Everest Trail Race 2018 #ETR2018

EVEREST TRAIL RACE, Nepal

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didnt do than by the ones you did do. So, throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbour. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. – Mark Twain

Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay (Sherpa Tenzing) are the stuff of legends; real comic book heroes for this modern era. They had the RIGHT STUFF! You know what I mean, stiff upper lip and the ability to take it on the chin.

Think back, 50+ years ago clad in wool and leather boots they departed Kathmandu on what is now considered one of the most iconic journeys everon the planet. A journey that would take the duo and a British expedition step-by-step, stride-by-stride from Kathmandu to Everest Base Camp; a journey to climb the highest mountain in the world, Everest.

To follow in the footsteps of these pioneers, to follow in the footsteps of Hilary and Tenzing and retrace the ‘53’ journey is beyond running. Its a life affirming and life changing experience and one that the Everest Trail Race provides.

Kathmandu is just the most incredible place. Its a cacophony of noise, colour, people, cars and dust. Nothing can really prepare you for the assault on your senses. A dichotomy for the mind; I embrace the poverty around me and I make it look amazing with stunning photos. Am I a fake? Its a question I often ask. Do I prostitute the locals for my own gain? I think the answer is yes! But with each photograph captured I receive a smile, an acknowledgement that I have made them happy.

Departing Kathmandu, the road to Jiri is a twisting and gut-wrenching series of bends and miles. At 1905m altitude base camp 1 is warmed by the glow of yellow tents. As the sun lowers behind the surrounding mountains, anticipation of the journey ahead is high. Sherpas and porters prepare dinner and we spend a first night under canvas. Suddenly, the journey ahead feels very real.

The Everest Trail Race (ETR) follows the route of Hilary and Tenzing from Jiri all the way to Tengboche and then turns around and heads back to Lukla, thus facilitating an easy and manageable exit point to fly back to Kathmandu.

At 100-miles in distance an experienced ultra-runner may well think the race to be easy. Think again. The combination of relentless climbing, long descents, technical terrain and high altitude makes the ETR, mile-for-mile one of the toughest races of its type.

Broken down into manageable chunks, the race is divided into 6-stages with daily distances of approximately 22, 28, 30, 31, 20 and 22km. Altitude gain starts at 3000m and builds to 6000m. The ETR is a journey to widen one’s eyes and lungs. The visual splendor of the Himalayas is beyond words. The mountains, trails and people arguably provide one of the most stunning backdrops to any race on the planet. It’s easy to become stuck in the moment; the moment of relentless forward motion, then something stirs, you look up and as your jaw hits the floor, the visual splendor takes what little breath remains away; you are left gasping, breathless at the beauty.

Large eyes, dried dirt, runny noses and wide-open welcoming smiles; the Nepalese people really are the salt of the earth. Living in a harsh, demanding and remote environment they have adapted to the surroundings and have found a peace and humility that we can all learn from.

The trekking route, on which we travel, is the motorway of Nepal. We are the tourists, a constant stream of heavy goods vehicles surround us: porters, mules or yaks. Porters transport goods and services up and down this trail motorway daily, an important lifeline to the whole community. For £10 a day they will carry 30kgs on their backs covering high altitude and long distances with the ease of mountain goats. Experienced porters have been known to carry up to 120kg per day. It is beyond belief or comprehension. It is easy to look on from the outside and nod disapprovingly. However, this is normal. No roads exist here, the only method of transporting any goods along the trail are by porter, yak or mule.

Day 1 to Bhandar eases runners into the race with 3700m+/- of vertical gain and descentand approximately 21km in distance. The mind is released, and the legs and lungs try to follow. The sound of horns from local villagers announce the race is underway.

Bhandar to Jase Bhanjyang is a beast and arguably day 2 is considered one of the toughest of the race. It’s a brute! A brute of epic proportions; it leaves every runner questioning the journey ahead and the possibility of completion. Deviating from Hilary and Tenzing’s route, the ETR does not circumnavigate Pikey Peak at just over 4000m but goes over it! As one runner said, ‘It would certainly appear that day 1 really had been just a hors d’oeuvre and the race would miss the entrée and go straight into the main course, ready or not!’

Like any good meal, you can sometimes be a little over faced with the plate in front of you. Pikey Peak was such an indulgence. It was a climbing journey that made a vertical kilometer look like a small hill-rep. Front-runners can anticipate 2-hours plus of relentless climbing, the remainder of the field can spend 4, 5, 6 and maybe longer negotiating the steep slopes of these Himalayan foothills. From the summit; each step of pain is rewarded with a wonderful vista of the Himalayan range. In the distance Everest, Lohtse and Ama Dablam making this 4000m-peak dwarf with their 7000m plus splendor.

Kharikhola provides an incredible end to day-3. A monastery perched atop a mountain. I have often heard how runners have discussed and explained out of body experiences while running. Its not something one can pinpoint, like a mirage they come and go leaving one to question ones sanity. Kharikhola may well have provided such stimulus. Is that real?one may ask and as the final steps arrive and the ETR finish banner awaits.

Travel is the discovery of truth; an affirmation of the promise that human kind is far more beautiful than it is flawed. With each trip comes a new optimism that where there is despair and hardship, there are ideas and people just waiting to be energized, to be empowered, to make a difference for good.” – Dan Thompson, Following Whispers: Walking on the Rooftop of the World in Nepal’s Himalayas.

The trail changes and suddenly more trekkers, more porters, more mules and yaks populate the trail to Lukla and beyond. Dropping down and climbing up, the trail switches and twists and as you turn a bend at Kari La, the mountains hit you through the mist. They are no longer distant peaks but massive snow-covered monsters that make you realise how completely insignificant you are.

I see a woman carrying wood to her home. I stop her and ask for a photograph. Without hesitation she stops, looks me in the eye and patiently waits while I work my craft. Her face is leathered, full of lines and adorned with gold jewelry. She is beautiful. I cant even remotely pinpoint her age, but her face tells me a multitude of stories. Each line an experience. A story of laughter, a story of childhood and I am sure many stories of hardship.

Tengboche, the finish line of day-5 offers a panorama to bring a tear to the eye. Everest, Lohtse and Ama Dablam are close and the finish line of the ETR frames them beautifully like a classic painting. Relief, emotions and an outpouring of tears make the journey worthwhile. So tough the journey, many a runner needs to be reminded to turn around, look, and see what is behind them. The reaction always the same, a huge intake of air, a hand to the face and then a lowering of the head.

Hillary and Tenzing carried on from Tengboche. In the process they created a new world, a world where anything is possible. They climbed to the top and looked down and in doing so they paved the way for all of us to set new horizons, new goals and they have made us all ask the question, what if?

It is not the mountain we conquer but ourselves.

Edmund Hillary

Passing through Sagarmatha National Park, crossing Hilary Bridge, navigating through Namche Bazaar the final calling of Lukla confirms the end of the ETR.

Nepal and the Everest Trail Race provides more than a race experience, they provide a spiritual journey that transcends running. Running may be the vehicle but the trails of Nepal provide the highway, a highway to a new experience, to something magical and to something special.

Words taken from the book RUNNING BEYOND HERE

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Episode 163 – Luke Sanchez, Petter Engdahl and Lily Dyu

Episode 163 of Talk Ultra brings you a chat with Luke Sanchez who just. finished Javelina Hundred 100 mile race – aged 15 years! We also speak with rising skyrunning star, Petter Engdahl.  Finally, we chat with Lily Dyu about her new book, all about fastpacking. Speedgoat Karl co-hosts.

Talk Ultra is now on Tunein- just another way to make the show available for those who prefer not to use iTunes – HERE  You can download the Tunein APP HERE
Talk Ultra needs your help!
We have set up a Patreon page and we are offering some great benefits for Patrons… you can even join us on the show! This is the easiest way to support Talk Ultra and help us continue to create!
Many thanks to our Patrons who have helped via PATREON
Donate HERE
*****
NEWS
OTTER TRAIL RUN
Bartłomiej Przedwojewski was out front early and added to that throughout for a 3:40 finish. That was 10 minutes in front of everyone else and 14 minutes better than the former course best. Marc Lauenstein (Switzerland), former course-record holder, was second in 3:50, and Oriol Cardona (Spain) was third in 3:51.
Holly Page (U.K.) has had great success in Skyrunning in 2018, and, just like the men’s winner, beat the former course best, too, 4:37 was 12-minutes better than the previous record. Second-place Ruth Croft was less than a minute back in 4:38, and third-place Toni McCann finished in 4:41.
RAID DE LA REUNION
Benoît Girondel and François D’Haene found themselves together and the pair crossed together in 23:18. Maxime Cazajous was third in 24:40, and 2015 winner and 2017 runner-up Antoine Guillon was fourth in 25:07.
Jocelyne Pauly was first woman in 28:54, followed by Audrey Tanguy and Juliette Blanchet also tied in 29:23.
TEMPLIERS
Sébastien Spehler made it two in a row as men’s winner in 6:36 and Azara García (Spain) was completely unmatched running 7:38 and won by over 30 minutes in the women’s race.
JAVELINA JUNDRED
Patrick Reagan followed up winning last year with repeat victory  in 13:42. Second- and third-place Dave Stevens and Kenneth Hawkes followed in 15:39 and 16:22.
Ever-present Darcy Piceu’s won another 100 miler in 18:49, she has also won HURT 100 Mile, Ronda dels Cims 105 miler, and  Angeles Crest 100 Mile in 2018, impressive! Dana Anderson and Tonya Keyes were second and third in 19:31 and 19:50, respectively.
*****
Interview with LUKE SANCHEZ
*****
BIG’S BACKYARD ULTRA
After 68 hours, Johan Steene won after a huge 283 miles! Ouch. Courtney Dauwalter pushed him close and was second with 279 miles and 67 hours, and Gavin Woody was third with 270 miles over 65 hours. Just bonkers, no?
*****
Interview with Petter Engdahl
*****
Interview with LILY DYU
*****
CLOSE
02:30:00
****
Share us on Facebook – Talk Ultra FB https://www.facebook.com/talkultra/
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Importantly, go to iTunes and subscribe so that you automatically get our show when it’s released we are also available on Stitcher for iOS, Android and Web Player and now Tunein.
Our web page at www.iancorless.comhas all our links and back catalogue.
Please support Talk Ultra by becoming a Patron at www.patreon.com/talkultra and THANKS to all our Patrons who support us. Rand Haley and Simon Darmody get a mention on the show here for ‘Becoming 100k Runners’ with a high-tier Patronage.
*****
Stitcher You can listen on iOS HERE, Android HERE or via a web player HERE
Website- talkultra.com
UP & COMING RACESgo to https://marathons.ahotu.com

Episode 162 – Beth Pascall, Casey Morgan, Brutal Claire and Elisabet Barnes

Episode 162 of Talk Ultra brings you a chat with Beth Pascall who placed 4th at the 2018 UTMB. We speak with Casey Morgan about injury and future plans and Brutal Claire will make us all feel lazy and inadequate in an inspiring chat. Elisabet Barnes co-hosts and tells us all about her victory and 4th overall at Ultra Mirage in Tunisia.
*****
Talk Ultra is now on Tunein- just another way to make the show available for those who prefer not to use iTunes – HERE  You can download the Tunein APP HERE
Talk Ultra needs your help!
We have set up a Patreon page and we are offering some great benefits for Patrons… you can even join us on the show! This is the easiest way to support Talk Ultra and help us continue to create!
Many thanks to our Patrons who have helped via PATREON
Donate HERE
*****
NEWS 00:35:36
ULTRA MIRAGE
What a day… Rachid El Morabity and Elisabet Barnes take the victory. Read the story HERE
GRINDSTONE 100
Michael Owen and Shannon Howell won the tough hundo in 20:08 and 22:22.
PIRIN SKY ULTRA
Pere Aurell ended the season as he started with victory! He kicked of the the year with victory at Transvulcania and here won again and the SWS world title. Benat Marmissolle was 2nd and Dmitry Mityaev 3rd – 7:44, 7:50 and 8:04 for the 66km with 4400m of vert!
For the women, Brittany Peterson took her first win, great result! Emily Hagwood (rising star) was 2nd and Antoniya Grigorova was 3rd, 9:01, 9:38 and 9:39.
ELS 2900
Dakota Jones and Nicke Elson took the top honours at arguably one of the most extreme races out there! Approx 70km and an estimated 6700m vert – runners in teams of two navigate all the peaks in Andorra as fast as possible by a route that they decide. They must ego to certain checkpoints but otherwise it is open to the imagination!
Husband and wife team, Konrad Rawlik and Jasmin Paris took the mixed team prize.
Only 50 people start in teams of two, 15 teams finished.
ULTRA PIRINEU
Ekaterina Mityeava finally took top honours in 15:12 ahead of Magdalena Lack and Roser Espanol, 15:56 and 16:31.
For the men, Jessed Hernandez beat Zaid Ait Malek and Jordi Gamito, 12:35, 12:40 and 13:01.
SPARTATHLON
The weather gods dropped everything on the race this year, huge congrats to Yoshihiko Ishikawa 22:54 and Zsuzsanna Maraz 27:04 for completing the distance.
*****
00:56:03 Interview with BETH PASCALL
*****
01:33:25 Interview with CASEY MORGAN
*****
02:03:33 Interview with BRUTAL CLAIRE
*****
02:56:22 CLOSE
02:57:44
*****
Share us on Facebook – Talk Ultra FB https://www.facebook.com/talkultra/
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And use good old word mouth.
Importantly, go to iTunes and subscribe so that you automatically get our show when it’s released we are also available on Stitcher for iOS, Android and Web Player and now Tunein.
Our web page at www.iancorless.com has all our links and back catalogue.
Please support Talk Ultra by becoming a Patron at www.patreon.com/talkultra and THANKS to all our Patrons who support us. Rand Haley and Simon Darmody get a mention on the show here for ‘Becoming 100k Runners’ with a high-tier Patronage.
*****
Stitcher You can listen on iOS HERE, Android HERE or via a web player HERE
Website- talkultra.com
UP & COMING RACES go to https://marathons.ahotu.com

Ultratrack Supramonte #UTSS 2018

Ultratrack Supramonte, (UTSS) an outdoor event in the breathtaking landscape of the Supramonte of Baunei, considered one of the very few wilderness in Europe and the entire Mediterranean basin.

We will let you run on the paths of the shepherds, the true custodians of this harsh and wild territory, on the mule tracks overlooking the cliffs, built by the charcoal burners in the 19th century.

Sea, woods and a lot of rock, so hard limestone for the toughest trailers, but everyone can count thanks to the many distances of the race.

Race website HERE

UTSS 90km:

6am was the start to the 90km race. Spanish Isaac Riera (Top Ten in the CCC 2018) took an early lead and ran into the morning. Unfortunatly he fell and injured his thigh, so he had to withdraw at km30. After Isaac’s withdrawal, the strong Polish Runner Bartosz Gorcyca ran his own race. He increased the lead to his followers to impressive 2hours. He won in new Course record of 9h51min (old record: Nicola Bassi, 10h15). “I did not know how far the next runners were behind me. If I knew about the gap, I’d have slowed down” smiled Bartosz at the finish line. Behind him, Francesco Pompoli (ITA), Patrik Sondell of Sweden, last year 2nd place finisher Michele Lando and last year’s 43km winner Michael Geisler (AUT) fought over place 2 and 3. Positions changed frequently between Michael and Michele. “Michele was very strong uphill, but I catched him most of the time on the technical downhills” Michael said later. He had to pull out at km 60 due to Stomach issues. Michele had a nasty fall at km50 and had to slow down. Patrik and Francesco ran together for the whole race. They found a common pace and had a great day out in the Wilderness. At the end Patrik and Francesco finished together on second place. Then minute behind them also Michele Lando arrived at the finish line. Immediately after him, the first women arrived in 12:13:42. Corine Kagerer of Switzerland won the UTSS Sardinia the second time (she won also in 2017). Second place female goes to Norwegian Runner Abelone Lyng, who was super happy about her strong finish. Third place on the womens podium went to Ivana Bertasa of Italy.

TSS 43km:

Roberto Gheduzzi won the 43km Race. Behind Roberto and Overall second  place took the first female: Ginevra Cusseau, a strong obstacle racer and Trailrunner from Italy. She won this year already the Ultra Trail de Mugello (25km) and placed 16th at the Dolomites Skyrace (22km).

summary from Michael Geisler

Results: https://trailive.wedosport.net/classifica.asp?evt=47864

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Episode 161 – Damian Hall, Neal Collick and David Laney

Episode 161 of Talk Ultra brings you a chat with Damian Hall who finally fulfilled his dream of placing top 10 at the UTMB. We also have a catch up with David Laney who is taking a year to get back to fitness after overdoing it in 2017 and we also speak with Neal Collick who won Superior 100 with a blistering course record.
*****
Talk Ultra is now on Tunein- just another way to make the show available for those who prefer not to use iTunes – HERE  You can download the Tunein APP HERE
Talk Ultra needs your help!
We have set up a Patreon page and we are offering some great benefits for Patrons… you can even join us on the show! This is the easiest way to support Talk Ultra and help us continue to create!
Many thanks to our Patrons who have helped via PATREON
Donate HERE
*****
NEWS
KIPCHOGE – Berlin
Wow – Eliud Kipchoge runs 2:01:39 for the marathon…. Off the scale
RUN RABBIT RUN
Unbelievable that Michelle Yates came back from being incredible in 2013 to win in 22:33 ahead of Emma Rocca and Kerrie Bruxvoort.
Jason Schlarb did it again winning in 18:48 – his 3rd win! Mark Hammond 2nd and Jeff Browning once again nailing another hundo!
SUPERIOR 100
Neal Collick and Mallory Richard set 2 course records in the process of winning the 2018 edition of the race. Read the report HERE.
00:24:39 Interview with NEAL COLLICK
SKYRUNNING WORLDS
Laura Orgue and Remi Bonnet were crowned the 2018 world champs for the VK ahead of Lina El Kott, Hillary Gerardi, Thor Ludvigsen and Stian Angermund-Vik on one of the toughest day’s on a mountain I have ever spent – torrential rain, windy and super cold. HERE
Ragna Debats backed up her IAU World Trail title with an ULTRA title in the Ben Nevis Ultra ahead of Gemma Arenas and Mercedes Pila. Jonathan Albon ran a stunning race to win against ever-present Andre Jonsson and Luis Alberto Hernando – the race route was changed due to bad weather making for less elevation, less technical running and a shorter course. HERE
Kilian Jornet obliterated the old course record after battling all day with Nadir Maguet in the SKY distance Ring of Steall. Stian Angermund – Vik placed 3rd. Tove Alexandersson also obliterated the old CR ahead of Victoria Wilkinson and Holly Page. HERE
GLEN COE SKYLINE
The bad weather continued to bombard Scotland after the world champs and the SWS race once shortened with the Aonach Eagach ridge removed from the race – it was just too dangerous in high winds. However, Curved Ridge remained and post-race everyone commented what a challenging race they had despite the changes… Kilian Jornet pulled off a weekend double ahead f Andre Jonsson (wo also placed 2nd in the ultra) and Dani Jung. For the women, Hillary Gerardi and Jasmin Paris battled side-by-side during the race and were separated by seconds on the line – Hillary taking the win! Brittany Peterson was 3rd. HERE
TOR DES GEANTS
Franco Colle once again won the big jaunt in the Aosta Valley in 74:03. Silvia Trigueros won for the women in 87:50.
WORLDS 100km
Hideaki Yamauchi took the honours ahead of Takehiko Gyoba and Comrades champ, Bongmusa Mthembu – 6:28, 6:32 and 6:33.
Nikolina Sustic, Nele Alder-Baerens and Mai Fujisawa ran 1,2,3 in 7:20, 7:22 and 7:39.
TAHOE 200
Kyle Curtin and Courtney Dauwalter battled at the front and in the end, Kyle took the top slot in 49:32 ahead of Courtney’s 49:54.
UTMB
The carnage edition….
*****
01:26:22 Interview with DAMIAN HALL
*****
02:18:33 Interview with DAVID LANEY
*****
02:38:19 CLOSE
*****
Share us on Facebook – Talk Ultra FB https://www.facebook.com/talkultra/
Tweet us on Twitter – Talk Ultra on Twitter https://twitter.com/Talkultra
And use good old word mouth.
Importantly, go to iTunes and subscribe so that you automatically get our show when it’s released we are also available on Stitcher for iOS, Android and Web Player and now Tunein.
Our web page at www.iancorless.com has all our links and back catalogue.
Please support Talk Ultra by becoming a Patron at www.patreon.com/talkultra and THANKS to all our Patrons who support us. Rand Haley and Simon Darmody get a mention on the show here for ‘Becoming 100k Runners’ with a high-tier Patronage.
*****
Stitcher You can listen on iOS HERE, Android HERE or via a web player HERE
Website- talkultra.com
UP & COMING RACES go to https://marathons.ahotu.com

Sky Erciyes VK 2018 Summary and Images

Turkey today hosted the Sky Erciyes VK – Europes highest VK reaching 3350m to the Ottoman cable car just below the incredible backdrop of Mt Erciyes.

The Vertical Kilometer covers 4.5km and climbs 1007m, starting at 2336m and reaching a highest point of 3350m. The terrain is mostly rocky. Gradients vary but in the steepest sections, a gradient of 64% can be found – average over the entire course is 23%.

The day was dominated by Ahmet Arslan who set a new course record betting the previous time by over 10-minutes (official times to follow).

Spain’s Pau Capell was 2nd running his first ever VK. On the finish line he said, ‘That was tough… painful, they just hurt,   maybe I should have run for a hour first to warm up!”

First Lady was the ever-present Elena Polyakova who races regularly in Turkey – this was another victory to who her already swelling list.

More results and information on the race website HERE

Tomorrow, Saturday 7th, the weekend concludes with a 10km, 25km and the main event, the Erciyes Ultra Trail which covers 64km and 3000m of vertical gain.

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Sue Ding and the 2018 Marathon des Sables #MDS2018

Marathon des Sables is an iconic race. For over 30-years it has been the leading example of multi-day racing all over the world. It has often been copied, but never bettered. In its incredible history, runners from all over the world have toed the line for the experience of a lifetime.

In 2018, for the first time ever, a Malaysian lady toed the line in the hope to be the first Malaysian lady ever to complete the race.

Sue Ding has been living in the UK for over 20-years. She came from Kuala Lumpur to study law at Liverpool University and then stayed successfully building her own legal practice in London. She is an entrepreneur, business woman and is extremely successful.

Running became an escape from the everyday stress of work. Like many, Sue built to the marathon distance and has successfully completed London, Berlin and Tokyo. But Marathon des Sables was something very different – a new challenge.

I first met Sue when she joined our Lanzarote Training Camp (HERE) in January 2018.

I was fortunate to follow her journey as she prepared for the 2018 MDS, both in training and then day-by-day throughout the race.

It turned out to be quite a story and shows that the mental aspect of ultra-running is often far more important than fitness.

You can listen to a full and in-depth interview with Sue on Talk Ultra podcast HERE

What initially made you decide to take part in MDS?

I had heard about the Marathon des Sables from friends and I had seen images on Instagram. It enticed me, I was looking for a new challenge and although I thought the race was beyond my ability I took the plunge and entered. I told nobody for two weeks as I couldn’t decide if I had done the right thing. When I did finally disclose my intentions, some friends and relatives were negative saying I was crazy and that I couldn’t do it… I needed no better motivation to prove them wrong!

You have run several marathons such as London and Tokyo. How does the MDS compare?

Other than running or walking, there is no comparison really. A road marathon is a challenge but it is safe, you have aid stations, there is always help at hand. MDS is just so much more than just running. It brings in elements of survival, it plays games with your mind and it pushes the individual to depths that they maybe never even realised they could reach.  MDS is truly a transformational experience and although I will always remember my first road marathon, I now think, ‘it is only a marathon!’

What was your training and preparation like for the MDS? What are the differences in comparison to a road marathon?

In all honesty, marathon training is actually good preparation for MDS as the individual stages are marathon distance or below. Of course, the exception is the ‘long day’ which in 2018 was 86.4km (around 53 miles, so two marathons). Marathon training works well but of course one needs to build up strength and stamina for the challenge ahead. Therefore, most people allow 12-months to get ready for MDS. Time on feet is important and also including some specific ‘training’ races that provide a similar scenario to MDS. For example. Several races in the UK last 2 or 3 days therefore providing a mini MDS scenario.

I also signed up for a specific desert training camp in Lanzarote, 3-months ahead of the race. This proved to be essential as I met other competitions, we trained on terrain specific and comparable to Morocco and I was able to test equipment. We even spent one night sleeping inside a volcano to simulate camp conditions in the Sahara.

Training Camp information HERE 

Finally, two points. 1. Many runners think they will run MDS – the reality is that they will not! Walking is an essential and integral part of completing MDS for most participants and I can’t stress enough to walk, walk and walk in training. 2. Prepare the mind for the challenge. If you get the mind in the right place it will take the body to the line.

What was the biggest challenges out in the Sahara?

The challenges change daily. For example, just starting on day 1 seemed like a huge challenge as I was so anxious and nervous.

Then on day 2 I was silly and neglected taking my salt tablets, this impacted on my hydration and caused me to be dizzy. It was touch and go but I rallied and achieved the finish line.

That night we were hit by a sand storm which wiped out our tent and reduced sleep to a minimum. So, as you see, the challenges change daily, by the hour or even by the minute at times. This is what makes MDS so special, it is how you adapt both physically and more importantly, mentally at times.

How did you cope with the challenges, did you feel prepared?

One can only prepare so much. I really dedicated myself to the task and prepared methodically for the challenge. But after Tokyo Marathon I picked up a stress fracture.

Photo ©sueding

This resulted in no running for three weeks and then a slow return to training. Ironically, my final preparation to MDS was terrible and that worried me. Friends were always positive, they told me, ‘You can do this!’ I trusted them and despite my reservations, I achieved the start line.

Equipment is equipment but it is essential. I took advice from the training camp and honed my equipment for my needs. I made last minute changes to the pack I would use and I also changed my down jacket. It all worked well. During the race you must be flexible and adapt to conditions – tiredness, dehydration, sore legs, snoring tent mates, sharing a space with 7 others – you can’t really prepare for that, it is this that makes MDS such an experience, it is a journey into the unknown.

What did you enjoy most about the whole experience?

I was so anxious before the race but I feel like I blossomed as the race progressed. I embraced the challenge and got the race done – I did that and nobody can take that away. But my tent mates, Tent 95 were incredible and they will be friends for life. You were also at the race and shared my journey, that was so special and something that I will never forget. The race is a life changer, I was told this before I went to Morocco, it’s only now, afterwards, that I realised that this is true.

What were some of the most memorable or unforgettable moments for you, explain why?

1. Tent 95 – Gary, Daniel, Mark, James, Brian, Taka and Denise were just the best. We laughed, we shared our stories in the morning and the evening and we rallied and encouraged each other. We all finished – what an experience!

2. On the long day it was dark, I was walking through large sand dunes and I was listening to Craig Armstrong music, I looked up to the sky and saw thousands of stars… I was lost in my mind and thoughts and it was truly magical.

3. I had low points throughout the race, times of despair and worries if I could push on through. They were my lowest moments but each time they became the most memorable – you would always arrive, just at the right time.

4. I got some really bad blisters which needed medical treatment and caused great pain – I had to continue on, ignore the negative and fight each day to achieve my goals.

How did you manage the conditions – heat, survival, rationed food etc?

In all honesty, I was expecting the worst and the reality was not as bad. We had cold nights, sand storms and hot days but I managed. I wore the same clothes for ten days with no showering or proper washing, it was unpleasant but I survived. I craved fresh food and had to eat dehydrated food.

I wanted so much a different drink other than water but water is the only thing available. I keep saying it but this is MDS. It is meant to test you mentally as much as physically and you need to embrace it. If you fight it, your week will be miserable. It’s best to laugh and soak up the experience.

A Coke after the long day was so magical – simple pleasure! Going to the toilet is also somewhat an experience… you will need to use your imagination for that one!

What went through your mind during the race?

Ha! What didn’t I think about…? I put the world to rights, thought about my past, thought about my future. I concentrated on one foot ahead of the other and I escaped with music.

You have a great deal of time to think and I think this is why, for many, MDS has such an impact. You suddenly realise what is important. I have realised it. Experiences and memories are far greater than things and possessions – the Sahara and the MDS made me feel truly alive, pushed me to the limit and beyond.

Did you doubt yourself at any time, elaborate?

I had huge doubts and anxiety before the race but did as much specific preparation as possible and I listened to you and Elisabet Barnes,  you both told me I could do it. I was so nervous on day 1 and of course on day 2 I was extremely worried.

However, as the race progressed the stronger mentally I became. I was more tired, my body ached, my feet hurt but my mind was strong, there was no way I was giving up or not finishing – I had to prove all the doubters before the race wrong.

One lady had said, ‘If you finish the race, I will eat my hat!’ Guess what? I bought a hat in Morocco after the race…

What was crossing the finish line like?

On the marathon stage I had a moment early on when I cried but I got over it and pushed on despite the pain.

The miles ticked by and then as the finish line came, you were waiting as were all my tent 95 teammates.

I had no more tears left, just smiles and gratitude. I was flying the Malaysian flag, I kissed my cross which was around my neck and I gave thanks for the opportunity to complete a truly magical, life changing journey.

What are the biggest takeaways from the race?

We are too protected, too comfortable in the world and we shy away from tough times. A little tough, some challenge, some hardship and some pain makes you realise you are truly alive.

I went to so many low points during the race and overcame them, I made new friends and I triumphed over arguably the toughest challenge I have ever undertaken.

I now feel invincible, I feel alive!

If you did MDS again, what would you change in preparation and why?

Well, I would definitely try not to get a stress fracture just 8 weeks before the race. In general though, I feel everything clicked into place. I would make sure my shoes did not give me blisters, I made a mistake there going with a shoe size too large.

What advice would you give to future MDS runners?

Prepare the mind and the legs and lungs will followI also had a ‘special’ bag with me ‘Not Gonna Happen’ it contained daily inspiration to keep me going… It was invaluable.

MDS is described as the toughest race on earth, on a scale of 1-10 give it a rating and explain why?

Tough question as I have done nothing like it to compare, so, for me it would be a 8, or 9. But the daily cut off times are generous and it is possible to complete the race walking, so, like I said previously, get the mind right and anything is possible.

Certainly, no change of clothes, carrying everything one needs on ones back and having rationed food and water takes things to another level and therefore it’s a combination of all those elements that makes the race so tough.

MDS is not cheap, can you elaborate on how much the whole process cost?

I don’t really want to think about it… The race costs so much more than just the entry fee. For example, entry fee, flights and hotels around £4000. But I started to prepare 12 moths in advance. I did training races, I did the Lanzarote training camp, I purchased all my equipment and then changed my equipment. I added some extras such as staying in Morocco afterwards. I have not tallied up the total cost but it would easily be £10.000.

You are the first Malaysian woman to complete the race, how does that make you feel?

I am proud to be Malaysian and cross the line flying the flag – it is a real honour.

You ran for charities, Make A Wish Malaysia and Malaysian Dogs Deserve Better, how much did you raise?

The total goes up daily as donations come in, but currently it is over £25.000.

“We all have our stories, we got together, encouraged each other, were there for each other, we went on a 250km MDS journey together… We are friends forever Tent 95! I was also privileged to have the additional support of a truly dear friend who documented our journey. Friendship and love completed the journey.”

#suckitupprincess

Check out Sue in MARIE CLAIRE – http://marieclaire.com.my/lifestyle/features/marie-claire-amazing-women-2018/5/

Episode 157 – Sue Ding, Lucy Bartholomew and Kris Brown

Episode 157 of Talk Ultra is a full and packed show as Kurt Decker brings you a Western States special chatting with Kris Brown and Lucy Bartholomew. Ian brings you a full and in-depth chat with Sue Ding who was the first Malaysian woman ever, to complete the Marathon des Sables.
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NEWS
 
LIVIGNO SKYMARTHON read HERE
 
The day was all about Petter Engdahl, the young skier/ runner dominated the race from the front and although he had some close competition at times, he blitzed the course with an incredible performance finishing in 3:33:26 ahead of Pascal Egli 3:38:01 and David Sinclair from the USA, a surprise 3rd in 3:39:16.
The ladies’ race was a close run epic with Laura Orgue and Sheila Aviles trading blows throughout. It was touch and go who would win, eventually it was Laura 4:10:11 to 4:10:45. Elisa Desco, wife of RD Marco De Gasperi, made a great return to racing after her 2nd child to take 3rd. in 4:19:45.
 
MONTE ROSA SKYMARATHON preview HERE
 
So now, 2018, 25-years in the making, the sport’s founders present an exclusive new event, this time in teams of two, roped together to race in true skyrunning style across moraine, snow fields and glaciers for 35 kilometres with an astonishing 7,000m ascent and descent.
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00:19:16 Interview with SUE DING
 
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BROKEN ARROW 52km
 
Jimmy Elam won in 4:54 ahead of Nick Elson and Jeff Mogavero 5:05 and 5:10.
Megan Kimmel dominated the ladies’ race in 5:30 ahead of Rea Kolbl and Rory Bosio, 5:48 and 5:52.
 
MOUNT WASHINGTON RR
 
Cesare Maestri in 1:00:53 the first European to win the race. For the ladies’ Kim Dobson in 1:11:42
 
MOZART 100K
 
Florian Grasel pipped the UK’s Damian Hall, 10:29 to 10:29 and Alexander Rabensteiner 3rd 10:32.
Martina Trimmel, Sarah Morwood and Veronica Limberger went 1,2,3 in 11:57, 12:12 and 12:21.
 
LAVAREDO has a packed field:
 
Fulvio Dapit, Pau Capell, Hayden Hawks, Scott Hawker, Michel Lanne, Stephan Hugenschmidt, Diego Pazos, Tim Tollefson and more…
 
Fernanda Maciel, Nuria Picas, Beth Pascall, Keely Henninger, Clare Gallagher, Mira Rai. Kelly Wolf and more…
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01:40:00 Interview with KRIS BROWN
 
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02:04:48 Interview with LUCY BARTHOLOMEW
 
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UP and COMING RACES
 
Check out the world ultra calendar on https://marathons.ahotu.comyou can do a specific search for the ultra calendar HERE
 
Ultramarthon calendar HERE
 
Race calendar for JULY 2018 HERE
 
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02:27:26 CLOSE
 
02:29:36
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Cajamar Tenerife Bluetrail 2018 Race Images and Results

Yeray Duran and Azara Garcia triumphed at the 2018 Cajamar Tenerife Bluetrail. It was a brutal day racing and Tenerife provided the runners with four seasons in a 24-hour period. Notably, the early morning climb up Mt Teide to 3500 was tough,with strong winds and freezing temperatures.

Yeray crossed the line 12:57 after a hard fought battle with Sange Sherpa who finished in 13:12.

Azara Garcia dominated the ladies’ race, so much so, she finished 4th overall in 14:21.

Race website HERE and full results.

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