Julien Chorier joins The Coastal Challenge 2022

Marathon des Sables

Former cyclist and triathlete, now inspirational trail runner, Julien Chorier will join the line-up of the 2022 The Coastal Challenge in Costa Rica.

It’s been a long-term project for Julien to join the TCC party, originally planned for 2020 then 2021, now Julien can make the dream a reality in ’22.’

With well over 10-years in the sport, there are few races that Julien has not participated in. Importantly, he has also won many… Way back in 2007 the Frenchman won CCC, in 2008 he was 3rd at UTMB, in 2009 he won the iconic Raid de la Reunion. 

9 Dragons, Hong Kong

What followed is a list of palmáres that are too long to list, key highlights being: 1st Andorra Ultra Trail 2010, 1st Hardrock 100 and Raid de la Reunion 2011, 1st UTMF 2012, 1st Andorra Ultra Trail 2013, 1st MIUT 2014, 1st EcoTrail Funchal 2016 and in and amongst all these victories are countless podium and top-10 places. Importantly, Julien has multi-day experience both at the iconic Marathon des Sables and MDS Peru.

Julien is an ambassador for the sport. Since 2014, he has been running and working for the HOKA brand, as team captain of the team trail. In addition to this, he has a ‘Middle Mountain Guide’ diploma and organizes and supervises trail courses, as he says, “It is a way to transmit my passion and my experience of ultra.”

The Coastal Challenge is excited to have Julien toe the line in Quepos come February 2022. One thing is for sure, Julien will bring a wealth of experience to the start line and doubt, in camp every night, he will pass that experience on to each and every participant.

“What a privilege to discover the world by running to discover myself, my limits and my feelings!”

– Julien Chorier

The Coastal Challenge

Irrespective of pace or effort, the Costa Rican coastline never stops providing inspiration. This is so much more than a race, It is a journey, a running holiday and a voyage of discovery. Friendships made in the rainforests, on the beaches and in the camps are ones to last a lifetime – the race is one of survival, perseverance and enjoyment in equal measure.

“This has been an incredible journey. It’s a stunning and magnificent part of the world and the course, terrain, views and the racing has been world-class. I have been blown away by everything – the final stage was just stunning and it managed to compress the whole TCC experience in just 22km. I will be back to TCC and Costa Rica one day, guaranteed!”

– Tom Owens, 2017 Champion

Hugging the coastline of the tropical Pacific, TCC is the ultimate supported multi-day experience that weaves in and out of the Talamancas; a coastal mountain range in the Southwest corner of this Central American country. Runners will cross rivers, boulder, swim through rivers, pass under waterfalls, survive long relentless beaches and finally finish in the incredible Corcovado National Park, a Unesco World Heritage site. The terrain is ever-changing from wide, dusty and runnable fire trails to dense and muddy mountain trails.

With two races available, an Expedition Run of 230km and an Adventure Run of 155km – TCC is a race not to be missed!

230km and 10.000m+

Join the race in 2022, February 5th to 12th, registration HERE

Please note, TCC requires full vaccination and documented proof will be required.

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

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Ultra Trail Snowdonia 2021 Summary #UTS

Josh Bakker-Dyos

Persistent rain, low cloud, poor visibility, mud, bogs, wet rocks, climbs and descents that made even the most adapted legs scream in pain, yes, that was Ultra Trail Snowdonia 2021.

Missing in 2020 due to the dreaded ‘C’ word, the UTS returned in 2021 to Capel Curig as part of the Ultra Trail World Tour and supported by Hoka One One to confirm the dream of Michael Jones of Apex Running – A big UTMB style weekend of racing in the heart of Wales.

VIEW THE IMAGE GALLERY

With distances of 50km, 100km and the whopping 165km, one word was touted pretty much everywhere all weekend, brutal! And it was… A savage weekend of racing but as Michael says, ‘beautifully beyond belief, savage beyond reason.’

Despite the rain, despite the lack of views, Wales was a stunning playground for trail running. Let’s be clear here, there is no ‘easy’ running at UTS. The 50km is a wonderfully challenging route that may well have surprised many with some of its technical challenges, particularly the climb from Ogwen up to Carnedd Dafydd, compensated for what could be then considered a ‘relatively’ easy run in to the finish via Lyn Cowlyd and Blaen-Y-Nant.

The 100km route followed the early miles of the UTS50 all the way to Pen-Y-Pass but then headed along the Miners’ Track for an extended loop to return via the Pyg Track heading off to Y Garn, a loop around Tryfan and then head up to Carnedd Dafydd via a different route to the 50km and then follow the same run in to the finish.

The 165km is well, just a monster! As expected, it created carnage amongst the competitors. It’s a relentless beasting of mind and body that passes through the whole of Snowdonia. The 100km and 50km routes all utilizing sections of this all-encompassing journey but only the 165km giving the full perspective of how beautiful and hard the Welsh mountains are. As with all races at UTS, it started and concluded in Capel Curig. Heading off to Blaenau Ffestiniog, Croesor it then picked up the 50km and 100km routes to Pen-Y-Pass. Nantmoor, Moel Hebdog, Llyn-y-Gadair and then after Yr Wyddfa it followed the Snowdon Ranger Path for an extended loop before returning via the Snowdon Massif and Pyg Track to Pen-y-Pass. From here, the 100km and 165km routes were identical all the way back to Capel Curig.

Tremayne Dill Cowdry summed it up:
“45 hours to do just over 100 miles and every minute of that was a hard slog.
Mountains, bog, wet rock, tough nav on a marked course, sleep deprivation, mist, rain and the terrain!! Very little was even runnable. I can’t imagine a 100 miler more difficult than that. Easily the hardest I’ve done and definitely the hardest in the UK. I was going ok although I would have happily dropped given the chance but my feet succumb to the permanent wet and I had to hobble the last 20-ish miles…

Stunning landscape

As with all races, someone has to cross the line first, and of course there was stunning performances all weekend. However, the real sense of achievement came firstly from toeing the line and being in with a chance of completing a journey. The second came from completing the journey. Every medal was hard earned.

Josh Bakker-Dyos

In the 165km event, Josh Bakker-Dyos lead from the start and while many expected him to blow up, so fast was his pace, he never did. He was relentless and consistent crossing the line in 28:51:43. It was easy to say, ‘he made it look easy!’ But for every other runner who crossed the 165km line, it was very clear, there was nothing easy on this route! Toby Hazelwood was less than 60-minutes behind in second, 29:45:17, another stunning run! Adam Jeffs rounded the podium with 34:09:54. Alice Sheldon and Becky Wightman were the only female finishers, 45:09:55 and 47:41:06 their hard-earned efforts stopping the clock – a brutal two nights and days out in the Welsh mountains. Only 32 completed the race.

Mark Darbyshire

The 100km route was won, but not dominated by Lakeland 100 champ, Mark Darbyshire ahead of Josh Wade and Jack Scott. Mark crossed in 14:25:47 with 14:33:36 going to second. It was 16:02:05 elapsed before the third crossed the line. Sarah Stavely (21:41:03) won the women’s race with Kajsa Holgersson and Julie Finn in second and third, 22:28:49 and 22:44:53.

Lauren Woodwiss

Harry Jones flew around the UTS 50 route and looked as strong at the finish as when he started, his 6:13:33 a stunning time. It was 6:56:54 elapsed before second place Will Simmons crossed ahead of Spencer Shaw in 7:14:53. Lauren Woodwiss, like Jones, lead from the start dictating an excellent pace over the 50km route and completed her journey in an excellent 7:54:18. Celia Waring placed second in 8:36:18 and Abelone Lyng from Norway, moved up from outside the top-10 women to eventually finish third in 8:43:16 after sprinting for the line ahead of Jenna Shail who was just 13-seconds behind.

VIEW THE IMAGE GALLERY

Abelone Lyng

As Capel Curig slowly returned to some normality on Sunday, it was easy to see that the UTS will become one of the ultimate trail running events not only in the UK but the world. It may not have all the glamour and glitz of Chamonix and the UTMB. It’s a much more grass roots event, some would say a ‘true’ trail running event. Ultimately though, Wales was the hero of the weekend offering stunning routes. This landscape combined with the vision of Michael Jones of Apex Running and a team of dedicated volunteers and supporters will make UTS a ‘one to do!’ However, if you are thinking about the 165 event? Think long hard and without doubt, train hard, it’s a beautifully brutal beast.

‘beautifully beyond belief, savage beyond reason.’

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

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Hoka One One ZINAL Shoe Review

Having avoided Hoka One One shoes since 2012 (long story, but insight here) I was tempted to try the Torrent 2 based on the number of recommendations and discussion telling me that ‘this’ is the least ‘Hoka’ like shoe out there… Basically that meant, less cushioning, less stack height and a more conventional run shoe feel.

I was impressed. The Torrent 2 really was a revelation and over recent months has become a shoe I have used on a regular basis, be that for road, trail, or fastpacking trips. At the time of writing the Torrent 2 review, I was aware of the ‘ZINAL’ and the pre-release articles mentioning that it would be Hoka One One’s lightest shoe with an emphasis on agile and fast. It was shoe designed around the iconic Sierre-Zinal race that takes place in August each year – A fast mountain race that requires athletic speed but mountain ability.

The arrival of the ZINAL confirmed all the PR. Light and low-profile with an obvious intention to run fast but with some comfort.

I have to say, the ‘Blazing Orange’ would not be my colour way of choice, but hey, it’s only a colour, the ‘Atlantis/ Outer Space’ option is far more appealing.

Atlantis/ Outer Space’ option is far more appealing.

At £140 the pricing is maybe a little on the expensive side, but in all honesty, run shoes these days all hover around this mark. Using recycled materials and boasting a Vegan tag, the ZINAL also ticks some very important boxes.

THE SHOE

The ZINAL is floaty light with a weight of 242g for the standard UK8/EU42 size. It’s neutral, responsive and has a 5mm drop. The side of the shoe boasts some statistics – S32x19|V490|W242. These stats refer to: Spring Measurement, Volume and Weight. While it’s not new to see stats on a shoe, volume and spring measurement are new on me and while I could understand volume, I did wonder what the spring measurement would mean?

Spring measurement is, ‘Curvature of the shoe, measuring how high the heel and toe are off the ground.’ So, for the ZINAL, this means 33mm at the rear and 19mm at the front. Don’t get confused here with drop, this does not mean a 14mm drop!

Volume relates to the total amount of foam in the midsole.

One would assume that the higher the volume number, the more cushioned or plush the shoe would be, but that is not the case. Here in the ZINAL, the shoe has a lower profile keeping you, the runner, closer to the ground and the cushioning is firmer to provide a more efficient and speedier propulsion in the transition phase. When I wrote about the Torrent 2, the thing I liked and others liked was a firmer ride; less Hoka like, by that I mean less plush and bouncy. Here in the ZINAL that is taken one step farther and the ride is firmer. So, it’s fair to assume that plush ride Hoka fans will find the ZINAL less appealing. Whereas, by contrast, runners who prefer a more conventional shoe who have wanted to try Hoka, will find the ZINAL appealing.

Designed to be minimalist, the ZINAL has very much a race shoe feel. It has enough cushioning and protection from PROFLY but not any extra that would add weight or bulk. Turning the shoe over, this is reflected in the outsole, it has the tried, tested, and loved by many, Vibram Megagrip 4mm lugs, BUT this version does not go the full length of the shoe. It protects the front and the rear. This is called ‘Litebase’ and quite simply it’s lighter because there is less of it.

The mesh upper is similar in many ways to the Torrent 2 and is very breathable and light but at the same time durable. Made from recycled content, it ticks the eco box.

Toe box is a 3 on a 1-5 scale, 1 being precision and 5 being wide. For me it’s ideal and in keeping with a faster shoe. There is a little toe protection from a bumper, but it is minimal.

A gusseted tongue and molded EVA sock liner give a nice firm hold of the foot around the instep which for me is very important, especially when running faster on trails. You want the shoe to hold you with little or no unwanted movement. The heel box is snug and secure.

IN USE

Sizing for me was true to size, I use an EU44/ UK9.5 for all my shoes and the ZINAL slipped on perfectly, however, they do fit different to the Torrent 2 by way of comparison. There seems to be just a little extra length. So, make sure you try them on, a 0.5 size smaller may possibly be better for you?

The low stack height is obvious immediately, and they feel like a normal cushioned shoe, considerably less Hoka like.

The upper is noticeably durable but light and breathable. At times I felt as though there is a little too much shoe, almost too much fabric. It’s hard to pinpoint, but all shoes fit differently and here in the ZINAL I felt there was more internal shoe volume, particularly in comparison to the Torrent 2.

The sock liner and gusseted tongue work well and pulling the laces tight, they give a secure and firm hold of the foot. For me, based on the comment above, I tightened my shoe a little more than normal, however, I did not have the need to lock lace – gladly the additional eyelets are available should that be required.

The tongue is protective but minimal.

The outsole as mentioned has 4mm Vibram Megagrip lugs which are tried and tested, but they are only at the front and the rear of the shoe. The middle of the outsole has no protection or grip and therefore, if running on technical trails such as tree roots or rocks, this can be noticeable as often the whole grip of an outsole can be required, so, this is a consideration. Most definitely, the ZINAL is designed for fast running on trails (and even road) of a less technical nature, just like you would see at the Sierre-Zinal race. When running faster with a mid to forefoot strike, the ZINAL works wonderfully and the Megagrip does its job just as you would want and expect.

The PROFLY cushioning is firm, and noticeably firmer than the Torrent 2. On my first run, I was surprised at how firm this shoe felt. But, when you pick up the pace, that firmness kicks back and propels you forward in the propulsive phase. This is just like how carbon works in carbon shoes – you get nothing for free, the speed and extra propulsion comes from you investing in the shoe with energy and cadence. The spring measurement on the side of the shoe, 33×19, I am still not sure what it means and how I equate those measurements to the feel of the shoe when running? Again, by way of example, on the Torrent 2, this figure was 33×16. 

Volume of the ZINAL V490 and again, by comparison, the Torrent 2 is V395 – I have some confusion here as my understanding of shoe volume related to the following: “If your foot has a medium to wide width and/or a high arch, you have a high-volume foot. If you have a narrow, slender foot and a flat arch, you have a low-volume foot.”

I do wonder sometimes that we can be given too much information. The volume and spring measurement are new on me, and I have been testing shoes for 10-years. I have never worried about these measurements but now I have them, I want to know what they mean and how I should read them so that I can relay back to you…. It’s left me perplexed. Am I over thinking it? Ultimately is the shoe good? Is it fast? Is it light? Is it responsive?

Spring and volume confusion aside, the ZINAL is light and responsive with an excellent ground feel and the 5mm drop works well with the shoe’s intentions. It’s a shoe that wants to go faster and most certainly, the faster you go, the better the shoe feels.

Based on the above, for me, the ZINAL is not an everyday shoe. It’s a shoe for those faster tail runs when you want to push the pace, either in shorter training sessions or if doing intervals or hill work. Of course, the ZINAL will excel in trail races (that are not too technical) when long-term comfort is sacrificed for speed. So, for many, this would be a great shoe for up marathon distance. Beyond that, would depend on the runner, their needs, their run style and so many other factors. For example, Hoka One One athlete, Camille Herron, toed the line at Western States 100 in a pair of ZINAL.

It’s too early for me to comment on the longevity of the shoe, I have no reason to think that the upper will have any issues, my Torrent 2 have had 400km+ and are still going well. However, the stripped back outsole by Vibram may well not last as long? If you take the ZINAL on rough and technical trails, I most definitely can see potential issues with the middle of the outsole and its lack of protection. I will feedback on this.

CONCLUSION

The ZINAL is a notable shoe for Hoka One One and a welcome step in a different direction for the brand who has a reputation for plush ride, arguably, the Torrent 2 paved the way. This is a shoe that is designed for fast (faster) running and as such, it’s not an everyday shoe, at least for me it’s not! The cushioning or lack of it (for some) causes me no issues, actually, the ZINAL for me is still one of the most cushioned shoes I am using, many of my other shoes have considerably less.

The outsole restricts the ZINAL use, and it is most definitely a shoe for groomed trail, smooth single-track and road. A good road to trail shoe! It can handle some technical trails, but I do believe that this will greatly impact on the life of the shoe, particularly from the outsole perspective. Avoid mud, it just would not be able handle it!

Torrent 2 Review HERE

A fun shoe, a fast shoe, a light shoe that brings a smile to your face when pushing the pace or when racing. But, if you want a shoe with many ZINAL similarities and more flexibility, the Torrent 2 is worth looking at IMO. Ultimately, the Torrent 2 and ZINAL would work well together and for me, I’d have the Torrent 2 as an everyday shoe and the ZINAL for sessions and racing.

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

Follow on:

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Hoka One One Torrent 2 Cotopaxi Review

It has been a long time since I slipped on a Hoka One One shoe, 2012 to be exact. Almost 10-years ago and while I could write my reasons why, it’s best to read an article I wrote called ‘Minimal, Maximal or the curious question of Drop.’

So, I have avoided Hoka One One and maximal cushioned shoes ever since.

However, when you test as many shoes as I do, I didn’t feel it correct to neglect Hoka, however, I also felt that no matter how impartial I try to be in reviews, I probably would still hark back to the pre 2012 days.

Recently though, I have been testing and loving trail shoes that somehow sit in the middle, not minimal cushioned or maximal, a nice middle ground. Currently, my shoe of the year is the adidas Speed Ultra and if I need more grip and an aggressive outsole, the VJ Sport Ultra has been great.

With this in mind, many who read my reviews suggested that I try the Torrent 2 by Hoka One One. One thing was universal in all the comments, ‘It is the least Hoka like shoe that they do.’ Ultimately, it is the least cushioned and bouncy shoe currently in the Hoka range… This may change with the new ‘Zinal!’

So, Hoka One One in Norway kindly sent me a Torrent 2 Cotopaxi to test. Cotopaxi is ‘an innovative outdoor product and experience that funds sustainable poverty relief, move people to do good, and inspire adventure.’

Cotopaxi joins brands, such as Hoka One One to ultimately ‘do good’ and they bring some unique colours and designs. The Torrent 2 celebrates the kaleidoscopic wonders of this great planet in what I think is a stunning colour way, but I fully appreciate that this may well be too much for some. I love the uniqueness, the colours, and the fact that the left shoe is different to the right.

THE SHOE

Love the colour way, it’s a winner for me.

The Torrent 2 is light, 278g from an UE44/ UK9.5.

The tongue is well padded and comfortable, the lacing excellent and additional eyelets exist should you need to lock lace or similar.

The upper is extremely durable and yet breathable using a mesh upper that utilises recycled post-consumer plastic waste to make a Unifi REPREVE yarn. Reinforcing exists to help protect the foot but there is little to no toe protection.

Heel box is padded and holds the foot well with no slippage when climbing.

The outsole is a nice middle ground trail grip that is extremely comfortable on dry trails and road but yes has enough grip when the trails become sloppy. The lugs are multi-directional which work exceptionally well and even on wet rock, the grip has been reassuringly good.

Toe box is on the wider side and allows good toe splay and comfort over longer distances. On a 1-5 scale, 1 being narrow, the Torrent 2 is a 4 for me.

Cushioning is somewhat a revelation, and, in all honesty, I expected to not like the feel or the ride. I was completely wrong. The Torrent 2 feels nothing like the Hoka’s I used pre 2012 and I understand why many say, ‘It is the least Hoka like shoe.’ The cushioning was firmer, had less roll and quite simply provides wonderful comfort over any distance. Cushioning is PROFLY.

The footprint of the shoe is wider, and this helps compensate for additional stack height reducing any inward or outward roll, and thus provides more precision and stability when the trails become more technical. The reason I defected from Hoka was I got way too much roll from the super soft cushioning and maximal nature of the shoes – note here.

IN USE

Well, I never thought I would be writing this, but, the Torrent 2 has become a real favourite shoe and has been in a regular rotation with my adidas Speed Ultra, which I love! The Hoka and adidas are in many ways similar but at the same time, very different. The adidas without doubt better on more technical terrain and excellent if not superb on the road.

The Torrent 2 is just a great everyday shoe that works on most terrain and provides comfort over short or long distance. The landing and cushioning from PROFLY is excellent and the propulsive phase are not lacking. There is a firmer feel to the Torrent 2 and I can anticipate that Hoka One One fans (who like the maximal bounce) will find this shoe maybe not to their liking. For me, it’s perfect!

A neutral shoe it allows my foot to respond to the terrain in a natural way and the shoe has great response, the 5mm drop adds to that ‘at one with the ground’ feel despite this being a more cushioned shoe with 18mm at the front and 23mm at the rear. The female version has less cushioning, 16/21 and I applaud Hoka for understanding that women need their own specific shoes, not smaller versions of the men’s shoe. Roll is present, especially when on rocky terrain, tree routes and so on, however, it’s completely manageable and within parameters I would want and expect from a shoe with more cushioning. The wider footprint goes a long way in providing more comfort and less roll. There is no rock plate in the shoe and in all honesty, I found no issues or problems. My regular trails are littered with rocks, tree roots and demanding sections. Nothing came through to impact on my foot.

On a scale of 0-100% for rigidity, I would say the Torrent comes in around the 50% mark offering reassured comfort that sits in a perfect middle ground. By contrast, the adidas Speed Ultra is considerably more flexible sitting around 75/80%.

The outsole I am assuming is ‘in-house’ but does have some resemblance to Vibram. Apparently, the outsole has been re-worked from the original Torrent and while not mega aggressive, it performs exceptionally well on most terrain but excels on dry trail. The grip works well in soft ground but if heading into muddy terrain, you will no doubt need a more aggressive outsole. Some compromise comes on wet rock.

Fit for me was excellent providing plenty of toe room and the lacing held my foot well. They are true to size.

The upper is a little hot, especially on hot days and in the wet, I found that the shoe drained well but the upper did retain some water.

CONCLUSION

Everything is personal and I love the Torrent 2, I will be clear, I didn’t expect to! I like them ultimately because they are not what I expected, and I am used to from a Hoka One One shoe. They are firmer, lower to the ground, provide adequate cushioning and allow great comfort over any distance and pretty much any terrain. They are a great everyday shoe.

If I wanted to race or move faster, I wouldn’t choose the Torrent 2. It’s a comfort shoe that allows me to relax and run over longer distances on easier run days or say when running a multi-day or fastpacking.

Hoka One One fans will like the Torrent 2 less I would imagine, I can hear the comments now, ‘They are too firm for me!’ And that is fine! What I like is that Hoka as a brand are looking beyond what made them famous (max cushioning) and understanding that many people (like me) would like what Hoka offer in a more ‘conventional’ shoe, the Torrent 2 does just that! The new Zinal looks to take that to a new level and I am keen to try them.

The collaboration with Cotopaxi is excellent providing a great colour way and some extremely positive ‘eco’ stats. Cotopaxi ties its earnings to impact by allocating 1% of annual revenues to the Cotopaxi Foundation. The foundation awards grants to outstanding nonprofit partners who are carefully selected for their track records at improving the human condition and alleviating poverty. This year alone, the foundation has awarded 34 individual grants, directly assisted 750,000 people, and donated over $400,000.

Ultimately, a great all-rounder over any distance and any terrain. It’s not a perfect shoe but there is little to complain about. It has low weight, comfort, toe splay and cushioning. Compare this to the latest Trailfly from inov-8 and we are talking chalk and cheese, I still struggle to understand how inov-8 could make such an awful shoe… But then again, some love it. Ultimately though, is the Torrent 2 as good as the adidas Speed Ultra? It’s a tough call, but the Speed Ultra would be shoe of choice. Trust me though, I have been rotating between the two and I am happy in both. The adidas gets the nod as it has more response, feels nimble, lighter and makes me want to run faster. If I compared the shoes as though cars, the Speed Ultra is nimbler and faster, say a Porsche, whereas the Torrent 2 is more a family saloon designed for comfort over the long haul, say a Toyota Rav4.

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

Follow on:

Instagram – @iancorlessphotography

Twitter – @talkultra

facebook.com/iancorlessphotography

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Andrea Huser, 2017 UTWT Champion dies while training in Saas-Fee

Transgrancanaria was a favourite race

The trail and ultrarunning world was shocked yesterday, Monday November 30th with the news that 2017 UTWT (Ultra-Trail World Tour) champion, Andrea Huser, was killed while training on Sunday November 29th.

Media resource, 20min.ch reported, “The sports scene mourns Andrea Huser: The athlete and mountain bike European champion from 2002 had a fatal accident while training in Saas-Fee.”

At Marathon des Sables, Morocco.

Rescue workers from the Saastal rescue station found the 46-year-old dead above Saas-Fee in the Oberi Schopfen area around noon on Sunday. Canton police in Valais, have reported, “she wanted to cross a stream several meters long while training. She apparently slipped and fell about 140 meters down a steep slope.”

Andrea, was reserved and avoided the limelight. She let her performances speak for themselves and her reputation within the sport of mountain, ultra and trail running was without compromise.

Gediminas Grinius, a friend and fellow competitor posted via social media, “I was lucky enough to call Andrea my dear friend & though it feels not fair to loose her so sudden and early, sooner or later we once again be playing together on the endless running trails!”

Known recently for exploits as a trail runner, Andrea was also a world-class mountain biker who In 2002, was crowned European champion and was Swiss champion in cycling marathon in 2004. Triathlon, cross-country skiing and of course running, her reputation was fortified in tough mountain races, “Give me steep climbs, technical trails and fast downhills” she told me on the finish line of Transgrancanaria.

“Many of us have had the privilege of meeting Andrea.  She won the UTWT title in 2017. A bright and discreet woman leaves us too fast”

Marie Sammons for Ultra-Trail World Tour via Twitter

“She was an extraordinary ultrarunner, some seasons she literally run everything, linking ultras every week. We’ll miss you Andrea. My condolences to the family and friends.”

Kilian Jornet via Twitter

Key results:

  • Swiss Alpine Davos 78km 2013 2nd
  • Eiger Ultra Trail 101km 2014 5th
  • UTMB 2014 7th
  • Transvulcania 2014 7th
  • Transgrancanaria 2015 4th
  • Eiger Ultra Trail 101km 2015 2nd
  • Swiss Alpine Davos 78km 2015 2nd
  • UTMB – TDS 2015 1st
  • Grand Raid Reunion 2015 3rd
  • Transgrancanaria 2016 2nd
  • MIUT 2016 2nd
  • Maxi Race Annecy 84km 1st
  • Lavaredo Ultra Trail 2016 1st
  • Eiger Ultra Trail 101km 2016 1st
  • Swiss Alpine Davos 78km 2016 2nd
  • UTMB 2016 2nd
  • Grand Raid Reunion 2016 2nd
  • Transgrancanaria 2017 2nd
  • MIUT 2016 1st 
  • UTMB 2017 2nd
  • Eiger Ultra Trail 101km 2017 1st 
  • Grand Raid Reunion 2017 1st 
  • Transgrancanaria 2018 2nd

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

Marco De Gasperi – Vertical Kilometer® Hints ‘n’ Tips

Marco De Gasperi is a legend of mountain and skyrunning. At the age of 16, he gained special permission to climb Monte Rosa with ISF president, Marino Giacometti and a small group of like-minded adrenaline filled mountaineers. It was the birth of skyrunning.

The rest his history, Marco has six-world titles and a list of victories from races all over the world. Marco, now in his 40’s is still respected as one of the best in the world. He recently became a Skyrunner World Series champion and has established FKT’s (fastest known times) on iconic courses such as Monte Rosa where his career began.

Courmayeur – Monte Bianco record

Marco De Gasperi – Sognavo di diventare Skyrunner

Born in Bormio (in the Alps) a hub for skiing and short-track skating. Living at 1200m provided Marco with advantages, however, he only found his true vocation at the age of 10-years. Marco had tried to adapt to Skiing and Nordic-Skiing, but the reality was soon apparent; he just didn’t have the required size and bulk required to be competitive. The mountains beckoned; daily he would leave his town, climb a peak and return in the same day.

At 12-years old, an encounter with Adriano Greco introduced him to the winter past time of ski-mountaineering and running in the summer months. Adriano was very much a coach and guide for Marco. He was introduced to a new aspect of sport, a new discipline that was at its birth. In 1994, Marco ran his first Vertical Kilometer® on the slopes of the Matterhorn.

Marco’s knowledge is invaluable in regard to mountains and how to run them! With the announcement of a new VK2 circuit HERE in Italy, it is timely that Marco provides some ‘hints and tips.’

Hints and Tips

Do you do any specific training for a Vertical Kilometer®?

My season always includes mountain races and races with plenty of climbing, so, I like to devote myself with specific training in the gym to build strength. For example, I use leg extension, leg press and other exercises such as squats. I also do up and down reps on a large box (60cm high), this is great for strength and endurance. It is also important to apply yourself outside and of course finding a steep incline of 30% and running at a smooth and consistent pace is ideal; it’s difficult to run all the way but I always try.

The Vertical Kilometer® is very demanding and runners incorporate different techniques to reach the summit in the fastest and most efficient way. Hands-on-knees and ‘poles’ are two methods; do you have a preference?

Application very much depends on the individual needs and demands of each runner and the course. For example, you will find many VK specialists come from a Ski-Mountaineering background and therefore they are very well adapted and practiced with the use of poles. Certainly, when slopes become much steeper, poles offer an advantage as they help balance the center of gravity and thus provide a more advantageous position. In principal though, I prefer to try and run!

Aerobically it is very easy to just ‘tip over the edge’ with a VK, do you have any special techniques in training to help to pace yourself?

You need to train and understand the muscular and mental aspects that are required to race a VK well. The correct pace is easy to find if your mind is prepared for the challenge ahead. Take long hills in training at an easy pace, try to keep running and enjoy the process, have fun! If I don’t have the possibility to train on long steep climbs, I like to find a short hill that is steep, and I do reps at a faster pace than racing… I walk back down to allow recovery and then repeat.

Walking for many will be a key element of a successful VK. I am well aware that you will try to run as much as possible. However, do you practice walking?

Long and steep mountains are very difficult, it’s all about efficiency and yes, sometimes it is far more efficient to walk. It’s about balance; I run for as long as possible, but a good climber knows when to switch to maintain rhythm and speed. You want to avoid building up too much lactic acid. I consider myself to be a good ‘walker’ and I am happy to switch as and when required. As for practice, no not really, just go out in the mountains and hike. It’s a perfect way to combine fun and training.

You have already mentioned indoor training and strength work. Have you ever trained on a treadmill and what about core and stability training?

Core and stability are very important, without doubt it provides benefits. Every week I do 3-4 sessions of five key exercises to work on this. In regard to a treadmill; it’s not the best way to train for a VK but maybe you have limited options? It can obviously be better than nothing. Just make sure you have it at an incline and work hard.

In regard to particular VK training, is it better to train on shorter or longer mountains; do you have a preference?

I have many years in the sport, in my opinion; I think that too many long mountains are not good for the specific demands of a VK. In particular, as a race approaches keep sessions in the 30 to 50-minute bracket.

Other than yourself (obviously) who do you regard to be the best runners at the VK distance?

You are very kind! I am going to split this. Urban Zemmer with poles, Berny Dermatteis without using poles and Valentina Belotti. I guess it comes as no surprise that these runners are all Italian, but the records show that they have the fastest times.

Finally, Marco, if you had to provide three invaluable tips for running a Vertical Kilometer® what would they be?

  1. Do 6-7 reps 3 times on a trail that is not too steep, rest by walking down.
  2. Make sure you have easier days between hard sessions
  3. To race and perform well on race day, your legs must be very relaxed and recovered.

Please support this website. I believe everyone deserves to read quality, independent and factual articles – that’s why this website is open to all. Free press has never been so vital. I hope I can keep providing independent articles with your help. Any contribution, however big or small, is so valuable to help finance regular content. Please support me on Patreon HERE.

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First published January 2014

Episode 170 – Mike Wardian #fktisrael and Kaytlyn Gerbin

Episode 170 of Talk Ultra is here… We bring you a full and in-depth interview with Michael Wardian after his stunning FKT on the Israel National Trail running 631-miles in 10 days 16 hours and 36 minutes. We also speak with Kaytlyn Gerbin after her excellent podium at Transgrancanaria.
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NEWS
MIKE WARDIAN SETS NEW FKT
Read the full story and view the images HERE
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Interview with MIKE WARDIAN
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JORDAN FKT
Dan Lawson and Robbie Britton set new FKT in Jordan 650km in under 10-days
BEHIND THE ROCKS ULTRA
Courtney Dewaulter is at it again…. She won the 50 miler in 7:23. Erik Sandstorm won the men’s race in 8:07. Results https://ultrasignup.com/results_event.aspx?did=56961
NINE TRAILS 35 MILE
Jim Walmsley broke a long-standing CR of 5:35 (1994) to cross the line in 5:12 with Jared Hazen and Kris Brown 2nd and 3rd in 5:23 and 5:29.
Taylor Nowlin won the ladies race in 6:24 ahead of Sandi Nypaver in 6:30 with Jade De La Rosa 3rd in 6:58.
CHUCKANUT 50K
Hayden Hawks took the win in 3:37 getting over his Transgrancanaria disappointment ahead of Tyler Sigi and Rob Watson. Kathryn Drew took the womens top slot ahead of Kim Magnus and Emily Hawgood 4:26. 4:29 and 4:38 respectively.
TRAIL DU VENTOUX 46k
Marc Lauenstein won in 3:39 ahead of Thibaut Garrivier and Nicolas Martin. Rachel Drake and Blandine L’Hirondel had a battle for 1st with Rachel taking the edge by 40-seconds. Sarah Vieuille was 3rd – 4:28, 4:28 and 4:30.
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Interview with KAYTLYN GERBIN
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03:20:30
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Mike Wardian #FKTIsrael 2019 – THE STORY OF THE FKT IN IMAGES

Michael Wardian from the USA just set a new FKT for the Israel National Trail. The time, 10-days, 16-hours and 36-minutes (time to be confirmed.)

I was fortunate enough to be asked by Mike and the creator of this crazy idea, Zoli Bihari of Canaan Running Adventures, to document this incredible journey in images and words.

Daily I produced a morning video and chased Mike around the FKT route for up to 20-hours a day to capture images. In the 10-days, I managed to cover 187km’s with Mike and I have to say, I was there at the most remote and beautiful sections of the course. It pays to commit oneself to the process to get the really special images that I seek and desire.

My daily reports typically have 6-10 images selected, but as you can imagine, I captured so many more. So here, I want to summarise the most incredible 14-days of my life with a summary of the journey.

The journey started in Eilat and Mike, Zoli, Erez and myself did a couple of days preparation to get everything ready for the epic journey. This allowed us to check out early sections of the course and do some pre FKT photography.

HIGHLIGHT SLIDESHOW PORTFOLIO

→ HERE ←

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PREPARATION DAY 1

PREPARATION DAY 2

DAY 1 FKT

“The landscape and scenery on day-1 is truly spectacular. Beauty comes at a price though – the trails are technical, have plenty of climbing and descending and then add some intense heat.”

 

READ THE DAILY REPORT HERE

 

DAY 2 FKT

“The highlight of the day came at Vardit and Barak Canyons. These natural wonders are truly spectacular, no, mind-blowing.”

 

READ THE DAILY REPORT HERE

 

DAY 3 FKT

“Mispe Ramon towards Mahmal Fort brought a conclusion to the day at 1900 hours. Mike, as the previous day, was robot like. He maintained a consistent pace. At no point did he say he was tired, on the contrary, at all times, he said, ‘I feel so good!’”

 

READ THE DAILY REPORT HERE

 

DAY 4 FKT

“Karbolet is known as the hardest and most challenging section of the whole Israel National Trail – it was stunning. It involved a long technical climb with rungs, exposure and technical sections. Once at the summit, the trail went up and down, mostly on angled slabs of rock. To the left, a drop to the valley below.”

 

READ THE DAILY REPORT HERE