Everest Trail Race 2018 #ETR2018

EVEREST TRAIL RACE, Nepal

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didnt do than by the ones you did do. So, throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbour. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. – Mark Twain

Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay (Sherpa Tenzing) are the stuff of legends; real comic book heroes for this modern era. They had the RIGHT STUFF! You know what I mean, stiff upper lip and the ability to take it on the chin.

Think back, 50+ years ago clad in wool and leather boots they departed Kathmandu on what is now considered one of the most iconic journeys everon the planet. A journey that would take the duo and a British expedition step-by-step, stride-by-stride from Kathmandu to Everest Base Camp; a journey to climb the highest mountain in the world, Everest.

To follow in the footsteps of these pioneers, to follow in the footsteps of Hilary and Tenzing and retrace the ‘53’ journey is beyond running. Its a life affirming and life changing experience and one that the Everest Trail Race provides.

Kathmandu is just the most incredible place. Its a cacophony of noise, colour, people, cars and dust. Nothing can really prepare you for the assault on your senses. A dichotomy for the mind; I embrace the poverty around me and I make it look amazing with stunning photos. Am I a fake? Its a question I often ask. Do I prostitute the locals for my own gain? I think the answer is yes! But with each photograph captured I receive a smile, an acknowledgement that I have made them happy.

Departing Kathmandu, the road to Jiri is a twisting and gut-wrenching series of bends and miles. At 1905m altitude base camp 1 is warmed by the glow of yellow tents. As the sun lowers behind the surrounding mountains, anticipation of the journey ahead is high. Sherpas and porters prepare dinner and we spend a first night under canvas. Suddenly, the journey ahead feels very real.

The Everest Trail Race (ETR) follows the route of Hilary and Tenzing from Jiri all the way to Tengboche and then turns around and heads back to Lukla, thus facilitating an easy and manageable exit point to fly back to Kathmandu.

At 100-miles in distance an experienced ultra-runner may well think the race to be easy. Think again. The combination of relentless climbing, long descents, technical terrain and high altitude makes the ETR, mile-for-mile one of the toughest races of its type.

Broken down into manageable chunks, the race is divided into 6-stages with daily distances of approximately 22, 28, 30, 31, 20 and 22km. Altitude gain starts at 3000m and builds to 6000m. The ETR is a journey to widen one’s eyes and lungs. The visual splendor of the Himalayas is beyond words. The mountains, trails and people arguably provide one of the most stunning backdrops to any race on the planet. It’s easy to become stuck in the moment; the moment of relentless forward motion, then something stirs, you look up and as your jaw hits the floor, the visual splendor takes what little breath remains away; you are left gasping, breathless at the beauty.

Large eyes, dried dirt, runny noses and wide-open welcoming smiles; the Nepalese people really are the salt of the earth. Living in a harsh, demanding and remote environment they have adapted to the surroundings and have found a peace and humility that we can all learn from.

The trekking route, on which we travel, is the motorway of Nepal. We are the tourists, a constant stream of heavy goods vehicles surround us: porters, mules or yaks. Porters transport goods and services up and down this trail motorway daily, an important lifeline to the whole community. For £10 a day they will carry 30kgs on their backs covering high altitude and long distances with the ease of mountain goats. Experienced porters have been known to carry up to 120kg per day. It is beyond belief or comprehension. It is easy to look on from the outside and nod disapprovingly. However, this is normal. No roads exist here, the only method of transporting any goods along the trail are by porter, yak or mule.

Day 1 to Bhandar eases runners into the race with 3700m+/- of vertical gain and descentand approximately 21km in distance. The mind is released, and the legs and lungs try to follow. The sound of horns from local villagers announce the race is underway.

Bhandar to Jase Bhanjyang is a beast and arguably day 2 is considered one of the toughest of the race. It’s a brute! A brute of epic proportions; it leaves every runner questioning the journey ahead and the possibility of completion. Deviating from Hilary and Tenzing’s route, the ETR does not circumnavigate Pikey Peak at just over 4000m but goes over it! As one runner said, ‘It would certainly appear that day 1 really had been just a hors d’oeuvre and the race would miss the entrée and go straight into the main course, ready or not!’

Like any good meal, you can sometimes be a little over faced with the plate in front of you. Pikey Peak was such an indulgence. It was a climbing journey that made a vertical kilometer look like a small hill-rep. Front-runners can anticipate 2-hours plus of relentless climbing, the remainder of the field can spend 4, 5, 6 and maybe longer negotiating the steep slopes of these Himalayan foothills. From the summit; each step of pain is rewarded with a wonderful vista of the Himalayan range. In the distance Everest, Lohtse and Ama Dablam making this 4000m-peak dwarf with their 7000m plus splendor.

Kharikhola provides an incredible end to day-3. A monastery perched atop a mountain. I have often heard how runners have discussed and explained out of body experiences while running. Its not something one can pinpoint, like a mirage they come and go leaving one to question ones sanity. Kharikhola may well have provided such stimulus. Is that real?one may ask and as the final steps arrive and the ETR finish banner awaits.

Travel is the discovery of truth; an affirmation of the promise that human kind is far more beautiful than it is flawed. With each trip comes a new optimism that where there is despair and hardship, there are ideas and people just waiting to be energized, to be empowered, to make a difference for good.” – Dan Thompson, Following Whispers: Walking on the Rooftop of the World in Nepal’s Himalayas.

The trail changes and suddenly more trekkers, more porters, more mules and yaks populate the trail to Lukla and beyond. Dropping down and climbing up, the trail switches and twists and as you turn a bend at Kari La, the mountains hit you through the mist. They are no longer distant peaks but massive snow-covered monsters that make you realise how completely insignificant you are.

I see a woman carrying wood to her home. I stop her and ask for a photograph. Without hesitation she stops, looks me in the eye and patiently waits while I work my craft. Her face is leathered, full of lines and adorned with gold jewelry. She is beautiful. I cant even remotely pinpoint her age, but her face tells me a multitude of stories. Each line an experience. A story of laughter, a story of childhood and I am sure many stories of hardship.

Tengboche, the finish line of day-5 offers a panorama to bring a tear to the eye. Everest, Lohtse and Ama Dablam are close and the finish line of the ETR frames them beautifully like a classic painting. Relief, emotions and an outpouring of tears make the journey worthwhile. So tough the journey, many a runner needs to be reminded to turn around, look, and see what is behind them. The reaction always the same, a huge intake of air, a hand to the face and then a lowering of the head.

Hillary and Tenzing carried on from Tengboche. In the process they created a new world, a world where anything is possible. They climbed to the top and looked down and in doing so they paved the way for all of us to set new horizons, new goals and they have made us all ask the question, what if?

It is not the mountain we conquer but ourselves.

Edmund Hillary

Passing through Sagarmatha National Park, crossing Hilary Bridge, navigating through Namche Bazaar the final calling of Lukla confirms the end of the ETR.

Nepal and the Everest Trail Race provides more than a race experience, they provide a spiritual journey that transcends running. Running may be the vehicle but the trails of Nepal provide the highway, a highway to a new experience, to something magical and to something special.

Words taken from the book RUNNING BEYOND HERE

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Everest Trail Race by The Elements Pure Coconut Water #ETR2017 – STAGE 4 KHARIKOLA to PHAKDING

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Day 4 #ETR2014

Kharikola to Phakding is very much a transition stage. The first 3-days have been quiet with the occasional glimpse of life but now the runners are on the motorway of Nepal. Porters are transporting all manner of goods from food and drink to 8’x4’ sheets of wood and even fridges! In and amongst this frenetic relay of goods are mule and yak trains and a plethora of tourists moving up and down the trails.

The diversity is incredible. Children play, parents work and the runners navigate a way through this section to finish at what many consider to be the gateway to Everest, Phakding.

Leaving the sleepy monastery of Kharikola, 29.5 km’s awaited the runners and after a short and twisting technical descent, a vertical kilometre of elevation to CP1 (Kari La) provided a great way to start the day and brush off the cobwebs. The descent to Surke (Cp2) is a 17km ankle twisting and knee swelling series of switchbacks of technical trail. But there is no rest, more climbing, more technical trails and finally the wire bridge at Monjo offers the ETR finish line.

It may come as no surprise that Suman Kulung and Luis Alberto Hernando dictated the pace from the start and arrived at Cp1 in less than 1-hour, Suman with a slender lead over the Spaniard.  It was a ridiculous time considering the technicality and elevation of the course. Sondre Amdahl was holding his ground but the writing was already on the wall. The Nepali runner was pushing hard and making Luis Alberto chase hard to retain his overall lead. It was a brave effort by both runners. At the line, Suman took the victory in 3:15:23 a 3+ min margin making the final 2-days of the 2017 ETR very exciting with it all to fight for between the Nepali and the Spaniard. Luis Alberto finished in 3:18:52 and still holds the number 1 slot on GC but it is close, really close! Sondre finished 3rd in 3:42:34 and Jordi Gamito 4th in 3:51:14

Chhechee Sherpa is one seriously impressive lady! She has a look of focus and determination that is softened by a smile. After a slow start in the 2017 ETR, this Nepali lady has been a force to reckon with. Once again, she was first to CP1 with a strong lead over Ester Alves who was chasing hard and then Elisabet Barnes who was further back. As the day unfolded though, Chhechee slowed. Firstly, Elisabet caught Ester and then the duo closed on Chhechee. For once, the first 3 ladies were separated by minutes and it remained that way all the way to the line. The Nepali crossed the line first in 4:45:04 and just 34-seconds later Ester crossed with Elisabet just 22-seconds later – that is a close and hard-fought race! The overall GC remains with Chhechee 1st, Ester 2nd and Elisabet 3rd – this is unlikely to change over the following 2-days.

Tomorrow, stage-5 is a short day of just 20km’s and 2124m of vertical gain. It culminates at the monastery at Tengboche with Everest, Lhotse and Ama Dablam providing arguably the most impressive finish line of any race!

Results top-3

  1. Suman Kulung 3:15:23
  2. Luis Alberto Hernando 3:18:52
  3. Sondre Amdahl 3:42:34

 

  1. Chhechee Sherpa 4:45:04
  2. Ester Alves 4:45:38
  3. Elisabet Barnes 4:46:00

 

Lead From Behind by Niandi Carmont

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“It is better to lead from behind and to put others in front, especially when you celebrate victory when nice things occur.” – Nelson Mandela

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I just so love this quote by Mandela one of history’s truly great legendary and inspiring leaders. This guiding principle is what no doubt helped Mandela lead South Africa towards the democracy it is today, even from behind the secluded prison bars of Robbin Island.

Leading from behind is one of the most effective, rewarding and empowering leadership strategies. It goes against the traditional image we hold of great leaders, leading the troops from the front by setting the example.

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As a coach during a 2016 training camp for multi-day racing and specifically the Marathon des Sables (here), I had the opportunity to put this into practice. Marathon des Sables or “MDS” as it is affectionately called by most aficionados is a gruelling self-sufficiency multi-stage running event which takes place every year in April in the Sahara. The event is celebrating its 31st year this year and will gather over 1300 international participants at the start line on 8 April. Participants are required to carry a minimum weight of 6.5kg with a minimum calorie allowance of 2000Kcal/day covering a total distance of 250km with temperatures exceeding 45C over dunes, jebels and scorched sun-dried salt lakes.

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The pre-race training camp last week in Lanzarote provided participants with an opportunity to run long distances on consecutive days in the heat and on demanding terrain simulating that encountered in the Sahara. It also allowed them to test their equipment and exchange with coaches on nutritional and hydration strategies.

Attendees were divided into groups of differing ability depending on the objectives they had set themselves.

“Outstanding leaders go out of their way to boost the self-esteem of their personnel. If people believe in themselves, it’s amazing what they can accomplish.” — Sam Walton

Coaching one of the groups provided me with one of the most insightful weeks on leadership, mentoring and providing feedback. How do you support and develop each participant in the group giving them the self-confidence to learn and grow? This is where leading from behind comes in. At times I would be running ahead setting the pace. Then I would slow down and run in the group egging them on to the next landmark. Other times I would drop down to the back of the pack and let them set the pace. After all isn’t it all about a balance between pushing people outside their comfort zone because you know this is what will help them have the strength to face adversity in the challenge they have set themselves? Then again you also need to be there to monitor their progress and not push them beyond their limits or dampen their enthusiasm. A fine line!

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A good leader is also a good listener. Managers are advised to listen 70% and speak 30% when providing feedback. It is surprising what you learn from coachees when you listen actively. I learnt a wealth of useful information listening to each participant in my run group. Listening gave me a better understanding of the difficulties of each and everyone: ranging from juggling personal and professional commitments to finding the time to train, fitting training around consecutive business trips, adopting a healthy nutritional strategy with a demanding work schedule and business dinners, dealing with sports injuries due to increased mileage, apprehension of the unknown, fear of failure, professional stress impacting on training performance…the list is endless. But listening helped me to be specific in my advice.

“A leader takes people where they want to go. A great leader takes people where they don’t necessarily want to go, but ought to be.” — Rosalynn Carter

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A leader should also enhance competitiveness. Many in my group had set out with the objective of completing Marathon des Sables and getting that beautiful big shiny medal handed over to them by the race Director Patrick Bauer, ticking MDS off on their bucket-list of ultra-running achievements and adding it to their run CV. I know the runners in my group will cross that finish line but I also know that they can achieve much more. They showed that tenacity, grit and determination in training that will take them to the finish line at MDS.

“The final test of a leader is that he leaves behind him in other men, the conviction and the will to carry on.” – Walter Lippman

And so my final message to my coachees after a week of learning from them about leadership, mentoring and providing feedback is:

“I won’t be there with you at the start-line although I’d love to be but I will be be tracking your progress live on-line and living every minute of the MDS experience with you.” – Niandi

 

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If you would like to join our 2017 Multi-Day Training Camp, please go HERE

View images from 2016 HERE

View daily images and summaries from 2016 HERE

Lanzarote Multi-Day Training Camp 2016 – Day 8

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Day 8 of the 2016 Lanzarote multi-day camp was a cracker. The hottest day of the week with little or no wind, a stunning coastal route with mixed terrain, volcano climbing and descending and of course, stunning views and amazing people.

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As on all previous days, we had three run/ walk groups. Everyone managed to cover somewhere between 20 and 35km and it was interesting to see how during the week, people progressed, not only in fitness but in regard to equipment, planning and preparation.

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We also pushed everyone out of their own comfort zones with some tough climbing, very technical terrain and challenging descents. It’s all about taking things up a notch so that when race day comes around, the runners are prepared.

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“Brilliant MdS training camp in Lanzarote with organiser, coach and photographer Ian Corless and MdS 2015 champion Elisabet Barnes. 100-miles run in the week with some excellent advice and support plus great people!” – Paul Allum

Paul’s thoughts were echoed by so many of the camp attendees. Elinor Evans in particular found the whole experience enlightening and invaluable. During the weekly runs, the overnight bivouac, the volcano walk and the daily talks, Elinor realised that she had the wrong pack for her, the wrong sleeping bag, a need to address her nutrition and look at her MdS admin. Invaluable!

“The Training Camp in my opinion was exceptional and far exceeded my expectations. The whole program start to finish pushed everyone to achieve their potential while taking into account the wide variety of abilities. All of the coaches were supportive and challenging and while clearly experts in their field never made novices like me feel stupid. The information we got was priceless and the blend of commercialism and a genuine desire to want to help people achieve their goal of competing or completing MDS was incredibly well done. I wouldn’t just recommend this to future MDS competitors I’d suggest you add it to your Compulsory Kit list! Simply brilliant!” – Simon Dunn

Listen to camp attendee feedback HERE

“Fantastic week in magical terrain with lovely people – thank you Ian, Elisabet, Niandi and Marie-Paule – Sahara countdown is ON.” – Elinor Evans

The morning run of 3-5 hours was followed with a relaxing lunch and then an afternoon Q&A which addressed many of the issues raised during the week and allowed everyone to clarify and appease their minds ahead of their next multi-day race.

The day finished with 20-30min cool down run and then an evening group meal and drinks. It has been an incredible week and one that has provided inspiration for all concerned. Roll on 2017.

‘How was your holiday?’ ask the lads at work. 

‘Amazing’ I say. ‘Look at these pictures’. ‘That’s how to round tape to ensure you minimize the risk of blisters’. Blank looks. 

‘See her? She’s the 2015 MdS champion putting the needle into my foot’. 

More indifference. 

‘Lads, this is the same you fat bastards going to Weston Karting centre at the weekend and Jensen Button turning up to do the safety briefing’. 

They still don’t get it. 
‘Did you learn much in Lanzarote darling?’. 

‘I certainly did. The WAA bag is a goner. It would be like taking a knife to gun fight. Ok, it would be like taking a clutch bag to an all day shopping trip. You know, when only a tote will do’. 

A nod of understanding, but really boredom turning to neutrality at best. 
‘Was it fun running Daddy?’ ‘It was. Midpack daddy is certainly going to need more fat than carbs to keep him going in the dunes girls’. 

‘Did you bring us back any sweets?’. 

‘No’. 

‘Can we watch TV?’ 
‘How was the volcano mate?’. ‘Wonderful. It was cold, but the stars were out and we all had an amazing time’. 

‘Get much sleep?’ 

‘Yes. In fact I’ve found it hard to sleep since without the sound of Elaine gently rustling inside her tent next to me’.  

These people don’t understand me anymore…. I miss #Lanzarote 
– Rich Carps

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If you would like to take part in the 2017 Multi-Day Training Camp, please go HERE

Many thanks for the support of MyRacekit, OMM, Raidlight, PHD. Scott Running, inov-8 and Berghaus.

“Really great few days, some invaluable experience and some valuable miles in the legs. Kit choice, food, packing the bag now all things I’m ready for. Thank you to the organisers and thank you to the fellow participants for making it such a nurturing environment in which to prepare for the MdS.” – Leon Clarance

Episode 100 – Elisabet Barnes and Anna Comet

A_GRAVATAR

This is Episode 100 of Talk Ultra. Yes, episode 100! We speak with multi-day expert Elisabet Barnes about her recent victory at Oman Desert Marathon and plans for 2016. We also speak to Anna Comet Pascual who won the Everest Trail Race in 2014 and just recently in 2015 and in addition made a huge impression on the 2015 Skyrunning calendar. Niandi talks cycling in Talk Training and Speedgoat is back!

100 episodes! wow

“100 episode is not that far….!” you gotta say it Speedgoat!

00:01:30 Show Start

00:20:16 NEWS

Help Nepal – Nepal images ‘FACES of NEPAL’ – order a print and all funds donated to Nepal charities HERE

TRAINING CAMP in Lanzarote with Elisabet Barnes 28th Jan to Feb 4th HERE

iancorless.com 2016 Calendar, not many left! HERE

 

JFK 50

1 – Jim Walmsley 5:47

2 – Graham Peck 5:49

3 – Robert Bond 5:58

1 – Sarah Bard 6:31

2 – Lorraine Young 7:16

3 – Lauri Dymond 7:27

EVEREST TRAIL RACE

1 – Anna Comet 25:44

2 – Jo Meek 27:20

3 – Julia Boettger 28:42

1 – Bhim Gurung 20:24

2 – Roger Vilardeli 22:54

3 – Joan Esparto 24:31

SALOMON SKYRUN SA 

1 – Bruce Arnett 13:56

2 – Pedro DeLa Barca, AJ Calitz and Christian Grayling all 2nd 14:57

1 – Landie Grayling 18:05

2 – Misty Weyers 21:36

3 – Riana van der Merwe 26:16

TUNNEL HILL 100-Mile

Notable result here as Mike Bialick ran a super fast 12:52 coming very close to Ian Sharman’s 12:44 at Rocky Raccoon. Needless to say, no other runners came close to Mike and we plan to catch up with him for the next show!

CHIMERA 100

Nikki Kimball got herself another 100-mile victory in 23:19 and Mark Hammond won for the men in 18:59.

OMAN DESERT MARATHON

1 – Rachid El Morabity 13:19

2 – Evgini Giyva 13:53

3 – Sami Alsaidi 14:15

1 – Elisabet Barnes 18:37

2 – Aziza Alraji 20;32

3 – Silvia Amodio 22:46

00:34:10 INTERVIEW with ELISABETH BARNES

01:09:09 TALK TRAINING this week Niandi Carmont tells us about how she has included cycling in her training. Read Cycling for Runners HERE

01:36:30 INTERVIEW with ANNA COMET 

UP & COMING RACES

Australia

New South Wales

Coast to Kosciuszko | 240 kilometers | December 11, 2015 | website

Tasmania

Bruny Island Ultra Marathon | 64 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website

Victoria

Alpine Challenge 100 km | 100 kilometers | November 28, 2015 | website

Alpine Challenge 100 Mile | 100 miles | November 28, 2015 | website

Alpine Challenge 60 km | 60 kilometers | November 28, 2015 | website

Brazil

Desafio das Serras 80 km | 80 kilometers | November 28, 2015 | website

Burkina Faso

Ultra AFRICA Race | 213 kilometers | December 04, 2015 | website

Cambodia

The Ancient Khmer Path | 220 kilometers | November 27, 2015 | website

Cape Verde

Boavista Salt Marathon | 71 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website

Boavista Ultramarathon – 150 km | 150 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website

Colombia

Del Mar a la Cima – 60 km | 60 kilometers | December 06, 2015 | website

France

Côtes-d’Armor

Le Grand Menestrail | 53 kilometers | December 06, 2015 | website

Haute-Garonne

Trail Toulouse Métropole | 50 kilometers | November 29, 2015 | website

Loire

La Saintélyon | 72 kilometers | December 06, 2015 | website

Seine-et-Marne

Trail du Tour du Canton – 82 km | 82 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website

Germany

Lower Saxony

  1. Lauf PSV Winterlaufserie 100 KM| 100 kilometers | November 28, 2015 | website
  2. Lauf PSV Winterlaufserie 50 KM| 50 kilometers | November 28, 2015 | website
  3. Lauf PSV Winterlaufserie 100 KM| 100 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website
  4. Lauf PSV Winterlaufserie 50 KM| 50 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website
  5. Lauf PSV Winterlaufserie 100 KM| 100 kilometers | December 06, 2015 | website
  6. Lauf PSV Winterlaufserie 50 KM| 50 kilometers | December 06, 2015 | website

Rhineland-Palatinate

Kleiner KoBoLT | 106 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website

KoBoLT | 140 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website

Ghana

Runathlon 50km Ultramarathon | 50 kilometers | November 28, 2015 | website

Runathlon 50km Ultramarathon | 50 kilometers | November 28, 2015 | website

Runathlon 50km Ultramarathon | 50 kilometers | November 28, 2015 | website

Greece

Feat in the Footsteps of Minos | 70 kilometers | November 29, 2015 | website

India

Tamil Nadu

Nilgiris 100 km Men-Only Ultra | 100 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website

Nilgiris 100 km Women-Only Ultra | 100 kilometers | December 06, 2015 | website

Nilgiris 50 km Men-Only Ultra | 50 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website

Nilgiris 50 km Women-Only Ultra | 50 kilometers | December 06, 2015 | website

Italy

Emilia-Romagna

Trail del Cinghiale | 60 kilometers | November 28, 2015 | website

Malaysia

Putrajaya 100 km | 100 kilometers | November 28, 2015 | website

Putrajaya 100 Miles | 100 miles | November 28, 2015 | website

Putrajaya 52 km | 52 kilometers | November 28, 2015 | website

Putrajaya 78 km | 78 kilometers | November 28, 2015 | website

Namibia

100 km of Namib Desert | 100 kilometers | November 29, 2015 | website

New Zealand

Kepler Challenge Mountain Run | 60 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website

Réunion

Mafate Trail Tour | 65 kilometers | November 28, 2015 | website

Spain

Andalusia

Ultra Trail Sierra Norte 105 km | 105 kilometers | November 28, 2015 | website

Catalonia

Marató de Muntanya l’Ardenya 63 km | 63 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website

Marató de Muntanya l’Ardenya 63 km | 63 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website

United Kingdom

Dorset

Coastal Trail Series – Dorset – Ultra | 34 miles | December 05, 2015 | website

Kent

Gatliff 50 km | 50 kilometers | November 29, 2015 | website

USA

Arizona

McDowell Mountain Frenzy 50K | 50 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website

Solemates’ Thanksgiving Tryptophun Rhun 100 Miler | 100 miles | November 28, 2015 | website

California

Calero Park 50K Run | 50 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website

High Desert 50K Ultramarathon | 50 kilometers | December 06, 2015 | website

Santa Barbara Red Rock 50 Mile | 50 miles | November 29, 2015 | website

The North Face Endurance Challenge California 50K | 50 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website

The North Face Endurance Challenge California 50 Mile | 50 miles | December 05, 2015 | website

Florida

Caloosahatchee Ultra 50K | 50 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website

The Guana River 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | December 06, 2015 | website

Georgia

Pine Mountain 40 | 40 miles | December 06, 2015 | website

Illinois

Arctic Frog 50K | 50 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website

Iowa

Hitchcock Hundred 100 Miler | 100 miles | December 05, 2015 | website

Hitchcock Hundred 50 Miler | 50 miles | December 05, 2015 | website

Louisiana

Big Dog Trail Run 50 K | 50 kilometers | November 28, 2015 | website

Massachusetts

TARC Fells Trail Ultra 32M | 32 miles | December 05, 2015 | website

TARC Fells Trail Ultra 40M | 40 miles | December 05, 2015 | website

North Carolina

Derby 50k Ultra Run | 50 kilometers | November 28, 2015 | website

Oregon

Civil War Relay | 52 miles | December 06, 2015 | website

South Carolina

Last Chance 50k Trail Run and Relay | 50 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website

Texas

Isle du Bois 54 km Trail Run | 54 kilometers | December 05, 2015 | website

Utah

Team Relay | 50 miles | December 05, 2015 | website

Washington

Ghost of Seattle 50K | 50 kilometers | November 28, 2015 | website

01:56:38 CLOSE

 

02:01:29

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