SCOTT KINABALU RC 2.0 – FIRST LOOK

The all new SCOTT Kinabalu RC 2.0 is built for SPEED.

Run faster on rolling trails, forests and parks with Its innovative traction design.

Hybrid TractionKinetic FoamInternal Fit System

Get ya sunglasses out, the new SCOTT KINABALU RC 2.0 is here! Boy are these shoes bright. Of course, the colour will divide opinion, some will love the look, and some will hate, they well be a Marmite shoe, but ultimately for me, it’s only a colour. Any good trail shoe should be covered in mud in a couple of runs, and then the shoe really takes on character.

Scott since 2012 have really made huge progress with their run shoes, in particular, the biggest transformations have come in the last 4-years with the ever-changing development of the ‘Kinabalu’ shoe.

This development has also gone in line with the ‘Black and Yellow’ apparel look and the ‘Traction Matters’ tagline.

I have to say, the ‘look’ of Scott on the trail is one of the best in my opinion. It’s classy, desirable and completely identifiable – I see black and yellow, and I know it is Scott. 

The latest addition the line-up is the SCOTT KINABALU RC 2.0.

It’s easy to see the development of ‘this’ model if one looks at the last 2-years of Scott’s shoe development. The ‘RC’ shoe concept has become hugely popular and I have to say, this latest incarnation really is a highlight. 

The RC range is roughly broken down to four categories:

  • Mountain Speed
  • Mountain Ultra
  • Trail Speed
  • Road Speed

THE SHOE

Bold, brash and loud, Scott are making a statement here and quite simply, this shoe will be immediately identifiable on the trail. There is no hiding. If you are going to stand out like this, you better have the ‘goods’ to back up the looks. The SCOTT KINABALU RC 2.0 does not disappoint.

Scott have not always made the lightest shoes; this shoe is a welcome departure weighing 260g for a UK9.5. Sizing is true to size, to clarify, I always use UK9.5 and this should allow a thumb nail of space above my big toe – the RC 2.0 is perfect. 

The toe box has room and allows toe splay without compromising foot hold, this is particularly noticeable when running technical trail.

The outsole has the now classic RC look which was specifically developed by Scott and their athletes. The outsole has lugs that designed for trail running be that on dirt trail, single-track, gravel, grass or rock in dry and wet conditions. However, the outsole is not aggressive enough for muddy conditions.

The upper is seamless and is noticeably a departure from other RC editions that Scott have produced. The upper is lighter with more breathability. There is reinforced section to add structure to the shoe and allow a firm hold. The toe box has a good bumper for rocky and gnarly conditions and will provide adequate protection in most scenarios. The heel box is cushioned, holds the foot well. The tongue is ‘free’ and does not have a sock-liner fit. That is a disappointment for me – Integrated tongues nearly always provide me with a much better feeling and more secure hold. Having said this, the RC 2.0 holds my foot really well. Lacing is pretty standard, nothing new here and no real surprises. The cushioning of the shoe is notable. I really feel comfort in these shoes without losing feel for the ground and the shoes have ‘life,’ something that was missing at times in previous Scott shoes. Drop is 3mm so designed for an efficient runner.

In a nutshell, this is Scott’s best shoe so far. 

IN USE 

The shoe has speed written all over it, but it is not at the expense of comfort. It’s a trail shoe that would work amazingly well on any run when conditions are not too muddy. The outsole has grip but it’s classic ‘trail grip’ and not UK mud grip – for example.

RC 2.0 will also be a fantastic mountain running shoe, especially in skyrunning (for example) when the transition from trail and rock is constant and of course, snow or ice may make an appearance.

One noticeable feature was how well the RC 2.0 feels on the road. It’s too early to say what impact on the outsole road running would have, but in regard to comfort, I had no issues. I am sure Scott would not recommend the RC 2.0 as a road running shoe, but ‘road sections’ can appear in any run, it’s good to know that comfort is there. The Kinetic Foam kicks in here.

There is little not to like about the RC 2.0 and for sure, I would say that past Scott RC users are going to love this shoe – it’s a lighter, faster, cushioned and more responsive shoe than previous incarnations. If you are a Salomon Sense fan and are looking for a change, I would immediately recommend trying out the Kinabalu RC 2.0. The Salomon and Scott have very different feels, but I draw comparisons. Notably, those who wanted to use a ‘Sense’ but found them too narrow will be pleased with the RC 2.0’s wider toe box.

Scott say, “We recommend it for any sort of speed workouts, fast running sessions, and non-technical mountain races up to marathon distance.”

HOW DO THEY FEEL

Well, light! That was my first reaction, particularly after testing and using previous Scott shoes. I was immediately impressed by the feel the shoes gave, even on a first run. I had a cushioned ride but still with a real feel for the ground. The grip is spot on in wet and dry conditions. I had no issues at all other than being caught on a very muddy steep hill after heavy rain, then, I was sliding all over the place. No surprise really as the lugs are just not long enough.

There are little negatives with the RC 2.0, but I did have two points of question. The lacing holes for me feel as though they could have been spaced better? I actually think an additional eyelet would have been beneficial. It’s a personal thing. Also, on my right foot I found that I constantly had a slight tight spot when I tied my laces. I tried many configurations and options but could not eradicate it? I didn’t have this with my left foot, so, I should add here that this maybe more to do with my right foot than the shoe. Just worth noting. 

CONCLUSION

This is Scott’s best shoe so far in my opinion. I have seen and witnessed the evolution of ‘Kinabalu’ and ‘RC’ over the past years and although they always came close to greatness, there was always just a little missing. With the RC 2.0 the main points of: 

  • Comfort
  • Lightness
  • Traction
  • Feel

Are all there and I can ask no more from a shoe.

This is a fast shoe and depending on the runner and ability, the RC 2.0 is great for a 5km blast, a classic technical skyrunning race or a trail race.

“We  started 4 years ago up high in the mountains, designing shoes to move fast over technical terrain, and the Supertrac RC was born. Then we stayed on the same mountainous environment but to run at a slower pace and for much longer. The Supertrac Ultra RC was created to deliver more comfort, protection and cushioning than its older sister. This year, we’re coming down from our mountains with the same approach. Start with a shoe designed to make you tackle more rolling and hard packed trails at faster speed. Whether it’s on flatter terrain or for mountain running races where trails are often mixed with road, Sierre Zinal being the perfect illustration of that hybrid terrain, the Kinabalu RC 2.0 will deliver.”

It’s a really versatile shoe and one thing is for sure, with that flu yellow look, it’s going to be really easy to see who is using the Kinabalu RC 2.0 in 2019 and beyond!

Do you want to be one of the lucky 10 people to win a pair of these mysterious yellow shoes?
Check out this page: https://www.scott-sports.com/kinabalu-rc

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Scott Kinabalu 2018 Review

The classic returns! The Scott Kinabalu was my first ever Scott running shoe and at the time, when I was seen wearing them, I always received the comment, “I didn’t know Scott made run shoes?’

That comment continued for some time, but now, Scott are well and truly established in the running world.

One could say that the introduction of the RC range in late 2016 and early 2017 took the brand to a new level. The distinctive black and yellow really stands out and the Supertrac RC not only looked great but had great reviews – HERE

 

The Scott Kinabalu 2018 edition is an all new shoe and it is fair to say that much of what appeared in the Supertrac RC has been carried over to this new incarnation of the Kinabalu.

It has a lower drop, new upper, new outsole and different look. It may have the Kinabalu name, but the 2018 version is something different altogether!

The Shoe

 Orange is obviously ‘the’ colour for the shoe industry with many brands using varying shades or tones for 2018 shoes. My Kinabalu is two-tone orange and grey (an all-black version is available too.)

Three things stand out immediately – the seamless upper, the cushioning and the outsole. As I said above, this Kinabalu is far removed from the original so drawing comparisons are almost pointless.

It is a cushioned shoe with 29mm at the rear and 21mm at the front. For comparison, the Supertrac RC and Kinabalu RC has 22.5 at the rear and 17.5 at the front.

The RC range have 5mm drop and are out-and-out racing shoes whereas the Kinabalu has 8mm drop. This is a good thing for those who run longer or want a more relaxed shoe. Certainly, with the crossover in looks and design, RC users will find switching and alternating with the 2018 Kinabalu seamless.

 The outsole has the ‘new’ Forward Traction technology, with a multi-layer lug design. It’s designed to grip, as all good outsoles should, on a plethora of different terrain, wet to dry.


eRide is standard on Scott shoes and one of the brands USP’s. It is a rocker outsole which is designed to increase running efficiency particularly if heal striking as it helps roll the foot forward.

Cushioning comes from Aero Foam + which increases comfort, durability and rebound in the propulsive phase.

The upper is seamless with a reinforced toe box, heel box and overlays in the mid foot section leading to the laces. The tongue is gusseted and provides a sock like fit. There are no seams so in theory, the shoe should not rub or cause blisters.

There are no additional eyelets at the top of the lacing section, so, lock lacing is not possible.

 The Kinabalu is marketed as a lightweight shoe but certainly comes in a little heavier than nearly all the shoes I would consider competition at this level. It’s of course marginal, but if you are obsessed about show weight, there are lighter shoes out there! For example, the Kinabalu weighs in at 320g for standard comparable size.

For comparison*:

inov-8 Parkclaw 275g here

Nike Wildhorse 4 300g here

TNF Ultra Endurance 310g here

inov-8 Trail Talon 290g here

* all above shoes are 8mm drop and cushioned shoes.

The Kinabalu is true to size and neutral fit.

First Impressions

For me, the jury is still out on seamless uppers. Or should I say, ‘some’ seamless uppers! I get the logic, understand the benefits but some just feel a little too stiff. I had this with the recent inov-8 X Talon (Here) and I have the same feeling for the Kinabalu. Most definitely, the Kinabalu needs breaking in. When I receive new shoes, I always use them as slippers in my home before running. That way I get a feel for the shoe and I soften them up a little. I also learn if there are potential hot spots and how I should adjust the laces, so the shoe is comfortable on my instep – always an issue for me as I have a high instep.

The Kinabalu was glove like when pulled on, the gusseted tongue giving great comfort and hold on the instep.

The heel box was plush, comfortable and held well.

The toe box is wide, but not super wide. On a scale of 1-5 (5 being wide) I would say the Kinabalu is a 3. When I walked around though the shoe felt stiff. Particularly noticeable when I bent the shoe at the front, just above the toes.

The stiff seamless upper seemed reluctant to bend and the fabric creased as if folding cardboard. I must clarify this got better and better as I wore the shoes but I can only stress that for me, you need to soften the Kinabalu up. Had I run in the shoe out of the box, I am pretty sure I would have had an issue above the toes.

Cushioning felt good – a little on the firm side but I could definitely feel the benefit of the 29/21mm combination.

The outsole stuck to my wooden floor making a nice sticky sound every time I lifted my foot.

In Use

I put 8 hours in the shoes in my home before running. Invaluable in my opinion! As with all my test runs, I do 1-mile of road at the beginning and the end of my runs, the middle section is 6-8 miles of varying terrain that has a little of everything – it’s a great test ground.

The Kinabalu bounces along on the road well with the cushioning providing great protection between my foot and the terrain. However, I didn’t particularly feel connected. The cushioning is definitely on the stiffer side and although this improved over time, the Kinabalu certainly is a stiffer ride. Very similar to the RC in my opinion. 

The outsole lugs are close together and whilst not designed for road running, the Kinabalu can handle the hard stuff with no problems.

On the trails, the Kinabalu felt good transitioning between different terrains. The lugs are not very deep, so, it is most definitely a trail shoe for firmer and drier terrain. When I ran through mud, the lugs failed for 2 reasons – they are too close together and lack length to purchase in the ground. Not a criticism, just a notable point so that you understand what terrain the Kinabalu excels on. On rocks, grip was excellent, even in the wet. Always a good thing!

I am a forefoot striker but have always found the eRide of Scott pleasurable – no difference with this new Kinabalu, it works well. I have already mentioned that the cushioning in my opinion is firmer and I noticed this in the propulsive phase. I was getting a good rebound and return but not as much as in some other trail shoes.

The upper really holds the foot well with reinforced layers in the lacing area providing good hold and security around the instep. Two loops are on the gusseted tongue which the laces pass through, this is a new one on me and they are there to help keep the tongue in place – they work! Scott have used a ‘lace-locker’ in the past, it’s a simple piece of elastic that sits lower on the laces and it allows one to tuck the excess away after being tied. They removed it on the Supertrac RC and it isn’t on the Kinabalu – I really don’t know why? It is such a simple and effective system and adds no weight. I would like to see it back! 

The heel area is very comfy, padded and held everything nice and tight. Even when climbing I had little to no movement at the rear.

The toe box is not narrow and not wide, so, in principal it should suit many runners. The reinforcement is just an overlay, it will add protection, but it is not a solid bumper that can be found on other trail shoes.

After 109 miles in the Kinabalu, the shoe is most definitely softening up and starting to hold to my foot and provide a softer more pleasurable run. This is primarily noticeable in the upper – with a little rain, mud and use it has softened up. The cushioning has certainly bedded in too allowing more feel for the ground.

The 8mm drop for me is perfect as it sits in that ideal middle ground of not too high and not too low. The Kinabalu is a great stand-alone trail shoe for any run but I also think that RC users will enjoy the additional cushioning and more relaxed drop for training and/ or longer races. The 2 shoes sit well together. So, if you like the RC, you will like the Kinabalu.

In Conclusion

The Scott Kinabalu is a rock-solid trail running shoe that will appeal to many runners. The combination of cushioning, 8mm drop and good grip makes it an ideal shoe for any trail runner – the only exception coming if one plans to run in a great deal of mud or soft ground.

The upper is pretty much bullet proof and this brings with it some pluses and minuses. The plus is that the upper will last and last. I don’t envisage the upper wearing out or tearing, of course, it is too early to tell so I will feedback on this. But that stiff upper needs loosening up and softening to get the best of the shoe, so, wear the shoes casually and expect your first few runs to feel a little stiff. 

Similarly, the cushioning is a little like the upper. It’s a little stiff to start but over time beds in nicely.

If you don’t like spending money on run shoes, or, if you like your shoes to last once purchased, the Kinabalu may well be a great shoe for you – I can see these going for many months and many miles.

SCOTT RUNNING website HERE

Scott Kinabalu ENDURO – First Impressions

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Since 2012 I have been using Scott shoes, yes, Scott make run shoes in addition to bikes. I say that, because that is what I get when other runners look at my shoes and say, ‘Scott, oh, thought they made bikes?’

Since the original T2 Kinabalu, I have been a fan. I remember the original incarnation in 2012 which I used to run all over the Transvulcania course (Review HERE). Since the original model, the T2 Kinabalu has had a few tweaks and the current incarnation is the 3.0 HERE.

Scott launched the Kinabalu Supertrac (original look HERE) and this shoe went on to be my favourite shoe of 2015. I even went through many other shoes I had been testing to work out which shoe (for me) was the best. The ‘Supertrac’ won, see HERE.

As 2015 came to a close, Scott informed me of several new shoes, one being the Enduro.

Well, the Scott Kinabalu Enduro has arrived and here are our first impressions and look.

©iancorless.com_ScottEnduro-00114

One thing is for sure, there is no hiding in the male version. Bright yellow, these shoes from the off say that they mean business. The ladies version is also bright but considering that many women wear bright apparel, I’m sure the colours will appeal. Certainly the original reaction from Niandi (who will test the ladies shoe) was wow, I LOVE the colours.

The shoes are not light. In all honesty, they were both noticeably heavy when removed from the boxes. The ladies a UK 8 weighs 380g and the mens UK9.5 weighs 418g. That is heavy; no doubt about it and I have to say initially disappointing.

Looking at the shoe closely, you soon realise why. The whole upper of the shoe has a plastic coating on top of the mesh below.

©iancorless.com_ScottEnduro-00081

I have to say, I asked why? Why is it necessary to add some much structure and protection to the upper of the shoe? Scott call this: Protective-High-Abrasion-Casing.

I took a look at Scott’s website and the description is as follows:

The brand new SCOTT Kinabalu Enduro is the latest addition to the range. The seemless one piece upper offers protection and comfort for all day adventures while the eRide tuned midsole and VIBRAM outsole provide performance and stability during your run.

Seamless upper – perfect

Protection – great

Comfort – brilliant

eRide – works, so great.

Vibram – tried and tested, so great

I still have to question though, why so heavy? My only point of question on the excellent Kinabalu Supertrac was the weight. Here Scott have beefed up the Kinabalu and made it bullet proof, it’s obviously way to early to tell but on first impressions, if you want a shoe to last and get value for money from, this may be the one!

©iancorless.com_ScottEnduro-00098

Cushioning as you would expect from Scott is good with 28mm at the rear and 17mm in the forefoot. However, these two figures cause me a little confusion, why for 2016 are Scott releasing a shoe with an 11mm drop? They dropped the ‘Supertrac’ from the Kinabalu’s original 11mm drop to 8mm drop and this for me made perfect sense. 8mm is a perfect sweet spot that appeals to many a runner and when running long it’s not too low to cause any issues. Having said that though, after just 2 runs in the ‘Enduro’ they do feel comfortable and offer a great feel. I have said this before, the ‘rocker’ system that Scott uses does give the shoes a feeling of lower drop due to the rolling action. I must point out too that I do fore foot strike so that will also help.

eRide – “Dynamic stability is the body’s own way to run efficiently and safely over uneven terrain. The eRIDE TUNED midsole has strategic flex zones to provide asymmetric flexibility and enhance ground adaptation while a EVA foam provides cushioning.”

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The outsole sits somewhere between the T2 Kinabalu and the Supertrac and therefore it will be a great all rounder for those who may well be looking for a ‘one shoe does all’ scenario. Made by Vibram, the outsole uses ‘MEGAGRIP’ as witnessed on the Supertrac but this version is less aggressive. From repeated year long use of the Supertrac I can confirm that this outsole is tried and tested and a favourite. This version does feels stiffer and less supple than the Supertrac version, we shall see?

©iancorless.com_ScottEnduro-00074

Lacing is standard and incorporates the ‘lace bungee’ for storing excess lace after you have tied your shoes. It’s a very simple and effective way for removing something that may catch on branches or trail obstacles.

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Heel box is very plush and secure. Always a key feature of Scott shoes and it really does add a secure and confident feel to the shoes.

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Sizing feels a little larger than normal. I always take a UK9.5 and the ‘Enduro’ does feel just a little more spacious, so, if you are new to Scott or if you have used Scott in the past, you may just want to check on sizing. The toe box is a little narrower than the T2 Kinabalu 3.0 and Kinabalu Supertrac and this may be why they size a little larger? If you like a wide roomy toe box, this may not be the shoe for you?

©iancorless.com_ScottEnduro-00076

Technologies:

  • Lace Bungee
  • Protective-High-Abrasion-Casing
  • Seamless-One-Piece-Upper
  • Rock-Protection-Plate
  • Vibram-Megagrip

Initial Conclusion

Our initial reaction to the ‘Enduro’ was shock. We were surprised at how ‘protected’ this shoe is. But having run in them on just 2 occasions and reflected on what Scott are trying to do, I completely understand the the addition of this shoe to the Kinabalu range. This is not a shoe to replace the T2 Kinabalu or the Kinabalu Supertrac it’s a shoe to be used in addition. So, if you like the other 2 models you will like this.

I’m still perturbed that the shoe is 11mm drop and not 8mm but it runs well; so why worry?

What’s the shoe for?

Well I guess you can use the shoe for any running, from groomed trail, fire trail to mountains. But considering the protection that has been added to the ‘Enduro,’ one has to think that this is intended for the rough stuff; rocks, snow, ice, gravel, slate and so; anything that can really batter a shoe and reduce its life.

For perspective, I recently ran for 1-month in La Palma on the Transvulcania course, I used a brand new pair of Supertrac and I used them every day, at the end of the month I threw them away. I am not saying the ‘Supertrac’ was no good, on the contrary, I love the Supertrac but the trails out in La Palma are harsh and abrasive; it eats shoes. The Enduro may well be a good shoe for a course like that due to the key elements of:

  • Protective-High-Abrasion-Casing
  • Seamless-One-Piece-Upper
  • Rock-Protection-Plate
  • Vibram-Megagrip

We will be reporting back in a couple of months after long term testing and only then will we really know how the Scott Kinabalu Enduro stacks up.

Scott shoes are available HERE

 

What is the best shoe for Road, Trail, Off-Road or Mountain?

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What is the best shoe for road, off-road, trail and mountain?

You won’t believe how many times I get asked this question. Of course I can’t answer it. Far too many variables come into play.

  • Drop
  • Cushioning
  • Grip
  • Upper type
  • Lacing
  • Outsole

Taking into consideration all of the above, certain elements are comparable and with 2015 drawing to a close I thought I would take a look back at some of the shoes I have tested and worn in the last 10-months and then put my neck on the line and say, which shoe (for me) is the best.

Shoes to look at:

  • Salomon S-Lab Sense – 4mm drop
  • Salomon S-Lab Sense SG (soft ground) – 4mm drop
  • Salomon Sense Mantra 3 – 6mm drop
  • The North Face Ultra MT – 8mm drop
  • The North Face Ultra Cardiac – 8mm drop
  • inov-8 Race Ultra (2-models) – 4mm and 8mm drop
  • inov-8 Terraclaw (2-models) – 4mm and 8mm drop
  • inov-8 Mudclaw 300 – 6mm drop
  • Scott Kinabalu 3 – 11mm drop
  • Scott Kinabalu Supertrac – 8mm drop
  • Scott Trail Rocket – 5mm drop

Notice that I have added the drop next to all the the shoes above. Drop has become a very important element when choosing a shoe. What drop you require as a runner is open to debate and to a certain extent; genetics. The book, ‘Born to Run’ inspired many runners to get low and minimal and what followed was carnage and very happy physiotherapists. Please read this post HERE to provide some perspective of my thoughts.

Drop and minimal are two separate issues.

1. Drop is the angle from the heel to the toes that the foot will sit at when parallel to the ground.

2. Cushioning is the amount of ‘soft stuff’ between you and the ground.

To clarify:

  • You can have low drop (typically 4mm) and LOADS of cushioning = Hoka One One
  • You can have low drop (zero) and no cushioning = Vibram
  • You can have a combination of varying drop and varying cushioning = Many of the above shoes.

So, if you want zero drop and no cushioning OR you want lower drop and maximal cushioning; stop reading, this is not the review for you!

If however, you are looking for a shoe that can handle some road, off road or mountain paths then read on; which shoe is a jack of all trades?

Where do I start?

It’s quite daunting taking so many shoes and then saying which pair, in my opinion is the best. So, here is my criteria:

  • Ability to run on road
  • Ability to run on hard trails
  • Ability on dry and wet rocks
  • Grip in mud
  • Climbing
  • Descending
  • Time on feet
  • Fit
  • Lacing
  • Cushioning
  • Outsole
  • Wear and tear
  • Drop
  • Conclusion

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Salomon S-Lab Sense SG – Read full review HERE

Ability to run on road – For a shoe with an aggressive outsole, on road experience is good but as the name suggests, the SG is for Soft Ground.

Ability to run on hard trails – Good. Handles the trail well with comfort.

Ability on dry and wet rocks – On dry rocks, grip is very good. On wet rocks the grip is very compromised and at times sketchy/ scary.

Grip in mud – For such an aggressive outsole, the grip is moderate. The SG sits somewhere in the middle.

Climbing – Shoes feel great. They are flexible, hold your foot snug and you have a feeling of precision. They also handle wet ground well providing it does not get very muddy. Wet rock is hit and miss.

Descending – As above but in mud, or on wet it can be a challenge.

Time on feet – 6mm drop, adequate cushioning and great fit make this shoe very popular. Excellent for 50k and after that it depends on the runner and the runners adaptation.

Fit – Excellent. Endofit and the speed lacing system is the best out there!

Lacing – The best but lacks an ability to tweak or adjust.

Cushioning – Cushioning is good and finds a nice mix that still allows feel and contact with the ground.

Outsole – It’s a soft ground outsole but for me it’s a great outsole for dry terrain with a variety of surfaces and not too much mud.

Toe box – Narrow, precision fit.

Wear and tear – Moderate – 500k – 600k

Drop – 4mm

Conclusion – Great fit, 4mm drop and soft ground outsole. For many this is the ultimate off road, trail and mountain shoe for longer days training or racing. It’s limited in the wet and mud though.

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Salomon S-Lab Sense 

Ability to run on road – Excellent. The outsole has a low profile.

Ability to run on hard trails – Excellent. The outsole has a low profile and therefore if the trail is dry, these shoes will fly along.

Ability on dry and wet rocks – On dry rocks, grip is very good. On wet rocks the grip is compromised and at times sketchy. You lack 100% confidence and that makes you go slower.

Grip in mud – Hopeless.

Climbing – Shoes feel great. They are flexible, hold your foot snug and you have a feeling of precision. Not good in the wet or mud.

Descending – As above but in mud, or on wet rock forget it!

Time on feet – This depends on ones adaptation to a more minimal shoe. If you like being close to the ground with a low drop this shoe will be perfect. However, for me I prefer this shoe for shorter runs on dry trails.

Fit – Excellent. Endofit and the speed lacing system is the best out there!

Lacing – The best but lacks an ability to tweak or adjust.

Cushioning – This is a more minimal shoe but it does have cushioning.

Outsole – For dry trails

Toe box – Narrow, precision fit.

Wear and tear – Moderate – 500k.

Drop – 4mm

Conclusion – It’s a racing shoe for dry trails for mid to fore-foot runners. Fit is excellent if you like a precision feel.

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Salomon Sense Mantra 3 – Read full review HERE

Ability to run on road – Excellent. The outsole has a low profile.

Ability to run on hard trails – Excellent. The outsole has a low profile and therefore if the trail is dry, these shoes will fly along.

Ability on dry and wet rocks – On dry rocks, grip is very good. On wet rocks the grip is compromised and at times sketchy. You lack 100% confidence and that makes you go slower.

Grip in mud – Hopeless.

Climbing – Shoes feel great. They are flexible, hold your foot snug and you have a feeling of precision. Not good in the wet or mud.

Descending – As above but in mud, or on wet rock forget it!

Time on feet – This depends on ones adaptation to a more minimal shoe. If you like being close to the ground with a low drop this shoe will be perfect. However, for me I prefer this shoe for shorter runs on dry trails.

Fit – Excellent. Endofit and the speed lacing system is the best out there!

Lacing – The best but lacks an ability to tweak or adjust.

Cushioning – This is a more minimal shoe but it does have cushioning.

Outsole – For dry trails

Toe box – Toe box is generous and for those looking for a Salomon with more room, this is the shoe for you!

Wear and tear – Good 700K

Drop – 6mm

Conclusion – I think the Mantra is a shoe that more people should look at. They often go for the S-Lab Sense because of the S-Lab tag but for me, this is a better all around shoe and far more suited for most runners. It has 6mm drop, wider toe box and more cushioning. If you run long on dry trails this is a great shoe.

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The North Face Ultra MT – Read full review HERE

Ability to run on road – Good considering the outsole but keep it to a minimum.

Ability to run on hard trails – It handles hard and dry trails well but the shoe lacks flexibility and is a little firm.

Ability on dry and wet rocks – On dry rocks, grip is very good. On wet rocks the grip is better than the Salomon due the Vibram sole. Felt far more confident in this shoe.

Climbing – Good but they are not as supple and flexible as others in the test. Grip is goo.

Descending – As above.

Time on feet – The Ultra MT is a relatively firm shoe that excels on softer, muddier and forgiving ground. If you stick to that terrain they are excellent.

Fit – Pretty good, you may need to replace the laces (not great) and tweak how they are laced to get the best fit.

Lacing – Provided laces are average.

Cushioning – It’s a firm shoe and although cushioning is present, it’s not a cushioned shoe.

Outsole – Is Vibram and aggressive. It’s good!

Toe box – Has loads of protection and although not over wide it will work for most people.

Wear and tear – Good 600k but less if you go on the road a great deal.

Drop – 8mm

Conclusion – I was disappointed with the Ultra MT at first. I wanted it to be something else I think! But after several runs I found that they excelled off road when the terrain was forgiving (cushioned) and muddy, wet or slick. It’s a good mountain shoe that protects the foot.

©iancorless.com_TNFUltraCardiac-7006

The North Face Ultra Cardiac – Read full review HERE

Ability to run on road – Excellent. The outsole has a relatively low profile.

Ability to run on hard trails – Excellent. The outsole has a low profile and therefore if the trail is dry, these shoes will fly along.

Ability on dry and wet rocks – Good. Confidence in both scenarios.

Grip in mud – Moderate. It’s a great middle ground shoe so does not handle the real muddy terrain well.

Climbing – Shoes feel great. They are flexible, hold your foot snug and you have a feeling of precision. Not good in the wet or mud.

Descending – As above but in mud it’s compromised.

Time on feet – Great. The combination of 8mm drop and good cushioning make this a great long distance trail. mountain or off road shoe for primarily dry conditions. I’d recommend these for 100-miles and multi-day racing.

Fit – Good with a well padded tongue.

Lacing – Standard lacing that you may wish to tweak for the best fit.

Cushioning – Great cushioning but not maximal. Ideal for longer days.

Outsole – Great compromise outsole that can handle road and trail. Okay for mud but not too much!

Toe box – Is average width so if you need a wide toe box you may want to try them.

Wear and tear – The upper lacks durability which is the only downside of the shoe – 500k?

Drop – 8mm

Conclusion – One of the best ‘all-rounders’ in this test that can handle multiple terrains with an 8mm drop that will allow you to run long.

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inov-8 Race Ultra 270 (4mm drop) and 290 (8mm drop) – Read full reviews HERE (270) and HERE (290)

Ability to run on road – Good, the outsole has minimal tread and they work well on road.

Ability to run on hard trails – As above, good outsole for hard and dry trails.

Ability on dry and wet rocks – Average grip and terrible when wet.

Grip in mud – Hopeless.

Climbing – If you have really wide feet they will feel ok, if not they feel sloppy, over stiff and lack any true feeling with the ground beneath.

Descending – Toe box is too wide and therefore foot moves around inside the shoe causing friction, toe impact and a lack of control.

Time on feet – A real plus of inov-8 shoes is that they provide you with 2 drops, 4mm and 8mm so that you can get the correct shoe for you. I personally prefer the 8mm drop shoe and the cushioning that goes with it for longer runs.

Fit – If you have wide feet one of these shoes may well be for you. They are roomy! Too roomy for me.

Lacing – Standard lacing and I used a ‘lock-lacing’ method to make both shoes feel more secure on my feet.

Cushioning – In both models is good but lacks feel for me and suppleness.

Outsole – For dry trails only.

Toe box – Wide, very wide.

Wear and tear – Very good 7/800k

Drop – 4mm and 8mm

Conclusion – The Race Ultra shoes look great and have been extremely popular. I personally don’t get along with either model. I can run in them for sure but I wouldn’t if I can choose any other shoe in this list. For me they lack feel for the ground, they are sloppy and stiff.

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inov-8 Terraclaw 220 (4mm drop) and 250 (8mm drop) – Read full reviews HERE (220) and HERE (250)

Ability to run on road – Both shoes run well on the road with good feedback but be warned, the outsole will wear dowm.

Ability to run on hard trails – Excellent. Plenty of feeling in both shoes and the grip works well.

Ability on dry and wet rocks – On dry rocks, grip is very good. On wet rocks the grip is compromised and at times sketchy. You lack 100% confidence and that makes you go slower.

Grip in mud – If it’s not too muddy they work well. This shoe is trying to be the perfect trail shoe doing all things well. Of course, compromises are made at the extremes: all road or all mud.

Climbing – Shoes feel great. They are flexible, hold your foot snug if laced correctly but the wide toe box lacks precision and makes them feel too sloppy for me.

Descending – As above but in mud grip is compromised and on wet rock you slow down.

Time on feet – This depends on ones adaptation and preference. Two shoes and two options, for me the 250 with 8mm drop is the shoe for longer days but if you are efficient and like low drop, the 220 works great,

Fit – Slipper like feel as the shoe has very little seams. You get a great barefoot feel from the wide toe box and if you lace the shoe as per your needs, they are very comfortable.

Lacing – The 250 laces conventionally and the 220 laces at an angle. I used lock lacing in both models to get a more firm hold of my foot which added security.

Cushioning – Cushioning is good in both but the 250 is for longer runs with more cushioning.

Outsole – Has good grip made from 2 compounds. The sole is aggressive but not too aggressive. You can run on the road in comfort and on the trails. Comprises would be made when the trail gets muddy, you start to loose grip. I also wouldn’t recommend for just road runs.

Toe box – Very wide.

Wear and tear – Good but not great, 6-700k

Drop – 4mm and 8 mm

Conclusion – The Terraclaw is everything the Race Ultra should be. They are comfortable, have great feel for the ground and the grip is great for all around use.

©iancorless.com_Mudclaw300-7440

inov-8 Mudclaw 300 – Read full review HERE

Ability to run on road – Surprisingly good considering the outsole but keep it to a minimum.

Ability to run on hard trails – Okay but this shoe is for the soft and muddy stuff as the name implies.

Ability on dry and wet rocks – On dry rocks, grip is very good. On wet rocks the grip is excellent for such an aggressive outsole. I would say the best in this group.

Grip in mud – Excellent. They will take loads of mud, soft grass and give you more security than any other shoe here.

Climbing – Shoes feel great. They are flexible, hold your foot snug and you have a feeling of precision. Although precision fit the toe box has room.

Descending – Excellent. Shoes give you great confidence.

Time on feet – If you are running in mud all day, the 300 has cushioning to go with the grip and I’d say they are one of the better long distance off road/ fell shoes. If you are on hard or dry trails you’ll start to feel it.

Fit – Precision fit shoe designed to hold your foot so that you can run with confidence. Toe box was roomier than expected and I had to lace with a locking method as they have a low heel to reduce problems with the achilles tendon.

Lacing – Standard lacing and I used a lock lacing method to add a more secure feel.

Cushioning – This is a more cushioned fell shoe and therefore it’s great for longer soft ground running.

Outsole – Aggressive for the soft and muddy stuff.

Toe box – Narrow, precision fit.

Wear and tear – On soft ground they will last but add hard trail, gravel and road and they will wear because of the soft rubber outsole.

Drop – 6mm

Conclusion – Brilliant off road shoe with great cushioning and 6mm drop for long days on soft, mountain and boggy terrain. A comprise comes with shoe longevity if you run on road and gravel but then again, the shoes name tells you where you should be using it! Grip is excellent even on rocks when dry and wet.

Scott T2 Kinabalu 2015

Scott T2 Kinabalu 2015

Scott T2 Kinabalu 3 – Read full review HERE

Ability to run on road – Excellent. It’s not a road shoe but it runs great on the hard stuff.

Ability to run on hard trails – Excellent. The outsole has a low profile and therefore if the trail is dry, these shoes will fly along.

Ability on dry and wet rocks – On dry rocks, grip is very good. On wet rocks the grip is compromised.

Grip in mud – Moderate, they can handle a little soft stuff but not too much.

Climbing – Pretty good. The shoes are a little more substantial than others in the test and therefore they are a little heavier and a little more rigid.

Descending – Good feel and cushioning but grip is compromised on wet and muddy trail/ rocks.

Time on feet – Great shoe for longer running and a very durable upper with great protection. The shoe has an 11mm drop which is almost unheard of these days. 8mm has become the norm. But Scott use a ‘rocker’ and this does keep you mid to fore-foot and they don’t feel like 11mm drop when running.

Fit – Great fitting shoe that feels comfortable and holds the foot.

Lacing – Standard lacing with ‘lace-locker’ to hold excess lacing after they are tied.

Cushioning – Very good.

Outsole – It’s a road to trail shoe that offers grip similar to the TNF Ultra Cardiac but they have more grip than the Race Ultra, S-Lab Sense and Sense Mantra 3.

Toe box – Standard with good protection

Wear and tear – Very good 800k.

Drop – 11mm

Conclusion – The Kinabalu in it’s 3rd incarnation is a really good shoe, if it was 8mm drop it would be excellent. It’s a great shoe for those who want one shoe to do all things.

©iancorless.com_ScottSupertrac-5043

Scott Kinabalu Supertrac – Read full review HERE

Ability to run on road – Surprisingly good for an aggressive sole and you can run comfortable for longer periods of time.

Ability to run on hard trails – Excellent. As above.

Ability on dry and wet rocks – On dry rocks, grip is very good. On wet rocks the grip is compromised at times but you have confidence in the shoes.

Climbing – They are heavier shoes with less flex but the combination of grip and firm foothold make them very pleasing to wear.

Descending – Good cushioning and a robust (bomb proof) upper make you feel confident to tackle most terrain.

Time on feet – 8mm drop, good cushioning and a bomb proof upper make these great for long days. The only downside comes with the weight of the shoe. They are a fair bit heavier (340g) than other shoes in this test.

Fit – Great fitting shoes, maybe a little stiff when new but they soften. Toe box has room but not too much room and protection is excellent.

Lacing – Standard with ‘Lace-Locker.’

Cushioning – Excellent

Outsole – Aggressive that works on a multitude of surfaces.

Toe box – Standard with good protection.

Wear and tear – Excellent 800k

Drop – 8mm

Conclusion – This shoe is a real winner that mixes up different surfaces really well in a shoe that gives great cushioning all with an 8mm drop. The downside is the weight.

©iancorless.com_Scott-8036

Scott Trail Rocket – Read full review HERE

Ability to run on road – Excellent.

Ability to run on hard trails – Excellent.

Ability on dry and wet rocks – On dry rocks, grip is very good. On wet rocks the grip is compromised.

Climbing – Shoes feel great. They are flexible, hold your foot snug and you have a feeling of precision. Not good in the wet or mud.

Descending – Okay if it is dry.

Time on feet – This depends on ones adaptation to a more minimal shoe. This is a shoe for faster running on dry/ mixed trail.

Fit – Good snug fit with precision feel.

Lacing – Standard.

Cushioning – This is a more minimal shoe for faster running but they are well cushioned.

Outsole – For dry trails

Toe box – Narrow, precision fit.

Wear and tear – Moderate – 5/600k.

Drop – 5mm

Conclusion – Great fitting shoe and the race rocker works well for keeping you mid to forefoot. This shoe compares to the Salomon S-Lab Sene, Mantra 3 or the Race Ultras. It has a specific use.

And the winner is?

Before I say my winner, lets look at my thought process. By ‘best’ shoe I am taking into consideration many things such as: comfort, drop, cushioning, longevity, fit and so on. I am not looking at the colour or the price of the shoe. It may sound flippant but all shoes are around the same price these days and to be honest, if the shoe is what I want and I know it works then I will pay the bucks.

You may well say, ‘But you can’t compare 4mm drop shoes to 8mm drop shoes and shoes with hardly any grip to shoes with loads of grip!’

Yes, I know.

But in some respects, this review or this comparison is all about purchasing one pair of shoes that can do all things well. If I wanted to just run in the mud I would get the Mudclaw 300. If I was just going to run fast hard trail I may well go for the Salomon Sense Mantra 3.

So, here you go:

Scott Kinabalu Supertrac

Surprised?

I am! When I started this process I didn’t think the Scott would come out on top but you know what, it has been a relatively easy decision.

I know it’s a heavy shoe and that is a big down side, especially when you compare it to say the Salomon which are almost 100g lighter; that is huge! But if I could only have one pair of shoes that had to take me along roads, along dry trails, up mud, down mud and along rocks in the wet and dry then the Supertrac would be the ones for me! The combination of 8mm drop, excellent cushioning, bullet proof upper, ‘rocker’ design and the aggressive outsole make them a winner; for me!

On a final note, shoes often have very specific uses and all the shoes above (in most cases) do one thing well! So, if you have the funds and the desire to own multiple pairs of shoes this almost certainly is the best way to go.

Three key shoe choices:

  • Road/ dry trails
  • Trail shoes for mixed conditions
  • Mud/ off-road shoes

The other key choice is drop and cushioning – you know your needs!

What are your thoughts and what shoes have I not tried here that would provide some competition?

SCOTT KINABALU SUPERTRAC – First Impressions

©iancorless.com_ScottSupertrac-5082

Spring is here and new run shoes are a plenty. Christmas takes place in December but I have to say, if you are a runner, February is stepping up to be a great month for a few surprise presents. Recently I have had new shoes from The North Face (Ultra MT, Cardiac and TR2, the Salomon S-Lab Sense 4 is due to arrive any day and several weeks back I looked at the Scott Trail Rocket and mentioned the Kinabalu.

Today we are taking a look at a new shoe from SCOTT, the KINABALU SUPERTRAC.

This is a shoe I asked Scott to make some 12-18 months ago! Having used and loved the Kinabalu (Here) I pleaded with them to come up with an 8mm drop shoe with a more aggressive sole. They have only gone and done it!

©iancorless.com_ScottSupertrac-5043

This shoe is a winner!

Looking at current shoe trends, Scott like The North Face, Salomon and other key brands have realised that a lower drop is the way forward. For many companies, 8mm provides that sweet middle ground. New Balance, TNF and now Scott have confirmed this while Salomon pave a way with 4mm and 6mm drop shoes.

As mentioned previously, if you are after a fast trail shoe (for dry conditions) and with a lower drop (5mm), you can’t go far wrong with the Scott Trail Rocket. But if you are after a shoe that can handle mud and a multitude of different conditions then the 8mm drop, Kinabalu Supertrac may be for you!

©iancorless.com_ScottSupertrac-5053

Carrying over many of the characteristics of the Kinabalu, the Kinabalu Supertrac in summary :

Fits like a glove, laces up nice and tight, hugs the heel without rubbing, the toe box provides a secure hold of your foot with a precise feel and grip is AGGRESSIVE!

©iancorless.com_ScottSupertrac-5061

In Detail

The Kinabalu Supertrac introduces a new level of technical shoe and a completely new concept of superior grip. The shoes are designed to match the needs of trail and mountain runners in the most extreme conditions : mud, snow, rock and mountain! Delivering great traction on soft and rough surfaces and all within a shoe that provides great comfort, cushioning and with an 8mm drop.

It comes as no surprise to me really. As I said previously, I loved the Kinabalu. I just wanted more grip and lower drop. Scott have that now provided me with that, so this can only mean one thing: happy runner!

If you are familiar with the Kinabalu, this ‘Supertrac‘ version will feel familiar. The tongue is padded, extremely comfortable and the laces are thin and textured. Importantly, the laces stay tight when tied. Scott’s ‘Lace Locker‘ is present and this provides a no nonsense simple solution to store loose laces.

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The shoes are neutral fitting and cushioned using AeroFoam+ which provides additional cushioning, increased durability and great rebound. The upper is breathable mesh with synthetic overlays and the lower part of the shoe is constructed from EVA and rubber.

©iancorless.com_ScottSupertrac-5088

The toe box is reinforced extremely well and will withstand some serious contact with rocks or unwanted obstacles. I usually prefer a wider shoe and the Supertrac allows for this but still holds my forefoot firm and without hot spots.

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The heel is injection moulded, plush, soft has no harsh contact points and provides a secure firm grip irrespective of when running on the flat, descending or going uphill. I had no movement at all.

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As one would expect, Scott carry over many features that we have seen on other shoes in the range. The eRIDE is a ‘rocker’ platform that is designed to guarantee a more efficient foot strike. If you already strike mid to forefoot, this may be less noticeable. However, if you are heel striking, the rocker really does roll you forward on to your toes.

©iancorless.com_ScottSupertrac-5094

 

The most noticeable aspect of the shoe is the GRIP! I can’t write about the GRIP without putting it in capital letters. Boy do they GRIP…

©iancorless.com_ScottSupertrac-5061

Think JCB meets running shoe. The outsole is extreme and made from a superior wet traction rubber compound that works really well on a multitude of surfaces. I am really impressed with just three to four runs*.

Conclusion

If you are looking for an out-and-out trail beast with great cushioning, 8mm drop and a comfort rating that will least all day, the Kinabalu Supertrac is going to be a serious contender. It has very quickly become my ‘go to’ when heading out on my local muddy trails.

Expect to see Marco De Gasperi, Elisa Desco and Joe Gray using this on the trails and mountains of Europe and the USA.

Pros:

  • GRIP
  • Cushioned
  • Spacious toe box with protection
  • True to size fit

Cons:

  • Not the lightest shoe

Details:

RRP £105

Available SS2015

Technology:

  • Lace bungee
  • Wet traction rubber
  • eRIDE Platform
  • AerFoam+
  • Self cleaning lugs
  • Upper: Mesh/ synthetic overlay
  • Lower: EVA/ Runner
  • Drop: 8mm
  • Weight: 340g (UK8)
  • Sizes: US7-14

#noshortcuts

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*I will provide an updated review after 1-month and plenty of nice muddy shots to show the shoe’s durability in the upper and outsole

Asian Traveler – Skyrunning

1 2 3 4

You can see a full set of IMAGES from TROFEO KIMAHERE

You can download the full PDF article HERE and it includes an additional article on Kinabalu – “Climax at Kinabalu”

Scott T2 Kinabalu Review

T2 Kinabalu

Sage CanadayMarco De GasperiIan Sharman and Joe Gray amongst others are utilising the benefits of the new Scott range of run shoes, you may very well want to take a more in-depth look at the 2013 offerings yourself?

Scott Running brand.

I did a review of the Scott eRide Grip 2 some time ago, I used the shoe extensively on the trails out in La Palma on the Transvulcania La Palma course. In summary, the shoe really impressed me. It had the combination of factors that makes a shoe great to wear. You can read the review HERE

copyright Ian Corless

copyright Ian Corless

Impressions

I have now had the Scott T2 Kinabalu for a couple of months. The design of this shoe has had great input from legendary mountain runner Marco De Gasperi and the T2 Kinabalu shows that all the great features of the Scott eRide Grip 2 have been transferred to the T2 Kinabalu but in a lighter more streamlined shoe. Sizing was true to size and the drop is 11mm.

From the moment I first put the shoes on, adjusted the laces and stepped out of the door and headed of for a one hour run the T2 Kinabalu put a smile on my face. A mile of road to my local trails felt comfortable and the shoes offered grip, cushioning and a wonderful ‘return’ of energy to the next foot strike. I bounced along. On trail the grip was secure and reassuring. I did find that my heel was moving a little initially but I re-laced the shoe differently and suddenly my foot was held secure and tight.

I have been through thick mud, snow, ice, hard trail, rocks, mountains and water crossings and have accumulated some 400+ miles in these shoes. Here are my thoughts.

Upper

At the front of the shoe, protection runs around the toe area providing adequate protection should you strike rocks or roots. The toe box is wide providing plenty of room but not so much room that they become loose. Your toes are able to spread and help provide feel and contact with the ground. At the rear your heel is held firm with no hot spots. The upper is light, breathable and colourful! I like the colour and the boldness of the shoe but some may very well find them a little OTT. It all comes down to personal taste. Within the upper is a support structure (synthetic overlay) that helps hold the foot in place. The laces are not as ‘stretchy’ as those on the Grip 2 but they have a texture too them that ‘grips’. This holds the laces firm and once adjusted I have had no need to tighten them when running. A nice touch is the elastic bungee on the front of the shoe that allows you to pass excess lace underneath so that it does not flap around. It’s not as fancy or extravagant as the ‘Salomon Lace Garage’ but it does the job well.

Midsole

The midsole has ‘Aero Foam’ which is Scott’s own technology and for a more minimalist shoe it provides great cushioning and feel for the ground. After several runs the midsole ‘bedded’ in and started to mould to my foot providing additional comfort. The sock liner is perforated and the midsole has ‘drainage’ ports to allow water to escape. A real plus in wet weather or water crossings. The platform of the shoe is wide and offers great grip, it has no cut away for the arch or any additional features that cut into the sole, so, what you have is great platform that creates maximum contact with the ground. You can really feel it. Without doubt the shoe is neural and low to the ground. It has all the feel and benefits of a minimalist shoe or racing flat but with cushioning.

eRide

One of the great aspects of this shoe is the eRide sole. As I explain below, the eRide technology is designed to make you a more efficient runner. By efficient, I mean striking the ground with a mid to fore-foot toe off. But an 11mm ‘drop’ normally would not promote this run style… step in eRide. Strike the ground with your heel and you feel the shoe propel you forward. Now I am a mid-foot striker but going downhill I felt the shoe throw me forward all the time, encouraging me to make the most of the hill and encouraging me to save my quads by stopping me braking.

Sole

Grip is not as severe as the eRide Grip 2 model but its greater than many shoes in it’s class and provides excellent traction on hard trail, rocks, ice, snow and wet ground. On muddy ground it provides some traction but not as much as the Grip 2. What I love about the T2 Kinabalu is its ability to transfer between all types of terrain providing great feel and comfort. These features are transferred even to road or pavement and I would have no problem running long stretches of road in the T2 Kinabalu.

Summary

I have been testing many pairs of shoes recently and I now use the T2 Kinabalu as my benchmark shoe. It has everything in one package; cushioning, light weight, great feel with the ground, comfort, security and most importantly the ability to handle a multitude of different terrains. If I was only allowed one pair of shoes, the T2 Kinabalu would be it.

A recent shoe test in ‘Trail Runnning‘ magazine also appointed the T2 Kinabalu as “Best In Test’ in the April 2013 edition.

Scott T2

T2 Kinabalu Information and Statistics

The T2 Kinabalu is the ultimate lightweight trail machine according to Scott. Maximum protection and traction with minimal weight. An ideal balance of lightweight materials, cushioning, protection and quick response thanks to eRide Technology. Shaped for smooth transition whether you are striking on the heel, mid foot or forefoot to adapt to the varied terrain. Our lightest trail shoe with uncompromised traction and protection, featuring an AeroFoam midsole, which is 50% lighter than traditional EVA foams.

copyright Ian Corless

copyright Ian Corless

Scott T2 Kinabalu

eRIDE

Get that fleet-footed feeling with our eRide range. The unique rocker shape creates a very stable midstance, promoting the faster and more efficient running style that runners strive for. You`ll be rocking as the miles roll by.

eride

copyright Ian Corless

copyright Ian Corless

The benefits:

1. Healthier body position

2. More energy efficient

3. Natural midfoot strike

4. Lower profile heel

5. Smoother ride

6. Minimal and lighter weight

Aero Foam

Working with our athletes, we always hear that they would like to run in lighter shoes, but are not willing to sacrifice any cushioning performance. So, we found an alternative to the EVA foam used in most running shoes. SCOTT Aero Foam combines lightweight materials with a wear resistant compound, resulting in shoes that are lighter, have more cushioning and last longer than traditional running shoes.

Aerofoam

Scott T2 Kinabalu

Specs

  • Weight 270g for UK9
  • Drop 11mm
  • eRideComposite push-through plate
  • AeroFoamWet traction rubber
  • Lace bungy
  • Upper: Mesh/Synthetic Overlays
  • Lower: EVA/rubber

Scott Website HERE

Scott T2 Kinabalu

T2 Kinabalu

 

Scott are renowned for Cycling and Skiing but in the running community they are still considered a newbie…. however, take note! With Sage Canaday, Marc De Gasperi, Ian Sharman and Joe Gray amongst others utilising the benefits of the Scott range you may very well want to take a more in-depth look at the 2013 offerings from the Scott Running brand.

I did a review of the Scott eRide Grip 2 some time ago, I used the shoe extensively on the trails out in La Palma on the Transvulcania La Palma course. In summary, the shoe really impressed me. It had the combination of factors that makes a shoe great to wear. You can read the review HERE

Scott eRide Grip2 2013 model

Scott eRide Grip2 2013 model

 

I have now just received the new addition to the Scott Trail range, the T2 Kinabalu. The design of this shoe has had great input from legendary mountain runner Marco De Gasperi and initial impressions show that all the great features of the Grip 2 have been transferred to the Kinabalu but in a lighter more streamlined shoe.

Scott Kinabalu

 

I will be racking up some miles in these over the coming month so I am really looking forward to feeding back how this shoe performs in comparison to the Grip 2 but also in direct competition to other shoes available form other manufacturers.

The T2 Kinabalu is the ultimate lightweight trail machine according to Scott. Maximum protection and traction with minimal weight. An ideal balance of lightweight materials, cushioning, protection and quick response thanks to eRide Technology. Shaped for smooth transition whether you are striking on the heel, mid foot or forefoot to adapt to the varied terrain. Our lightest trail shoe with uncompromised traction and protection, featuring an AeroFoam midsole, which is 50% lighter than traditional EVA foams.

Scott T2 Kinabalu

 

eRIDE

Get that fleet-footed feeling with our eRide range. The unique rocker shape creates a very stable midstance, promoting the faster and more efficient running style that runners strive for. You`ll be rocking as the miles roll by.

eride

 

The benefits:

1. Healthier body position

2. More energy efficient

3. Natural midfoot strike

4. Lower profile heel

5. Smoother ride

6. Minimal and lighter weight

Aero Foam

Working with our athletes, we always hear that they would like to run in lighter shoes, but are not willing to sacrifice any cushioning performance. So, we found an alternative to the EVA foam used in most running shoes. SCOTT Aero Foam combines lightweight materials with a wear resistant compound, resulting in shoes that are lighter, have more cushioning and last longer than traditional running shoes.

Aerofoam

 

Scott T2 Kinabalu

 

Specs

  • Weight 270g for UK9
  • Drop 11mm
  • eRideComposite push-through plate
  • AeroFoamWet traction rubber
  • Lace bungy
  • Upper: Mesh/Synthetic Overlays
  • Lower: EVA/rubber

Scott Website HERE

Marco De Gasperi 2013 calendar

Marco De Gasperi

Marco De Gasperi, the 6-time world champion  is one of the most famous runners in the disciplines of Skyrunning, mountain and trail running in the world. If you want to know where he will be competing this year, follow his race calendar.

  • 16.03.2013: Hong Kong 50km Raidlight Trail, Lantau (CHN)
  • 06.04.2013: Lanzarote (SPA) Lava Trail
  • 21.04.2013: Naturno Oetzi Alpin Relay Marathon (ITA)
  • 26.05.2013: Sky Runner World Series Alpina Marathon, Zegama-Aizkorri (ESP)
  • 02.06.2013: Orobie Vertical, Valbondione (ITA)
  • 09.06.2013: Italian Championships Mountain Running 1st race (ITA)
  • 29.06.2013: Marathon du Mount Blanc, Chamonix (FRA)
  • 14.07.2013: Vertical Kilometer, Chiavenna (ITA)
  • 21.07.2013: Italian Championships Mountain Running 2nd Race, Arco (ITA)
  • 03.08.2013 WMRA Berglauf Meisterschaften Langdistanz, Szklarska Poręba (Pol)
  • 11.08.2013: Orobie Skyrace, Passo Presolana (ITA)
  • 18.08.2013: Italian Championships Mountain Running 3rd race, St. Giacomo Brentonico (ITA)
  • 08.09.2013: World Mountain Running Championships (POL)
  • 14.09.2013 Jungfrau Marathon, Interlaken (SUI)
  • 22.09.2013: Pasturo Zacup Trofeo delle Grigne (ITA)
  • 13.10.2013 Skyrunning Xtreme, Limone sul Garda (ITA)
  • 19.-20.10.2013 Mount Kinabalu Climbathon, Kinabalu Park (MAS)

Scott Kinabalu

 

Marco was instrumental in the new Scott shoe, the KINABALU named after the famous Skyrunning race.

The ultimate lightweight trail machine. Maximum protection and traction at minimal weight. An ideal balance of lightweight materials, cushioning, protection and quick response thanks to eRide Technology. Shaped for smooth transition whether you are striking on the heel, mid foot or forefoot to adapt to the varied terrain. Our lightest trail shoe with uncompromised traction and protection, featuring an AeroFoam midsole, which is 50% lighter than traditional EVA foams.

Category: Trail Running

Weight 270g

USM 9

Heel to toe drop11 mm

Technologies

  • eRide Composite push-through plate
  • AeroFoamWet traction rubber
  • Lace bungy

Material

  • Upper: Mesh/Synthetic Overlays
  • Lower: EVA/rubber

Size run USM 7-13

I will be testing the new Kinabalu shoe in the coming month so watch this space for images and a full review.

5 Races 5 Continents

If possible, you may want to check out this movie as part of the festival AFF 2012 (link here) – Endurance Adventure will take you across the world. From Antarctica, with the world’s first unsupported expedition to walk to the South Pole and back again, to ultra-running across five continents (as outlined below) and chasing the disappearing Colorado River.

5 Races 5 Continents

At the beginning of the 2011 trail running season Kilian Jornet set out to win five races on five continents. The lengths varied in distance, climate and altitude – from a 100 mile race in the scorching heat of the Sierra Nevada Mountains to the vertical ascent of South East Asia’s highest mountain in Malaysian Borneo, Mount Kinabalu.

Follow his experiences over the year, from the pressures of high-end competition to his unprecedented performance and success. This story is not just about what he has achieved, but rather what he has learnt from running in these surroundings and the emotions they bring. The film immerses itself in the trail communities around the world as Kilian and his teammates, friends and competitors try to understand the desire they have for the mountains and running.

For many, it is the simplicity of running, its meditative nature and the freedom it offers to explore new landscapes that drives their passion for the sport. 5 Races, 5 Continents is an inspirational ode to the beauty of trail running, a sport that is inherently simple and pure.

Length – 26 minutes

Director – Dean Leslie from The African Attachment

Dean Leslie is young South African Filmmaker and Co-Owner of Cape Town based independent film production company, The African Attachment. He has experience on a wide range of local and international productions and has worked as a producer, director, cinematographer, photographer and editor. He was the cinematographer for ‘Interviews Unit’ in the Academy Award nominated feature film, ’District 9’. He edited the International short film,‘Pumzi’, for Focus Features (USA) and Inspired Minority Pictures, which was won Best International Short at Cannes Independent Film Festival and was a favourite at the 2010 Sundance International Film Festival.He produced, directed and edited the critically acclaimed South African documentary,’12 Mile Stone’, alongside Greg Fell, and has directed a string of music videos for some of South Africa’s top bands including  Die Heuwels Fantasties, The ParlotonesThe Dirty Skirts, aKING andAshtray Electric. He is currently in post-production on his debut documentary feature film‘Wandering Fever’, a film that has seen him shoot on all 7 Continents over 4 years  as he explores the idea of why we run through the story of South African elite ultra runner Ryan Sandes. Dean  has a distinctive visual style and his projects have a strong narrative element layered with underlying themes and tones. His work has been widely praised for its cinematography, style and underlying mood – all testaments to Dean’s continued growth and progress as a Director. Taken from Vancouver International Mountain Festival.

Episode 1

Episode 2

Episode 3

Episode 4

Episode 5