inov 8 X-TALON 210 Shoe Review

The inov 8 X-TALON range for 2018 has had a reworking. Always a tricky subject, especially with such a classic shoe in the inov 8 line-up. But as history shows, this shoe is 10-years old and has had many incarnations.

So, what is different for 2018?

Well, first and foremost, STICKY GRIP. This new outsole compound is inov 8’s new secret weapon for holding a runner on the ground when conditions are challenging, in particular, wet and slippery rocks.

The second key aspect is the reworking of the shoes upper. Now depending which X-TALON you have, the upper will be different. For example, I have just reviewed the X-TALON 230 HERE and the upper on the 230 is a world away from the upper on the 210.

So, here goes!

THE SHOE

Orange! Whoa, yep, you are going to be seen coming in these babies on your first outing. I strongly suggest, going in the garden and rubbing them in the soil before venturing out. I wore sunglasses for the first day of testing. I joke obviously, but the 210 is a bright shoe, one could easily be put off by the colour, but let’s face it, if you are using the shoe in the place it is intended for, they are only bright for one outing!

In comparison to the X-TALON 230 (here) the 210 appears super light and airy – funny as there is only 20g difference between the shoes. The upper is light, very breathable and has the now traditional inov 8 overlays that gives the upper its structure. They are light and fast and gladly they have a gusseted tongue to give a slipper like feel. They feel very different to the 230’s – I would go as far to say that they are not comparable. They are completely two different shoes. So, whereas in the past you may have two pairs of X-Talon’s with different drops and have a similar feel between the two, now that is not the case. So, if you fancy 230’s with more cushioning, 6mm drop and a tough upper, make sure you try them first.

The 210 is 1 arrow, so, 3mm drop. Fit is scaled as 2, so, they are at the narrow end of inov 8’s fit gauge but not as narrow as the 230’s which scale as 1. Have to say, I prefer the fit of the 2.

The outsole, like the 230’s, is STICKY GRIP with classic 8mm lugs – a winning combo!

Cushioning is pretty minimal with 6mm at the front and 9mm at the rear.

This is a shoe that has racing written all over it.

MORE DETAIL

The fit is slipper like and the 2-grade fit is pretty sweet allowing a little room for toe splay but not at the loss of control or precision when running. Of course, fit is all relative and based on an individual’s foot. However, I keep saying this, if you want a shoe for fast and technical running, it can’t be sloppy. It must fit and hold the foot – the 210’s does this perfectly.

The upper is very soft and flexible. The fit and security all comes from the overlays and in particular the 5 that lead to the lace eyelets.

The overlay extends round to the front of the shoe and the outsole extends up to provide a little toe protection. Toe protection is minimal, especially when one compares to the 230’s!

The upper is very breathable and there is method to this! inov 8 are recommending this shoe for the obvious fell, mountain, trail, obstacle course running but with the new addition of swim/run – a fast growing sport! Cleverly, the upper does not absorb or retain water and it has been Designed to actively encourage water (or sweat even) to escape. Obviously, this is key for swim/run but I can also see this being a great feature for any races or courses where one may be in and out of water. For example, the 210 would be a great shoe for the multi-stage race in Costa Rica, The Coastal Challenge – here participants on certain stages are in and out of water all the time. The heal box is snug, comfortable, holds the foot perfectly and caused no issues .

The outsole is a key feature of the 210 just as in the 230. STICKY GRIP is the new secret weapon. Basically, it’s a new compound of outsole that is softer and stickier than previous inov 8 outsoles. In mud, on trails, on fells etc there is little noticeable difference as the 8mm lugs do the job they have all done. What is noticeable is the additional grip on rock, particularly when wet. This is a great USP and maybe even more so for this shoe with a possible swim/run audience. 

IN USE

Unlike the 230, I slipped the 210 on and they immediately felt great – slipper like and definitely no breaking in required. I wore them around my home and soon didn’t notice them.

The 2 fit is as mentioned is narrow/ precision but not super narrow and I really liked the feel – this was helped by the soft upper and the gusseted tongue. The shoes upper combination works really well and once I adjusted the laces to personal feel and preference, I just knew that I was going to be happy in them.

With minimal cushioning and 3mm drop, this is not a shoe for everyone, or maybe I should clarify and say, that for some people, it is a shoe they should use sparingly. It’s a fast and light shoe designed for an efficient runner. The shoe is very flexible and just urges you to push on with the META FLEX on the outsole really helping with the propulsive phase.

Although cushioning is relatively minimal, the EVA FUSION works really well and providing excellent comfort. The shoes are so low to the ground, they are a little like taking a F1 car out for a drive. Hoka One One shoes for example would be a double decker bus.

A mile of road had me clipping along, right on my toes and then I suddenly realized I didn’t have the fitness for the pace the shoes made me want to run. So, racers out there are going to love this feel! On a muddy tow path, the 8mm studs gripped as they have always done and I had 100% confidence, the low-drop adding to that secure feel.

The 210 certainly gets you on your toes. I purposely tried to run slower and heal strike to get a feel of how the shoe would respond – it just felt all wrong. So, I speeded back up and got back on my toes.

On a wet grassy bank, the outsole gripped away and in the really thick mud that followed, I was over my ankles with soft, wet, brown stuff. Here I noticed two things, the 8mm lugs were trying to gain purchase in the harder ground below, at times they did, at times they didn’t – that is the nature of thick mud. One thing is for sure, in most other shoes I would have hit the deck! The second thing I noticed was how the shoes filled with mud but noticeably on the harder trail that followed, the shoes squelched and squelched, and I could see the mud escape from the uppers! I normally miss a small river on my run, yes, to avoid getting my feet wet, but I had to test the swim/ run capability. Apart from the water being bloody freezing, the shoes and uppers worked a treat. I was really impressed to see the water escape as I ran down the follow-on trails.

Wet rocks have been a hit and miss affair with inov 8 in the past but I can confirm, just as I found in the 230’s (here) that the new STICKY GRIP is a huge step forward for the inov 8 outsole. It is definitely getting more purchase and thus providing more security which in turn allows one the confidence to run at speed.

Most of my runs in the 210 have been between 5-12 miles. I haven’t gone past 100 minutes in any one run and in all honesty, for me, I would probably say 2-hours would be the max I would want to run in such a light, minimal and low-drop shoe. But that is me! My preferred drop is 6 or 8mm and most scenarios I prefer a little more cushioning. A light, fast and efficient runner I am sure could run longer in them!

Nearly all my runs have 1 mile of road at the start and end. With 108 miles in the 210 I can see the impact of the road sections, but it is not worrying. In all honesty, the 210 should only be used off-road and if I could, that is what I would do. The reality for most of us though is that a little road will always appear in our runs, so it is good to get a feel of the durability of the new STICKY GRIP. It’s still too early to say what that life is.

With extensive experience in Skyrunning races, I see the 210 being a perfect match for VK’s and SKY races (typically 20-30km) – in particular, the STICKY GRIP outsole would be most welcome on the technical, rocky and often wet ridges that can be encountered say in the Dolomites or the Alps.

CONCLUSION

The 210 is a winning shoe for efficient runners who want to be low to the ground feeling the terrain as though running barefoot without the discomfort. The combination of the light upper, precision fit and new sticky outsole makes them really stand out as a shoe distance racing shoe for fell, mountain and OC races. The upper certainly works really well at expelling water, so, if swim/run is your thing, they will be worth a look.

At 3mm drop and minimal cushioning, the 210 is definitely not for everyone. Certainly, I could not run in a shoe like this every day, but I think it’s fair to say that inov 8 don’t intent that to be the case. By way of clarity, the 210’s are a 2-seater car that sits in the garage, only to be used every now and again, whereas normally every day you drive around, say in a Ford Focus. Maybe the X-Talon 230’s are the Ford Focus and the X-Talon 210 is the Porsche 911?

The 95! – The 2016Cape Wrath Ultra™ Starts

CapeWrathUltralogoThe Cape Wrath Ultra™ brought to you by Ourea Events, the team who revived the Dragon’s Back Race are in the countdown days to a once in a lifetime multi-day journey that will test mind and body over 8-days weaving a 400km journey through the Highlands of Scotland.

Starting at Fort William on May 22nd, the race will take runners on an incredible journey in a magnificent and remote part of the world that will culminate in the most northwesterly point of the British Isles, Cape Wrath on May 29th.

Cape Wrath Ultra website HERE

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Stunning scenery, remote wilderness, beautiful lochs, glens, towering mountains and the crashing ocean, the Cape Wrath Ultra™ is arguably one of the most stunning multi-day journeys in the world.

A supported expedition, equipment for the competitor’s will be transported day-by-day, tented accommodation and meals will be provided.

In a nutshell, 400km (250-miles) over and through the Scottish Highlands will be the ultimate test for the runners as they navigate via map and compass (GPS are allowed with GPX routes provided by Ourea Events) over 8-days over multiple distances with a variety of terrain and elevation gain.

Today, 95 runners arrived in Fort William to register, collect numbers and leave drop bags in preparation of the race to start tomorrow, Sunday 22nd May at 1000 hours.

Over the coming days, you will be able to follow these 95 runners via live tracking as they weave their way north. We thought it only appropriate that you can put a face to the name. Here are the 95!

Cape Wrath Ultra Website HERECapeWrathUltralogo

CapeWrathRoute

Race Day Nutrition (Part One) – Marc Laithwaite

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In recent articles, we’ve discussed the 2 main fuel sources for endurance exercise (fat and carbohydrate) and how you should optimise your body to burn fat, thereby allowing you to save precious carbohydrate stores. When it comes to race day then the game and the rules change completely. As a recap, when training you should:

1. Ride or run at the correct intensity or follow a specific protocol such as Maffetone
2. Avoid fluctuations in intensity, remember that average heart rate or power output are NOT the critical figures, it’s TIME IN ZONE that counts
3. Eat foods which are balanced with low GI carbohydrates and fats to encourage fat usage and avoid sugar spikes
4. Avoid gels and sugar products based on point 3 above

If you follow the above guidance, over a 12-16 week training period, you can teach your body to utilise a greater amount of fat as fuel and also to use less calories overall, making you more economical. The important thing to remember is that ‘training’ and ‘racing’ are 2 separate things and your fuelling approach should reflect this.

What happens during the race?

Okay, let’s presume that you have trained correctly and maximised your fat burning potential and fuel economy. You reach the first event of the year and when riding or running at race pace you are using 700kcal per hour, 50% of which comes from carbohydrate and 50% of which comes from fat. You only need to worry about the carbohydrate loss as that’s the one which is critical, so let’s focus on the 350kcal of carbohydrate which equates to 88 grams of carbohydrate (4 kcal per gram).

The limitation of carbohydrate intake

Here’s the big problem, you can only absorb approximately 60g of carbohydrate per hour. Imagine that there are small boats, which ‘ferry’ carbohydrate across the intestine wall into your blood stream. Unfortunately you only have so many ‘ferry boats’ so no matter how much carbohydrate you throw in there, the amount which can be ferried is limited to a pretty standard 60g. For our example above, that means that you’re going to fall short. You’re using 88 grams per hour and you can only replace 60 grams per hour. That’s a 28 gram / 112 kcal per hour deficit.

So I can’t just eat more?

Unfortunately not. If you eat more, it’s unlikely to be digested and will simply sit in your stomach or intestines without providing energy. There are a lot of people who suffer from gastric problems during long distance events and this is generally caused by eating too much food which they are unable to digest. It’s really important that you understand, eating more food doesn’t mean you’ll have more energy and it may well mean that you’ll face stomach upsets. I stress this point knowing how obsessed Ironman athletes in particular become with regards to feeding on the bike.

A deficit of 112 Kcal per hour doesn’t sound too bad

No, it doesn’t. But that is based on the presumption that you are only using 700kcal per hour, bigger people and less efficient people may be using more. It’s also based on the assumption that 50% is coming from fat and that may not be the case at all, in fact, as much as 80-100% may be coming from carbohydrate. What makes this worse is that bigger people can’t necessarily take on board more fuel, the 60g limit still pretty much applies. It’s a gut issue, it’s not about how big your muscles are and how much you can store in there.

So the 3 things you might want to know are:

1. How many calories do I burn per hour?
2. How many of them come from fat and carbohydrate?
3. How much should I be taking in as a consequence?

As a start point, you can probably work out your calorie usage by using a heart rate monitor or power meter. Run or ride at race pace and it’ll do the calculation for you, although the power meter is a lot more accurate than the heart rate monitor, it’s still a start point. Warm up, then do an hour at your ‘race pace’ and work out the figures. It’s amazing how many people who consider their training and racing to be ‘serious’, still have no clue how many kcal they use when racing. How can you have any grasp of nutrition requirements without knowing this figure? Once you’ve calculated that figure, apply the following rule:

80/20: If you are struggling to ride 50 miles / run 15 miles even when fuelling yourself throughout, then apply the 80/20 rule. That means 80% of your fuel is carbohydrate and 20% is fat.

65/35: If you can ride 50 miles / run 15 miles comfortably using fuel, then apply the 65/35 rule. That means 65% of your fuel is carbohydrate and 20% is fat.

50/50: If you can ride 50 miles / run 15 miles comfortably without using any fuel whatsoever, then apply the 50/50 rule. That means 50% of your fuel is carbohydrate and 50% is fat.

Are those figures accurate?

Absolutely not, I just made them up. They are by no means 100% accurate but they will give you a good start point and will allow you to calculate an approximate figure. The running figures are less ‘straight forwards’ than the cycling, as the impact of running can really fatigue your legs, so you may find 15 miles difficult, even if your fat burning and fuel economy is good. for cycling, the impact is low, so it’s more likely governed by metabolism and fuel.

Ok, so what’s the next step?

Here’s what we’re going to do. Prior to next week you are going to do a 1 hour ride or run at your ‘race pace’ and then using your cycle power meter, GPS or heart rate monitor, calculate how many calories per hour you are using when exercising at that intensity. I feel this is a pretty important thing for you to understand if you are to race successfully. It’s easy with a power meter for cycling, it does the maths for you. Most heart rate monitors will use your age and weight to work out kcal per hour. There are some tools on the internet such as: http://www.braydenwm.com/calburn.htm which can help to give you a basic idea.

Go forwards my endurance friends and do the maths, next week, we will be looking at planning your intake.

Until then, stay healthy.

– Marc Laithwaite

About Marc:

Sports Science lecturer for 10 years at St Helens HE College.

2004 established The Endurance Coach LTD sports science and coaching business. Worked with British Cycling as physiology support 2008-2008. Previous Triathlon England Regional Academy Head Coach, North West.

In 2006 established Epic Events Management LTD. Now one of the largest event companies in the NW, organising a range of triathlon, swimming and cycling events. EPIC EVENTS also encompasses Montane Trail 26 and Petzl Night Runner events.

In 2010 established Montane Lakeland 50 & 100 LTD. This has now become the UKs leading ultra distance trail running event.

In 2010 established The Endurance Store triathlon, trail running and open water swimming store. Based in Appley Bridge, Wigan, we are the North West’s community store, organising and supporting local athletes and local events.

Check out the endurance store HERE

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Mourne Skyline MTR 2014 – Race Images

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Misty skies, gale force winds, relentless climbing, technical terrain and an incredible field of runners made the inaugural Mourne Skyline MTR a day to remember.

Congratulations to Stevie Kremer and Kim Collison on two great performances.

Stevie said post race, ‘that is the hardest race I have ever done! Harder than Zegama Aizkorri it was just brutal. Relentless climbing, technical and with the wind it was just soooo hard. Kilian Jornet would love it!’

A full race report will follow.

RESULTS WOMEN Mourne Skyline Mountain-Trail Race
Stevie Kremer 4:24.2 (10th overall)
Jo Meek 4:30.3
Diane Wilson 4:45.4
Sharon Trimble 5:02.1
Shileen O’Kane 5:03.1

RESULTS MEN Mourne Skyline Mountain-Trail Race
Kim Collinson 3:57.0
Eoin Lennon 3:59.4
J Marshall Thomson 4:08.3
Ally Beaven 4:12.0
David Steele 4:15.0

Jo Meek on RUNULTRA

 

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Jo Meek has illuminated the ultra world in the past 18-months placing 2nd at the 28th edition of Marathon des Sables, winning The Coastal Challenge in Costa Rica, setting a new course record and an outright win at Iznik Ultra and then placed 5th at the iconic Comrades Ultra Marathon in South Africa. But it didn’t end…

I caught up with Jo and wrote an article for RUNULTRA on this rising star of our sport.

Please check it out HERE

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Uphill Secrets from the Pros – Trail Running Mag

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Check out the latest edition of TRAIL RUNNING with an article and images by yours truly on running uphill.

It features Emelie Forsberg, Antonella Confortola, Erik Haugsnes, Florian Reichert, Tessa Hill and Stevie Kremer

www.trailrunningmag.co.uk

You can subscribe HERE

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International Mountain Day

I Love Mountain iancorless.com

 

December 11th is International Mountain Day

The theme for 2013? “Mountains: Key to a Sustainable Future”

Covering around 27 percent of the earth’s land surface, mountains play a critical role in moving the world towards sustainable economic growth. They not only provide sustenance and wellbeing to 720 million mountain people around the world, but indirectly benefit billions more living downstream.

In particular, mountains provide freshwater, energy and food – resources that will be increasingly scarce in coming decades. However, mountains also have a high incidence of poverty and are extremely vulnerable to climate change, deforestation, land degradation and natural disasters.

The challenge is to identify new and sustainable opportunities that can bring benefits to both highland and lowland communities and help to eradicate poverty without contributing to the degradation of fragile mountain ecosystems .

Commitment and will to advance this cause were strengthened during the International Year of Mountains in 2002, and mountains have gained an increasingly high profile on agendas at all levels.

The Year also led to the adoption of resolution 57/245, in which the General Assembly designated 11 December as International Mountain Day, and encouraged the international community to organize events at all levels on that day to highlight the importance of sustainable mountain development. Content ©un.org link here

In the words of Marino Giacometti, president of the ISF, “today the World celebrates the International Mountain Day, but we all know that everyday must be the day of the mountains, the wonderful arena for our sport that we love and respect.”

It is a pleasure for me to go back to one day last in August on the Matterhorn, the place of the first skyrunning competitions and of the first World Championship  in 1998. That day, August 21, 2013 Kilian Jornet united 20 years of our history by challenging the mythical record for the ascent and descent of Matterhorn established by Bruno Brunod in 1995 with the time of 3.14.44. With an extraordinary time of 2.52.02 Kilian celebrated the mountain and to our first skyrunning world championship title.

Mont-Blanc Chamonix ©iancorless.com

On the mountains of truth you can never climb in vain: either you will reach a point higher up today, or you will be training your powers so that you will be able to climb higher tomorrow.
Friedrich Nietzsche

Episode 44 – Sharman, Hollon, Clark, Clayton

Episode 44 of Talk Ultra - Sharman, Hollon, Clark, Clayton

Episode 44 of Talk Ultra and on this weeks show we have a long distance theme. We have an interview with Nickademus Hollon who just recently placed 7th overall at Tor des Geants. We also have an in-depth chat with Ian Sharman about his incredible summer running the Grand Slam. We also speak to Nick Clark in his regular Grand Slam slot, Clarky’s Corner. We speak to Brit, Emma Clayton about her silver medal in the WMRA worlds in Poland. The news, Talk Training, a blog, up and coming races and of course, Speedgoat Karl.

00:09:56 NEWS

Run Rabbit Run

  1. Jason Schlarb 17:15:20
  2. Karl Meltzer 18:32:07
  3. Jeff Browning 18:52:00
  4. Josh Arthur
  5. Timothy Olson
  1. Michele Yates 20:16:54
  2. Nikki Kimball 20:59:13
  3. Rhonda Claridge 21:45:05
  4. Becky Wheeler
  5. Pam Smith

Wasatch 100

  1. Nick Clark 20:24:26
  2. Ian Sharman 21:01:30
  3. Rod Bien 22:01:58

 00:15:08 INTERVIEW Ian Sharman Grand Slam Interview

  1. Sarah Evan McCloskey 24:31:19
  2. Andrea Martinez 26:21:17
  3. Paulette J Zilmer 27:15:02

Tor des Geants

  1. Iker Karrera 70:04:15
  2. Oscar Perez 70:29:41
  3. Franco Colle 72:05:23
  1. Francesca Canepa 88:12:17
  2. Nerea Martinez 91:01:42
  3. Emanuela Tonetti 94:45:59

Jungfrau Marathon

Men:

1. Geoffrey Gikuni Ndungu 2:50:28

2. Petro Mamo 2:52:49

3. Viktor Röthlin 2:53:21

4. Robert Krupicka 3:00:48

5. Hosea Tuei 3:02:12

Ladies:

1. Andrea Mayr 3:20:20

2. Aline Camboulives 3:25:08

3. Martina Strähl 3:25:23

4. Sabine Reiner 3:25:59

5. Stevie Kremer 3:27:09

The North Face Endurance Challenge (Wisconsin) 50mile and 50K

Nicholas Wied emailed in… The 50 Mile

Men

1. Tyler Sigl (Green Bay, WI) 5:38:49;

2. Brian Condon (Madison, WI) 5:55:43;

3. Adam Condit 6:08:38. 

This is crazy because Ian Sharman set the CR last year at 5:55. 

This is Tyler’s 1st ultra, he is a 2:15 marathon guy who works a full time job and trains on the side.  He lowered Ian’s record by almost 20 minutes, INSANE! 

Another note, Brian Condon running his 3rd ultra and 2nd 50 miler (he also took 2nd behind David Riddle at Ice Age 50) ran the same time as Ian’s CR. 

50mile women

1.Molly Culver 7:51:12;

2.Wendy Lilly 8:20:03;

3. Holly Fearing 8:32:42.    

50K Men

1.Andy Nesheim 4:01, 2. Brian Udovich 4:08, 3. Andrew Hollatz 4:14. 

50K Women

1. Lorena Campos (Chile) 4:21, 2. rin Seffrood 4:38, 3. Bri Famera 4:40. 

Kilian & Emelie – rescued

UROC preview

On a final note, in the Sun Newspaper (not that I read the Sun) a snippet said, “Rab Lee from Bowness and pal, Mark Howlett set a new World Record for running 68.2 miles – three legged, non stop in 24 hours at the Glenmore24 – BONKERS


01:30:10 BLOGS

Kilian Jornet – http://www.kilianjornet.cat/en/blog

“This is a warning that the mountain is a hard and dangerous place, even when precautions are taken. One must be humble in the mountains, because a high price can be paid for our failures, especially when travelling light. We must accept and be aware of the risks that we are prepared to take individually and with the people who accompany us, depending on our physical and technical skill and also our experience.”

01:31:14 15 MIN OF FAME with Brit Emma Clayton

01:43:09 TALK TRAINING – Marc Laithwaite

02:07:22 INTERVIEW

This week’s interview is with Nickademus Hollon. Nick is not your normal runner… he seeks out the tough and the extreme. We interviewed Nick earlier this year when he became the youngest and one of only 14 people to finish the Barkley. Just recently, he took on the Tor des Geants in Italy.

03:04:05 MELTZER MOMENT 

Good –

Bad –

and Ugly – 

03:09:15 SMILESandMILES with Emelie Forsberg – smilesandmiles@yahoo.com

03:34:42 CLARKY’S CORNER – discusses Wasatch and his summer on the trails going head-to-head with Ian Sharman

03:51:48 Up & Coming RACES for the next two weeks

Australia

South Australia

Yurrebilla Trail 56km Ultra | 56 kilometers | September 22, 2013 | website

Austria

Wörthersee Trail-Maniac 57 K | 57 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Brazil

Jungle Marathon Brazil – 100 km | 100 kilometers | October 03, 2013 | website

Jungle Marathon Brazil – 240 km | 242 kilometers | October 03, 2013 | website

Canada

British Columbia

50K Cody Claim Run | 50 kilometers | September 29, 2013 | website

Frosty Mountain Ultra Trail Race | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Great Lake Walk and Ultramarathon | 56 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Ontario

Sears Great Canadian Run – Toronto | 141 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Chile

Patagonian International Marathon – 63K | 63 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

France

Aveyron

100 km de Millau | 100 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

Haute-Loire

Le Grand Trail du Saint Jacques | 66 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

Haute-Savoie

Trail des Aiguilles Rouges | 50 kilometers | September 29, 2013 | website

Ille-et-Vilaine

100 km de la Vallée du Semnon | 100 kilometers | September 22, 2013 | website

50 km de la Vallée du Semnon | 50 kilometers | September 22, 2013 | website

Loir-et-Cher

Ultrail de Beauval | 65 kilometers | September 29, 2013 | website

Lot

Figeac – St-Cirq-Lapopie – Conques : du 20 au 24 septembre 2013 | 208 kilometers | September 20, 2013 | website

Nord

La Contrebandière | 65 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

Seine-et-Marne

Impérial Trail – 64 km | 64 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Germany

Baden-Württemberg

KuSuH Trail 100 | 100 miles | September 28, 2013 | website

Bavaria

Allgäuer Volksbank Voralpenmarathon – 50 km | 50 kilometers | September 22, 2013 | website

Churfranken Trailrun | 73 kilometers | September 22, 2013 | website

Lower Saxony

Volkslauf ” Gesund beginnt im Mund” – 52.8 km | 52 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

North Rhine-Westphalia

50 km von Hitdorf | 50 kilometers | October 03, 2013 | website

Rhineland-Palatinate

Dorint-RUN50 | 50 kilometers | September 20, 2013 | website

Greece

Spartathlon | 245 kilometers | September 27, 2013 | website

Italy

Friuli-Venezia Giulia

Magredi Mountain Trail 100 Mile | 100 miles | October 04, 2013 | website

Piedmont

Trail di Oulx – 50 km | 50 kilometers | September 22, 2013 | website

Veneto

Lupatotissima 100km | 100 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Japan

Akita Nairiku 100km Marathon | 100 kilometers | September 22, 2013 | website

Akita Nairiku 50km Marathon | 50 kilometers | September 22, 2013 | website

Kenya

Amazing Maasai Ultra | 75 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

Morocco

UltraTrail Atlas Toubkal | 105 kilometers | October 03, 2013 | website

Norway

Nordmarka Ultra Challenge | 82 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

Singapore

Craze Ultra 100 miles | 100 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Craze Ultra 101 km | 101 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Craze Ultra 78 km | 78 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

South Africa

Bonitas City2City Marathon – 50 km | 50 kilometers | September 29, 2013 | website

Spain

Catalonia

Ultra Cavalls del Vent | 100 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Madrid

100 km Madrid-Segovia | 100 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

50 km Madrid Trail | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Turkey

Lycian Way Ultramarathon | 250 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

United Kingdom

England

Atlantic Coast 3-Day Challenge | 78 miles | October 04, 2013 | website

Cotswold Way Century 100mi | 102 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Hardmoors 60 | 60 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

High Peak 40 Mile Challenge | 40 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

London to Brighton Run | 56 miles | September 22, 2013 | website

XNRG Toad Challenge 2013 | 90 miles | September 20, 2013 | website

Northern Ireland

Causeway Coast Ultra Marathon | 39 miles | September 28, 2013 | website

USA

Alaska

Equinox Ultra Marathon 50 km | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Arizona

Mogollon Monster 100 | 106 miles | September 28, 2013 | website

California

Coastal 50K | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Ragnar Relay Napa Valley | 186 miles | September 20, 2013 | website

Sierra Nevada 100K | 100 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Sierra Nevada Double Marathon | 52 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Tahoe 50 | 50 miles | September 29, 2013 | website

Tahoe 72 | 72 miles | September 29, 2013 | website

Colorado

Devil Mountain 50K | 50 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

Devil Mountain 50 Mile Ultra | 50 miles | September 28, 2013 | website

The Bear Chase Race 50K Trail Race | 50 kilometers | September 29, 2013 | website

The Bear Chase Race 50 Mile Trail Race | 50 miles | September 29, 2013 | website

Georgia

Georgia Jewel 100 Mile Run | 100 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Georgia Jewel 35 Mile Run | 35 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Georgia Jewel 50 Mile Run | 50 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

The North Face Endurance Challenge-Georgia 50K | 50 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

The North Face Endurance Challenge-Georgia Gore-Tex® 50 Mile | 50 miles | September 28, 2013 | website

Idaho

Priest Lake 50K Ultra Marathon | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Kansas

FlatRock 50K | 50 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

Maryland

Ragnar Relay Washington D.C. | 200 miles | October 04, 2013 | website

Massachusetts

Hancock Shalker Village 50 Mile Race | 50 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Michigan

Dances With Dirt – Hell (50km) | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Dances With Dirt – Hell (50mi) | 50 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

DWD Hell 50K | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

DWD Hell 50M | 50 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

New Jersey

The Mountain Madness 50K | 50 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

New York

Chautauqua Ultras 50K | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Chautauqua Ultras 50 Mi | 50 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Ragnar Relay Adirondacks | 210 miles | September 28, 2013 | website

Virgil Crest 100 Mile Ultra | 100 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Virgil Crest 50 Mile Ultra | 50 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Ohio

Hocking Hills Indian 60K Run | 60 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Oregon

Flagline 50k Trail Run | 50 kilometers | September 22, 2013 | website

Pennsylvania

Trails 4 Tails Ultra Run | 40 miles | September 21, 2013 | website

Utah

Bear 100 | 100 miles | September 27, 2013 | website

Grand to Grand Ultra | 160 miles | September 22, 2013 | website

Zion-Bryce Traverse | 85 miles | September 28, 2013 | website

Vermont

Vermont 50 Ultra Run | 50 miles | September 29, 2013 | website

Virginia

GrindStone 100 | 101 miles | October 04, 2013 | website

Trail Runner Ultra Race of Champions 100K | 100 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

Uber Rock 50K Trail Race | 50 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

Washington

Cle Elum Ridge 50K | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Middle Fork 50K | 50 kilometers | September 21, 2013 | website

Wyoming

Sundance 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | September 28, 2013 | website

CLOSE

03:59:20

Links:

Run Rabbit Run 2013 – Race Preview

runrabbitrun_logo2.41-250x300

 

Run rabbit, run rabbit

Run! Run! Run!

Run rabbit, run rabbit

Run! Run! Run!

Bang! Bang! Bang! Bang!

Goes the farmer’s gun

Run rabbit, run rabbit

Run! Run! Run!

 

The 2nd Annual Run Rabbit Run 100 Mile Endurance Run, held in the terrific little town of Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The race starts on Friday, September 13, 2013 at midday

I cant help but hear ‘Speedgoat’ Karl Meltzer in my head… jogging along allowing all the fast guys to shoot of in search of the $10,000 first prize and singing the song aloud. It happened last year (not singing the song, but allowing the others to shoot off) and look what happened. One-by-one they fell by the wayside and the old goat himself reeled them in and schooled them all on how to run a 100-miles. Karl should know; he has won enough.

Once again he is playing down his chances of winning the 2013 edition RRR. In last weeks Talk Ultra (Ep43) we discussed at length his form and reading between the lines, I know he is ready. He wasn’t ready at Western States early in 2012 due to niggles and still pulled out 10th, however just a few weeks later, just like Seb Chaigneau at TNFUTMB, the exertions of a tough 100 at WSER took its toll and he dropped from Hardrock 100.

Karl, with his own race done and dusted, the Speedgoat 50k, he finally found some down time and concentrated on getting fit and healthy for the RRR and for Karl, there’s nothing quite like a $10,000 purse to motivate him… ask his wife, she got a new bathroom out of the race last year! (Or was it a kitchen?)

©copyright .iancorless.com.P1010198

Joe Grant also had a troublesome Hardrock 100 and although he was super motivated to top the podium he just didn’t have the right day. It may very well have been his early season Iditarod still making demands on his body or ultimately, it may have just been a bad day! However, he seems to have got his head in a great place and certainly his recent trip to Europe as support and crew for Anton Krupicka has given him a new lease of life and all those mountain miles may well transfer to something special at RRR.

Ever present force over the 100k distance, Dave Mackey will hope to bring that speed to RRR and pull off a win at 100-miles. Although he has had some good 100 performances, notably 2nd at WSER, he has never quite hit the nail on the head like he has done over the shorter 100k-distance. He nearly rectified this at San Diego 100 earlier this year but unfortunately that went pear-shaped due to course errors. He is due a win!

Jason Schlarb I am pretty sure will be looking to put the record straight at RRR this year after a great start to the 2012 race that went completely problematic and frustrating due to going off course. For me, he is the dark horse of the favourites and don’t be surprised if he leads early on but manages to hold on!

Timothy Olson, TNFUTMB ©iancorless.com

Timothy Olson, TNFUTMB ©iancorless.com

Timothy Olson gets my final mention. Yes, I am mentioning Timothy last. Not because I don’t think he can win but you have to consider his season and because just the other week he placed 4th at TNFUTMB. I am pretty sure the $10,000 first prize is the attraction here and that has to be a motivating factor. However, he dug deep at TNFUTMB and used all his physical and mental reserves to reach the line. It could go either way for Timothy at RRR. Irrespective of what happens, he has had a great year with results at Tarawera, Transvulcania La Palma and of course, the defense of his WSER crown.

Behind this front five is a group of runners just waiting for the opportunity to steal the carrot from the other Rabbits. Keep an eye on Jeff Browning, Jason Loutitt, and if Dave James is in a good place, he may well push the others for the podium.

Nikki Kimball, La Palma ©iancorless.com

Nikki Kimball, La Palma ©iancorless.com

The ladies race is potentially a little more open than the men’s race however; it does have some key names that stick out. In particular a rejuvenated and in-form Nikki Kimball. I interviewed Nikki after her incredible 2nd place at the 2013 Western States and for sure, she has found a new balance. She is racing less and when she races, she wants to perform. Her lining up at RRR can only mean one thing!

Darcy Africa is another hot ‘fave’ for the RRR crown coming from another great win at Hardrock 100. She is consistent over the longer distances as her 2012 season shows. Without doubt she will be pushing the pace at the front here!

I predicted Cassie Scallon would have a great race at WSER based on her performances over shorter distances and her natural speed. However, the big dance didn’t go well and she is untested at 100-miles. I still think we will see her rectify the situation in Steamboat Springs and contend for a podium place at least.

One-to-watch goes to Jennifer Benna. She ran a great 100 earlier this year and then went to Transvulcania La Palma but pulled out early saying things just didn’t feel right. WSER didn’t go well either so redemption is required at RRR.

Finally, last years 2nd place at RRR, Rhonda Claridge returns and with another solid performance at Hardrock 100 she will be looking to move one place higher and take home the $10,000 pot.

Jeez, I missed Pam Smith. Thanks Speedgoat. For sure, Pam Smith coming from winning the 2013 Western States changes the dynamic of RRR and she will be gunning for the win. Of course Pam will be the one who all the ladies will be watching. Her main priority will be ‘chicking’ Speedgoat again though and of course taking the big bucks!

 Links

  • Race Line up is here if you’d like to point out any contenders for the podium.
  • Race website here
  • Course description here
  • Athlete tracking here