – this is confirmed on the outsole along with the 2.5mm lugs.

The heel area is well cushioned, and the tongue is minimalist with holes all over to reduce weight and add breathability. It’s not a sock liner fit but it is attached at the sides which provides a more secure hold of the foot and instep.

Turning the shoe over, the outsole confirms the shoes intended use – hard, dry and fast trails. The Continental rubber has multi-directional 2.5mm lugs and in the middle, there is a cutaway for the ‘Torsion System’ which provides a thermoplastic arch bridging the heel and the forefoot assisting them to move independently and adapt to various surfaces.

IN USE

It’s just a wow! It’s been a long time that I have pulled on a shoe, run 12-miles off the bat and not taken the smile off my face because the footwear is just bouncing me and pulling me along and tempting me to run at a pace that I can’t maintain.

The Terrex Speed Ultra is quite simply stunning!

Fitting true to size, (I use EU44 272g) slipping the shoe on the toe box is that wonderful middle ground of having enough width to allow toe splay, but not so wide that you don’t have precision or control. Now of course, how the shoe fits does depend on the individual, but based on all my shoe reviews, the Speed Ultra is a wonderful middle ground.

Foot hold is superb, the thin tongue is padded enough for comfort but still allows for a great tight fit. The 6 eyelets allow for great lacing and hold particularly on the navicular bone. There are two ‘additional’ eyelets at the front to adjust lacing and at the top, there are the two additional eyelets that would allow lock-lacing or similar. The upper is extremely breathable.

The cushioning is immediately noticeable and although neutral, there does feel just a hint of support under the arch. It’s minimal! The Speed Ultra is not soft and squidgy, they somehow manage to balance soft and firm. Maybe this is the mix of boost and Lightstrike? The 18/26 cushioning is superb and still gives feel for the ground.

The shoe needed no bedding in, from the off they were comfortable and just felt superb. They forced me or influenced me to run with good technique and constantly they enticed me to go faster. It has been a long, long time that I have had a shoe that made me want to open up the throttle. Hitting the ground, the cushioning was firm but equally soft enough to propel me forward… Had I been told that this shoe had a super thin carbon plate inside, I would not have been surprised. The heritage of adidas making road shoes can be felt here in the Speed Ultra. After all, hard trail and single-track is very similar to road. The difference primarily comes with the outsole.

The outsole is by Continental and they make great rubber which really provides a secure grip in wet or dry. The 2.5mm lugs quite simply are for hard and dry trail, this is NOT a muddy trail shoe. As Tom Evans has shown, hard, fast and long ultras such as Western States are the terrain for the Speed Ultra. This shoe would be amazing for many US trails.

Road or hard trail, the Speed Ultra switches between the two seamlessly and in all honesty, if I was running a road race, the Speed Ultra would be my shoe. It’s that good! The Continental outsole also provides a little more security and grip. Now of course, I am not ‘competing’ for a win in a road race, so, the marginal gains from a specific road shoe may well prove a better choice. Tom Evans for example, after all he did run 63:14 for a half-marathon and I am sure he used a specific road shoe.

On trail, if it’s hard, rocky, tree routes or single-track, the Speed Ultra performs. The shoes fly along managing to provide precision and comfort all in a great package. The 8mm drop and cushioning provide all the comfort needed for a long day, hence the ‘ultra’ in the shoe title.

Ultimately, the Speed Ultra is one of the best shoes I have used in a long time.

SUMMARY

This is a glowing review. To clarify, the shoes were provided to test, as are all the shoes that I review. But this is not a paid review.

The Speed Ultra is one of the most exciting shoes I have used for some time. They put a smile on my face, and they tempted me to run longer.

Comfortable, secure and pleasure to wear. The Speed Ultra is going to be on my feet for any dry trail or road run for some time. On trail, the drop and comfort are perfect be that on gravel, path, hard pack single-track, rock or tree roots; wet or dry. However, this is not a shoe for mud or sloppy terrain… The outsole is not up to the job of gripping in soft stuff and for me, the cushioning would have me to high off the ground, I prefer to be lower and feeling the terrain when it is more challenging. Not a criticism of the shoe, just a clarification of how the Speed Ultra should be used.

*****

To clarify, the shoes were provided to test, as are all the shoes that I review. But this is not a paid review.

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

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Episode 203 – Jamil Coury

Episode 203 of Talk Ultra has a chat Jamil Coury about racing in Covid times. Speedgoat co-hosts.


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NEWS

  • Check FKT website for latest updates https://fastestknowntime.com/
  • La Sportiva VK Boa shoe review HERE
  • Moonlight head lamp review HERE
  • inov-8 Roclite Pro boot review HERE
  • Review of 2020 HERE
  • Icbebug Pytho 5 Review HERE
  • inov-8 Mudclaw G260 Review HERE
  • inov-8 G270 Long-Term Review HERE
  • Fuelling for a Multi-Day like MDS HERE
  • Episode 201 – Simen Holvik HERE
  • Winter Running – Hints n Tips HERE
  • Timothy Olson TCC2021 HERE
  • Icebug Route Winter Studded Shoe Review HERE
  • Haglöfs LIM Essens Jacket Review HERE
  • 12 – 24 Week Multi-Day Training Plans now available HERE
  • 100-Mile Training Plan now available HERE
  • The Ultimate Guide to Desert Multi-Day Racing (updated) HERE
  • Join the #FEB406 Challenge (run 406km in February) HERE

INTERVIEW : JAMIL COURY

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Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

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inov-8 MUDCLAW G260 Review

The name says it all, MUDCLAW, if you are looking for a shoe to handle soft, deep and slippery mud, then look no further. The inov-8 MUDCLAW G260 is for you…

BUT, before we go into what makes the MUDCLAW great, let’s have some perspective. This shoe needs perspective.

I often like to compare choosing a run shoe to cars. Going on a long drive with many hours and miles, you will no doubt want something a little more plush, relaxed and comfortable – a family car. Going off-road with mixed terrain, then maybe a 4×4. If going for spin on a summer’s day, feeling the wind in your air and the need for some speed and feel; maybe a sports car? And if you are going to go as fast as possible, want to stick to the ground and comprise comfort for speed and grip, then a Formula 1 is for you.

The inov-8 MUDCLAW G260 is a Formula 1 of run shoes.

If you are looking for a jack of all trades – the Mudclaw is not for you!

If you are looking for comfort for hours and hours – the Mudclaw is not for you!

If you are looking for insane grip in sloppy mud with an almost barefoot feel for the ground – the Mudclaw is for you!

The Mudclaw is a stripped back Formula 1 shoe for trails, fells and OCR racing. Running in the shoe reminds me of the early inov-8 posters showing a shoe tread on a foot.

inov-8 advert that really echoes the feel of the Mudclaw

The 8mm Graphene lugs are akin to football boots and hark back to what elevated inov-8 to a world-stage many years ago. Grip, grip and more grip. There is currently no other shoe on the market that has soft-ground grip that compares with the Mudclaw G260. One shoe comes close, the iRock3 by VJ Sport, but even the 6mm Butyl of the VJ does not claw and grip like the G260.

The Graphene outsole (renowned sticky rubber infused with Graphene) is now reaching many of the shoes in the inov-8 line-up and the recent success of the Terraultra G270 (here) has really turned heads. The G260 takes that Graphene and adds it to crazy lugs. So, is the grip between the G270 and the G260 comparable? Yes and no. The G270 grips incredibly on dry and wet trail, on rocks (wet or dry) but is compromised in mud as the lugs are only 4mm. With the G260, the grip in mud is incredible but with less overall contact points, the grip on wet rock is not as secure as the G270.

Quite simply, the G260 is for mud and lots of it!

When running off-road, particularly in mud, feel for the ground is important and inov-8 know this, they have therefore reduced the cushioning in the G260 to a mere 4.5mm at the front and 8.5mm at the rear. It’s almost like running barefoot. The principal is, the mud and soft-ground provides the cushioning and any additional cushioning would only compromise feel and responsiveness.

The 4mm drop, 6mm footbed and minimal Meta-Plate is ideal and in-keeping for the Mudclaw’s intentions; low to the ground and increased feel for the ground.

The upper has been reworked and like the Terraultra G270, it has a super-strong materials give high levels of durability and breathability which is proving to be a real plus with considerably less wear and tear over previous inov-8 uppers. The upper is also extremely breathable and this has an added bonus for water drainage.

As the name suggests, the weight is 260g in a UK8, so, they are super-lightweight.

Like many inov-8 shoes, the rear of the shoe has gaiter attachment points on either side to help keep out or reduce debris entering the shoes.

The fit is ‘1’ on the inov-8 scale and that quite simply means precision – no surprise for a Formula 1 shoe.

IN USE

I keep referring to a Formula 1 car and this is really important when explaining how the shoe feels. To drive a F1, you would have it toed out of the pit lane and then you would drive on the circuit. The Mudclaw is no different, you really want to put this shoe on at the trail head and run immediately off-road and in mud.

It’s hard for me to go directly to trail unless I drive there, so, even for a ‘normal’ run I will have a minimum of 1-mile of road or path. You can really feel that the shoe has little to no cushioning. It’s bearable for short distances but you really do need to keep to a minimum.

When in mud, the shoe is wonderfully at home. It grips when other shoes would not, you have a feel for the ground without compromise and the foot-hold is excellent from the lacing configuration. 

The upper is robust for the conditions and gladly drains water quickly. The overlays add structure and help hold the foot in place.

The Mudclaw is a narrow shoe and particularly narrower at the heal. Back to the Formula 1 scenario; this is a race shoe and as such some comfort is compromised. Think of a Ballerina, they would not walk around in ballet shoes, but when they perform they need a very specific shoe. The Mudclaw is the same.

Sizing leaves me with a question mark. I have been testing inov-8 for years and I am always a UK9.5. The Mudclaw feels a little too long for me in ‘my’ size but having said that, I have used them… Despite the narrow fit, I used a very thin Merino liner sock with a thicker Merino sock over the top to make some compensation. It has worked for me but I would recommend trying normal size and maybe a half-size smaller to be sure.

Back to the upper. The flex point (Meta-Flex with inov-8) in the propulsive phase is always a problem area in many shoes and in the Mudclaw the upper flexes differently, no doubt due to the material used.

At times it can feel as though there is a little too much fabric and this may cause a weakness at the bend point? With over 100km in the shoes, there is no wear showing. I will do a long-term update after 400km.

Heel box is minimal and it holds as one would expect but there is little cushioning comfort. Toe bumper is great and offers excellent protection.

The outsole is the hero of the shoe and the 8mm lugs are quite simply the best I have tried or used in mud. Give or take, there are 40 +/- lugs designed to claw into the ground and provide purchase on what normally would not be possible. This applies for soft-grass too. Despite the same Graphene as the G260, I found the hold on wet rock not quite as assured as the Terraultra G260. I put this down to less contact points. But then again, I need to clarify, this shoe is for mud!

IN SUMMARY

The Mudclaw is a shoe to be considered in addition to other shoes that you already own. It’s not a shoe that you can use for day-to-day running, it’s not even a shoe that you can use for trail runs. This shoe is for mud and mud alone. Yes, it can take a little hard-trail, yes it can take some rocks, wet or dry, and yes, you can run a little road to get to muddy trail but all times, you need to keep this to a minimum. It’s narrow, has a precision fit, offers a great feel for the ground and return gives you speed and grip.

If you want a shoe that does the above but has more comfort and has more flexibility then you need to look at X-Talon 260 which has a wider fit (4,) considerably more cushioning (6/16mm,) 8mm drop and still 8mm lugs.

It’s a shoe for mud…

Specs:

  • Fit 1
  • Drop 4mm
  • Footbed 6mm
  • Lug 8mm
  • 4.5mm front / 8.5mm rear
  • Graphene Grip
  • Meta-Plate Shank
  • RRP £140

To clarify, the shoes were provided to test, as are all the shoes that I review. But this is not a paid review.

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content.

Please support me on Patreon HERE.

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Andrea Huser, 2017 UTWT Champion dies while training in Saas-Fee

Transgrancanaria was a favourite race

The trail and ultrarunning world was shocked yesterday, Monday November 30th with the news that 2017 UTWT (Ultra-Trail World Tour) champion, Andrea Huser, was killed while training on Sunday November 29th.

Media resource, 20min.ch reported, “The sports scene mourns Andrea Huser: The athlete and mountain bike European champion from 2002 had a fatal accident while training in Saas-Fee.”

At Marathon des Sables, Morocco.

Rescue workers from the Saastal rescue station found the 46-year-old dead above Saas-Fee in the Oberi Schopfen area around noon on Sunday. Canton police in Valais, have reported, “she wanted to cross a stream several meters long while training. She apparently slipped and fell about 140 meters down a steep slope.”

Andrea, was reserved and avoided the limelight. She let her performances speak for themselves and her reputation within the sport of mountain, ultra and trail running was without compromise.

Gediminas Grinius, a friend and fellow competitor posted via social media, “I was lucky enough to call Andrea my dear friend & though it feels not fair to loose her so sudden and early, sooner or later we once again be playing together on the endless running trails!”

Known recently for exploits as a trail runner, Andrea was also a world-class mountain biker who In 2002, was crowned European champion and was Swiss champion in cycling marathon in 2004. Triathlon, cross-country skiing and of course running, her reputation was fortified in tough mountain races, “Give me steep climbs, technical trails and fast downhills” she told me on the finish line of Transgrancanaria.

“Many of us have had the privilege of meeting Andrea.  She won the UTWT title in 2017. A bright and discreet woman leaves us too fast”

Marie Sammons for Ultra-Trail World Tour via Twitter

“She was an extraordinary ultrarunner, some seasons she literally run everything, linking ultras every week. We’ll miss you Andrea. My condolences to the family and friends.”

Kilian Jornet via Twitter

Key results:

  • Swiss Alpine Davos 78km 2013 2nd
  • Eiger Ultra Trail 101km 2014 5th
  • UTMB 2014 7th
  • Transvulcania 2014 7th
  • Transgrancanaria 2015 4th
  • Eiger Ultra Trail 101km 2015 2nd
  • Swiss Alpine Davos 78km 2015 2nd
  • UTMB – TDS 2015 1st
  • Grand Raid Reunion 2015 3rd
  • Transgrancanaria 2016 2nd
  • MIUT 2016 2nd
  • Maxi Race Annecy 84km 1st
  • Lavaredo Ultra Trail 2016 1st
  • Eiger Ultra Trail 101km 2016 1st
  • Swiss Alpine Davos 78km 2016 2nd
  • UTMB 2016 2nd
  • Grand Raid Reunion 2016 2nd
  • Transgrancanaria 2017 2nd
  • MIUT 2016 1st 
  • UTMB 2017 2nd
  • Eiger Ultra Trail 101km 2017 1st 
  • Grand Raid Reunion 2017 1st 
  • Transgrancanaria 2018 2nd

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

Episode 199 – Hayden Hawks and Camille Herron

Episode 199 of Talk Ultra we talk with Hayden Hawks and Camille Herron who both won JFK50.

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NEWS

Check FKT website for latest updates https://fastestknowntime.com/

Kilian Jornet Phantasm article HERE

La Sportiva VK Boa shoe review HERE

Moonlight head lamp review HERE

inov-8 Roclite Pro boot review HERE 

Silva Trail Runner Free review HERE

How to choose a headlamp article HERE

Layered clothing article HERE

In other news…

INTERVIEW : HAYDEN HAWKS

INTERVIEW : CAMILLE HERRON

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Kilian Jornet #kilianPhantasm24h Part Two!

Kilian Jornet, Trofeo Kima 2014

On October 26th 2020 I released via this website that Kilian Jornet would take on a 24-hour run at the Måndalen Stadium in Norway on November 8th.

This post was news to the ultra running world and it created a stir. It was BIG news. Just the thought that mountain man, climber, skier, alpinist, explorer and adventurer, Kilian Jornet, would contemplate running around a 400m loop was, well, crazy!

Kilian ‘Skyrunning’ at the iconic Trofeo Kima.

My news was copied, posted, re-quoted, shared and many media took my content, provided no credit and then shared the story.

Ironically, the news was short lived. Kilian direct messaged me to say he was too injured to contemplate this and then said via social media:

“Wow! I was all the day out and saw this just now 😅 Thanks for the idea guys!! At the moment I’m trying to get back from a injury (literally did my first run since last weekend) but why not to try to run something that long in the future..”

Suddenly, all the media who had posted were left perplexed and while many supported my news, I received countless negative comments, questions and basically nasty comments. I think the assumption was I had posted fake news, to coin a phrase.

I had been with Kilian at Hytteplanmila 10km Road Race (HERE) where he ran 29:59 in his first ‘official’ road race. He told me of a niggling injury and that he would take a week off. In the following days (w/c Oct 19th), I heard news of the 24-hour attempt. This came from multiple sources, primarily athletes who were being invited to join Kilian on November 8th at Måndalen Stadium.

“In fact, the assault on the 24-hour challenge was scheduled for the first week of November, but Kilian was forced to delay it due to the discomfort that appeared after running his first 10 km race on asphalt, the Hytteplanmila, in 29 ‘ 59 ” in mid-October.” – Albert Jorquera writing for Runedia

It was difficult to confirm the story. That is until Sunday October 25th when a post on Norsk Ultra was made public. It was only a matter of time before this news became available for all.

I wrote my article HERE and reached out for quotes. The post once live went viral. I guess the rest is history… The announcement today by Salomon and Kilian is vindication, albeit the date of the event was wrong (injury doesn’t work to dates), of my original post.

*****

November 15th, Salomon and Kilian Jornet released simultaneously.

kilianphantasm24 announcement.

The date may have changed (due to injury) but the location and the concept remain the same. Kilian Jornet will run 24-hours on a track.

HERE

©Salomon

#kilianphantasm24

The release of the news by Salomon is extremely welcome and it so wonderful to hear the Kilian will push himself on a new stage. The original concept was an attempt to break the record of ultrarunnning legend Yiannis Kouros. The reality is 756 laps of a 400m track. Yiannis set the world record at 188.590-mile.

The event will take place at *Måndalen Stadium, and should have happened on the weekend of November 21/22 and as per my original post, the provision of +/- 2-days may need to be considered for weather. (*Lymbus who manage Kilian confirm the location to be Måndalen.)

Kilian writing on Facebook

The attempt has now been pencilled for Friday 27th November with a 1030 am start – to be confirmed! Weather looks cloudy with some sun but temperatures could drop to -7 if long term forecasts are to be relied on.

https://www.salomon.com/phantasm24.

Salomon say, “The start time of Kilian’s Phantasm24 challenge is slightly weather dependent…”

Currently, weather forecasts are very poor with 70/80% chance of snow and temperatures between -1 and -3 during the day, they would be much colder at night. The stadium Måndalen Stadium is outdoor and this in itself brings a whole new dynamic to any 24-hour should this be the confirmed location. Norway in November, minimal daylight and cold temperatures, this will be a tough 24-hour.

To follow all the health prevention measures against the Covid pandemic, the challenge will be closed to the public. But it will be possible to watch live HERE

Phantasm shoe – Kilian used this for the 10km road race.

Titled #kilianphantasm24 – the project will see Kilian push new personal boundaries and at the same time, provide exposure for the Phantasm shoe. I am currently aware (tbc) of several other high-profile athletes who ‘may’ join Kilian on the track, Didrik Hermansen, Simen Holvik, Sebastian Conrad and two more, Harald Bjerke and Jo Inge Norum I believe.

“My hopes are to set a new national record and to have the honor to run 24 hours with these fantastic people.” – Simen Holvik

Didrik Hermansen Oslo 2020.

“So, now we all know! Going to be exiting. I will do the 24h, zero degrees.. hopefully no wind!” – Didrik Hermansen.

For perspective, to break the Yiannis Kouros world record, any runner would need to be able to cover an incredible 7.875-miles per hour. Statistics show that from the ‘test’ run by Kilian earlier in August 2020 that this objective may be possible? He ran 84.89km in 5:58:13 with an average 4:13/km pace. The numbers speak for themselves, it’s a huge undertaking, especially on an outdoor tack. However, it is going to be fascinating to see what happens with each journey of the 400m.

“…and now I am super excited to test myself doing something that long (and far from what I like) but where I will learn so much and grow as an athlete. (And probably doing this 24h in a track because I love that pain feeling.)”

Kilian Jornet, Twitter

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

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Episode 198 – Mike McLean, Molly Bazilchuk and Jack Scott

Episode 198 of Talk Ultra brings interviews with Michael McLean, winner of the 120km Thailand by UTMB, Molly Bazilchuk who won the  first edition of the Rondane 100 in Norway and Jack Scott from the UK about his recent FKT.


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NEWS

Check FKT website for latest updates https://fastestknowntime.com/

Tim Tollefson and Nicole Bitter win at Javelina.

Pau Capell continued his personal projects and followed up UTMB and Trail Menorca solo by running in Tenerife starting at the sea, summiting Mt Teide and then dropping back down to sea level setting a new FKT 6:13:20 for the 55km route.

REVIEWS:

La Sportiva VK Boa shoe review HERE
Moonlight head lamp review HERE
inov-8 Roclite Pro boot review HERE

In other news…


00:11:11 INTERVIEW : MIKE MCLEAN

01:09:00 INTERVIEW : MOLLY BAZILCHUK

1:52:15 INTERVIEW : JACK SCOTT

02:22:06

Episode 198

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