Episode 104 – Candice Burt, Lucy Bartholomew, Zach Bitter

A_GRAVATAR

This is Episode 104 of Talk Ultra and I am pleased to say Speedgoat is back. On this show we talk with rising Australian star, Lucy Bartholomew. We speak to fast man, Zach Bitter about running 100-miles super quick and Candice Burt talks Hurt 100 and the appeal of 200-mile races.

Our show has always been and always will be free for you, the listener. If you like what we do, please consider a donation.

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00:01:30 Show Start

00:14:17 NEWS

HURT 100

1 – Jeff Browning 21:22

2 – Gary Robbins 21:55

3 – Yassine Diboun 22:39

1 – Denise Bourassa 30:24

2 – Candice Burt 31:28

3 – Junk Suzuki 32:29

00:25:36 INTERVIEW with CANDICE BURT on her 2nd place and her running history as a racer and RD.

BANDERA 100k *Golden Ticket Race

1 – Jim Walmsley 7:46 (fast!)

2 – Chris DeNucci 8:06

3 – Paul Terranova 8:38

1 – Cassie Scallon 9:19 (fast!)

2 – Vanessa Taylor 9:40

3 – Michele Yates 9:45

ZOLKAN 4 DAY in Chile

Won by Veronica Bravo and Moises Jimenez

THE SPINE 268 miles

Eoin Keith smashed the old course record  to finish in 95:17:18 (approx 15 hours quicker.) Last years winner, Pavel Paloncy finished 2nd in 100:34:58 and Pete Wilkie 3rd in 117:15:15.

Only 2 ladies finished, Zoe Thornborough 11:40:12 and Anna Buckingham 167:17:05.

In the Challenger 108 miles (shorter race) last years Spine winner, Beth Pascall smashed the CR to finish in 30:32:10, Sarah Davies 2nd 44:35:50 and Sharon Sullivan 3rd 52:24:45.

Tom Hollins was 1st man 29:37:25, Matt Bennett 30:25:33 and Scott Morley 38:26:37.

01:26:46 INTERVIEW with LUCY BARTHOLOMEW who smashed the ladies record at Bogong to Hotham is Australia

02:10:56 INTERVIEW fast man ZACH BITTER talks training for, racing and looking for that elusive super fast time for 100-miles.

UP & COMING RACES

Antartica

Antarctic Ice 100k | 100 kilometers | January 23, 2016 | website

White Continent 50K | 50 kilometers | January 25, 2016 | website

Australia

Queensland

Beerwah at Night – 50 km | 51 kilometers | January 23, 2016 | website

Beerwah at Night – 50 km | 51 kilometers | January 23, 2016 | website

Cambodia

128 km | 128 kilometers | January 23, 2016 | website

64 km | 64 kilometers | January 23, 2016 | website

Canada

Yukon

Yukon Arctic 100M | 100 miles | February 04, 2016 | website

Yukon Arctic 300M | 300 miles | February 04, 2016 | website

Yukon Arctic 430M | 430 miles | February 04, 2016 | website

Chad

Half TREG | 90 kilometers | January 24, 2016 | website

TREG | 180 kilometers | January 24, 2016 | website

France

Essonne

Raid 28 | 80 kilometers | January 23, 2016 | website

Semiraid 28 | 50 kilometers | January 24, 2016 | website

Eure

47 km | 50 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

Eure-et-Loir

Ultra Raid 28 | 120 kilometers | January 23, 2016 | website

Tarn

La Ronde Givrée | 62 kilometers | January 31, 2016 | website

Germany

Bavaria

Chiemsee-Ultramarathon Januar | 108 kilometers | January 23, 2016 | website

Brandenburg

HallenMarathon 50km Ultra-Lauf | 50 kilometers | January 24, 2016 | website

Hesse

Rodgau 50km Ultramarathon | 50 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

Hong-Kong

Green Power Hike 50K | 50 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

Vibram® Hong Kong 100 Ultra Trail® Race | 100 kilometers | January 23, 2016 | website

Kenya

Kimbia Kenya 100 km | 100 kilometers | January 29, 2016 | website

Kimbia Kenya 50 km | 50 kilometers | January 29, 2016 | website

Netherlands

North Holland

Dutch Coast Ultra by Night 100 km | 50 kilometers | January 22, 2016 | website

Dutch Coast Ultra by Night 50 km | 50 kilometers | January 22, 2016 | website

Dutch Coast Ultra by Night 75 km | 75 kilometers | January 22, 2016 | website

New Zealand

Ian Priest Memorial Ultra Marathon | 60 kilometers | January 23, 2016 | website

The James Mountain Stampede Ultra | 50 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

Nicaragua

Survival Run: Nicaragua | 70 kilometers | February 03, 2016 | website

Oman

Wadi Bih Run | 72 kilometers | February 05, 2016 | website

Réunion

Transvolcano | 52 kilometers | January 24, 2016 | website

Spain

Canary Islands

Marathón ‘Isla del Meridiano’ – 86 km | 86 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

Thailand

The North Face 100® – Thailand | 100 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

The North Face 100® – Thailand – 50 km Solo | 50 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

United Kingdom

Cornwall

Arc of Attrition | 100 miles | February 05, 2016 | website

Lancashire

Marmot Dark Mountains™ – Elite Course | 53 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

Milton Keynes

Quadzilla | 164 kilometers | February 04, 2016 | website

USA

Alabama

Mountain Mist 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | January 23, 2016 | website

Arizona

100 Mile Trail Run | 100 miles | January 23, 2016 | website

52K | 52 kilometers | January 23, 2016 | website

52 Mile | 52 kilometers | January 23, 2016 | website

California

Bandit Ultra Trail Run 50K | 50 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

Crystal Springs 50 Km Trail Run | 50 kilometers | January 23, 2016 | website

Crystal Springs 50 Km Trail Run | 50 kilometers | January 23, 2016 | website

Folsom South Side Trail 38 Mile Run | 38 miles | January 30, 2016 | website

Folsom South Side Trail 50K Run | 50 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

Fort Ord Trail Run 50K | 50 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

Ordnance 100K | 100 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

Colorado

Frozen Dead Guy 50km | 50 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

Florida

55K Ultra Individual Marathon (34.2 miles) | 55 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

55K Ultra Relay (each leg is 3.1 miles x 11 legs = 34.2 miles) | 55 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

Ragnar Relay Florida Keys | 199 miles | February 05, 2016 | website

Minnesota

Arrowhead 135 mile Winter Ultramarathon | 135 miles | January 25, 2016 | website

New York

100 Miler | 100 miles | January 23, 2016 | website

50 Miler | 50 miles | January 23, 2016 | website

North Carolina

50K | 50 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

50 Mile Relay | 50 miles | January 30, 2016 | website

Maysville to Macon 50 Mile Run | 50 miles | January 30, 2016 | website

North Carolina Fat Ass 50k | 50 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

Ohio

Run for Regis 50K | 50 kilometers | January 23, 2016 | website

Winter Buckeye Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | January 24, 2016 | website

Texas

Horseshoe Trail Run 50k | 50 kilometers | January 23, 2016 | website

Utah

Snowshoe Festival 50K | 50 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

Washington

Lake Youngs NUTS 50K Run | 50 kilometers | January 30, 2016 | website

Virgin Islands (USA)

St. Croix Scenic 50 km | 50 kilometers | January 24, 2016 | website

St. Croix Scenic 50 Mile | 50 miles | January 24, 2016 | website

03:05:25 CLOSE

 

03:08:10

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Getting the Wally Hayward record by Johan van de Merwe

©iancorless.com.DSCN0518

 

Introduction

It was in October 2012 when I first heard about Wally Hayward’s indissoluble records. At that stage I was in the prime and peak of my running career. I was set on challenging the 24 hour race record that was uncontested for the past 60 years. Wally Hayward set the South African record of 256.4 km in London on the 21st of November in 1953. On paper the record seemed fully reachable and even undemanding. With the collaboration of my co-club members at the Pietersburg Road Runners and with the added financial aid of Digit Vehicle Tracking we hosted the first 24 hour race within our local community. The race took place on the 31st of March, 2013 and the purpose thereof was to ultimately improve the 24 hour South African record. It was however not as trouble-free as it initially seemed. Even after my best efforts I still missed the record with approximately 3km. I was extremely disheartened, saddened and disenchanted. Hosting the race proofed to be very pricey and I felt as though I disappointed all my family, friends and supporters. As a consequence, I under duress tried to forget about improving the record.

In order to deal with my setback I participated in numerous elongated races. During April to September 2013 I took part in a 6-day race in Hungary where I completed 516km. I furthermore ran the Comrades Marathon and finished it with a time of 7h28. In addition I also did three hundred milers, the Washie Race (13:18:02), the Golden Reef Race (14:41:45) and the Capital Classic Race (14:33:08). My results far exceeded my expectations but it still did not relief my utter sense of dissatisfaction.

Who is Wally Hayward?

©www.wally.org.za

©www.wally.org.za

Wallace (“Wally”) Henry Hayward (10 July 1908 – 28 April 2006) was a South African endurance athlete with a 60-year career. Wally won the Comrades five times and completed the distance of around 90 km the last time just before his eighty-first birthday.

He was born and died in Johannesburg. In 2006 just a few days before the annual Wally Hayward Marathon, Wally passed away.

Comrades Marathon

He won the race for the first time on his first attempt in 1930 at age 21 (the youngest runner at that stage). Only twenty years later he competed again and won it from 1950 to 1954, except for 1952 when he choose to rather represent South Africa at the 1952 Summer Olympics. He finished tenth in the Olympic Marathon event.

In 1951 and 1953 (first athlete under 6 hours) he broke the down-run record, and in 1954 he broke the up-run record and became the oldest man to win the race at age 45 (later overtaken by Vladimir Kotov in 2004). In 1988 he returned once again to participate. He beat half the finishers with a time of 9h44m. Wally’s most dramatic moment came the following year, in 1989, when he completed the down run at the age of 80. There was hardly a dry eye in the stadium as he staggered across the line in an obviously distressed state, making the cut-off time by a mere 1min 57sec, after which he finally quit the race for good. To this day, he has the distinction in the record books of being the oldest finisher in the history of the Comrades Marathon.

Other records

In 1953 he established records in the London to Brighton Marathon, the Bath to London 100-miler and the 24-hour track race. At the 1938 Empire Games in Sydney he won the bronze medal in the 6 miles competition. In the 3 miles contest he finished fourth. Hayward fought in North Africa and Italy during World War 2 and in 1942 earned the British Empire Medal for bravery for his actions near El Alamein in Egypt.

Family

Married Gladys Catto in December 1934 and had one daughter, Gwenolyn in October 1935. In 1957 Wally and Gladys divorced. In 1971 Wally married his second wife, Bertha Bland.

Contoversy

In 1953 he accepted a small donation towards his traveling while competing in the UK. The South African Athletics and Cycling Association declared him a professional, banning him from all amateur events. The ban was finally lifted in 1974.

Wally Hayward Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wally_Hayward

DECISION

©iancorless.com.IMG_2106

On the 4th of October, 2013 I came across a list of international races. I was interested in determining the amount of 24 hour races that was still to be hosted throughout 2013. At that time I occupied the seventh position for the international 24 hour races. I reflected back over 2013 and realized that there were no races that I was particularly proud of. I wanted to conclude 2013 on a high note but had no idea how to accomplish my goal. It was already October. My body felt fatigued and worn-out and an exceptional achievement seemed utterly impracticable and idealistic. I browsed the internet and discovered a 24 hour race that was scheduled for the 7th of December. The race was to take place in Taipei, Taiwan. While looking at the previous years’ results I realized that the race was a high standing sports event. I later learned that it was classified as a “gold labelled event” according to the International Association of Ultra runners.

I decided to travel to Taipei in order to participate in the race. It was particularly difficult for me to attempt again to improve the South African record only eight months after my setback. It felt as though I was not in the best physical condition so as to take on the challenge. With all the long races in which I participated in during 2013 I never focussed on just training effectively for any race. I mainly focussed on tapering for and recovering after a race. My legs ached incessantly, my muscles felt stiff and I was just not able to practice adequately. I had to decide whether or not my desire to improve the record was stronger than my physical condition.

GAME PLAN

During the first 24 hour race I ran on the 31st of March 2013 I learned a few essential things. I henceforth decided to concentrate solely on the three mistakes I made while preparing for the race in Taipei. My first mistake was that I started much too fast. The second mistake was that I did not eat and the third detrimental mistake was that I tended to pull my body weight to the right side and as a result it affected my overall balance. In October and November I focused on practicing on the racing track without the use of my GPS watch with the intention of establishing a proper pace and the most suitable eating pattern for every five laps.

THE UNKNOWN

Taiwan is a rather unfamiliar and foreign country with its indefinite culture and peculiar eating habits. My greatest concern was that my body would not be able to deal with the outlandish food, eccentric aromas and odd tastes. We decided therefore to take South African food with us on our journey. I specifically packed cheddar cheese, salami, biltong and pvm energy bars. We arrived four days prior to the race in Taiwan with the aim to adjust to their climate. To furthermore prepare adequately I researched all the contestants and studied their unique profiles. The contenders were all world class athletes against whom I had to compete. I harboured mixed emotions of excitement and apprehension. Some of the participants included athletes like the 2013 – 24 hour world champion, The USA’s 100 mile and 12 hour record holder John Olsen, the eight time race champion, Asia’s 24 hour record holder, Ryoichi Sekiya and Asia’s 12 hour, 100 miler and 100 km record holder Yoshikazu Hara, the 24 hour woman record holder Mami Kudo, the Italian 24 hour record holder and the two-time Spartathlon champion Ivan Cuddin.

RACE

©iancorless.com.DSCN0587 copy

I only truly comprehended the magnitude of the race a day before it commenced. It was amazing to witness how the track transformed into an Olympic type of arena. Enormous tents, medical facilities, banners, cones and an impressive platform for introductions and entertainment were erected within a short span of time. I felt rather anxious once the athletes were being formally introduced to the media and while meeting all the various champions and record holders. I was fully aware of the enormity of the race. I was faced with the reality that I had to really do my best in order to compete with my commendable opponents. Shortly before the race started the athletes were introduced to the public and to their personal lap-counters. Each international athlete had the opportunity to write inspirational, encouraging words with their signatures on a big gold label board. I wrote “God will give me strength” not knowing how true it would prove throughout the duration of the race.

A particular doctor was employed to see to the needs and physical welfare of each athlete. All athletes were weighed in, in order to monitor their wellbeing throughout the race. Every single one was weighed on a fourth hour basis when the direction of the race was changed. I was rather shocked to weigh-in on 65.5 kg as I usually only weigh between 60 to 62 kg. I was in mint condition in 2012 just before the Washie race when I only weighed 59.5 kg. The extra weighed had me rather concerned.

The race commenced at exactly 9h00. I was clothed in my full South African attire that reflected our country’s national colours. The starting gun announced the beginning of the race and I was faced with the moment of truth. All participants was at first hesitant to take the lead. After a few frustrating and exasperating laps I however decided to take the lead. After every fifth lap I took the time to eat something. My wife provided me with various snacks that consisted of cheese, salami and pvm energy bars. I mostly drank 32 GI, water, rehydrate and Sprite. After every 60km I also drank a recovery drink as well as an addition magnesium tablet. After the first three hours I yet again realized that I started too fast. I was still in the lead of approximately 40.8 km, more or less 1km ahead of the Japanese, Hara. Even though I was still running comfortably I was concerned that I was yet again making the same mistakes as I did previously. I felt so poised that I even played cat and mouse games with Oslen and Cudin.

After the first fourth hour the direction of the race changed and the athletes were weighed in. My weight shockingly decreased to 61.5kg. I lost a staggering 4kg within the first hours of the race. The doctor spoke to my wife and informed her that if I lost any more weight that he would be obligated to take me out of the race. I was petrified and tried to make various plans in order to pick up weight. My wife ordered a Mc Donalds burger, but I felt awfully nauseas after the first bite. The last thing I wanted was to throw up during the race. I knew from experience that one can easily loose all your strength within a blink of an eye when you dehydrate. I was fearful and decided to conceal something in my pants in order to ensure that my weight was not less than the previous weigh-in. My wife moreover found two-minute noodles that I was able to eat. I determined to go to a different scale to be weighed. I weighed 62.5kg – it was a great relief. I instinctively decided to stop chasing kilometres and to exclusively focus on improving the record time.

©iancorless.com.DSCN0589

I set a few milestones for myself in the race in order to obtain my goal. I just did not want to make the same mistakes as those I made in Polokwane. On twelve hours however I completed exactly the same kilometres as I completed previously – 145.2km.  I realized that my attempt might be in jeopardy and I set an objective for the 100 mile mark. My 100 mile time was 6 minutes slower than it was in Polokwane. My self-confidence was shot. My time was 13:38 far removed from my expected time of 12:45. Wally completed his 100 miler split during his 24H race in 1953 in a time of 12:47.

I apprehended just how difficult it would be to improve the record time. I knew that it was imperative for me to maintain the correct posture and to proceed regardless of how I felt. My position fell from first to third. My body played tricks on me and I continuously ran to the bathroom without any avail. When looking back it might have been a way for my body to rest. My wife realized what was happening and she kept a close eye on me. She encouraged me not to waste any time.  She warned me before the race that she was going to be rather stern in order to keep me in line. At 22 hours I realized that the record of 256.4 km was well within my reach if I kept my focus. It required a lot of exertion and determination. My body did not want to take in any food or fluids at that stage.

On 23 hours my personal lap counter indicated that I have completed 249km. I still had to do 7.4 km in order to improve the record. I knew I had to step up and increase my pace. I eventually completed the race and improved the record with a total distance of 258.064km.  The South African flag waved proudly above my head as I crossed the finish line.

It is almost anomalous and strange to be without a goal currently. It feels as though I am growing stronger and stronger despite my age. It is imperative for me to set a goal that will serve as my focus point for the next two years. I have my sights set on the 48 hour as well as the 6 day records that seem attainable on paper. The only record that might be within reach is the demanding, arduous SA 100 miler record that was set in 1972 by Derek Kay with a time of 11:56:56.

My biggest rule in running is that you must at all times believe in yourself when you participate no matter how unattainable and gruelling your goal seems. If I work hard and prepare adequately none of my goals will be unfeasible and beyond my reach.

©iancorless.com.DSCN0598

 

Many thanks to Johan van de Merwe for providing this report and images.

Johan will be interviewed for a future episode of Talk Ultra.

Ultra Running Review of the Year 2013

Rob Krar UROC ©iancorless.com

What an amazing time to be involved in the sport of ultra running! The once niche minority sport has exploded to greater heights and distances in 2013. No longer is a long beard and ‘Buff’ a pre requisite of ultra running (unless you’re Rob Krar). Clean cut, young, fast is the new ‘ultra runner’ mixing it up with the old guard.
Just think back to this time last year, had you heard of Zach Miller (not the Zach Miller, but, the Zach Miller; confused?), Michele YatesRob Krar, Magdalena Boulet and Xavier Thevenard.
Racing and the opportunity to race has also increased to the extent that it is now possible to race pretty much week in and week out for 12-months of the year. Of course, this brings pluses and minuses, certainly from an elite level, runners need to be far more savvy and race clever. You can no longer race month on month and expect to win. Races now have much higher quality fields and the pace is going up. The growth of Skyrunning has been instrumental in enticing a world audience to test runners of all abilities on tough, technical and high-terrain and the feedback has been incredible. UTWT have launched a series of races above the 100-km distance and in doing so have created a ‘trail’ circuit that offers multiple terrain in multiple locations all over the world. It will be interesting to see how the inaugural year goes when 2014 comes around.
So, what are the highlights of 2013?
Ultra Runner of the Year – Men and ladies
Rob Krar UROC ©iancorless.com
  • Lets start with Rob Krar. I interviewed Rob just after his incredible ‘FKT’ in the Grand Canyon early in 2013 when he put the Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim record at another level. At the time we discussed Western States, he was intimidated by the ‘Super Bowl’ of ultra and his first 100-miler. “I’ll give it a shot and see what happens”. Well, if you hadn’t noticed Rob pre WSER you did afterwards. Your not supposed to run WSER and get 2nd overall in your first attempt. UROC, Ultra Race of Champions was the final of the Skyrunner Ultra World Series and for some reason they had bestowed upon themselves the title, ‘The Ultra Running World Championship’. Mmmmm well, it certainly had a quality field but ‘World Championship’? I don’t think so. In the end it came down to a head-to-head between Dakota Jones and Rob Krar. Dakota looked as though he had it sewn up but on the final descent, Rob unleashed a pace that Dakota went on to say was ‘just crazy’. Rob took the win and a pattern was forming. We were all a little surprised to see Rob’s name on the start list for JFK50, primarily with TNF50 in San Francisco just two weeks later. As it happened, Rob dropped at around the 41-mile mark and went on to say that it was either ‘a great training run for TNF50 or the worst decision he had made in a while.’ It was a great training run! Rob ran a super calm, collected and mature race in San Francisco and when he took the front in the last fifth of the race he released a pace that was just incredible. Without doubt my ultra runner of the year!
Kilian Jornet and the Matterhorn ©iancorless.com
  • Of course, you can’t talk about male ultra runner and not mention Kilian Jornet. Kilian is a phenomenon. He is the star of our sport. Once again he was crowned Skyrunner World Ultra Series Champion with wins at Transvulcania and Ice Trail Tarentaise. In addition to this, Kilian was also champion of the ‘Sky’ series with 4 wins; ZegamaMont-BlancMatterhorn Ultraks and Limone Extreme. Add this a couple VK’s, a win at Canazei Sky race for the European Championships and a win at Trans D’Havet for the ‘Ultra’ Skyrunning European Championships and you would say the deal is done! But wait-a-minute, we haven’t mentioned his records for his ‘Summits’ project. A stunning new FKT for Chamonix-Mont-Blanc-Chamonix but arguably THE highlight of the year was his Matterhorn Summit. It was a sublime and surreal performance that put going to the mountains light on another level. It was without doubt my ‘moment’ of the year. You can read my ‘Matterhorn Summits Interview’ with Kilian here. Kilian is the most complete athlete I know.
Michele Yates - iancorless.com ©bradclayton

Michele Yates – iancorless.com ©bradclayton

  • Michele Yates hadn’t run an ultra before 2013. Who would have thought that Ms Figure Colorado 2008 would be such an awesome talent? Well her history shows that she is a 2x Olympic Trials Marathon Competitor, she has 9 marathon wins and PB of 2:38:37. To say Michele burst on the ultra scene would be an underestimation. Her win at Indiana Trail 100 (17:35:18) almost went unnoticed but then taking top spot and the $10,000 prize at Run Rabbit Run suddenly made every one stop, look around and take notice. Placing 3rd at UROC was another sign that Michele was no one trick pony but just like Rob Krar, Michele sealed a quality 2013 with a win at TNF50. She started that race from the front and never relinquished the lead until the line. Is Michele female ultra runner of the year? Well, I would have said yes. That is until the weekend of Dec 13th/ 14th(Listen to interview with Michele on the Christmas show of Talk Ultra, Ep51 out Dec 27th)
  • Pam Smith victorious at Western States turned up at the Desert Solstice track meet run by Aravaipa Running and not only took out the win for 12-hours on the track but set a new female record for 100-miles, 14:11:26. Take your pick, Michele or Pam; it’s a tough call.
Emelie Forsberg ©iancorless.com
  • But wait a minute, what about Emelie Forsberg. Emelie arrived on the run scene in 2012 and instantly had success, continually placing top-3 with Anna Frost and Nuria Picas. However the break through moment came ironically this time last year, she won TNF50 in San Francisco. This seemed to change everything, Emelie arrived at Transvulcania in May 2013 and won, she followed this up with a win in ZegamaCanazeiIce Trail TarentaiseMatterhorn UltraksUROC and then went on to run her first 100-miler at the super tough Diagonale de Fous (Raid de la Reunion) and place 2nd. Do you want to vote against Emelie?
Performances of the Year
tnfutmb 2013 ©iancorless.com
  • Rory Bosio blasted around the TNFUTMB course and in the process not only obliterated the female record but placed 7th overall. Her performance was nothing short of miraculous.
  • Jon Olson set a new American record for 100-miles on the track and then just as the year came to a close, Zach Bitter broke the record with an 11:47:21 but maybe even more important, Zach set a new World Record for 12-hours (101.66 miles) beating a Yiannis Kouros record. That does not happen very often! (Zach Bitter will be in the Christmas episode of Talk Ultra, Ep 51 out Dec 27th here)
  • I have already mention Kilian and the Matterhorn but it was so good I am mentioning it twice!
  • Timothy Olson went back to Western States and won again. You can win a race once but going back and doing it again is always a true sign of a champion.
  • Seb Chaigneau took a win and CR at Hardrock 100.
  • Nickademus Hollon became the youngest person ever to not only complete Barkley but also win it. You can listen to his interview on Talk Ultra here.
Julien Chorier Ronda dels Cims ©iancorless.com
  • Julien Chorier produced a sublime and calculated performance at the super tough Ronda dels Cims. It was a joy and a pleasure to watch someone control and dominate a race from the front and look good all the way.
  • Sage Canaday, jeez I missed him out and he definitely deserves a mention for BanderaTarawera, Transvulcania (3rd), Lake Sonoma and Speedgoat 50k.
 
Francesca Canepa ©iancorless.com
  • Francesca Canepa once again had an incredible year with a great performance at Ronda dels Cims but arguably a repeat win at Tor des Geants places her well and truly at the top on ‘endurance’ lady of the year!
  • Iker Karrera nailed Tor des Geants.
  • Ricky Lightfoot went over to South Africa and raced at The Otter and not only won but put the course record at a new level, in addition he won the IAU World Title in Wales.
 
tnfutmb 2013 ©iancorless.com
  • Xavier Thevenard took everyone, including himself, by surprise at TNFUTMB with a controlled and impressive performance against some top competition.
Jez Bragg TNFUTMB ©iancorless.com
  • Jez Bragg completed the Te Araroa in New Zealand. An incredible journey from the northern tip of New Zealand all the way down to the southern tip. Listen here.
  • David Johnston completed the Iditarod trail Invitational in 4 days 19 hours 13 mins.Crazy fast.
  • Ian Sharman and Nick Clark went head-to-head in the Grand Slam of Ultra Running and produced possibly the most exciting competition of 2013. The pair of them produced incredibly consistent performances and showed us all that it is possible to race four 100-milers back-to-back. They didn’t only ‘complete’ but they competed. They both won a race and were never out of the front rankings. Ian Sharman ultimately had the icing on the cake with the overall fastest time and a new Grand Slam record. Respect! Interview with Ian Sharman here.
  • Paul Giblin at the West Highland Way race. 15:07 and good beating of Terry Conway’s previous CR.
Stevie Kremer Limone Extreme ©iancorless.com
  • Stevie Kremer doesn’t do ultras but she is a darn fine trail and mountain runner and what ‘Pocket Rocket’ achieved in 2013 is nothing short of miraculous. Can’t wait to see what 2014 has in store.
  • Ed Catmur has continued to knock out some great 100-mile performances on the GB scene with wins at North Downs Way and the Winter 100.
  • Lizzie Wraith new female CR for the Lakeland 100 in the UK.
  • William Sichel keeps running and running crazy distances and setting new records.
  • Jonas Buud didn’t win Comrades in 2013 but he ran one of the best paced races I’ve ever witnessed. He was way back in the late 30’s and slowly moved up to 3rd. Wow! Notable mention to Brit ladies, Joanna Zakrezewski and Holly Rush who placed top-10.
Surprises of the Year
  • Rob Krar – Just one word sums up the bearded warrior ‘Krarnage’.
  • Zach Miller – no, not Zach Miller, but Zach Miller. Zach rocked up at JFK50, nobody knew him and he didn’t know anyone else. He took over the lead when Rob Krar dropped at mile 41. Not only did he win but also he set the 3rd fastest time ever. Interview with Zach here.
  • Xavier Thevenard – TNFUTMB was going to be won by Anton KrupickaMiguel HerasJulien ChorierSeb Chaigneau or Mike Foote. Somebody should have told them all about CCC winner, Xavier.
  • Michele Yates – wow, what a first year in the ultra world.
Who and what to watch out for in 2014
Cameron Clayton UROC ©iancorless.com
  • Cameron Clayton has found his feet, 2013 had some mixed performances but when everything aligns he races with the best. His TransvulcaniaUROC and TNF50 performances without doubt elevates him to ‘hot’ for 2014.
Luis Alberto Hernando Haria Extreme ©iancorless.com
  • Luis Alberto Hernando pushed Kilian close at Transvulcania, Zegama, finished joint first at Trans D’havet and won at Cavalls del Vent. In 2014 he plans to race TNFUTMB, now that will be interesting.
  • Magdalena Boulet had an ultra debut at TNF50 and placed 2nd. This sub 2:30 marathon runner may turn a few heads in 2014.
  • Brit, Stuart Air may raise a few eyebrows in 2014. He had a solid Ronda dels Cims, Ice Trail Tarentaise and Tor des Geants and for 2014 he has a Hardrock 100 slot!
  • Hardrock 100 had it’s draw and suddenly much of the WSER ‘lottery’ chat shifted focus to the field up at Silverton. The 2014 race is a classic in the making with Kilian JornetSebastian ChaigneauJulien ChorierJoe Grant and more. Excited? Just a little.
  • The Skyrunning World Championships take place in Chamonix with runners from all over the world coming to race VK, SKY and ULTRA in one of the endurance capitals of the world.
  • Beards – the jury is out. Are beards fast or slow? Rob Krar, Timmy Olson and ‘Clarky’ are certainly great advocates for hairy running but Kilian, Cameron, Sage provide a strong counter argument. What are your thoughts?
And finally…
 
A review of any year is going to be personal. Without doubt we will all have our own highlights and favourite moments, so, I would love to read your thoughts.
Please use the form below.
Ian Corless ETR ©iancorless.com
On a personal note, 2013 was an incredible year, I feel blessed with all the opportunities I have had. To witness many of the moments I write about is a great pleasure. Of course, it’s nothing without you folks reading, looking at my photographs or listening to my podcast.
A very BIG thank you from me.
Happy Christmas and a wonderful 2014 awaits us all…
LINKS:
Photography from 2013 races HERE
IMAGES book HERE
Calendar HERE
Podcasts HERE