Lucy Bartholomew to join The Coastal Challenge 2019 #TCC2019

The Coastal Challenge #TCC2019 reaches new heights in 2019 celebrating 15-years of amazing racing.

The 14th edition completed in February 2018 at the stunning Drake Bay on the Osa Peninsula, was a record breaker! Yes, course records were broken daily and Tom Evans and Ragna Debats elevated the overall CR’s to a new level obliterating the 2017 records set by the UK’s Tom Owens and New Zealand’s Anna Frost.

Time never stands still and to make the 15th edition of TCC extra special, race director’s Rodrigo Carazo and Sergio Sanchez have confirmed a new incentive for the 2019 edition of the race.

A reward purse totaling $8000 will be up for grabs as the race gets underway from the stunning beaches of Quepos, Costa Rica.

Each day, $250 will be up for grabs should the stage course records be broken by the fastest male or female. For example, in 2018, Tom Evans broke every stage record, that would have been rewarded with a $1500 payout!

Should the overall course record set in 2018 by Tom Evans or Ragna Debats be broken in 2019, $2500 will be on offer. Should the male and female record go, that is a payout of $5000.

Feel like a fast start to 2019? It comes no faster than the 15th edition of The Coastal Challenge!

BIG NEWS to kick off the previews of the 2019 race, Lucy Bartholomew, will join the Pura Vida party as we roll out from the Pacific Ocean come February 2019.

Lucy is a rising star of the ultra-trail world and the Salomon team. She has an infectious smile, a bubbling personality and an abundance of natural born talent that will no doubt set the trails on fire as she makes her way over 234km’s of Costa Rican rainforest, beaches, waterfalls, river beds and dusty fire trails.

Lucy started running to spend more time with her Dad and going against the wishes of her father, she toed the line of Australia’s only multi-day race, the 250km Big Red Run aged just 17-years! She won it! What has followed is an inspiring journey. Earlier in 2018 she placed 3rd at the iconic Western States in the USA.

Over the coming days and weeks, we will introduce you the elite runners that will toe the line of the 2019 TCC by asking them the same fifteen questions:

What attracts you to Costa Rica?

I went to Costa Rica when I was in year 10 at high school and did some community service and trekking there. I fell in love with the culture, the people, the landscape and the food!

This is the 15th edition of the TCC, a special one – what do you know about the race?

I have followed this race for a few years and watched friends and team mates run for a full week through some hot, wet and challenging conditions. I know that it is really demanding, it builds a real community and it’s a lot of fun!

Heat and humidity will play a major factor in the race, how do you plan to adapt?

I am pretty OK with heat living in Australia and with the lead up to Western States later in the year it will be good for my body to be in these conditions.

Ragna Debats and Tom Evans set incredible course records in 2017. There is prize money available for a new CR in 2019 – does that motivate you? Can you break the record?

Of course! I want to give my best but for sure it doesn’t define my experience or enjoyment of being allowed this opportunity to see this area again.

Multi-day racing brings many different challenges to a single-stage race – what are you most looking forward to? What are you most fearful of?

I have done 2 other multistage races being the Big Red Run in the Australian outback and the Transrockies race in the USA. In the Big Red Run, I remember on day one crying in my tent because I didn’t think I could complete the challenge but each day I got up and stood on the start line and I got stronger each day. I think looking after the body is always difficult to make sure it can be in its best form to start each day.

The elite line-up is incredible for 2019, you will need to be in the best shape, does that excite you?

I think it makes the running really exciting and the time at camp even more fun, a lot of these people are my good friends, so it will be nice to share this adventure with them.

February is early in the season, what will your winter training look like, so you will be ready for February?

For me I will be coming out of summer in Australia, so I am pretty lucky and at a bit of an advantage here! Through the Australian summer I have little plans to race after a big year, I just want to get into that groove of training and getting strong again!

I am sure you have looked at past editions of the race, viewed the stages, the profile – it is a tough race that suits a rounded athlete. You need to be able to climb, descend, handle technical trail and run on the flat – where will your strengths be?

I think this year I really focused on the flatter running for the races I chose to run and so my speed on the flat is good and with some time in the European alps this year my climbing is good too… downhill and really technical… not so much!

What experience do you have of multi-day racing?

As I said previously, I have done 2 other multistage races being the Big Red Run and the Transrockies with a race bib, as well as participating as a guest and for media purposes at the Transalpine race in Europe.

Racing starts very early in Costa Rica, with the sun! An early finish allows for relaxation on the beach, you can even have a beer – combining racing and relaxation is a key of TCC. It is a ‘Pura Vida’ race – tell us about your hopes and desires for the 2019 edition.

I really want to enjoy this balance of running hard and then resting harder. I want to bring out my best, have some fun, challenge myself and others, eat a lot of fruit and smile so much my face hurts more than my legs.

What three music choices would sum up your racing style?

Ed Sheehan

Lukas Graham

Jess Glynne…. Chilled out.

Tell us about your nutrition and hydrations strategies for the race?

I will be using a mix of CLIF bar products for my nutrition along with checkpoint food and Precision Hydration for the electrolytes which will be key under this big sun. My strategy is to eat and drink regularly.

Tell us about key equipment such as shoes and apparel that you will use?

I haven’t fully committed to my apparel for this race but maybe something like the Salomon Amphib with the light weight/ water draining and good footing! I think my clothing will be anything light weight and Salomon, a Suunto watch and some Le bent socks…. I think that’s all my sponsors 😉

Feel free to tell us something, anything!

Totally honored to have been contacted by the team of this race and Ian, delighted to explore more of the world and stoked to get back to this countries fruit supply.

Tell us about your greatest achievement/ result in 2018?

Finishing Western States 100 in 3rd female.

Please list a summary of your career highlights for 2017 and 2018:

2017- Ultra Trail Australia 100km- 1st place

2017- TDS 120km- 5th place

2017- Ultra Trail Cape Town 100km- 1st place CR

2018- Shotover moonlight marathon 42km- 1st place CR

2018- Ultra Trail Australia 22km- 1st place CR

2018-Western States 100mile – 3rd place

*****

TCC as it is affectionately known is a multi-day race starting in the southern coastal town of Quepos, Costa Rica and finishing at the stunning Drake Bay on the Osa Peninsula. It is an ultimate multi-day running experience that offers a new challenge even to the most experienced runner. Taking place over 6-days, the race hugs the coastline of Costa Rica, travelling in and out of the stunning Talamanca mountain range. Even the strongest competitors are reduced to exhausted shells by the arrival of the finish line due to the combination of technical trails, dense forest, river crossings, waterfalls, long stretches of golden beach, dusty access roads, high ridges and open expansive plains.

*****

You can read and view images from the 2017 edition HERE and the 2018 edition HERE

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The Coastal Challenge 2018 #TCC2018 – Stage 6

The 2018 The Coastal Challenge today came to an end on the stunning beaches of Drake Bay on the Osa Peninsula.

Tom Evans and Ragna Debats are the champions after a masterclass of multi-day running. The duo obliterated the 2017 records set by Tom Owens and Anna Frost. I think it’s fair to say, these records may be around for while!

The 22km final day is a stunning day, starting and finishing on Bahia Drake, the loop is like a mini Coastal Challenge all compressed into one stage. Waterfalls, rainforest, plantations, dusty fire trail, water crossings, beaches, coves and the stunning Pacific as a backdrop as the runners make the way to the finish.

Tom Evans wanted the course record and he ran today, once again with Hayden Hawks. The duo worked together, creeping in under the 2-hour mark and securing a place in history. Tom Evans as the champion and Hayden Hawks as the 2nd. Any other year and Hawks would be the champion, but as the American said, “Tom has been on fire and I have tried to push but really, I have been holding on!’

Previous TCC winner and course record holder Michael Wardian finished 3rd overall and then the battle for first Costa Rican was on – Erick Aguero dominated the day.

For the ladies’ it was a neutral day with the top-3 ladies running together for much of the stage. Finally, Ragna Debats finished hand-in-hand and third places Suzanna G finished 3rd.

The line was full of emotion as an epic journey has come to an end. The 2018 TCC will go down in history as the fastest ever.

2019 will see the 15th edition of the race and I believe we can expect something special!

For now though, it’s all about Evans and Debats celebrating victory. This evening, the awards will take place on the beach with a roaring camp fire.

What else would you expect?

PURA VIDA

 

  1. Tom Evans 1:59:54
  2. Hayden Hawks 1:59:55
  3. Erick Aguero 2:00:26
  4. Neruda Cespedes 2:09:09
  5. Michael Wardian 2:10:48

 

  1. Ragna Debats 2:27:57
  2. Ester Alves 2:27:58
  3. Suzanna Guadarrama 2:34:38
  4. Shannon Colley 3:08:39
  5. Kerri Treheme 3:09:35

 

OVERALL GC

 

  1. Tom Evans 21:44:11 new CR
  2. Hayden Hawks 21:48:36
  3. Michael Wardian 25:17:42
  4. Erick Aguero 25:36:15
  5. Neruda Cespedes 25:39:00

 

  1. Ragna Debats 26:14:39 new CR
  2. Ester Alves 29:59:42
  3. Suzanna Guadarrama 30:41:30
  4. Mirta Reaple 35:08:36
  5. Josephine Adams 36:07:38

 

Full results at www.webscorer.com

Follow the action as the race unfolds #TCC2018

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The Coastal Challenge 2018 #TCC2018 – Stage 5

It was the longest day of the 2018 The Coastal Challenge and what a day! At 49km, it was only 2km more than day 3 but coming at this stage in the race, it is always a tough one.

Runners departed camp via bus for a short bus ride to the Sierpe river and ferry across to the other side. At 6am, they were released.

Much of today’s race is very runnable on wide gravel roads. It’s great if you can run, but for many it’s a tough day. Technical forest sections break up the distance and then at 2/3rd of the race covered, the runners turn right on a loop around the peninsula, running through forest trails before finally dropping to the beach and taking a small boat from one side to the other.

Once across the estuary, it is 10km’s to the line with the final sections on the beach to the stunning Drake Bay.

It was a day of drama, Tom Evans and Hayden Hawks pushed all day, but they are so matched – Tom the obvious stronger runner who is marking Hawks to ensure he retains his winning margin. To watch these two has been seriously impressive, the pace mind-blowing and the old course record is being obliterated. With the finish in sight, Hawks lifted the pace, Evans was having none of it and they started a 400m sprint… Evans pulled away winning by 4 seconds, 4:32:14 to 4:32:18. It’s fair to say, that Tom Evans will be the 2018 TCC champion with a new course record!

Ragna Debats, just like Evans and Hawks has been an unstoppable force, not only in the ladies’ race but the men’s. She has pushed and pushed, obliterated all previous times and in the process has smiled all the way to each line. Today she went through a bad patch, rallied and then crossed the line 7th in 5:34:55.

The big news of the day, unfortunately, saw Marcus Scotney and Jorge Paniagua (3rd and 4th on yesterday’s stage) disqualified from the race after missing a key right turn and missing many challenging kilometers. They were told to turnaround and retrace; they chose not to. I will provide more information on this when I have spoken to Marcus and Jose. In simple terms they were out of water and would have needed to run another 20km before reaching an aid station, in this heat, that would have been reckless. Needless to say, both are devastated with the mistake!

This mistake has opened up the general classification and of course the first place for Costa Rican runners.

Erick Aguero seized the opportunity finishing 3rd on the stage in 5:11 and Michael Wardian 4th in 5:16. Neruda Cespedes was 5th in 5:19.

Suzanna Guadarrama has been a revolution as the days have passed and she has become stronger. Yesterday she finished with Ester Alves, today, she pulled away and finished 2nd lady in 6:01. Ester Alves, ever the fighter, pushed hard and finished 3rd, just over 20 minuses later in 6:22. Josephine Adams had a great day finishing 4th and that will certainly move her up the rankings!

Tomorrow’s stage is a loop of Drake Bay – it’s a stunning day that manages to encompass all the previous 5 days in one loop.

  1. Tom Evans 4:32:14
  2. Hayden Hawks 4:32:18
  3. Erick Aguero 5:11:46
  4. Michael Wardian 5:16:22
  5. Neruda Cespedes 5:19:18
  1. Ragna Debats 5:34:55
  2. Suzanna Guadarrama 6:01:34
  3. Ester Alves 6:22:51
  4. Josephine Adams 7:17:23
  5. Kerri Treheme 7:36:16

Full results at www.webscorer.com

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The Coastal Challenge 2018 #TCC2018 – Registration

The 2018 The Coastal Challenge finally got underway today in San Jose, Costa Rica, as over 100 runners from all over the world came to packet pick up and registration for the 14th edition of the race.

As always, it was a mixture of nerves and excitement. The journey ahead, a stunning 6-days running along the coast of Costa Rica from Quepos to the iconic Drake Bay. Flanked on the right by the Pacific and to the left, the amazing Talamanca mountain range. 

The 2018 edition of the race has all the makings of a classic. The men’s field is arguably the best ever with Michael Wardian, Hayden Hawks, Tom Evans, Marcus Scotney and Timothy Olson.

Michael Wardian, TCC champion and previous course record holder.

Hayden Hawks 2017 CCC champion.

Tom Evans 3rd at MDS Morocco 2017 and 4th at CCC and the Eiger Ultra Trail.

Marcus Scotney winner of the Dragons Back Race and Cape Wrath Ultra.

The ladies’ race is equally impressive with past winner Ester Alves returning joined by Ragna Debats, Inge Nijkamp and Josephine Adams.

Ester Alves 2016 The Coastal Challenge champion.

Ragna Debats Skyrunner World Series champion 2017.

Inge Nijkamp 11th at MDS Morocco 2017.

Josephine Adams 6th at MDS Peru 2017.

Full preview HERE

Tomorrow, Sunday 11th, runners depart for San Jose at 0400 for the 4-hour journey to the coast.

It’s a tough day as the race will start at 0900, the sun will already be high in the sky and the heat intense. It’s a day when patience can prevail.

Follow the action as the race unfolds #TCC2018

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The Coastal Challenge 2017 #TCC2017 – Stage 6 Results and Images

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The Coastal Challenge 2017 Stage 6

 Words by Niandi Carmont. Images by iancorless.

Stage 6 of the Costa Rica Coastal Challenge 2017 aka “The Victory Loop” and epilogue to this gruelling multi-stage race started at 7am. This allowed runners to “sleep in” a little and get some much-needed recovery before the final sprint, well, half-marathon! The final stage is always relatively short and the same distance for Adventure racers and Expedition racers. Many take this final stage easier as by now the podium is pretty much a given. An additional incentive for outsiders to race this stage is guaranteed free entry to the winners of the stage in both the male and female categories as well as the winners of each category in the overall ranking. Some race volunteers also like to join the runners in the final stage as a gesture of solidarity.

The final stage is a 22.5km representation of the whole race with all the course elements thrown in: fire trail, a magnificent waterfall, forest single track, more fire trail, beach sections and a lovely final 10km along the coast on shaded single track. With a total ascent of 613m and a descent of 613m it is a relatively flat route. There was only one CP at 22.5km.

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In the men’s race Tom Owens seemed relaxed chatting at the start and not too worried about racing. However, Chema Martinez had his race hat on and chased Tom right from the start egging him on. Chema had a lot of competition from the Costa Rican field especially Jorge Paniagua who joined the two leaders, battling it out with them until the final sprint, where the 3 finished barely a second of each other. Jorge was first, Chema second and to complete the stage podium Tom Owens in third position. The Costa Rican was delighted to gain a free entry to the 2018 edition and has promised to be back to perform even better.

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Tom Owens was crowned 2017 champion and he was full of praise and thanks on the line.

“This has been an incredible journey. It’s a stunning and magnificent part of the world and the course, terrain, views and the racing has been world-class. I have been blown away by everything – the final stage was just stunning and it managed to compress the whole TCC experience in just 22km. I’d be back to TCC and Costa Rica in a shot…!”

 

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In the Ladies field, Ester Alves led the race. She needed to defend her third overall position. Anna Comet followed in hot pursuit to secure her second position and not allow Ester to close the gap significantly in the overall ranking. Anna Frost then also gave chase. Elisabet Barnes who had intended to race this final stage very hard in a final attempt to secure third felt weak and tired.

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“It is only once I started running hat I realized my body wasn’t responding and that my legs were tired, that I wasn’t going to be able to race this stage. I decided to consider it a recovery run as my focus is on MDS 2017 which is just round the corner. I didn’t want to compromise that.” – Elisabet Barnes

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Ester Alves did not even stop at CP1 to replenish her water supply or drink.

“I decided not to waste any time and ran the last 10km full out skipping the water point. I had run out of water before the checkpoint but I wanted to gain as much time as possible. I squeezed my soft flasks but not a drop came out. It’s amazing what the body can do in this heat, running 10km on no water, when the mind takes control and the drive is there. I must admit it was very stressful and it is a stage I enjoyed last year.” – Ester Alves

 

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Ester led the race until the finish completing this stage 9min ahead of second lady Melanie Langer (9th lady overall) who had run hard all day.

iancorless-com_tcc2017-6894In the closing stages, Melanie took advantage of Anna Comet and Anna Frost relaxing into the finish with Sondre Amdahl – the trio had run together from half-way enjoying the closing of the 2017 TCC. Elisabet Barnes completed the stage 30min behind Ester in 6th place and 4th overall.

Anna Frost cried on the shoulder of race director, Rodrigo Carazo on the finish line.

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“This has been a tough and emotional journey, three editions in the making. I have finally won the race I love! I think I am done, not with Costa Rica or the TCC – next time I will be watching and spectating though!” – Anna Frost

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Nothing can describe the emotion of those finishing this tough 6-day multi-stage in some of the hardest conditions or the joy and relief on their faces on being handed the well-deserved finisher medal. Many have vowed to return to better their performances or tick this box.

Tonight (or this afternoon), will be a long night of post-race celebration where the ‘Imperial’ will flow and spirits will be high.

PURA VIDA!

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Stage Results

  1. Jorge Paniagua 2:04:33
  2. Chema Martinez 2:04:38
  3. Tom Owens 2:04:39
  4. Neruda Cespedes 2:06:54
  5. Erick Aguero 2:14:39
  1. Ester Alves 2:23:41
  2. Melanie Langer 2:32:17
  3. Anna Comet 2:32:33
  4. Anna Frost 2:32:36
  5. Katelyn Tocci 2:43:03

Overall Results for the 2017 The Coastal Challenge #TCC2017

1. Anna Frost (New Zealand): 27:08:41.9
2. Ana Comet (Spain): 27:58:45.4
3. Ester Alves (Portugal): 28:23:27.5
4. Elisabet Barnes (Sweden): 29:00:11.2
5. Katelyn Tocci (Costa Rica): 29:58:09.1

1. Tom Owens (Scotland): 22:29:45.2
2. Chema Martínez (Spain): 23:43:36.2
3. Jason Shlarb (USA): 24:34:57.0
4. Eric Agüero (Costa Rica): 24:57:43.3
5. Pancho Pinto (Ecuador): 25:43:37

All results HERE

You can also follow on Facebook HERE, on Twitter HERE and on Instagram HERE

#TCC2017 concludes, get ready for #TCC2018

Want to run The Coastal Challenge 2018 #TCC2018 entries will open soon through the official channels. Only go to http://thecoastalchallengecostarica.com

Stage Results

  1. Jorge Paniagua 2:04:33
  2. Chema Martinez 2:04:38
  3. Tom Owens 2:04:39
  4. Neruda Cespedes 2:06:54
  5. Erick Aguero 2:14:39
  1. Ester Alves 2:23:41
  2. Anna Comet 2:32:33
  3. Anna Frost 2:32:36
  4. Katelyn Tocci 2:43:03
  5. Ana Gonzales 2:43:31

Overall Results for the 2017 The Coastal Challenge #TCC2017

1. Anna Frost (New Zealand): 27:08:41.9
2. Ana Comet (Spain): 27:58:45.4
3. Ester Alves (Portugal): 28:23:27.5
4. Elisabet Barnes (Sweden): 29:00:11.2
5. Katelyn Tocci (Costa Rica): 29:58:09.1

1. Tom Owens (Scotland): 22:29:45.2
2. Chema Martínez (Spain): 23:43:36.2
3. Jason Shlarb (USA): 24:34:57.0
4. Eric Agüero (Costa Rica): 24:57:43.3
5. Pancho Pinto (Ecuador): 25:43:37.

 

The Coastal Challenge 2017 #TCC2017 – Stage 5 Results and Images

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The Coastal Challenge 2017 Stage 5

 Words by Niandi Carmont. Images by iancorless.com

Stage 5 of The Coastal Challenge saw the main players battling it out in a final attempt to put minutes in the bank and secure those desired podium places. The day started at 4.45am for the Expedition runners as they were transported by buses to the depart on a river in Sierpe. The Adventure Category runners who were doing 30km of the 49.8km course were taken by bus to catch a speedboat and were dropped of near CP2 on the course. None of the adventure racers complained about the “shorter” distance as they enjoyed a 40min speed boat ride with a refreshingly cool breeze and the river spray hitting their faces. Flocks of white egrets nestled in the trees along the early morning river and amphibious “Jesus Christ” lizards skimmed the surface of the river.iancorless-com_tcc2017-5096

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For most it was a tough day out. The course had been slightly modified since last year to include a longer beach section and more technical accents and descents in the jungle.

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The race started with the first steep technical climb in jungle undergrowth to 300m, followed by an equally steep descent requiring runners to watch their feet for twigs, branches, vines and overhanging branches. Instructions had been given prior the race not to grab hold of anything like trees covered in sharp needle-thin thorns. After the first climb, a little respite at CP2 (Sabalo) at 17km and then a second very steep climb to 450m in 3km, followed by a 400m drop in 1.5km. After the technical jungle sections, the runners reached CP3 at 24.6km. Then the course took the runners on some fire trail, a right turn back into the jungle and climbing and descending in what felt like a pressure cooker in suffocating heat. After this followed a soft sand shaded track along the beach, a river boat crossing, some road and a finish on the beach in Bahia Drake Bay.

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In the men’s race today, Tom Owens and Chema Martinez took the lead and ran together until CP1 at 9.1km. Chema had to work very hard on the technical climbs which are Tom’s playground. Tom seemed surprisingly relaxed as he ran effortlessly and nimbly up the dense jungle climbs. Chema, in contrast was struggling to keep up with the British fell-runner.

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“I wanted to start strong today. The two climbs were tough. I was chasing Tom. This stage had changed since last year. I tried to keep up with Tom but I was battling. I kept him in sight until 25km and then I lost him.” – Chema Martinez

 

The two lead runners were followed closely by Jason Schlarb, who confessed he was starting to feel tired today and hadn’t got the miles in in preparation for the event. “I’ve been focussing mainly on ski-mountaineering.” Tom maintained the lead until he crossed the finish line, with Chema in second position and Jason Schlarb 3rd. Costa Rican Erick Aguero, who had been vying for 3rd   overall, finished 6th today, which counts him out for a podium finish as tomorrow’s stage will be 22km. 2nd in the overall ranking, Chema was happy with performance today, feeling that he has improved his technical running skills since the 2016 edition.

“From September to December, I suffered from a Baker’s Cyst, due to a knee problem. I had it treated but could train properly for 3 months. Basically, I’ve had 2 months training for this and it’s a mix of road and trail, shorter distances and track. A week before the Costa Rica Coastal Challenge I did a half-marathon in Barcelona in 69min so I am back on form, even though my training hasn’t been race-specific.” – Chema Martinez

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In the Ladies Race, Anna Frost and Elisabet Barnes set the pace at the start. Elisabet decided to run hard from the beginning and dropped Anna Frost before CP1. At CP2 she was well in the lead, followed by Anna Frost and Anna Comet. A few seconds at CP3 (24.6km) and Elisabet, who was still in the lead, was off looking very fresh and focussed. She was followed by Frosty, who spent a bit more time at CP3 before picking up her pace. Ester Alves entered CP3 looking surprisingly relaxed and unhurried.

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“It was a good stage. I spent my time chatting with a Spanish runner from Barcelona. I was feeling very positive. Just after 25km, I overtook Anna Comet who was suffering from a stomach bug, then Anna Frost and on the second technical climb I overtook Elisabet. Raphael and I decided to nail it on the beach section. At the end of the beach section, we came to the river-crossing and had to wait for the boat which had just left to ferry across some runners. I was so frustrated thinking of all the time I was losing. We made it across and nailed the last 12.5km to the finish. I am happy with my second place today. I don’t think I was particularly strong today. I just think the other girls were tired. I’ve learnt to pace myself since my cycling days.” – Ester Alves

The overall podium for the men is almost a foregone conclusion with tomorrow’s stage being only 22km. In the Ladies Race, Anna Frost has a comfortable lead, as has Anna Comet who is second. The battle will be on for 3rd as Ester Alves has an 8min lead over Elisabet Barnes. Tomorrow Elisabet intends to wear her racing hat and attempt a podium finish.

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Overall Results

  1. Anna Frost 24:36:05
  2. Anna Comet 25:26:12
  3. Ester Alves 25:59:46
  4. Elisabet Barnes 26:08:10
  5. Katelyn Tocci 27:15:05iancorless-com_tcc2017-5285
  1. Tom Owens 20:25:05
  2. Chema Martinez 21:38:58
  3. Jason Schlarb 22:10:43
  4. Erick Aguero 22:43:04
  5. Francisco Pinto 23:27:30

Daily reports and images will be posted on this website when connection allows.

You can also follow on Facebook HERE, on Twitter HERE and on Instagram HERE

#TCC2017

The Coastal Challenge 2017 #TCC2017 – Stage 1 Results and Images

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Katelyn Tocci – Costa Rican hope for the podium.

Costa Rica Coastal Challenge 2017 Stage 1

Words by Niandi Carmont. Images by iancorless.com

Heat, humidity and hydration warnings by race director Rodrigo Carazo signified the start of the 2017, The Coastal Challenge – now in its 13th edition.

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Time to cool off…

The start of the 34.6km stage was on the beach at Playa Del Rey and temperatures were already soaring at the start where runners were dropped off after a 4-hour coach journey from San Jose. The first section until CP1 was extremely runnable fire trail. Many were still adapting to the heat and held back. In the men’s race Tom Owens set the pace and literally flew off with Chema Martinez hot on his heels. Local Costa Rican Erick Aguero followed closely. In the ladies’ race Elisabet Barnes took the lead on the flat fire track followed by Anna Frost and Ester Alves.

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Elisabet Barnes

 “It was hot,” Frosty said. “I felt terrible for the first 15km on the flat. As soon as I got to the hilly section I felt better. I didn’t want to blow up this first day so I tried to be sensible. Elisabet was flying on the flat section. I passed her after CP1 on the climb. We ran together until CP2 and then I took the lead.”

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Ester Alves and Anna Frost chasing Elisabet Barnes

Ester Alves tried to keep up with the duo but was soon outdistanced and overtaken by Anna Comet who looked surprisingly fresh and unaffected by the heat. Frosty won the first stage with a 5min lead on Elisabet Barnes with Anna Comet completing the podium just 2min behind. Ester, defending 2016 ladies’ champion was philosophical about her performance today: “It’s the first stage and I had lots of fun. You have to accept the good days and bad days. I haven’t planned a strategy for tomorrow. Just having fun.”

With her preference for technical courses and Stage 2 being much more challenging than today, she will be well-served. Elisabet Barnes was very happy with her second place and performance, finishing the stage 25min faster than last year.

After CP1 the course took the runners on a climb to 450m with a drop down to CP3 at 29.5km. It was on this first climb through jungle undergrowth and in the heat that novices and those who had forgotten to pace themselves and keep body temperatures down, really suffered.

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Tom Owens in the early km’s after the start

In the male field Tom Owens had a small gap over Chema Martinez . At CP2 and 19km into the race, they arrived together and then Chema, who boasts a 2:08 marathon PB, left first in an attempt to open a gap on the fast and dusty roads on what was very runnable downhill fire trail. However, Tom managed to hold on to him.

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Chema Martinez

The course ended with a hilly single track shaded forest section, a little add-on and alteration introduced in 2016 to avoid too many fire trail and road sections with a slippery river crossing to the finish near Rafiki Lodge along the river.

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Jason Schlarb in the rainforest section after CP1.

The day was not without incidents with Jason Schlarb missing a turning and the bright pink fluorescent markers just after CP3 and taking a big detour, adding on extra miles and ending up 25min behind Chema Martinez. “I was 10min behind Chema Martinez and in 3rd place after CP3,” Schlarb said. “I missed the turning and ran along the river and back onto the road where a crew vehicle pointed me in the right direction. I went from 3rd to 6th position and lost 15min.” 2015 ladies’ champion, Veronica Bravo from Chile also went off course after CP3 finishing 6th today.

Veronica Bravo just before going off course.

Veronica Bravo just before going off course.

Men’s Race

Tom Owens: 2:44:45

Chema Marinez: 2:47:55

Erick Aguero: 3:02:42

 

Women’s Race

Anna Frost: 3:14:49

Elisabet Barnes: 3:19:24

Anna Comet: 3:21:23

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Daily reports and images will be posted on this website when connection allows.

You can also follow on Facebook HERE, on Twitter HERE and on Instagram HERE

#TCC2017

 

Sondre Amdahl to run The Coastal Challenge, Costa Rica 2017

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Sondre Amdahl has been on a roll over the last couple of years running amongst the best runners in the world and on multiple occasions excelling with a string of consistent top-10 results.

I guess the journey really started in 2013 when Sondre placed 4th at Transgrancanaria (83km) and 10th at the CCC. In 2014, the Norwegian runner stepped up to the 125km Transgrancanaria race and placed 6th, ultimately though, the breakthrough came at UTMB with 7th followed up with a 17th at Diagonale Des Fous on Reunion Island.

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The 2015 season started really well with 2nd at Hong Kong 100 and moving up the ranks to 4th at Transgrancanaria – a race Sondre loves! 15th at Western States and 4th at UTMF set the stage for 2016 and Sondre’s first attempt at the Marathon des Sables were he placed 9th amongst a highly competitive field.

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“The main attraction with multi-day racing is that it takes longer! When I travel to the other side of the world, I appreciate that I can run more than “just” one day and night, like in a typical 100-mile race,” Sondre said when I asked about the appeal of the Sahara and MDS. “Multi-day racing also has a more social component to it. You meet more people and have more time to hang out with other passionate runners. Even though I’ve only done one multi-day (MDS in April 2016), I find the lack of recovery/rest and sleep makes it hard to race hard day-after-day.”

Sondre is hooked on the format of racing for multiple days and as I write this he will head to Oman to race in the desert once again. However, never wanting to stand still and always seeking a new challenge, the heat, humidity and varied terrain of Costa Rica has lured Sondre to The Coastal Challenge.

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“Of course it will be a challenge, but I love technical trails and elevation change. I think the TCC course fits my running style. I guess the biggest challenge for me will be the heat and the humidity! I live in one of the coldest places in Norway and in February the normal day temperature is minus ten/fifteen degrees Celsius. My heat acclimatisation needs to be spot on.”

Costa Rica is a magical place and so different to the baron almost featureless Sahara Desert. Having raced all over the world in stunning mountains, on isolated trails, I wondered why Costa Rica?

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“The tropical climate is a real attraction and it will be a great escape from the cold winter in Norway. I can’t wait to run on the beach and explore the rainforest.”

Renowned for specific training, Sondre often immerses himself in preparation for a key race. As he has said, Norway is not going to be the ideal training ground for a high humidity race with hot temperature. It begs the question, how will he train for this challenge?

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“TCC will be my main target for the winter/spring of 2017. I have had a couple of easy months after a DNS at the Tor des Géants (due to injury). I feel a lot better now, and I’m ready for a good block of training in November, December and January to prepare for TCC. This training block will include the Oman Desert Marathon and a 115 km race in Hong Kong on New Years eve. I will also train in Gran Canaria in January to be 100 percent prepared for TCC.”

Sondre is leaving nothing to chance and peaking for a race so early in season can bring with it some risks, the racing calendar is so full and long now! I therefore wondered what his 2017 schedule will look like and I also wondered would we see more multi-day races?

“I will run the Jungle Ultra in Peru (6-day stage race) in early June of 2017. And may be Hardrock? I also want to go back to Reunion and run the Diagonales Des Fous in October.”

Marathon des Sables provided an opportunity to test equipment and be self-sufficient. It’s a challenge carrying ones own kit and I know only too well that not having enough food can be a real test, especially when racing hard. TCC is not a self-sufficient race and so therefore calories shouldn’t be an issue, however, I wondered about equipment such as shoe choices and other details for the race?

“I haven’t thought too much about this yet, but I guess I’ll use the Superior and/or the Lone Peak shoes from Altra. TCC will be fantastic as I just need to run with liquid and some food. I wont be weighed down by a 6.5kg pack. Being in my own tent but with all the other runners also provides a great compromise over a race such as MDS. I can have some privacy if I need it but I can still share the community spirit that a multi-stage race brings. I think for those who are looking for a challenge but also some comfort, TCC is perfect for this. I can’t wait!”

TCC and Costa Rica has a reputation for being a relaxed and enjoyable race – do you think holidays that combine a race are a good idea?

“For me personally, the race and holiday combo is just perfect. I will be racing for sure, that is my DNA But I know that when I get back home again, I will remember (and appreciate) camp life and the social aspect way more than the race result.”

The 2017 TCC is just a few months away, the ladies’ line-up is already looking incredible with 2016 champion Ester Alves returning. 2015 MDS champion and 2016 TCC runner up, Elisabet Barnes will also return. Add to the mix Everest Trail Race two-time winner, Anna Comet, and one thing is for sure, Sondre may need to watch out for the ladies’ as competition, never mind the men…

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A multi-day race over 6-days starting in the southern coastal town of Quepos, Costa Rica and finishing at the stunning Drake Bay on the Osa Peninsula, The Coastal Challenge is an ultimate multi-day running experience.

Intense heat, high humidity, ever-changing terrain, stunning views, Costa Rican charm, exceptional organisation; the race encompasses Pura Vida! Unlike races such as the Marathon des Sables, ‘TCC’ is not self-sufficient, but don’t be fooled, MDS veterans confirm the race is considerably harder and more challenging than the Saharan adventure.

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Hugging the coastline, the race travels in and out of the stunning Talamanca mountain range via dense forest trails, river crossings, waterfalls, long stretches of golden beaches backed by palm trees, dusty access roads, high ridges and open expansive plains. At times technical, the combination of so many challenging elements are only intensified by heat and high humidity that slowly but surely reduces even the strongest competitors to exhausted shells by the arrival of the finish line.

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The Coastal Challenge which will take place Feb 10th – 19th, 2017.

All images ©iancorless.com – all rights reserved

Entries are still available for the 2017 edition

Email: HERE

Website: HERE

Facebook: HERE

Twitter: @tcccostarica

More information:

Read the full 2016 race story HERE

View and purchase images for the 2016 race HERE

Follow #TCC2017

The Coastal Challenge 2015 #TCC2015 Day 3 Dominical Beach – Ventanas Beach

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Dominical Beach – Ventanas Beach

48km

2450+ ascent

 Day three of the TCC is always a significant stage! Combining extremely mixed terrain it suits no one style of particular runner, however, if you are a balanced runner, the stage can play to your hands.

Iain Don Wauchope was stinging a little after loosing the lead after a stunning stage 2 run by Mike Murphey. Kicking off the day, Iain made it very clear that he wanted to make this a race and if Mike wanted to keep overall victory, he was going to have to keep pushing.

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The race started with a long section of ‘running’ in a riverbed. It was a run that was part swimming and part bouldering. For those in the know, Iain is a repeat winner of The Otter in South Africa, a race that incorporates all these elements. In his element, Iain slowly opened a lead and at Nauyaca Waterfalls he was clearly showing Mike his intentions.

As the day progressed, the gap between the two front men continued to open as Iain gained time on Mike. A long, tough and technical descent from cp2 was followed by kilometre after kilometre of hot and stunning beach. The sting in the tail; a small dense forest section and then 4km’s of hot tarmac road. With temperatures well over 30-degrees and humidity through the roof Iain showed stunning form by not only winning the stage with a new course record but he had gained enough time over Mike to take the race lead by 1minute and 51seconds.

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Mike Murphey had had some nutritional problems during the stage but ultimately, I think he paid the price for pushing so hard on day two with a course record run. Mike’s legs looked like he had been in a war with thorn bushes… they were scarred, cut and grazed from the dense forests. At the end of the beach he was a spent force and he seized the opportunity to submerge himself in a rock pool before pushing on for the line.

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Joe Grant unfortunately had a very restricted run due to spraining his ankle the previous day. Joe ran and finished the stage, but any chance of a podium place is now gone. Joe’s misfortune opened up a door way for the local Costa Rican talent, and they currently hold third (Ashur Youssefi), fourth (Roiny Villegas) with Speedgoat Karl in 5th overall.

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In the ladies race, Anna Frost ran a smart day matching Veronica Bravo step-by-step. From the moment they started, till the moment they crossed the finish line, the duo never left each other’s side. In many respects, Frosty can run this way all the way to the end now and play safe. The question mark will come if Veronica feels strong one day and takes a risk to pull back the time between the two of them? This is always a risky tactic, push too hard and you may blow up opening a doorway for third place to gain time.

©iancorless.com_TCC2015_Day3-0447Nikki Kimball once again placed third on the stage running as solidly as ever. The heat had taken its toll. But then again, every runner showed very clearly the drain from the course and the weather on their faces. Tough terrain, relentless heat and high humidity make for a brutal combination and this is what sets The Coastal Challenge apart from other multi-day races. It really is tough!

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*Images to follow when we can find some wii

  1. Iain Don Wauchope – South Africa – 4:43:12
  2. Mike Murphey – Canada- 4:59:17
  3. Ashur Yussefi – Costa Rica – 5:30:55
  1.  Anna Frost – Australia – 6:25:02
  2. Veronica Bravo – Chile – 6:25:02
  3. Nikki Kimball -USA – 6:52:58

 

 

Anna Frost and Samantha Gash : 2-weeks and counting #TCC2015

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The Coastal Challenge 2015 (#TCC2015) is point-to-point race starting in Quepos and finishing in the stunning Drakes Bay close to the border of Panama. The 230km route weaves in and out of the Talamancas (a coastal mountain range in the south west corner of the country) providing a true multi terrain experience.

Participants are required to balance the distance, severity of the terrain and a tropical climate to reach the finish line. Jungle, rainforest trails, mountain trail, single track across ridge lines, highlands and coastal ranges lead into pristine beaches, rocky outcroppings, reefs, river valleys, river and estuary crossings to provide an ultimate journey.

I caught up with two of the male contenders for overall victory in the 2015 edition just the other day:  Joe Grant and Speedgoat Karl Meltzer (read HERE.) Today we have a catch up with Anna ‘Frosty Frost and Samantha Gash.

Anna Frost – Salomon

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You have been back home in the Southern Hemisphere over the Christmas period, what have you been doing to prepare for TCC?

Well, it only seems like yesterday the 2014 race season finished. So I have been having a break and catching up with family and friends after a long race season away from home. It has been a wonderful hot summer so I have naturally been getting used to the heat and enjoying some beach runs and swims! It is a perfect time to be in the mountains on overnight adventures so I have taken the opportunity to get some long days back to back. 

You managed to experience the TCC race in 2014 without racing, how beneficial has that been in preparation for the 2015 race?

 I learnt a lot about the course and was able to see the challenges without putting myself through them. Although nothing really prepares you like the experience itself. I hadn’t expected such long beach sections so I have been making the most of living beside the beach and doing most of my runs there. 

Your mum is joining you out in TCC. That’s going to be quite special. Are you planning making this a holiday race?

Yes, my mum is joining me which will be fabulous to be able to share this part of my life with her. Stages races are so social and exciting everyday so for spectators to get involved is really nice for everyone. I got my travel blood from my parents so she is definitely looking forward to seeing somewhere new and in a new way through my race. (Im not sure what you mean by a holiday race) I am not fully back into race mode or training hard as I have a long season ahead, but this race will most definitely give me a good base to kick start the year.   

Any tips for all those taking part?

Drink lots of water, anytime you go past water submerge yourself to fully cool down, drink some replacement fluids afterwards and even in the morning and then drink some more water. It is so hot there…we are all going to need it. 

Anna Frost ©iancorless.com

Samantha Gash

Sam Gash

You have been back home after South Africa, what have you been doing to prepare for TCC?

I spent Christmas and New Years in New Zealand with my partner and fellow ultra running friends. It was only my second overseas trip in four years that didn’t revolve around a race! We spent everyday outside, running some incredible trails and hiking hard up some mountains. Although it wasn’t planned to be so, it was great training for TCC. 

You had a wonderful no racing multi day experience in South Africa. Great preparation for TCC but have you recovered?

To be honest I wouldn’t say I have recovered 100% yet. I get more tired after a run and mentally my mind isn’t yet committed to doing long runs for the purpose of training. It would be easier to be hard on yourself for feeling weaker whilst climbing hills and weary after a 20km run, but it is to be expected after what we experienced – both from a running and preparation perspective.

You have multi day racing dialled. What for you are the secrets of racing/ running day after day?

Be strategic in how you attack each stage. I personally like to think of the entire race as an arch as opposed to separate stages. There will be times where you may choose to run more conservatively to complete the entire arch. Nutrition and how you choose to recover between the stages is also important. So, I will aim to get some rest after each days run in addition to a good nights sleep. 

Any other tips for all those taking part?

Have fun, look around and get to know the other competitors. These are the things you will probably remember more than how you placed. 

Sam Gash2

The 2015 #TCC2015 starts on January 31st and finishes on February 7th. Daily reports and images will be available on this website and you can follow Facebook and Twitter#TCC2015

The Coastal Challenge Facebook page is HERE and the race website is HERE

Route book and profiles available on PDF Here

Top images of Anna Frost – ©paulpetch.co.nz