Episode 146 – Courtney Dauwalter and Katie Kaars

Episode 146 of Talk Ultra brings you an interview with the amazing Courtney Dauwalter who won Run Rabbit Run and then just weeks later won Moab 200 (238 miles) outright! We also speak with rising trail and mountain runner Katie Kaars. Speedgoat co-hosts!
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*****
NEWS
JAVELINA JUNDRED
Patrick Reagan took the top slot over Zach Bitter and Brendan Davies placed 3rd, it was close under a super hot day – 13:01 (new CR and his debut 100) Zach ran 13:52 (he was previous course record holder) and 14:04 for Brendan. For the ladies’ Larisa Dannis made a comeback in 16:32, Dana Anderson ran 17:15 and Stacy Buckley 19:32.
The 100km even was won by Makai Clemons 8:32 and Caroline Boller (who has been on Talk Ultra) in 9:34.
DIAGONALE DES FOUS
Benoit Girondel ran 23:53 which is a very solid run on this tough course, Antoine Guillon 2nd and Guillaume Beauxis 3rd 24:26 and  25:09 respectively. Andrea Huser did it once again, this woman is the most prolific and consistent ultra runner in the world, I and nobody else knows how she does it. Quite incredible. Top slot in 26:34 which was way ahead of 2nd Emelie Lecomte and Marcelle Puy who ran 29:02 and 30:58. The UK’s Beth Pascall was 6th in 32:08.
Well, Walmsley did a Walmsley and dropped around 100km but there was other notable drops – Julien Chorier, Ludovic Pommeret and Xavier Thevenard didn’t start.
TEMPLIERS
Ruth Croft pulled off a huge victory ahead of Ida Nilsson and Emelie Forsberg, their times 7:27, 7:33 and 7:46. Fast! For the men, Sebastien Spehler, Nicolas Martin and Alex Nichols were crowned top-3 for the 76k race – 6:38, 6:43 and 6:49.
FULLY VK
A huge day for the VK with Philip Gotsch setting a new world record of 28:53 for the 1.9km 1000m course – ridiculous. Christel Dewalle won the ladies race in 35:10.
BIG BACKYARD ULTRA
Bonkers, bonkers, bonkers! Guillaume Calmettes was last man standing after 59-hours, 59-laps of the 4.16 mile loop. Harvey Lewis pushed it close but faltered in the latter stages. Total distance 245.44 miles!
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Interview with KATIE KAARS
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OTTER Trail Run South Africa
Christiaan Greyling and Meg Mackenzie both took top honours at South Africa’s iconic OTTER, their times 4:13 and 5:01
Moab 200 (we mentioned last show but another shout out!)
Courtney Dauwalter runs an incredible 57-hours and 52-minutes for an outright win for the 238-mile race, we caught up with her to hear all about it!
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Interview with COURTNEY DAUWALTER
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UP & COMING RACES

Argentina

Noroeste Argentina Trail – 100 km | 100 kilometers | November 07, 2017 | website
Noroeste Argentina Trail 50 km | 50 kilometers | November 07, 2017 | website
Puna Inca Trail | 200 kilometers | November 03, 2017 | website
RacingThePlanet: Patagonia 2017 | 250 kilometers | November 12, 2017 | website

Australia

New South Wales

Carcoar Cup Ultra Marathon | 60 kilometers | November 05, 2017 | website
Freedom Trail Run – 50k | 50 kilometers | November 12, 2017 | website
SURVIVAL RUN AUSTRALIA | 50 kilometers | November 17, 2017 | website
Survival Run Australia 75km | 75 kilometers | November 17, 2017 | website

Egypt

100 Km Pharonic Race | 100 kilometers | November 17, 2017 | website

France

Bouches-du-Rhône

La grande Etoile | 76 kilometers | November 11, 2017 | website

Haute-Loire

Trail 70 km | 70 kilometers | November 11, 2017 | website

Marne

Sparnatrail | 57 kilometers | November 12, 2017 | website

Savoie

100 Km Route | 100 kilometers | November 04, 2017 | website

Territoire de Belfort

Belfortrail 55 km | 55 kilometers | November 10, 2017 | website

Germany

Lower Saxony

KILL 50 | 50 miles | November 04, 2017 | website

North Rhine-Westphalia

Bottroper Herbstwaldlauf – 50 km | 50 kilometers | November 05, 2017 | website

Hong-Kong

Oxfam Trailwalker Hong Kong | 100 kilometers | November 17, 2017 | website

India

Karnataka

100 km | 100 kilometers | November 11, 2017 | website
50 km | 50 kilometers | November 11, 2017 | website
75 km | 75 kilometers | November 11, 2017 | website

Maharashtra

100 km | 100 kilometers | November 12, 2017 | website
160 km | 160 kilometers | November 12, 2017 | website
50 km | 50 kilometers | November 12, 2017 | website
75 km | 75 kilometers | November 12, 2017 | website

Telangana

50K | 50 kilometers | November 05, 2017 | website

Italy

Sicily

Etna Tour Trail | 67 kilometers | November 08, 2017 | website

Nepal

Everest Trail Race | 160 kilometers | November 05, 2017 | website
Manaslu Trail Race | 212 kilometers | November 14, 2017 | website

New Zealand

Off Road Ultra Marathon | 60 kilometers | November 04, 2017 | website
Tarawera Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | November 11, 2017 | website

Oman

Oman Desert Marathon | 165 kilometers | November 17, 2017 | website

Spain

Andalusia

Ultra-Trail Gran Vuelta Valle Del Genal | 125 kilometers | November 05, 2017 | website

Thailand

TU50 | 50 kilometers | November 11, 2017 | website

United Kingdom

Kirklees

100 Mile | 100 miles | November 04, 2017 | website
60 Mile | 60 miles | November 05, 2017 | website

Northamptonshire

Druids Challenge Ridgeway Multistage Ultra | 84 miles | November 10, 2017 | website

Powys

Rebellion | 135 miles | November 03, 2017 | website

Stirling

Glen Ogle 33 Ultra | 33 miles | November 04, 2017 | website

Swansea

Coastal Trail Series – Gower – Ultra | 34 miles | November 11, 2017 | website

USA

Arizona

Colossal-Vail 50K | 50 kilometers | November 11, 2017 | website
Colossal-Vail 50 Mile | 50 miles | November 11, 2017 | website

California

CTR Lake Chabot Train Run 50 km (Nov) | 50 kilometers | November 04, 2017 | website
Ragnar Relay Napa Valley | 186 miles | November 03, 2017 | website
Reebok Ragnar Napa Valley | 200 miles | November 03, 2017 | website
Regular Team (12-Person) | 200 miles | November 10, 2017 | website
Rio Del Lago 100M | 100 miles | November 04, 2017 | website
Ultra Team (6-Person) | 200 miles | November 10, 2017 | website

Florida

100K | 100 kilometers | November 11, 2017 | website
100M | 100 miles | November 11, 2017 | website
Reebok Ragnar South Beach | 200 miles | November 11, 2017 | website
Regular Team (3-6 runners) | 50 miles | November 04, 2017 | website
Ultra Team (2 runners) | 50 miles | November 04, 2017 | website
Xtreme Triathlon | 300 miles | November 10, 2017 | website

Georgia

Georgia Sky to Summit 50k | 50 kilometers | November 04, 2017 | website

Hawaii

Reebok Ragnar Hawaii | 200 miles | November 04, 2017 | website

Illinois

Tunnel Hill 100 Miler | 100 miles | November 11, 2017 | website
Tunnel Hill 50 Miler | 50 miles | November 11, 2017 | website

Maryland

Fire on the Mountain 50K | 50 kilometers | November 05, 2017 | website
Rosaryville Veteran’s Day 50k | 50 kilometers | November 11, 2017 | website

Massachusetts

Stone Cat 50 Mile | 50 miles | November 04, 2017 | website

Missouri

Dogwood Canyon 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | November 12, 2017 | website
Ozark Trail 100 Mile Endurance Run | 100 miles | November 04, 2017 | website

New Jersey

NJ Trail Series One Day – 50K | 50 kilometers | November 11, 2017 | website

New Mexico

50 Mile Run | 50 miles | November 04, 2017 | website

Oklahoma

Solo | 100 miles | November 11, 2017 | website
Team (2 to 5 runners) | 100 miles | November 11, 2017 | website

Oregon

50K Ultra | 50 kilometers | November 04, 2017 | website

South Carolina

Run for the Veterans 2017 | 50 miles | November 10, 2017 | website

Tennessee

50K | 50 kilometers | November 10, 2017 | website
50 Mile Race | 50 miles | November 10, 2017 | website
Nashville Ultra Marathon 50 K Race | 50 kilometers | November 04, 2017 | website
Nashville Ultra Marathon 50 Mile Race | 50 miles | November 04, 2017 | website
Nashville Ultra Marathon 60 K Race | 60 kilometers | November 04, 2017 | website
Nashville Ultra Marathon 70 K Race | 70 kilometers | November 04, 2017 | website
Upchuck 50K Trail Running Race | 50 kilometers | November 11, 2017 | website

Texas

50K | 50 kilometers | November 12, 2017 | website

Virginia

Mountain Masochist Trail Run | 50 miles | November 04, 2017 | website
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CLOSE
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Episode 130 – Sondre Amdahl, Jason Schlarb, Anna Comet, Cherie Soria, Dan Ladermann and Jim Mann

Episode 130 of Talk Ultra brings you some audio from The Coastal Challenge with Sondre Amdahl, Jason Schlarb, Anna Comet and an in-depth chat with Cherie Soria and Dan Ladermann. We also talk with UK based fell and mountain runner, Jim Mann.

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00:18:31 NEWS

Riverbank One Day

Courtney Dewaulter ran 250km (155.3 miles) to set a new American record beating Sabrina Littles best by more than 3-miles. Dewaulter will join Katlin Nagy, Traci Falbo, Jenny Hoffman and Pam Smith in Ireland for the IAU 24-Hour Championships. – That is a seriously strong ladies team!

Transgrancanaria

What a stunning race that turned out to be a Pau Calpell and Azara Garcia show. The two respectively lead from the front to take great victories. Pau (13:21) smashing the old course record set by Didrik Hermansen who placed 3rd in this years edition. Second place went to Lithuanian, Vlaidas Zlabys (13:35) who is going to be one-to-watch this year! Although Azara won the ladies’ race (16:25), she was 1-hour slower that Caroline Chaverots 2016 time. Chaverot dropped at 30km not feeling good! Andrea Huser placed 2nd (17:150 and Melanie Rousset 3rd (17:30).

The Coastal Challenge

Anna Frost won in 27:08. Anna Comet (Spain) and Ester Alves (Portugal) were second and third in 27:58 and 28:23, respectively. Tom Owens dominated the men’s in 22:29. Chema Martinez (Spain) 23:43 and Jason Schlarb 24:34 were second and third. We caught up with Sondre Amdahl, Anna Comet and Jason Schlarb for a post TCC chat.

00:25:10 INTERVIEW with Sondre Amdahl, Anna Comet and Jason Schlarb

The Coastal Challenge images HERE

At TCC Cherie Soria and Dan Ladermann were a constant inspiration to all competitors. Niandi caught up with them and ‘Coastal’ the dog, back in our hotel in San Jose.

01:30:14 INTERVIEW with CHERIE SORIA and DAN LADERMANN

Iditarod Trail Invitational

David Johnston once again won the 350-mile journey from Knik Lake to McGrath. Conditions this year were very tough with many drops. This is Johnston’s 5th victory – he finished in 5-days, 21-hours, 43-minutes. Second was Kyle Durand… 2-days later! I am not sure if any woman finishes, results don’t show this HERE

Red Mountain 55k

Once again saw ‘one-to-watch’ Hayden Hawks take another victory in 4:15. Rachel Cieslewicz won the ladies’ race in 5:38. Results HERE for the men and HERE for the ladies.

Way to Cool 50k

Cody Reed won in 3:16 and Megan Roche in 3:52 results HERE

SkiMo

Not many race results yet, still early in the calendar but if you are missing watching some of the top runners in the world, take a look at ski mountaineering. The cross over between mountain running and skimo is growing and growing – Kilian and Emelie have long been exponents but runners like Rob Krar, Nick Elson, Mike Foote, Jason Schlarb and so on are turning to skis over the winter months. Currently the iconic Pierra Menta is happening – it’s the Hardrock (on a much bigger scale) of skimo. Read here.

RUNNING BEYOND BOOK

I will be also going to Sofia in Bulgaria on the 17th, 18th and 19th March for a trail, mountain and Skyrunning expo.

Jim Mann is a low-key highly accompolished fell and mountain runner in the UK. However, he like to keep a low-profile. Recently, Jim completed all 3 UK rounds in 1 month… in winter! On the 22nd January Jim set a new winter record for the Charlie Ramsay Round completing it in 22:23. Three weeks later (11th February) Jim completed the Paddy Buckley Round in 21:37. And then theBob Graham Round in 20:26. I had to chat with him!

02:37:17 INTERVIEW with JIM MANN

UP & COMING RACES

Canada

British Columbia

50 km | 50 kilometers | March 11, 2017 | website

Yukon

Likeys Ultra 6633 – 120 Mile | 120 miles | March 10, 2017 | website

Likeys Ultra 6633 – 350 Mile | 350 miles | March 10, 2017 | website

Costa Rica

51 km | 51 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

80 km | 80 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

France

Ardèche

Trail sud ardéchois | 50 kilometers | March 12, 2017 | website

Haut-Rhin

Trail du Petit Ballon | 52 kilometers | March 19, 2017 | website

Paris

80 km | 80 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

Hong-Kong

Translantau 100 km | 100 kilometers | March 10, 2017 | website

Translantau 50 km | 50 kilometers | March 11, 2017 | website

Hungary

BSI Lake Balaton Marathon+ Fonyód – Szigliget | 52 kilometers | March 24, 2017 | website

BSI Lake Balaton Supermarathon | 195 kilometers | March 23, 2017 | website

Italy

Veneto

Ultrabericus | 65 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

Malaysia

TITI 100KM | 100 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

TITI 200KM | 200 kilometers | March 16, 2017 | website

TITI 250KM | 250 kilometers | March 17, 2017 | website

TITI 50KM | 50 kilometers | March 19, 2017 | website

Morocco

Morocco Tizi N’Trail | 120 kilometers | March 24, 2017 | website

Ultra Trail Chaouen 85K | 85 kilometers | March 11, 2017 | website

Nepal

Kathmandu West Valley Rim 50km | 50 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

Netherlands

South Holland

50km | 50 kilometers | March 19, 2017 | website

New Zealand

50 km Mountain Run | 50 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

Northburn Station 100 km Mountain Run | 100 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

Triple Peaks Challenge | 50 kilometers | March 11, 2017 | website

Nicaragua

SURVIVAL RUN NICARAGUA | 80 kilometers | March 11, 2017 | website

Norway

70K | 70 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

Philippines

All Women Ultra-Marathon | 50 kilometers | March 11, 2017 | website

TRD80 Ultramarathon | 80 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

Réunion

Caldeira Trail | 74 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

South Africa

100 Mile Trail Run | 100 miles | March 11, 2017 | website

44 km Trail Run | 44 miles | March 12, 2017 | website

76 km Trail Run | 76 kilometers | March 12, 2017 | website

Spain

Catalonia

UT les Fonts | 120 kilometers | March 10, 2017 | website

UT les Fonts – Trail de les Fonts | 70 kilometers | March 11, 2017 | website

Taiwan

100 km | 100 kilometers | March 11, 2017 | website

120 km | 120 kilometers | March 11, 2017 | website

60 km | 60 kilometers | March 11, 2017 | website

Turkey

85 km | 85 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

United Kingdom

Aberdeen City

D33 Ultra | 33 miles | March 11, 2017 | website

Andhra Pradesh

Red Rose Ultra | 40 miles | March 19, 2017 | website

Bradford

Haworth Hobble | 32 miles | March 11, 2017 | website

Dorset

Jurassic Coast Challenge | 78 miles | March 17, 2017 | website

East Sussex

Coastal Trail Series – Sussex – Ultra | 34 miles | March 18, 2017 | website

Highland

2XU Jogle | 860 miles | March 24, 2017 | website

North Yorkshire

Hardmoors 55 Ultramarathon | 55 miles | March 18, 2017 | website

USA

Alabama

Lake Martin 100 Mile Trail Race | 100 miles | March 18, 2017 | website

Lake Martin 50 Mile Trail Race | 50 miles | March 18, 2017 | website

Arizona

50K | 50 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

50M | 50 miles | March 18, 2017 | website

Arkansas

3 days of Syllamo | 150 kilometers | March 17, 2017 | website

California

Marin Ultra Challenge 50K | 50 kilometers | March 11, 2017 | website

Marin Ultra Challenge 50 Mile | 50 miles | March 11, 2017 | website

Colorado

High Line Canal 100K | 100 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

Florida

100K Individual | 64 miles | March 18, 2017 | website

100K Team ( 3-4 Person Teams ) | 64 miles | March 18, 2017 | website

50K Individual | 32 miles | March 18, 2017 | website

Cross Florida Route 40 Romp | 116 miles | March 11, 2017 | website

Cross Florida Route 40 Romp – 2 Person Relay | 116 miles | March 11, 2017 | website

Idaho

Pickled Feet 100 Mile Run | 100 miles | March 24, 2017 | website

Kentucky

50 mile run | 50 miles | March 11, 2017 | website

60k | 60 kilometers | March 11, 2017 | website

Mississippi

Spring Equinox 50K | 50 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

Spring Equinox 50 Miler | 50 miles | March 18, 2017 | website

Nevada

50K | 50 kilometers | March 11, 2017 | website

50M | 50 miles | March 11, 2017 | website

Vegas Moonlight Ultra 100 Mile Run | 100 miles | March 11, 2017 | website

North Carolina

Badwater Cape Fear 50 km | 50 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

Badwater Cape Fear 51.4 Mile | 51 miles | March 18, 2017 | website

North Dakota

Extreme North Dakota Sandhills Ultra Run Experience 100K | 100 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

Extreme North Dakota Sandhills Ultra Run Experience 50K | 50 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

Pennsylvania

Lt. J. C. Stone 50K UltraMarathon | 50 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

South Carolina

Palmetto200 Relay | 200 miles | March 24, 2017 | website

Tennessee

Music City Trail Ultra 50K | 50 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

Ragnar Relay Tennessee | 196 miles | March 24, 2017 | website

Texas

100k | 100 kilometers | March 11, 2017 | website

50K | 50 kilometers | March 11, 2017 | website

Prickly Pear 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | March 12, 2017 | website

The Grasslands 50-Mile | 50 miles | March 18, 2017 | website

Utah

Antelope Island 100 Mile | 100 miles | March 17, 2017 | website

Antelope Island 50K | 50 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

Antelope Island 50 Mile | 50 miles | March 18, 2017 | website

Vermont

PEAK Snowshoe 100 Mile Race | 100 miles | March 10, 2017 | website

Virginia

50K | 50 kilometers | March 11, 2017 | website

50 mile | 50 miles | March 11, 2017 | website

Elizabeth’s Furnace Fat Ass 50K | 50 kilometers | March 11, 2017 | website

Washington

Chuckanut 50 K | 50 kilometers | March 18, 2017 | website

03:18:10 Close

03:23:30

We say this every show, but Talk Ultra is nothing without downloads and listeners so please help us spread the word.

Please support Talk Ultra by becoming a Patron at www.patreon.com/talkultra and THANKS to all our Patrons who support us. Rand Haley and Simon Darmody get a mention on the show here for ‘Becoming 100k Runners’ with a high-tier Patronage.

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Jasmin Paris does it again… !

iancorless-com_glencoe2016-9946

Jasmin at Salomon Glen Core Skyline

Jasmin Paris does it again…. following on from her incredible 15:24 Bob Graham Round and her 16:13 Ramsay Round. This weekend, Jasmin completed the Paddy Buckley in 18:33 (tbc). That is the UK’s ‘BIG 3 ROUNDS’ completed.

“Paddy Buckley round in 18.33. Had to dig deeper than ever before. Huge thanks to an incredible team for making it possible. Time for a rest!” – Via Jasmin on Twitter

The Paddy Buckley, also sometimes known as the WCR, (Welsh Classical Round) is the Welsh equivalent of the BGR. Considered tougher than the BGR, a record attempt can be considered to take at least 1-hour longer.

Covering approximately 61-miles and 8500m +/- of ascent, the route takes in 47 ‘tops’ within Snowdonia.

Wendy Dodds was the first to complete the round way back in 1982, her time was 25:38. Like most rounds, the aim is to complete the round in sub 24, this was first done in 1985 by Martin Stone. He ran 23:26.

The route as one may guess, was devised by Paddy Buckley and it may be started at any point and can be completed in a clockwise or anti-clockwise direction.

Jasmin very clearly had a desire to complete and maybe set three records on all three rounds in 2016. An incredible feat, especially when one considers what she has also achieved in addition. A 3rd place at the Skyrunning World Championships, 6th place at her first 100-mile race; UTMB. Victory at Tromso SkyRace and the Salomon Glen Coe Skyline which also provided a world series title for the Skyrunner World Series in the Extreme category.

This Paddy Buckley result, in addition to all the other results listed, well and truly places Jasmin as one of the most interesting prospects in the fell, trail, mountain, ultra and Skyrunning world.

Congratulations Jasmin!

The previous ladies record was set in 2013 by Nicky Spinks in a time of 19:02. Therefore, once ratified, Jasmin Paris will hold records on all 3 rounds.

Fastest aggregate time for the three rounds in one year was by Adrian Belton – completed over 29 days in 1989.

©iancorless.com_Tromso2016-8875

Jasmin on her way to victory, Tromos SkyRace

New Shoes from INOV-8 2016

©iancorless.com_inov8_TrailTalon275-06473

It’s been a while since we have posted a shoe review and we have good reason, we have been testing and trying out shoes on the trails and mountains. Coming up over the next few weeks we will be posting reviews of new shoes in the inov-8 line up and I am pleased to say, there are some real quality products to look at!

TRAIL TALON 275 (click on images to view larger)

©iancorless.com_inov8_TrailTalon275-06473

Perfect for long miles on hard-packed trails, the TRAIL TALON 275 delivers the perfect fit and unrivalled comfort with next generation ADAPTERFIT technology. A two-piece Powerflow midsole delivers optimum levels of shock absorption and energy return. Standard fit and 8mm drop.

X-CLAW 275
©iancorless.com_inov8_XClaw275-06454

The ultimate shoe for running long distances over extreme terrain. Delivers outstanding claw cleat grip, comfort and protection while retaining lightweight flexibility. Ideal for high mileage training in the mountains and fells.  Standard fit and 8mm drop.

X-TALON 225

©iancorless.com_inov8_XTalon225-06432

Designed for running fast over extreme terrain, the newest addition to the legendary X-TALON range offers increased durability and improved grip in a perfect lightweight, agile package. Ideal for fell and mountain racing. Precision fit and 4mm drop.

TRAIL TALON 250

©iancorless.com_inov8_TrailTalon250-06494

The lighter version in the series, the TRAILTALON 250 has been designed for speed and delivering the best grip possible on hard-packed trails. A two-piece Powerflow midsole delivers optimum levels of shock absorption and energy return. Standard fit and 4mm drop.

All shoes available in men’s and ladies sizes

Detailed reviews of the following shoes will follow in the coming weeks

inov-8 logo

https://www.inov-8.com

Northern Traverse 2016 – Day 1 Summary

©iancorless.com_NorthernTraverse2016-3979

St Bees on the west coast of the UK witnessed the start of the 2016 Northern Traverse – a 190km route that crosses the north of England through three National Parks finishing in Robin Hood’s Bay on the east coast. Taking in iconic mountains, valleys, moors and over 16,000 feet of ascent, the Northern Traverse is a truly spectacular and challenging event.

Starting 1000 today, the race has now been going for 12-hours and pre-reace favourite and SPINE winner, Eoin Keith is charging away into the night. It’s been an incredible first day with wall-to-wall sunshine.

As darkness envelopes the fells, it’s head-torch time or sleep time. However, you can follow ‘live’ on trackers and watch the action unfold HERE.

Here are a selection of images from day 1 primary the start in St Bees, Ennerdale, Honister Pass and Patterdale.

More images and updates tomorrow.

Race website http://www.northerntraverse.com

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Jasmin Paris smashes the #BGR Bob Graham Round

Jasmin Paris - The Berghaus Dragons Back Race

Jasmin Paris – The Berghaus Dragons Back Race

The names Billy Bland and Nicky Spinks are well and truly cemented in Bob Graham Round cement. Imagine it, covering 66-miles (approx) 27,000ft of climbing and crossing the 42 highest peaks in the English Lakes in under 24-hours.

First completed in 1932 by Bob Graham at the age of 42, the 42 peak round has become the holy grail of the fell running world. Just to complete it in under 24-hours is considered by many to be enough, but to set a FKT (Fastest Known Time) is something else.

How does one break the record?

In 1932 Bob Graham took pacers and company to help him in completing his round. It is an ethical and practical approach that the club encourages, and is committed to continue to require as a criterion for membership.

In light of the above, the criteria for Club membership were set down back in 1972. The criterion regarding having one’s arrival at each summit witnessed remains as valid today as ever.

From the Club’s perspective, solo attempts will, for safety reasons, not be recognised or considered for club membership (this includes partly solo rounds, i.e. a round that is only partly witnessed). One of the Club’s purposes is to encourage attempts. The potential risks to a contender are significantly increased should a contender chose to travel solo for around 24 hours in the Lake District mountains. Having company in the mountains enhances the safety factor.

The risk of losing a contender in the mountains may seem far-fetched but there have been deaths of fell runners during much shorter fell races. It is understandable that there is no desire to repeat that experience in a Bob Graham Club context. Were the Club to recognise solo completions for membership, it’s no great step in the minds of loved ones left behind to see that as an endorsement, nay an encouragement, of solo attempts; and families may feel that the Club (which is an unincorporated body) and therefore its Officers should bear some responsibility for a dreadful turn of events.

One claim made for modern GPS devices is that they can provide both veracity and a form of safety, however there have been fraudulent attempts to secure membership over the years; the advent of modern technology to validate a round neither mitigates the safety issue nor removes the ability to defraud.

Allied to solo attempts are attempts where a form of reciprocal witnessing takes place: contender A witnesses contender B and vice versa. This is acceptable, and there have been several such rounds over the years, but not recommended.

There are many accounts of multi-contender attempts having to split up. The most common reason is simply that most people go through a significant bad patch, often for several hours, and hoping that these coincide is hoping for too much. If contenders do have to separate, safety margins are hugely reduced. Pacts not to separate are all well and good at the Moot Hall before setting off but can unravel under the physical and mental pressures of the day. Again if the party has to separate, then the attempt will effectively be over in terms of obtaining membership of the Club.

In summary, the witnessing rule has always been in the Club’s Guidance Notes, and always will be. It is grounded in safety. Clearly in limiting the only help on the fells to a co-contender (who may be in a pretty poor physical state should problems arise), there is a significant reduction in the safety margins for the individuals. Usually a support team of two persons per leg should be adequate, but the decision on the number of supporters and pacers is of course up to the individual.

– Bob Graham Club

Billy Bland’s time of 13 hours and 53 minutes is a milestone and many have questioned, can that time be bettered?. Despite years of trying nobody has really come close; time has stood still. The ladies record set by Nicky Spinks of 18 hours and 12 minutes was set in 2012. Nicky has long been a pioneer of the Bob Graham Round.

That however all changed just yesterday, Saturday April 23rd.

Jasmin Paris, a respected fell and mountain runner, set a new ladies benchmark of 15 hours and 23 minutes. This time is OFF THE SCALE!

Not only does it obliterate the 2012 time of Nicky Spinks but it comes remarkably close to Billy Bland’s time of 13 hours and 53 minutes.

This is just fell running, a low key sport that takes place in the heart of England. Believe me though, in terms of running, this record is one that should be shouted from the rooftops.

Jasmin is a low-key athlete, who hides away from the spotlight despite incredible performances. She races regularly, almost too much some may say. Her response has always been, I have a job and I run for fun and pleasure.

I’ve been saying it for some time, JASMIN PARIS is one to watch and this year, Jasmin will run on the world stage taking part in many Skyrunning events and UTMB.

The dark horse is no longer, the dark horse…

Many congrats Jasmin

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Information on the Bob Graham Round HERE

Morgan Williams, Bob Graham Round secretary discusses the BGR in-depth HERE

Listen to Nicky Spinks on Talk Ultra HERE

Listen to Rickey Gates talk Bob Graham Round HERE

Garmin Mourne Skyline MTR – First Images

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Absolutely stunning and tough day in the Mourne Mountains, Northern Ireland, for the 2nd edition of the Mourne Skyline MTR and the 6th and final race in the 2015 Skyrunning UK calendar.

Garmin Mourne Skyline MTR logo

Race report, results and full set of images to follow.

Here is a preview of the days action

A Day on Fells – Wolf’s Pit, Peak District

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A fun weekend in Sheffield for ShAFF (Sheffield Adventure Film Festival) and the opportunity to take American ultra running legend, Nikki Kimball to experience a fell race.

It was a blast. I had so much fun… a course like this for 100-miles would be great! – Nikki Kimball

Well, I am not sure that anyone else in the race would fancy running the route eighteen times to make up the required 160-km but hey, we know what Nikki means (I think!).

The Peak District played ball and the sun came out. Great day!

Wolf’s Pit, Peak District

  • Date & time: Sun 22nd Mar 2015 at 11:00
  • Country: England
  • Region: Peak District
  • Category: AS
  • Website: www.wolfspitfellrace.org.uk
  • Distance: 9km / 5.6m
  • Climb: 450m / 1476ft
  • Venue: Shatton, nr Bamford, Hope Valley.
  • Grid ref: 196825
  • Skills & experience: ER, PM, LK, NS
  • Minimum age: 16

inov-8 X-TALON 212 Review

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If Wolverine™ were going to go running on the trails, he would pair up his incredible hands (and blades) with a pair of X-Talon 212’s.

Irrespective of what type of running you do; road, trail, mountain, fell or even treadmill, the X-Talon 212 has that distinctive look that not only sets it apart from the competition but also makes one take a second look and ask the question, “is that a run shoe or a football boot?”

It’s a winning shoe that combines minimal weight, low drop, stability and awesome grip for when conditions are muddy, boggy, slippery or basically just downright awful.

I doubt that inov-8 needs an introduction but let’s have a recap just in case.

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The company is just 11-years old and the creation of South African, Wayne Edy. You can sum up inov-8’s growth in just one quote from Wayne, “I’m not a follower, I never will be. I like to carve a new way. I thrive to innovate.”

inov-8 shoes are all about being at one with the terrain and in the UK they have become the ‘go to’ shoe when you need grip.

inov-8 say, “We believe in natural running. Natural running involves taking running back to its most innate form, letting nothing alter the natural biomechanics of the foot and body. Natural running relies on the strength of the runner’s feet and legs rather than the cushioning or support of a shoe. The foot controls the shoe, not the other way around.”

inov-8 were very much at the forefront of minimalist running and right from the off the offered a very structured and methodical approach to getting ‘lower’ to the ground.

This system was a series of arrows (on the rear of the shoe) that signified the shoes drop in 3mm increments: 3 arrows = 9mm, 2 arrows = 6mm and so on. This arrow system informed runners immediately of what drop a shoe was and importantly allowed runners to make an informed and structured progression to get lower (if required). The shoe naming was also quite innovative. You had the model of shoe, for example: Trailroc, Roclite or X-Talon and then a number afterwards, so, in this scenario X-Talon 212. The ‘212’ refers to the weight of the shoe in grams.

Lightweight, minimal and functional, inov-8 have pioneered running shoes for trail, rock, fell or mountain and in simple terms have endeavoured to keep runners low to the ground (with grip) via a plethora of shoe models providing a selection of drops, cushioning and grip. The recent addition of the Race Ultra 290 (Review HERE) is a prime example of how the company are looking at the growing ultra market and the need for a more cushioned shoe but still with a low drop (6mm) and a flatter outsole for extended hours running.

2015 will see many new additions to the already expansive range. (*see below)

X-TALON 212

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Firstly, big news! The X-Talon is now available in a standard fit in addition to the normal precision fit. This is important news for many a runner who would have loved to use the 212 but found the tight and narrow fit of the precision just too tight for their Hobbit like feet.

As mentioned previously, the 212 may well be one of the flagship shoes in the inov-8 range and you can expect to see the shoe in Trail, Mountain, Fell, Orienteering, Cross Country, Obstacle and Skyrunning races all over the world.

The 212 is an out and out off road shoe and as the name suggests, the grip is Talon like.

The Shoe 

x-talon-212-side

I used the standard fit in my normal shoe size UK9.5 so it would be fair to say that the 212 is true to size. However, even though this shoe is standard fit it still fits super close in the toe box, you almost certainly would want to try this shoe on before purchasing. Please remember that the 212 are an out-and-out off road and soft ground shoe, so it is important that your foot has minimal movement within the shoe. This is why the shoe was originally designed in precision fit only. A close fitting shoe is ideal when climbing, descending or contouring when on soft or uneven ground. The lacing system allows you to pull the shoe tight to your foot and cradle it offering more support. Spend a little time tweaking the lacing and you will be rewarded with a wonderful close and natural contact to the ground.

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First off, the shoe is super flexible. You can bend it anyway, fold it in half and the shoe does not resist. The shoe upper is tough and quite thick and I have heard criticism saying the upper is too thick! Of course this all comes down to personal preference but if you are bombing up and down wet and muddy terrain everyday, you need an upper that can withstand that sort of abuse… I have had my 212’s for 6-months (probably 3-runs a week) and I have well and truly abused them without failure. That’s a plus in my book.

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The shoe has Meta-Flex™ and Meta-Cradle ™, which provide a flex groove and upper webbing support at the metatarsal heads. In all honesty I am not fully sure what that means but if that means good flex and support then I agree.

INO540_400_2

The sole of the 212 looks like a football boot with a series of spaced out rubber nodules that are made of soft ‘sticky’ compound rubber as one would see on some climbing shoes. What makes this shoe work so well off road is the fact that the grip is spaced out and this therefore stops soft ground filling and clogging up the grip of the shoe. The soft rubber works really well on rocks, gravel and other dry surfaces and should the rocks become wet, grip is still highly impressive allowing you to run with confidence. One downside of the soft rubber is that if you go on the road it will wear down. This is not a criticism of the shoe. It’s basically just a heads up to warn against excessive road use. I should point out that my everyday run requires at least a couple of miles on road or pavement to get to the trail and yes, my sole has started to show wear and tear but that is after 6-months of regular use.

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Cushioning is minimal and the drop (2 arrows) is 6mm; this provides a great contact for the trail beneath your feet. Ironically, the shoe feels very comfortable on hard trail and even road. I would say it feels surprisingly cushioned despite its minimal looks. inov-8 do not use a rock plate to protect your foot against small and/ or sharp objects and therefore you can sometimes feel these objects when running.

Th front of the shoe has a rubber bumper but toe protection is minimal. The rear of the shoe holds the foot well and if you have the right size shoe and the laces adjusted correctly, you have have little or no movement when running.

IN USE

Pros

The 212 are all about gaining grip on soft and boggy ground. If you use the shoe in these conditions you will be over the moon by the grip, feel and security offered. The upper is durable and the lacing perfect. The addition of a standard fit in addition to the long established precision fit now ensures that you can have comfort despite your shoe size or width. The combination of these elements makes the 212 my ‘go to’ shoe for anything that resembles fell running or soft ground running (including snow.) I have used the shoe for 6-months, accumulated 100’s of hilly miles and the shoes have performed perfectly. They have also been my preferred shoes when running Vertical Kilometres™ particularly when the terrain has been grassy and steep. The low drop allows great feel for the terrain below and although relatively minimalist from a cushioning perspective, they do offer great comfort for runs of 2 to 3-hours. This comfort is extended if the ground remains soft and boggy.

Cons

It’s a very specific shoe for a very specific use and therefore this would be an ‘addition’ to your shoe collection. It’s almost unfair to say this is a con but for some, they want a wonder shoe that does ‘all things,’ the 212 is NOT that shoe.

The lack of a rock plate does mean that you can feel small and sharp objects occasionally.

The shoe is very flexible with minimal cushioning and therefore one would need to be attentive to how long one runs in them. Of course this is very personal to the user… one person may find 60-mins enough, another 3-hours. Certainly, the more you use them, the more time you will be able to spend in them.

Specs

  • Weight 212g
  • Upper Synthetic, TPU
  • Lining Mesh
  • Drop 6mm (2 arrows)
  • Sole X-Talon (Sticky)
  • Midsole Injected eva
  • Fit Precision and now Standard

Conclusion

The X-Talon 212 really is a top quality shoe with a very specific use. If you are looking for a shoe to do several types of running (road and trail), the 212 is not for you. However, if you are looking for grip on off road terrain then you would be hard pressed to find a shoe that does the job better than the 212. The addition of a standard fit to the long established precision fit should mean that if you have tried the 212 in the past and found them too narrow, they may very well fit you now! Both models are unisex.

Note

X-Talon-190-side-1_13

If you prefer a more minimalist shoe with lower drop, inov-8 make the X-Talon 190, which has 3mm drop, a stripped back upper and the same talon like grip.

*New for 2015

X-talon-200-Blk-Red-Yel-1-15-1024x490

inov-8 are strengthening the  X_TALON off-road running shoe range (212 & 190) with the addition of the new X-TALON 200. Available in early 2015, the shoe looks set to be a huge hit with off-trail runners and obstacle racers.

Navigation 101: Intermediate Navigation – Beyond the Basics by Mountain Run

Mountain Run

This is a second article in a trio of interviews with Ian Corless, about Navigation for Ultra Runners & more. Read article one HERE

all content ©mountainrun

In the first interview we covered the Basics of Navigation, this encompassed maps, compasses, setting your map & how to set a bearing.

The second interview was moving into intermediate navigation & it consisted of the following information & techniques:

  1. Declination/Magnetic Variation
  2. Grid Numbers/Plotting a Grid Reference
  3. Back Bearings
  4. Re-Orienting/Re-locating
  5. Thumbing the Map
  6. Hand-railing
  7. Catching Features
  8. Aiming Off

So lets start with:

1) Magnetic Declination or Magnetic Variation: 

There are 3 points at which north is seen. 1) True North, 2) Grid North & 3) Magnetic North. We are concerned with Grid North & Magnetic North.

Grid North is what is detailed on a map, its where the North/South grid lines show us the direction of north, according to the grid lines printed on the map. This is almost the same as True North, so we will group True North & Grid North the same. These are fixed points & do not move.

Magnetic North is what your compass needle points towards, being magnetised & this is not a fixed point, it moves over time. Magnetic North is explained as so:

“The North Magnetic Pole is the point on the surface of Earth‘s Northern Hemisphere at which the planet’s magnetic field points vertically downwards (in other words, if a magnetic compass needle is allowed to rotate about a horizontal axis, it will point straight down). There is only one location where this occurs, near (but distinct from) the Geographic North Pole and the Geomagnetic North Pole.

The North Magnetic Pole moves over time due to magnetic changes in the Earth’s core.[1] In 2001, it was determined by the Geological Survey of Canada to lie near Ellesmere Island in northern Canada at 81.3°N 110.8°W. It was situated at 83.1°N 117.8°W in 2005. In 2009, while still situated within the Canadian Arctic territorial claim at 84.9°N 131.0°W,[2] it was moving toward Russia at between 34 and 37 miles (55 and 60 km) per year.[3] As of 2012, the pole is projected to have moved beyond the Canadian Arctic territorial claim to 85.9°N 147.0°W.[2]

Because we have a variance between True North & Magnetic North, we therefore need to use something called the Magnetic Variation. This is described as follows: 

“Magnetic declination or variation is the angle on the horizontal plane between magnetic north (the direction the north end of a compass needle points, corresponding to the direction of the Earth’s magnetic field lines) and true north (the direction along a meridian towards the geographic North Pole). This angle varies depending on position on the Earth’s surface, and changes over time.”

It is also explained more formally, Bowditch defines variation as “the angle between the magnetic and geographic meridians at any place, expressed in degrees and minutes east or west to indicate the direction of magnetic north from true north. The angle between magnetic and grid meridians is called grid magnetic angle, grid variation.

Magnetic_North_Pole_Positions

Depending on which country you reside in will then depend on what the Magnetic Variation actually is. For example, if you live in the UK then the Magnetic North is 1.5 degree’s at the start of 2014 west of True North. The reason it is west is that we sit to the east of the Agonic Line or line of Zero Declination where Mag North & True North are the same. There are several points where this occurs around the world. Its a bit technical, but all you need to remember is that the Mag Variation is printed on all maps in the UK to advise what the Mag Variation is at what ever year the map was printed.

IGRF_2000_magnetic_declination

In order to correct your bearing to take into account the Mag Variation, you must adjust the compass 1.5 degrees east of the bearing you have taken, or more easily remembered, add 1.5 degrees on to your compass bearing you have just taken from the map. To make life even more confusing, the Mag Variation in 2015 is 0, therefore Mag Variation need not be corrected for that year, so it is almost not worth making this correction for the next year & certainly if your navigation is broken down into small legs. It really only comes into play right now, if you are travelling over large expanses of land, without any catching features, hand rails etc.

Transversely, if you are using the Mag Variation, remember when making a sighted bearing, whilst relocations, you might want to subtract 1.5 degree’s off your bearing in order to get an accurate bearing when you place the compass on the map. It all depends how accurate you need the bearing to be? Are you looking at a mountain summit? If so, is your bearing really that accurate anyway.

So Mag Variation in the UK is not really necessary right now.

If you are in Europe or other parts of the world like the US, then your Mag Declination/Variation will be different. It should be on the map you are using, if not consult a website like Wiki for more information.

North & South of the Equator. 

If you buy your compass in the northern hemisphere, then it is not set to work in the southern hemisphere & visa versa. Silva produce 3 types of compasses to work in 3 different magnetic zones. The best piece of advise is if you are traveling, then buy a compass for use in the zone which you are traveling. Best to contact a company like Silva to get the right compass.

Can I set the declination on a compass, so I can forget about the Mag Variation? 

Yes is the answer, but they don’t come at a small price. Most compasses, of reasonable value, like Silva 2NL-360 Explorer will have a Declination Scale on the bevel base plate, this can be used for quick adjustment. If you want to set the mag declination, then you need to purchase a compass capable of doing this, like the Silva 15T-360/6400 Green military compass. Its not really necessary for general use, especially in the UK right now.

Ok, so the confusing Mag Declination/Variation is done. Use at will, just remember to check on the country you are in as to what the variation is & apply it if necessary. Its list on the map you have in your hand, or at least the one you will be using.

2) Grid Numbers & Plotting a Grid Reference

Grid numbers are applied to the grid lines. These are a squared matrix applied to the whole country to divide it into different sections. They are laid out to make squares 100k by 100k, these squares are then broken down to have a further matrix applied giving squares of 1km by 1km. These are the lines/squares printed on your map. The lines running from east to west are numbered from south to north, these are the ‘northings’, the lines running from north to south are numbers west to east, these are called the ‘eastings’. A grid reference is made up of these printed numbers.

northings-eastings

So on the image pictured to the left, we have Eastings along the bottom & Northings running up the side. In order to find a certain grid we need 4 of these numbers. This a 4 figure GR.

We are always given the Eastings first & the Northings second.  A 4 figure GR would read as 17 45

Once we understand this we can move to a 6 figure GR. This is done by breaking down each of the squares into a further 10 divisions on either scale, making 100 squares inside the existing square and will allow us to pin point a location to within a 100m square on the ground. A 6 figure GR would be something like 175 454.

This can be taken into a further pin point of 10m squares by using the same logic & so on.

A roamer on your compass can be of great help here to pin point 6 figure GR’s.

Not following? Book on a course….

3) Back Bearings. 

Very useful in either re-locating yourself or using a feature to make sure you are looking at what you think your looking at. A back bearing is taken by using a sighting of an identifiable feature, be it a path, summit, building or  large reentrant & applying it to the map. This can help you do one of 2 things. 1 – re-locate yourself on a line feature (its hard to relocate with this technique exactly, but it can help your judgement or give you a rough location) or 2 – help you to make sure the feature you are looking at is the same one you are looking at on the map.

Remember that when taking a back bearing, you might need to subtract the Mag Variation to make sure its correct. 

compassatpeak

To take a back bearing, line the direction of travel arrow at the front of your compass with the feature, make it as exact as possible. Then swivel the rotating bevel so that you line the red end of the needle in the red house/shed, remember the Red in Shed. This is now your bearing set. Next put the compass on the map & line the front side up with the feature you think you are looking at, and move the compass until your orienting lines on the base plate match with the N/S Grid Lines on the map. You should now be able to locate yourself somewhere along the side of the compass.

A back bearing works best if you are already located on a line feature, as this bearing will then cross the line feature at some point, giving you a rough location of where you are on that line feature.

4) Re-Orienting/Re-Locating.

A very necessary skill, used to either make sure you are where you think you are, or as it sounds, to actually re-locate. Once you are adept at this skill, it should be used throughout the day, as you progress through your race or just through the mountains to keep a check on your position, but of course if you are thumbing the map, then it will be a whole lot quicker & easier. When you’re really good at it you will re-locate whilst on the move.

Clients on a recent OMM Mountain Skills Day relocating on Place Fell, Eastern Lakes

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How to do it: 

Use everything at your disposal. This means look for all the identifiable features you can see, summits, paths, streams, woods, walls, buildings, ruins, sheepfolds etc. Orientate your map, if it is not already! Now match the features on your map to the ground, or visa versa. If your still not sure, then use a back bearing by locating a summit or other feature & take a bearing from it by following what was discussed above.

If you are not on a line feature you will then need to start really assessing the contours & because you have studied your contours well at home, you have a good handle on how to interpret what you are looking at to the features/contours on the ground. Are you in a reentrant, or is there one close by. Is the valley in the right place in front of you in relation to the map.

Re-Location requires lots of practice, the more you do, the better you will get until you can re-orientate whilst on the move.

5) Thumbing the map. 

Thumbing the map with compass in hand.

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A very simple, but very useful technique. Once you start to get a handle on navigation, map reading & compass work you will be able to fold your map smaller, so not needing so much of it in view. The smaller you can have your map folded, the easier it is to thumb the map. By doing this we mean, fold your map in half, half again and so on until you have a manageable size to hold in your hand. Obviously make sure you can see the area you are in. Now, knowing where you are on the map, put your thumb over this location. Having the map oriented correctly in your hand is very important. As you walk/run along your chosen courses/bearing, you simply move you thumb small increments to keep up to date with your progress.

Why is this useful? 

Because you need to be able to locate your rough position on the map at a split second or whilst on the move. When you want to check your surroundings against the map, just pull it up to have a look & your thumb will be placed near to where you are, you can then re-locate very quickly & keep a track of your progress from map to land or the other way round. This is how you will learn to re-locate whilst on the move!

6) Hand-railing. 

It is as it sounds, using a handrail to help you on your way as you travel across the land. So what is a handrail? It a feature on the map that allows you to use it as a hand-rail. It is always a line feature & can be as simple as a path, or as obscure as a blind ridge line (by blind I mean rounded & not obvious). Once you have established the handrail is going in the direction of travel you want you can walk/run along it until you need to make your next decision.

Examples of Hand Rails

Handrails

How do you know when to stop? Use the next technique, a catching feature….

7) Catching Features. 

A catching feature again is as it sounds, its a feature that catches you. It can be designed to wake the brain up to say your nearly at your destination, next direction change or just as a marker to what is coming next. You can have as many catching features as you like along your chosen course. Don’t pick too many though, as it will be hard to remember. Try to limit them as wake up calls, or direction changes, but you can still use them as markers to track your progress.

Plenty of Catching Features in the image below: 

Catching-Features_edited-2

A catching feature might be a wall corner, building, junction in a path or river or a crag that you are moving past. Used in conjunction with thumbing the map & hard rails, you can see that you can really track your progress as you move forwards.

8) Aiming Off. 

The last technique in our intermediate navigational skill set. We use aiming off to catch a line feature, that we may then use as our next bearing setter or as a handrail until we reach the next catching feature.

To aim off we use a bearing slightly off to the side of the line feature we are heading for. This can be either left or right, but it need to be obvious, otherwise you might miss it.

Aiming Of below so you don’t miss the control, best practice in foul weather!

Aiming-Off_edited_edited-1

Lets say your travelling across open ground south to north, there is a tarn in front of you running from west to east & you want to catch this feature, but keep moving past it. The weather is in and visibility isn’t what you want it to be. You want to pass the tarn to the east, so you need it to be on the western side of you. How will you know you have passed it, if you can’t see so well due to mist? The tarn might be 500 m long, west to east. By aiming off, rather than passing the tarn on a bearing and checking it off as you go, you are better aiming off your bearing slightly to the west & hitting the tarn, this then gives you an identifiable feature to break up your leg & confirm you are where you think you are. You can then take your next bearing to the location you want to reach, using the techniques of handrails, catching features & possibly aiming off again.

Get these skills dialled in good weather & you can now be ready to head out in to the open fell in inclement weather. Get them dialled in bad weather & your getting ready to head out at night.

Still not got it? 

Are you interested in an UltraTrail Nav Day or a Mountain Marathon Skills Day?

Send us your details here: