Lanzarote Multi-Day Training Camp 2016 – Day 2

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The Lanzarote 2016 multi-day training camp got underway today with an easy 1-hour run along the coastal trails of La Santa to Famara.

In total, we have a group of 27 runners with a broad range of 2016 objectives such as Marathon des Sables (Morocco), The Coastal Challenge (Costa Rica), Big Red Run (Australia), Cape Wraith Ultra (UK) and the Everest Trail Race (Nepal).

It’s always great to see so many runners of mixed ability come together with one goal in mind; completion of a challenging multi-day race!

Tomorrow, 4-hours of classic desert terrain awaits the runners as they depart in three groups lead by Elisabet Barnes, Niandi Carmont and Marie-Paule Pierson. Ian Corless, camp co-ordinator and planner, will move through the groups, running out-and-back to ensure that everyone is on track and comfortable.

In the afternoon, a group talk and discussion followed with an easy 30-60 min run.

Lanzarote, situated off the coast of Morocco provides the perfect environment to simulate many of the conditions that runners will experience in a classic multi-day race; wind, sand, rocks, tough terrain, climbs and maybe even a little scrambling.

If you are interested in a multi-day training, dates for 2017 have been set and you can view HERE

Many thanks to the following brands for helping with this camp:

MyRaceKit, OMM, inov-8, Berghaus, PHD, Raidlight, Scott Running

 

Roques de los Muchachos, La Palma – Transvulcania Ultramarathon

©iancorless.com_LaPalma2015-2160

The island of La Palma has always ticked many boxes for me, it’s a quiet island that lacks tourism, it has incredible all-year round weather and of course it hosts the Transvulcania Ultramarthon.

I’ve been coming here since 2012; it never disappoints. This year I’m here to find some quiet time to write content for my book, Running Beyond. But I am also here for a long overdue holiday, to spend time with Niandi (who gets neglected with all my travel) but also to get back to some regular time on the trails.

Notice I said, ‘time on the trails’ and not running. To be honest, I’ll take the running if the body will allow, it’s not important though, I just need the head space and the isolation the trails out here bring.

We have no plans other than to work and get objectives done each day and then spend the rest of time doing what makes us happy. Yesterday, I was up early and decided I wanted to be finished with work by midday. My plan was to head up into the mountains and run/ walk/ hike around the rim of the Caldera de Taburiente. In the Transvulcania Ultramarathon, this is often referred to as Roques de los Muchachos but actually Roques is the end of the section where the observatories are located and then the long 18km drop and descent to Tazacorte Port.

It’s an incredible place and one of the key sections of the Transvulcania Ultramarthon due to its elevation of 2400+m and the stunning views it provides to the east and the west. In the east one can see the islands of TenerifeEl Hierro and La Gomera and they are visible in the photos. The terrain here varies greatly from technical rocky sections of jagged and irregular rock to sandy and dusty trail. Although the trail goes up and down, in real terms most of the climbing is done by the time you reach Pico de la Nieve at 2232m.

Niandi and myself accessed the GR131 (Transvulcania route) at Pico de la Nieve as a trail, the PR LP 3 comes in from the main access road (LP4).

From the road it’s a 20-30min hike in to the GR131 and then it’s possible to follow the Transvulcania route on an out-and-back to Roques de Los Muchachos (approx 10km, 20km round trip).

Needless to say it’s a stunning section of trail and I have to say, one of my favourites in the world. Key sections are Pico de la Cruz, Piedra a Llana, Marro Negro, Pico de la Cruz and Fuente Nueva before arriving at Roques de los Muchachos.

If you are a runner, hiker, walker or basically someone just looking for an inspirational day on trail with stunning views, I can’t recommend this enough.

Yesterday for me was one of those special days; from early afternoon, through to sunset and then finishing off in the dark with just a headlight, the moon, the stars and Niandi for company.

Niandi and myself didn’t worry about pace, time, or anything for the that matter. We just moved, stopped, took photographs and soaked in a magical place.

So magical, I wanted to share the journey in images.

Episode 94 – Glen Coe Skyline and UTMB

TALK ULTRA LOGO

Episode 94 of Talk Ultra is all about the Salomon Glen Coe Skyline and UTMB. We have some post race chats with Emelie Forsberg, Florian Reichert and RD, Shane Ohly about Glen Coe and then we have a full and in-depth interview with race winner, Joe Symonds. UTMB was a race of drama and instead of speaking to the top 3, we chat with Damian Hall and Richard Ashton, two Brits who finished in the top 50. Niandi Carmont is my co-host

00:09:30 NEWS

Help Nepal – Nepal images ‘FACES of NEPAL’ – order a print and all funds donated to Nepal charities http://iancorless.org/2015/04/28/nepal-appeal-nepalearthquake/

You will notice a few changes in episode 93 of Talk Ultra. Yes, we have some new music, a new logo and over the coming weeks and months we will start to add some new interview sections.

GLEN COE SKYLINE

1 – Joe Symonds 7:36:21

2 – Mark Harris 7:44:51

3 – Jayson Cavill 7:49:42

00:13:30 INTERVIEW FLORIAN REICHERT

1 – Emelie Forsberg 7:44:12 and 2nd overall

2 – Jasmin Paris 7:54:29

3 – Sarah Ridgway 9:21:44

00:25:15 INTERVIEW EMELIE FORSBERG

00:31:56 INTERVIEW SHANE OHLY

UTMB

1 – Xavier Thevenard 21:09:15

2 – Luis Alberto Hernando 21:57:17

3 – David Laney 21:59:42

1 – Nathalie Mauclair 25:15:33

2 – Uxue Fraille 26:29:35

3 – Denise Zimmerman 27:33:51

LEADVILLE

1 – Ian Sharman 16:33:54

2 – Kyle Pietari 18:16:04

3 – Juan Carlos Sagatsume 18:29:27

1 – Liza Howard 19:34:09

2 – Kara Henry 19:54:08

3 – Danielle Hilson 22:28:00

ULTRAVASEN

1 – Jonas Buud 5:45:08

2 – Max King 6:06:11

3 – Didrik Hermansen 6:08:10

1 – Jasmin Nunige 7:02:35

2 – Ida Nilsson 7:05:56

3 – Petra Kindlund 7:34:02

00:56:31 INTERVIEW

JOE SYMONDS

01:51:05 INTERVIEW

RICHARD ASHTON

02:26:54 INTERVIEW

DAMIAN HALL

UP & COMING RACES

Australia

New South Wales

Great North Walk 100 km | 100 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Great North Walk 100 Miles | 100 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

Queensland

Glasshouse 100 km | 100 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Glasshouse 100 Mile | 100 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

Victoria

Walhalla Wound-Up – 50 km | 50 kilometers | September 13, 2015 | website

Austria

“GRAWE” 50km Lauf | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

“NKE Austria” 100km Lauf | 100 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Wörthersee Trail-Maniac 114 K | 114 kilometers | September 18, 2015 | website

Wörthersee Trail Maniak 114K Superior | 114 kilometers | September 18, 2015 | website

Canada

Alberta

Lost Soul 100 Km Ultra | 100 kilometers | September 11, 2015 | website

Lost Soul 100 Mile Ultra | 100 miles | September 11, 2015 | website

Lost Soul 50 Km Ultra | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

British Columbia

50K Cody Claim Run | 50 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

Finlayson Arm 50k Fat Ass | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Golden Ultra | 80 kilometers | September 18, 2015 | website

Mount Robson 50km Ultra Marathon | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Ontario

Haliburton Forest Trail 100 Mile Race | 100 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

Haliburton Forest Trail 50 km Race | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Haliburton Forest Trail 50 Mile Race | 50 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

Sears Great Canadian Run – Toronto | 141 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Quebec

Chute du Diable 50 km | 50 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

Chute du Diable 80 km | 80 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

Croatia

Ucka Trail – 73 km | 73 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Denmark

Nordjylland

100 Miles – Around the isle of Mors | 100 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

France

Alpes-Maritimes

Ultra-Trail Côte d’Azur Mercantour | 140 kilometers | September 04, 2015 | website

Bas-Rhin

Grand Trail du HK ” The Magic Trail” | 52 kilometers | September 06, 2015 | website

Bouches-du-Rhône

Grand Raid de Camargue | 100 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Isère

Ultra Trail du Vercors | 88 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

Lot

Figeac – Conques | 208 kilometers | September 17, 2015 | website

Trail Vallée Cere et Dordogne – 53 km | 53 kilometers | September 06, 2015 | website

Pas-de-Calais

Trail de la côte d’Opale – 62 km | 62 kilometers | September 13, 2015 | website

Rhône

La Nuit des Carbones – 50 km | 50 kilometers | September 04, 2015 | website

Vendée

Bol d’Air – 50 km | 50 kilometers | September 13, 2015 | website

Vosges

L’infernal Trail des Vosges – 160 km | 158 kilometers | September 13, 2015 | website

L’infernal Trail des Vosges – 72 km | 72 kilometers | September 13, 2015 | website

Germany

North Rhine-Westphalia

P-Weg Ultramarathon | 73 kilometers | September 06, 2015 | website

Rhineland-Palatinate

Dorint-RUN50 | 50 kilometers | September 18, 2015 | website

Greece

Athens-Sparta | 245 kilometers | September 04, 2015 | website

Iceland

Run Iceland Adventure Trail | 110 kilometers | September 06, 2015 | website

India

Jammu and Kashmir

Khardung La Challenge | 72 kilometers | September 13, 2015 | website

Tamil Nadu

Chennai Trail Ultra Marathon | 50 kilometers | September 13, 2015 | website

Ireland

Munster

Dingle Ultra Marathon | 50 miles | September 05, 2015 | website

Kerry Way Ultra | 120 miles | September 04, 2015 | website

Italy

Aosta Valley

Tor des Géants | 330 kilometers | September 13, 2015 | website

Liguria

Avatrail – 54 km | 54 kilometers | September 06, 2015 | website

Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol

Sellaronda Trail Running | 56 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Veneto

Troi dei Cimbri | 53 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Japan

100 km | 100 kilometers | September 13, 2015 | website

50 km | 50 kilometers | September 13, 2015 | website

Netherlands

Gelderland

53 km | 53 kilometers | September 06, 2015 | website

New Zealand

Marton-Wanganui Ultramarathon | 66 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Norway

Telemark’s Toughest | 81 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

Poland

7 Valleys Run Ultramarathon of the Festival | 100 kilometers | September 13, 2015 | website

Bieg 7 Dolin – Ultramaraton – 100 km | 100 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Bieg 7 Dolin – Ultramaraton – 66 km | 66 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Portugal

180 km | 180 kilometers | September 04, 2015 | website

Romania

Ciucas X3 Ultramaraton | 105 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Dracula 106K | 106 kilometers | September 04, 2015 | website

Dracula 106K 2-Day Stage Race | 106 kilometers | September 04, 2015 | website

Vlad Tepes 52K | 52 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

Singapore

Craze Ultra 100 miles | 100 miles | September 05, 2015 | website

Craze Ultra 101 km | 101 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

Craze Ultra 78 km | 78 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

Slovenia

Marathon Celje-Logarska dolina – 75 km | 75 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

South Africa

Bonitas Sunday Mont-Aux-Sources Challenge | 50 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

Hout is Goud Day-Breaker | 80 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Spain

Catalonia

Ultra Trail dels Comtes d’Erill | 82 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

Principality of Asturias

Ultra Trail Macizo de Ubiña “Los Güeyos del Diablo” | 64 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Switzerland

Valais

Trail des Dents-du-Midi – Trail découverte | 57 kilometers | September 18, 2015 | website

Vaud

Ultratour du Leman | 173 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

United Kingdom

Anglesey

Ring o’ Fire | 131 miles | September 04, 2015 | website

Argyll and Bute

Tiree Ultramarathon | 35 miles | September 06, 2015 | website

Buckinghamshire

Infinity Run – 100 miles in 24hrs | 100 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

Cumbria

Lakes Sky Ultra | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Gloucestershire

Cotswold Way Challenge Multistage Ultra | 57 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

Northern Ireland

Titanic Quarter 101k | 101 kilometers | September 06, 2015 | website

Titanic Quarter 50k | 50 kilometers | September 06, 2015 | website

Oxfordshire

Thames Path Challenge 100km | 100 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Thames Path Challenge 50km | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Powys

10 Peaks Brecon Beacons – Long Course | 89 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

10 Peaks Brecon Beacons – Short Course | 58 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

Shropshire

Double or Nothing | 70 miles | September 18, 2015 | website

Stockport

Bullock Smithy | 56 miles | September 05, 2015 | website

Suffolk

Ultra Tour of Suffolk | 50 miles | September 05, 2015 | website

USA

Alaska

Klondike Trail of ’98 International Road Relay | 175 kilometers | September 11, 2015 | website

Arizona

Paatuwaqatsi Run 50K | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

California

Headlands 100mi | 100 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

Headlands 50mi | 50 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

Headlands 75mi | 75 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

Los Pinos 50K | 50 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

Lost Sierra 50K | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Robinson Flat 50k | 50 kilometers | September 13, 2015 | website

Tahoe 200 | 200 miles | September 11, 2015 | website

Colorado

Devil on the Divide 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Flaming Foilage Relay | 160 miles | September 11, 2015 | website

Hideaway Hundred 100 Miler | 101 miles | September 05, 2015 | website

Hideaway Hundred 50K | 33 miles | September 06, 2015 | website

Hideaway Hundred 50 Miler | 50 miles | September 05, 2015 | website

Run Rabbit Run 100 Mile Ultra Marathon | 100 miles | September 18, 2015 | website

Solemates Silverton 100 Miler | 100 miles | September 05, 2015 | website

Tommyknocker 100K | 100 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Tommyknocker 50K | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Florida

The Pinellas Trail Challenge | 46 miles | September 05, 2015 | website

Wildcat 100 km | 100 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

Wildcat 100 Miler | 100 miles | September 05, 2015 | website

Idaho

Moscow Mountain Madness | 50 kilometers | September 06, 2015 | website

Illinois

50K | 50 kilometers | September 13, 2015 | website

Double-Ender 25k | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Evergreen Lake Ultra and a Half | 51 miles | September 13, 2015 | website

Evergreen Lake Ultras | 34 miles | September 13, 2015 | website

The Hennepin Hundred – 100M | 100 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

The Hennepin Hundred – 100M Relay | 100 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

The Hennepin Hundred – 50M | 50 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

Kansas

Hawk 100 | 100 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

Hawk 50 | 50 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

Massachusetts

TARC Fall Classic 50K | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

TARC Fall Classic 50 M | 50 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

The Rock Run | 50 miles | September 05, 2015 | website

Michigan

Freak 50K | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Hallucination 100 Mile | 100 miles | September 11, 2015 | website

LSD 100K | 100 kilometers | September 11, 2015 | website

Peace, Love & 50 mile | 50 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

Minnesota

Superior Sawtooth 100 Mile | 100 miles | September 11, 2015 | website

Superior Trail 50 Mile | 50 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

Missouri

Go! KT82 Trail Relay | 82 miles | September 05, 2015 | website

Montana

The Rut 50K | 50 kilometers | September 06, 2015 | website

Nebraska

Bohemian Alps 50 Kilometer Ultramarathon | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

New York

Shawangunk Ridge 74-Mile Trail Run/Hike | 74 miles | September 18, 2015 | website

North Carolina

Weymouth Woods 50K | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Oklahoma

3 Half Marathons in 3 Days | 39 miles | September 05, 2015 | website

3 Marathons in 3 Days | 78 miles | September 05, 2015 | website

Do-Wacka-Do 50k Trail Run | 50 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

DoWackaDo 50 Mile Trail Run | 50 miles | September 05, 2015 | website

DoWackaDo Trail 50K Run | 50 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

Oregon

McKenzie River Trail Run | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Pennsylvania

Groundhog Fall 50K | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Pine Creek Challenge 100K | 100 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

Pine Creek Challenge 100M | 100 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

Tennessee

Stanky Creek 50K | 50 kilometers | September 13, 2015 | website

Texas

50K | 50 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

Utah

Red Rock Relay Zion Edition | 187 miles | September 11, 2015 | website

Wasatch Front 100 Mile Endurance Run | 100 miles | September 11, 2015 | website

Vermont

Jay Peak 50K Ultra | 50 kilometers | September 06, 2015 | website

Virginia

Iron Mountain 50 mile Trail Run | 50 miles | September 05, 2015 | website

Odyssey 40 Mile Trail Ultra | 40 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

The Blude Ridge Relay | 208 miles | September 11, 2015 | website

The Ring – Massanutten Trail Circuit Run | 71 miles | September 05, 2015 | website

Washington

Day Two- (September 7) 50k | 50 kilometers | September 06, 2015 | website

First Call Veterans Day 50K (September) | 50 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

PCT Bunker to Bonneville 50K  | 50 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

Plain 100 Mile Endurance Run | 100 miles | September 12, 2015 | website

Volcanic 50 Mt St. Helens | 50 kilometers | September 05, 2015 | website

Wisconsin

Lake Michigan Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | September 06, 2015 | website

Wyoming

Sundance 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | September 12, 2015 | website

03:00:00 CLOSE 

 

 03:05:43

http://traffic.libsyn.com/talkultra/Episode_94_GlenCoe_UTMB.mp3

ITunes http://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/talk-ultra/id497318073

Libsyn – feed://talkultra.libsyn.com/rss

Website – talkultra.com

Episode 90 – Jurek on the #AT, Krar, Kimball, Ayre, Kremer

A Gravatar

Episode 90 of Talk Ultra is playing catch up. Yes folks we missed a show… Speedgoat discusses Scott Jurek on the AT. We talk Western States and have an interview with Rob Krar. We have some Richtersveld Wildrun chat from South Africa with Nikki Kimball and Georgina Ayre. We also speak to Stevie Kremer on Ultra Skymarathon Madeira. Talk Training, the News and Niandi co-hosts.

Speedgoat discusses Scott Jurek’s AT attempt

NEWS 

Help Nepal – Nepal images ‘FACES of NEPAL’ – order a print and all funds donated to Nepal charities http://iancorless.org/2015/04/28/nepal-appeal-nepalearthquake/

WSER

  1. Magdalena Boulet 19:05:21
  2. Kaci Lickteig 19:20:31
  3. Stephanie Howe 19:32:58
  4. Aliza Lapierre 19:43:22
  5. Emma Roca 20:12:00
  6. Nicole Studer 20:19:56
  7. Sally McRae 20:27:33
  8. Caroline Boller 21:44:11
  9. Erika Lindland 21:47:25
  10. Nikki Kimball 22:01:55
  1. Rob Krar14:48:59
  2. Seth Swanson15:17:28
  3. Jared Hazen15:37:55
  4. Gediminas Grinius15:40:55
  5. Thomas Lorblanchet15:56:32
  6. Julien Chorier16:34:43
  7. Ian Sharman16:44:27
  8. David Laney17:01:37
  9. Andrew Tuckey17:19:17
  10. Paul Terranova17:43:17

Mont-Blanc 80k

  1. Alex Nichols 10:31
  2. Franco Colle 11:03
  3. Andy Symonds 11:04
  1. Mira Rai 12:32
  2. Anna Comet 12:54
  3. Hillary Allen 13:11

FKT for Gary Robbins – In Washington on the 95-mile Wonderland Trail around Mount Rainier, Gary Robbins ran 18:52 to cut just over two hours from Kyle Skaggs’s previous supported record, which had stood since 2006.  

RICHTERSVELD WILDRUN

  1. Thabang Madiba 13:55:38
  2. Dayle Wheeler 15:16:24
  3. Filippo Faralla 16:46:25
  1. Katya Soggot 15:26:57 (3rd overall)
  2. Nikki Kimball 16:31:20 (4th Overall)
  3. Karoline Hanks 16:46:19 (5th overall)

INTERVIEWS with Nikki Kimball and Georgina Ayre 

USM – Ultra SkyMarathon Madeira

  1. Stevie Kremer 7:33:373
  2. Ester Alves 8:14:45
  3. Lucia Franco 9:01:53.
  1. Ricky Lightfoot 6:09:56
  2. Clemente Mora 6:17:22
  3.  Nuno Silva 6:24:57

INTERVIEW with Stevie Kremer

Mount Marathon Alaska

  1. Emelie Forsberg 47:48 new CR
  2. Allison Ostrander 50:28
  3. Christy Marvin 52:59
  1. Kilian Jornet 41:48 new CR
  2. Rickey Gates 42:56
  3. Jim Shine 43:11 

Hardrock 100 – preview HERE

TALK TRAINING

MARC LAITHWAITE (listen to Waterlogged w/ Tim Noakes HERE)

INTERVIEW

ROB KRAR

UP & COMING RACES

Australia

Queensland

3 Marathons in 3 Days | 126 kilometers | July 10, 2015 | website

Gold Coast Kokoda Challenge | 96 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Victoria

You Yangs 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | July 19, 2015 | website

Belgium

Wallonia

ASICS Xtrails – Red Bull Trail Sprinter Houffalize – 110 km | 110 kilometers | July 10, 2015 | website

ASICS Xtrails – Red Bull Trail Sprinter Houffalize – 77 km | 77 kilometers | July 10, 2015 | website

Bulgaria

65km Tryavna Ultra | 65 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Canada

Alberta

Sinister 7 Ultra | 100 miles | July 11, 2015 | website

British Columbia

Broken Goat 50K | 50 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Ontario

The North Face Endurance Challenge Ontario 50 Km | 50 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

The North Face Endurance Challenge Ontario 50 Mile | 50 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

Quebec

50 km | 50 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Finland

Lapland

NUTS Midnight Sun Trail Ultra 125 km | 125 kilometers | July 24, 2015 | website

France

Alpes-Maritimes

Neander-Trail | 50 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Corrèze

L’EDFi du Lac | 100 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Le Tour du Cardant | 65 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Finistère

100 km de Cléder | 100 kilometers | July 12, 2015 | website

Gard

Grand trail Stevenson 126 km | 126 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Grand trail Stevenson 144 km | 144 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Grand trail Stevenson 179 km | 179 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Grand trail Stevenson 224 km | 224 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Grand trail Stevenson 55 km | 55 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Haute-Corse

Restonica Trail – 68 km | 68 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Ultra Trail di Corsica | 105 kilometers | July 10, 2015 | website

Haute-Garonne

Aneto 3404 | 60 kilometers | July 12, 2015 | website

Haute-Savoie

L’intégrale | 77 kilometers | July 19, 2015 | website

Haut-Rhin

Trail du Pays Welche | 50 kilometers | July 12, 2015 | website

Isère

Maratrail des Passerelles du Monteynard | 55 kilometers | July 19, 2015 | website

Jura

Un Tour en Terre du Jura – Jour 1 | 55 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Un Tour en Terre du Jura – Jour 2 | 55 kilometers | July 12, 2015 | website

Un Tour en Terre du Jura – L’intégrale | 110 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Lozère

Grand trail Stevenson 110 km | 110 kilometers | July 12, 2015 | website

Grand trail Stevenson 59 km | 59 kilometers | July 13, 2015 | website

Grand trail Stevenson 65 km | 65 kilometers | July 12, 2015 | website

Pyrénées-Atlantiques

Grand trail de la Vallée d’Ossau | 73 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Savoie

Ice Trail Tarentaise Val d’Isère | 65 kilometers | July 12, 2015 | website

Ultra Trail du Beaufortain | 105 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Germany

Rhineland-Palatinate

Bärenfels Ultra Trail | 64 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Greece

Kronion Ultra | 70 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Guadeloupe

Rèd Mammel | 50 kilometers | July 24, 2015 | website

Ultra Transkarukera | 120 kilometers | July 24, 2015 | website

Iceland

Laugavegur Ultra Marathon | 55 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

India

Jammu and Kashmir

ZENchallenge Ladakh – 100K | 100 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Ireland

Leinster

Stonemad Multi Stage Marathon – Day 1 Ultra Marathon | 62 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Stonemad Multi Stage Marathon – Day 2 Ultra Marathon | 55 kilometers | July 12, 2015 | website

Italy

Piedmont

Grand Raid International du Cro-Magnon | 130 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Trail del Marguareis | 80 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Tre Rifugi Val Pellice Trail | 54 kilometers | July 12, 2015 | website

Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol

Südtirol Ultra Skyrace – 121 km | 121 kilometers | July 24, 2015 | website

Südtirol Ultra Skyrace – 66 km | 66 kilometers | July 24, 2015 | website

Veneto

Asolo 100 km | 100 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Asolo 50 km | 50 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Japan

Oxfam Trailwalker Japan | 100 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Mauritius

Xtreme Dodo Trail | 50 kilometers | July 12, 2015 | website

Poland

TriCity Trail 80+ | 80 kilometers | July 12, 2015 | website

Portugal

Ultra-Trail Douro e Paiva 60km | 60 kilometers | July 12, 2015 | website

Romania

Marathon 7500 Elite | 90 kilometers | July 17, 2015 | website

Russia

TransUral | 160 kilometers | July 15, 2015 | website

Slovakia

Nízkotatranská stíhačka | 100 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

South Africa

Rhodes Trail Run | 52 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Spain

Andalusia

Ultra Sierra Nevada | 103 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

USN Trail | 62 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Basque Country

Ehunmilak | 168 kilometers | July 10, 2015 | website

G2handiak | 88 kilometers | July 10, 2015 | website

Castile and León

Gredos Infinite Run – 120 km | 120 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Catalonia

BUFF® Epic Trail Aigüestortes – 105 km | 105 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Cadí Ultra Trail | 80 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Ultra Trail Valls d’Àneu | 92 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Sweden

Swedish Alpine Ultra | 107 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Switzerland

Berne

Eiger Ultra Trail E101 | 101 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Eiger Ultra Trail E51 | 51 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Valais

Trail Verbier St-Bernard – 110 km “La boucle” | 110 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Trail Verbier St-Bernard – 61 km “La traversée” | 61 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Turkey

Gökhan Türe Ultra | 90 kilometers | July 23, 2015 | website

Long Course | 75 kilometers | July 23, 2015 | website

Medium Course | 60 kilometers | July 23, 2015 | website

United Kingdom

Buckinghamshire

Chiltern Ultra Challenge “Intro” 50km Ultra | 50 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

East Riding of Yorkshire

The Montane Lakeland 100 | 100 miles | July 24, 2015 | website

Essex

Saffron Trail Ultra | 70 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

Glasgow City

Clyde Stride Ultra Marathon | 40 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

Hertfordshire

Fairlands Valley Challenge – 50km | 50 kilometers | July 19, 2015 | website

Kent

The 50 Mile Challenge | 52 miles | July 19, 2015 | website

North Yorkshire

Lyke Wake Race | 42 miles | July 11, 2015 | website

Oxfordshire

Race to the Stones | 100 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Scotland

Run the Blades | 50 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Shropshire

Wenlock Olympian Run | 50 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

Wenlock Olympian Walk | 50 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

Somerset

Ham & Lyme 100k | 100 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Ham & Lyme 50k | 50 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

USA

Arizona

Solemates’ CYA 100 | 100 miles | July 11, 2015 | website

California

CTR Lake Chabot Train Run 50 km (Jul) | 50 kilometers | July 19, 2015 | website

Golden Gate Trail Run 50 km (summer) | 50 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Mt. Disappointment 50K Endurance Run | 50 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Mt. Disappointment 50 Mile Endurance Run | 50 miles | July 11, 2015 | website

Northshore 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | July 19, 2015 | website

Pacifica 50 km | 50 kilometers | July 12, 2015 | website

Rancho Canada del Oro and Calero Park 50K | 50 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Santa Barbara 100K | 100 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Santa Barbara 100 Mile | 101 miles | July 11, 2015 | website

Colorado

Hardrock 100 Endurance Run | 100 miles | July 10, 2015 | website

Leadville Silver Rush 50 | 50 miles | July 12, 2015 | website

Sheep Mountain 50 Mile Endurance Run | 51 miles | July 11, 2015 | website

Idaho

Beaverhead 100K Endurance Run | 100 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Beaverhead 50K Endurance Run | 50 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

McCall Trailrunning 40 Mile Classic | 40 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

Indiana

110 Miles HIgh School (up to 7 runners) | 110 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

110 Miles Open (5-7 runners) | 110 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

110 Miles Superhuman (2 runners) | 110 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

110 Miles Ultra (3-4 runners) | 110 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

55 Miles Open (5-7 runners) | 55 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

55 Miles Superhuman (2 runners) | 55 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

55 Miles The Gump (1 runner) | 55 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

55 Miles Ultra (3-4 4unners) | 55 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

Kansas

Honey Badger 100 Mile Ultra Road Race | 100 miles | July 11, 2015 | website

Psycho Psummer 50K | 50 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Maine

Down East Sunrise Trail Team Relay | 102 miles | July 24, 2015 | website

Maryland

Rosaryville 50k Trail Runs | 50 kilometers | July 19, 2015 | website

Montana

Devil’s Backbone 50 Miles | 50 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

Thunderbolt Creek 50 Km | 50 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Nevada

Tahoe Rim Trail 100M | 100 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

Tahoe Rim Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Tahoe Rim Trail 50M | 50 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

Oregon

50K | 50 kilometers | July 12, 2015 | website

Mt Hood Pacific Crest Trail Ultramarathon | 50 miles | July 11, 2015 | website

Relay | 69 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

South Carolina

Cremator 50 Mile Endurance Run | 50 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

Texas

El Scorcho | 50 kilometers | July 19, 2015 | website

Muleshoe Bend – 60k | 60 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Utah

Skyline Mountain 50 Trail Run | 50 miles | July 11, 2015 | website

Ultra Adventures Capitol Reef 100 Mile | 100 miles | July 10, 2015 | website

Ultra Adventures Capitol Reef 50K | 50 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Ultra Adventures Capitol Reef 50 Mile | 50 miles | July 11, 2015 | website

Vermont

Vermont 100k Endurance Race | 100 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Vermont 100 Mile Endurance Race | 100 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

Washington

Grey Rock 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

Ragnar Relay Northwest Passage | 190 miles | July 17, 2015 | website

Wild Woman Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

Wisconsin

50K | 50 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

DWD Devil’s Lake 50K | 50 kilometers | July 11, 2015 | website

DWD Devil’s Lake 50M | 50 miles | July 11, 2015 | website

Hilloopy 100+ Relay | 100 miles | July 18, 2015 | website

Junkyard Dog 50K | 50 kilometers | July 18, 2015 | website

CLOSE

Show Links:

Website – talkultra.com

Mayonnaise, gin, cheese and taulas – Trail Menorca 2015 by Niandi Carmont

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Mayonnaise, gin, cheese and taulas ……..what do these words bring to mind? No, you got it wrong! The answer is ………Menorca!

Yep, not many people know that mayonnaise (and who doesn’t love dollops of it on chips) was invented by the Duc de Richelieu on encountering and adapting the Menorca aioli. As for gin this little island is home to Xoriguer Distillery and is well-known for producing its own distinctively fragrant variety of the spirit.

But where is Menorca might you ask? This Balearic Island is located in the Mediterranean off the Spanish coast not far from Mallorca. Menorca means windy island and hardly surprising as there is a gentle breeze on most days due to its relatively flat relief. A little wind is welcome if you consider that the island enjoys 300 days of yearly sunshine.

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Booze, sea and sun ….convinced? Well what enticed me to the island were none of the aforementioned but more the opportunity to take part in what I consider to be a fantastic and scenically beautiful trail race. The Cami de Cavalls is the backdrop of several trail races organized on the island in May. It is an ancient hiking trail/path of 186km that takes you around the coastline of the island. This long-distance walking route is the GR223 of the Senderos de Gran Recorrido network in Spain. Historically-speaking the Cami de Cavalls was built in order to connect the watchtowers, fortresses and cannons distributed along the coast. It was patrolled by soldiers mounted on horses hence the word cavalls meaning horses in Catalan.

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In the 2015 edition there were several distances: 185km, 100km, 55km (trekking), 32km (trekking).

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The 85km race (TMCS, Trail Menorca Costa Sud)) takes on the whole southern coastline from Es Castell to Ciutadella. This is the trail race I decided to do as I really wanted to experience as much of the historic Cami de Cavalls as possible but had only just recovered from Marathon des Sables 4 weeks prior. Taking that into consideration it seemed the best and most reasonable option. I arrived in Menorca on Thursday and my race start was on Saturday so this provided me with the opportunity to relax a little, do some sight-seeing and pick up my number and chip without too much stress. Thursday on arrival in Ciutadella I picked up my number and chip after some leisurely tapas and rosé in the port and attended the race briefing in the late afternoon for the 185km. This was followed by a cocktail with some local dignitaries involved in the sponsorship and promotion of Trail Menorca .

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The Friday was spent walking around the cobbled streets in the old quarter of Citadel and having fresh grilled squid al fresco with 2015 MDS winner Elisabet Barnes near the town-hall and an early night in anticipation of the early race start the following day. Saturday I was woken by my alarm at 5am. Some instant porridge and I was off to catch the shuttle bus at 6am to the start in Es Castell. What is practical about the different races is that they all finish in Ciutadella, the 185km and 100km (TMCN Trail Menorca Costa Nord) starting a day before. Shuttle buses at the finish in Ciutadella take the runners to the start of the different races so logistically it makes sense to book your accommodation at the finish and it is completely hassle-free. Also should you drop out (highly unlikely of course) or not make the cut off times shuttle busses are laid on at the checkpoints to take you back to the finish).

©iancorless.com_Menorca2015-9942

An 85km drive along the coastline and the bus of excited runners arrives in Es Castell. During the journey Elisabet and I exchange worried looks as the rain starts pelting down – this must be one of the 65 days of rain on the island! However, it proves to be just a short-lived downpour and at 8am we start the race in cool and pleasant temperatures.

©iancorless.com_Menorca2015-3898

The course is well marked with the over 2.200 GR 223 landmarks making it hard to get lost with added signage and red & white tape in urban areas on lamps or posts. These are reinforced with spray paint, biodegradable tape and red leds for runners running at night.

There are 7 well-equipped feed stations on the TMCS offering water, coca cola (ice-cold), isotonic drinks, fruit juices, fruit, nuts, dates, bread, Nutella and local ham and cheese. I found it unnecessary to take any additional food supplies although the race is supposed to be “self-sufficient” and runners are encouraged to do so. The support, friendliness and encouragement at the feed stations are amazing. When you do this race you really don’t feel like a number when you are cheered as you enter the feed station and cheered when you leave!

©iancorless.com_Menorca2015-3641

I was incredibly surprised at the beauty of the course. I had been told that the TMCN along the North Coast was more scenic although much more technical but to be honest the TMCS was absolutely stunning. The variety of the course is unrivalled – beach sections, little coves of azure turquoise water, tiny coastal villages, luscious green flowered fields and cliffs overlooking the island’s multitude of pristine bays.

©iancorless.com_Menorca2015-4134

The course is partly exposed and partly shaded providing a certain amount of respite from the midday sun. Temperatures at this time of the year can vary and although the day spent sightseeing was quite hot (36°C), on race day it was pleasantly mild. The only technical parts of the course are along the sea-front on hardened rock formations where you can easily trip up especially once fatigue starts setting in and the last section of the course although flat was quite technical and rocky with the head-on wind from the North Tramuntana complicating matters! At this point I was walking as I really didn’t want to trip up on the rocks and no longer had the energy to battle against the wind.

©iancorless.com_Menorca2015-4525

The final kilometres of the race take you through the coastal seaside resorts into the finish area at Ciutadella where a welcoming crowd of local supporters and giant paella and free beers await the finishers. The icing on the cake? The beautiful medal with the words Live the Legend……..and I really felt I lived the Cami de Cavalls ….. until 2016 that is!

©iancorless.com_Menorca2015-4729 ©iancorless.com_Menorca2015-4734

Ciutadella and the surrounding area is extremely Spanish and beautiful – take a look.

Race images are available to view and purchase HERE

CYCLING for RUNNERS – Article 6 Indoor Intensity

 

Cycling for Runners HEADER2

A new year can be a daunting thing… the excitement and buzz of Christmas is over and suddenly 12-months lie ahead. Many of you may well have already planned early season targets or even objectives for the whole year. However, as I know only too well, for every person who has planned key targets, there will be another person who has planned nothing. So, before you do anything, take some time out and decide on your targets for the coming year. Please remember, these targets do not need to be racing targets. They could be FKT’s, personal projects or even an expedition. Once you have dates in a diary, you will find structuring your training so much easier. It provides perspective!

Did December go well for you?

December can be a tough month. It’s so easy to be distracted and miss training but don’t worry. If you maintained 3-4 sessions per week you are going to be in a great place to build your fitness in 2015.

It goes without saying that if you weren’t injured you will have been out running, be that on the trails or the treadmill. We hope that you managed to include a couple of cycling sessions? Ideally you will have done one easy session spinning the legs to help recovery from running and one ‘faster’ session either on the road or on an indoor trainer to help build stamina and strength

Niandi has been doing several indoor sessions as recovery and she wrote about them HERE

Me? Well you know what, the winter arrived in the UK, the ice came and so did the snow. For me it was perfect. I love running in the cold and snowy conditions. However, cycling outdoors was not an option. Thank goodness for the indoor trainer (Turbo Trainer) and I applied the session we outlined in Article 5 (Here) and I also cycled easy for 30 minutes with a high cadence for recovery.

Here is a summary of the session:

Warm up for 10-minutes ‘spinning’ your legs in an ‘easy’ gear. This is all about getting blood flowing, loosening stiff and/ or tight muscles and preparing for the session ahead.

Session: Perform 2 minutes at 80% of maximum heart rate (keeping cadence on or around 90) – You will need to use your cycling gears to add resistance and provide the necessary difficulty level for you elevate your heart rate. Monitor your HRM with a quality item – We use Suunto Ambit 3 Peak and Ambit 2 units

Recover for 2-minute ‘spinning’ your legs as in the warm up.

Repeat the 2-minute session with 2-minute recovery for an additional 5-times (making a total of 6 in week-1). *In week 2 do 7-repetitions, in week 3 do 8-repetitions and in week 4 do 10-repetitions.

I hit the reps building up the 2-minute intervals over a 4-week period and it felt great.

If you are anything like me, you will not want to loose those gains made over December and January so in February we are going to build with four sessions that you can do indoors or outdoors. 

THE SESSIONS

If you don’t already know, training indoors on a bike is hard; I love it! You have no escape, no rest and your cadence, HRM, legs and sweat rate do not lie. Did I mention sweat! Boy do I sweat indoors. Even with a window open and a fan on me I am like a running tap with water pouring out of me. Make sure you keep yourself hydrated particularly during and after all sessions.

This month we have four sessions for you, one for each week and most of them include the same warm up and warm down. I call this: 5,4,3,2,1.

How does it work?

Your bike gearing will usually have two cogs at the front, for simplicity, we will call this the big ring and the small ring. Typically, a racing bike will have a 52/39 set up. The numbers refer to teeth on the cog. The ‘39’ makes gearing easier in comparison to the ’52.’

shimano-da9000-cset-zoom

At the back you will have a selection of gears, if your bike is relatively new it will probably have 10-cogs.

shimano-da9000-cass-zoom

The rear cogs start small (harder gear) and get larger (easier gear) and step up/ down progressively so that you can maintain an ‘ideal’ cadence (90) irrespective of the terrain. Your rear gearing may look like this:

12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25

 The above numbers refer to ‘teeth’ on the rear cogs.

Shimano Dura Ace  press camp 2012 - Kortrijk/Belgium..For example, 39×23 may be used on a steep climb when you need an easier gear or by comparison, if you are riding down a steep hill with the wind behind you, you may use 52×12.

If you are not used to cycle gearing, the 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 will help you.

Depending on your experience, strength, fitness and experience. You may do this session on your small ring (easier) at the front of the bike or the big ring (harder.). I do my sessions on the ‘52’ cog. I am an ex cyclist with experience and bike strength and therefore adapted to pushing harder gears. Remember, you are using cycling to enhance running!

Start as follows:

  • 52*x25 for 5 minutes aiming for 90+ cadence
  • 52*x23 for 4 minutes aiming for 90+ cadence
  • 52*x21 for 3 minutes aiming for 90+ cadence
  • 52*x19 for 2 minutes aiming for 90 cadence
  • 52*x17 for 1 minute aiming for 90 cadence

 *Note, if you wanted this gearing to be easier you would replace the ’52’ (big ring) with say a ’39’ (small ring) for example.

By the time you reach the final minute you will be completely warm, your heart rate will have slowly elevated and the gearing will be ‘challenging’ but sustainable. Your heart rate will be in the 70-75% zone of max hear rate.

Now the sessions:

The sessions below can be done on the road or on an indoor trainer. It goes without saying that for such specific sessions, an indoor trainer would be preferable as you can control the whole session. If you do try the sessions outside, you will need a good long stretch of flat road. Undulating roads would make this session impossible.

Hints ‘n’ Tips

  • Use a heart rate monitor. It’s great to get the feedback. I have included my hear rate profiles recorded via my Suunto for the sessions below.
  • Have water handy – you will need it.
  • If training indoors use a fan or train near an open window.
  • Keep your pedalling technique smooth, don’t fight the bike.

Week 1: 40-minute session

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5, 4, 3, 2, 1 warm up

*Move up 1 additional gear, for me this would be 52×16 and maintain a 90 cadence for 5 minutes. You can expect your heart rate to rise as you maintain the effort.

Drop back down to 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 and repeat the warm up – this loosens the legs and adds souplesse.

Repeat the above set* but in the final minute push really hard to maximal effort. At the end of the final minute you will have a good idea of your maximum hear rate (MHR).

Cool down with 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 but in reverse finishing with just 1 minute in the easiest gear. This works as a great cool down.

Week 1 heart rate data - Ian Corless

Week 1 heart rate data – Ian Corless

Week 2: 1-hour session

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5, 4, 3, 2, 1 warm up

*Stay in the final gear you used for the 1-minute in the warm up and maintain a 90+ cadence for 30 minutes building your effort throughout the session.

Cool down with 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 but in reverse finishing with just 1 minute in the easiest gear. This works as a great cool down.

Week 2 heart rate data - Ian Corless

Week 2 heart rate data – Ian Corless

Week 3: 40-minute session

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4, 3, 2, 1 warm up (we miss the 5-min section this time)

Move up 1 additional gear, for me this would be 52×16 and maintain a 90 cadence for 4-minutes and then step up 1-gear (for me this is 52×15) and work hard for 1-minute. At the end of 1-minute drop back down one gear, for me 52×16 and repeat 4min/ 1min for four more times (total five repetitions)

Cool down with 5-minutes spinning in your start gear, for me, this would be 52×25

Week 3 heart rate data - Ian Corless

Week 3 heart rate data – Ian Corless

Week 4: 1-hour session

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5, 4, 3, 2, 1 warm up

Move up 1 additional gear, for me this would be 52×16 and maintain a 90 cadence for 4-minutes and then step up 1-gear (for me this is 52×15) and work hard for 1-minute. At the end of 1-minute drop back down one gear, for me 52×16 and repeat 4min/ 1min for five more times (total six repetitions)

Cool down with 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 but in reverse finishing with just 1 minute in the easiest gear. This works as a great cool down.

Week 4 heart rate data - Ian Corless

Week 4 heart rate data – Ian Corless

NOTE: The above cycling sessions would replace a faster run session in each week and I would still recommend one or even maybe two other cycle sessions per week for recovery. On the recovery sessions just use an easy gear and ‘spin’ with 90+ cadence. Make sure you drink if training indoors, it gets really hot!

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Join us on STRAVA

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Thanks to SCOTT SPORTS and SUUNTO for the support and backing

Print

Check out SCOTT HERE

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Check out SUUNTO HERE

 

CYCLING for RUNNERS – Girl What Cycles (3)

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“I love running cross country….

On a track, I feel like a hamster.”- Robin Williams

I’ve always felt the same as Robin Williams about the indoor trainer. To me, training indoors on a bicycle is just like running on a track or treadmill. Yet, like track and the treadmill, cycling indoors can provide a huge advantage to your training if used in a structured way.

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First and foremost when the weather is horrendous (like it is in the UK at the moment) you can get a good workout indoors in a warm, safe and controlled environment. I am new to cycling and although not inexperienced, braving winter conditions on a bike would be a step too far for me at the moment. This is where the home trainer becomes a useful piece of equipment.

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I can still get my fix for the outdoors with my running… to be honest, I love running in cold temperatures but I also incorporate one treadmill session which allows for faster running (hills or intervals) with some fast-paced loud music which is difficult to do outside.

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In a research project at John Moores University, researchers found that when participants exercised to faster-paced music they “chose to accept, and even prefer, a greater degree of effort”. As well as enhancing performance, music lowers the perception of effort. It dulls or masks some of the pain associated with training. We know from scanning the brain that when athletes are played loud upbeat music there is an increase in activity in the ascending reticular activating system.

For all these reasons I have also been using the home trainer to get in some recovery training after racing or long run sessions. At the beginning of December I completed a 72km trail race at night in sub-zero temperatures. Conditions were very muddy, icy in some parts, with a head-on wind to contend with and as it was at night with poor visibility, the going was tough. Also I forgot to mention I flew out to Lyon on the Saturday, picked up my number, took a shuttle to the start in St Etienne, started the race at midnight, ran to Lyon through the night and flew back to London on Sunday, took a coach, another train ….All a bit crazy and exhausting to say the least. Over the next 2 days following the race, I suffered DOMS (delayed onset of muscle soreness). This meant no running for a few days. I had a fun run planned in Paris the following weekend so I decided to use cycling as “active” recovery. Like running on the treadmill you can quickly get hot very quickly on an indoor trainer. I set myself up near an open window to allow for some ventilation. If you were doing a hard session, an indoor fan would also be a good idea.

Recovery is all about spinning my legs, easing away muscle soreness, getting the blood flowing and I suppose not having too much structure. However, I find indoor training easier if I have a plan to follow and music!

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Hints ‘n’ Tips

  • Use your own bicycle. I am using my SCOTT bike fixed to my indoor trainer via the rear wheel. This is perfect as I do not compromise on my cycling position which I have worked hard to make perfect.

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  • Use your normal cycling shoes and pedals

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Suunto Ambit 2

  • Have water available
  • Use a fan or train near an open window
  • Have a towel handy – you will sweat
  • Use music or a TV for stimulus

Need some free music to help you with your indoor session? Try HERE for 50minutes of audio. I personally recommend that you make your own playlist that is specific for your session. Using something like iTunes makes this really easy. Alternatively, a company like Audiofuel provides specific music mixes with or without coaching.

Session 1:

Length : 44 min        

  • Warm-Up : 10min in a very easy gear allowing me to ‘spin’ at a cadence of 90
  • Main Set: 24min alternating 3min at 90 cadence and 3min at 110 cadence. Gearing should be easy and light to allow your legs to spin around. The faster cadence session of 110 allows me to concentrate on cycling technique using the up and down of the pedal stroke and adds souplesse to my legs.
  • Cool Down: 10min easy gear at a cadence of 90

Session 2:

Length: 35min

  • Warm-up: 10min in a very easy gear spinning at 90 cadence
  • Main set: 15min broken down into 30sec at 90 cadence and 30sec at 120 cadence
  • Cool Down: 10min very easy gear at 90 cadence

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Initially you will find your legs struggling to get used to using different muscle groups in this recovery work-out. The aim is not to PUSH the gears or have resistance. We don’t want to stress sore muscles. These two sessions are all about spinning legs with an easy gear on the bike and allowing the muscles to recover. This is what is so great about cycling… you can exercise in a non weight bearing way. However, the increased cadence sessions of 110 and 120 will allow you to raise your heart rate.

I shall be doing a turbo session at least once a week as active recovery in my build up to my next long distance run, Paris Mantes 50km towards the end of January. This will be followed by a week off running but 2 turbo sessions before a trip to Costa Rica and the opportunity to run The Coastal Challenge stage race.

Happy New Year and remember, cycling is great for running if used sensibly.

Join us on STRAVA

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Thanks to SCOTT SPORTS and SUUNTO for the support and backing

Print

Check out SCOTT HERE

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Check out SUUNTO HERE

 

CYCLING for RUNNERS – Article 5 Spice Up Sessions

Cycling for Runners HEADER2

December is here. The days are shorter and many of you will be feeling like hibernating! Nothing wrong with that, training should have peaks and troughs and if you don’t have them, in our opinion you just end up with a series of flat performances.

For the last few months you will have hopefully been incorporating cycling as part of your weekly routine; primarily to replace one or two of your ‘recovery’ runs. Or maybe you have been injured and you are using cycling as rehabilitation? Either way your body will be thanking you for the new stimulus, the lack of impact and the opportunity to try something new.

An article 4 we outlined winter cycling and provided some hints ‘n’ tips to allow you to cycle safely on cold and short days and we also introduced you to indoor training.

In article 5 we are going to spice up your training with two sessions – one for the road and one for indoor training.

Please remember, these sessions are in addition to your recovery cycles and are a replacement for one of your faster, more intensive run sessions.

Worried that cycling will not benefit you as a runner?

Hopping on a road bike or indoor bike provides non-impact cross training that will build your engine, maintain fitness and keep off the pounds! If you are running or cycling you will need strong lungs, a great capillary network and a strong heart. So don’t worry…

First of all, let us have a refresh.

  • Maintain your long run either mid-week or at the weekend
  • Maintain one quality run work out – speed, hills, tempo, fartlek or so on.
  • Incorporate strength and conditioning
  • Stretch post sessions, particularly hamstrings, ITB and calf’s after cycling
  • Have a rest day
  • Cadence – think and concentrate on 90 ‘rpm’ when cycling
  • Use a heart rate monitor and/ or Gps to monitor training

Road ‘V’ Indoor

©goskyride.com

©goskyride.com

Cycling is cycling; yes? Well, yes it is BUT cycling outside in contrast to indoors provides a very different experience. It’s just like running outside in comparison to running on a treadmill.

Many of us would always choose a session outside in comparison to an indoor session, however, indoor sessions are great training sessions that allow us to ‘almost’ completely control the training situation and therefore be very specific. We embrace indoor sessions of 45-90 minutes when we are particularly working on a particular aspect of fitness. For example, you can control your heart rate, monitor your cadence, you have no traffic lights, bad weather or more importantly, danger! You can remain warm, listen to music and embrace a quality workout.

We discussed indoor bike set up in article 4; if you need a refresher, take a look HERE.

Keeping in mind this is our first ‘session’ on the bike it will be an introduction session and one that we recommend you incorporate once a week for the coming four weeks. *We do however recommend you add repetitions with each week for 4-weeks.

The Indoor Session

Image copyright - highergearchicago.com

Image copyright – highergearchicago.com

What you need:

  • Bike
  • Indoor trainer
  • HRM
  • Water
  • Fan
  • Music
  • Towel

Hints ‘n’ Tips

  • Make sure you have your rear tyre at 100 psi (at least) and ensure that you always inflate to the exact same pressure for every session, that way you have consistency and you can monitor progress.
  • You will apply pressure to the rear tyre by adding resistance from the drum on the indoor trainer. Perform a ‘roll-down’ test each time so that you have a controlled environment. A roll down test works as follows: inflate to 100psi and then apply pressure to the back wheel using the turbo trainer. Cycle and build to a particular speed (say 15mph) and then stop pedalling. Time how long it takes the wheel to stop moving. For example, 4 seconds. Every time you train you should ideally have the same roll down time for consistency and monitoring. If it takes 5 seconds, add more resistance and vice versa.
  • Use a fan to regulate temperature.
  • Drink during the session – you will sweat a great deal!
  • Use music and compile a play list that suits the session – no point listening to classical music if AC/DC are what you need to ramp the session up!
  • A HRM is essential to control your effort and monitor progress
  • Aim for 90 cadence

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Warm up for 10-minutes ‘spinning’ your legs in an ‘easy’ gear. This is all about getting blood flowing, loosening stiff and/ or tight muscles and preparing for the session ahead.

Session: Perform 2 minutes at 80% of maximum heart rate (keeping cadence on or around 90) – You will need to use your cycling gears to add resistance and provide the necessary difficulty level for you elevate your heart rate. Monitor your HRM with a quality item – We use Suunto Ambit 3 Peak and Ambit 2 units

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Recover for 2-minute ‘spinning’ your legs as in the warm up

Repeat the 2-minute session with 2-minute recovery for an additional 5-times (making a total of 6 in week-1). *In week 2 do 7-repetitions, in week 3 do 8-repetitions and in week 4 do 10-repetitions.

Tip – you can set your HRM/ GPS to time these intervals for you. That way you can just concentrate on the effort!

Warm down for 10-minutes spinning and then stretch

This session is a quality workout that maximises your time training and provides the necessary stimulus to make you a better, faster and more efficient runner.

The Outdoor Session

Indoor training may just not be your thing? Road riding, particularly in winter is more stressful, less predictable and carries increased risks of accident. The risks are very real, so please be sensible! Our hot tip for cycling in winter is ideally cycle between the hours of midday and 3pm – you have more light, potentially less traffic and the weather should be more predictable. For example, any early morning frosts will have disappeared providing ambient temperatures have increased.

©iancorless.com©iancorless.com_cyclingforrunners-

Lets face it. A beautiful winters day, blue skies, glowing sun and a nip in the air makes you feel great to be alive.

In contrast to an indoor session, road cycling is less controllable due to many of the points already raised, so think about your ride and what you want to achieve. For our first session, we are going to work on ‘structured *fartlek’ and therefore we recommend riding out of any built up areas (use this as a warm up) and then use quiet roads for the session. Ideally the road should be flat or slightly undulating – hill sessions come later in the training!

* Fartlek, which means “speed play” in Swedish, is a training method that blends continuous training with interval training. The variable intensity and continuous nature of the exercise places stress on both the aerobic and anaerobic systems.

Warm up for at least 15-minutes, in reality though your warm up may be longer due to your location and how far away quiet roads are.

Once on quite roads build pace using progressively harder gears but still maintain 90-cadence.

Session: 1-min, 2-min, 3-min and 5-min intervals at 80-85% of max HR. Be ‘random’ with how you do these intervals and the session should last 30 to 40-minutes including recovery. Ideally you will do at least 11-minutes of fartlek and build to 22-minutes of fartlek over a 4-week period.

Recovery is based on feel and unstructured, Use heart rate as a guide here. For example, when your heart rate drops back down to 70-75% of max HR – perform another repeat/ interval.

Warm down is as warm up – use cycling home in an easy gear and make sure you stretch post ride.

Incorporate one or both of the above sessions in over a 4-week period and you will start to feel the benefits not only physically and mentally.

In the New Year we will take our sessions up a notch to provide you with a great kick-start for another successful year in sport.

Have a great Christmas break and a great New Year!

*****

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Thanks to SCOTT SPORTS and SUUNTO for the support and backing

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CYCLING for RUNNERS – Article 2 Recovery, Cadence, Long Sessions and Strength

Cycling for Runners HEADER2

In article 1 of CYCLING for RUNNERS we discussed finding the correct sized bike and then how to fit the bike. Niandi and myself ride the same size bike (52cm) however, our experience on a bike are different. I have been riding and racing bikes for years whereas Niandi is new and very much on a learning curve in using cycling to improve her running. Also, our morphology is different. Niandi has a slightly longer leg whereas my torso is longer.

My bike is a SCOTT Addict 10. It’s a stiff bike, made of carbon and it’s all about speed. The geometry is classic race geometry with a 74deg seat angle. It’s fast, sometimes a little twitchy but really grips the road.

Scott Addict 10

Niandi’s bike by comparison is a SCOTT Solace 20. It’s a new breed of bike from SCOTT that provides comfort and performance with relaxed geometry. It’s still a super light bike but for long days in the saddle or for the novice cyclist, this bike will certainly help ease the transition. Also, importantly the ‘reach’ of the Solace is less than the Addict. As we mentioned in bike fit, we can tweak saddle, height, handlebars and stem to ensure that our bikes work for us.

Solace 20

So, how is your bike? Do you have it set up properly and do you feel comfortable? Before progressing with some specific cycling sessions on how to improve, we wanted to provide you with several key bullet points why cycling can benefit you as a runner.

You may well have turned to cycling in the past because YOU HAD TO! Yes, we all get injured and as an injured runner we are usually desperate to get an endorphin kick, maintain fitness and reduce impact. Step in cycling…

Although cycling is great as that ‘alternative’ to running, why not think ahead and plan cycling into your weekly schedule to avoid that injury that is almost certainly waiting to happen. 

RECOVERY

Injured or recovering from hard run training, cycling provides great ‘active’ exercise with no impact. We have often heard the phrase, recovery run! But does a recovery run really exist? 20/30 or 40mins of easy running is still creating impact through all your joints and muscles, even if you do not elevate your heart rate. So, why not replace some of these sessions with cycling? Cycling provides all of us with an opportunity to move our legs, increase blood flow, ease joint stiffness, ease tired muscles and we will flush out lactate acid from tired or stiff legs. This is nothing new. Runners have been using cycling as a means of active recovery or injury rehabilitation for years. The addition of a Turbo Trainer (indoor device that attaches to your bike) will also allow you to spin away indoors while keeping warm, dry and you can even watch some TV or listen to music if that is your thing.

Tips: Keep your gearing very light and ‘spin’ your legs. You do not want to be pushing big and heavy gears. Remember, this is about recovery and injury maintenance.

CADENCE

Cadence is something we will have all heard of. Cadence in cycling refers to how many revolutions our legs make per minute. If has often been stated that 90 rpm (revs per minute) is an optimum cadence. We agree! Spinning your legs for 90 rpm (180 for both legs) provides ‘souplesse.’ This souplesse (flexibility) is key to becoming an efficient cyclist. Look at this objectively and the next time you go out for a run, count your foot strike. Maintaining 90 rpm or 90 foot (180 both legs) strikes per minute will make you not only efficient but will also help with technique. Bike and run cadence are two transferable skills. When coaching cyclists, we often use 90 rpm as a benchmark; this also provides a great indicator as to when to change up and down gears. In time, as you become a stronger cyclist you will find that you are able to push a harder gear for the same cadence. In simple terms, you are getting stronger and this means you will go faster.

Tips: You can use a cycle computer and magnet to provide information ‘live’ while cycling. This can be extremely useful when looking to maintain optimum cadence. When running, you can use a foot pod or similar device to relay cadence back to a wrist unit. Both are great tools for improve bike to run cadence.

LONG SESSIONS

Long run sessions and back-to-back run sessions are an essential part of a good runners training plan. However, these sessions can damage the body and in time, potentially injure the body. A long bike ride in isolation or a ‘brick’ session is a fantastic way to gain added fitness time without impacting on your body. Long bikes allow you maximal aerobic time with minimal impact; the only downside will be that you need to be out longer for a similar gain to running. However, this is not the point… a long bike session is about adding variety, providing a new stimulus and increasing or maintaining fitness without impact. A brick session is when bike and run sessions are combined to make one session. Anyone coming from a duathlon or triathlon background will be well aware of this. Running on bike legs is quite a unique experience, the term ‘jelly legs’ is often used. This is because the legs and muscles are used in two very different ways. However, this transition process provides great stimulus and if done gradually, is a great addition to a training plan.

Tips: If you want to translate long runs to bike time, we often use 15min per mile, so, if you did a 20-mile run we would recommend a 5-hour bike ride as starting point. Of course many variables come in to play so be careful. Brick sessions are challenging, start by adding just 10-15 minutes of running to a bike session. In time you can build this but be gradual.

STRENGTH

Running builds a certain set of muscles, fine tunes them and makes them extremely efficient for the job that you ask them to do; run! However, we have many other muscles that feel a little bit neglected with our run habit. Cycling provides a stimulus to these neglected areas. Running and just running makes us all plateau, adding cycling will not only compliment our run muscles but also so many other areas of our body will become stronger (such as our core, arms, shoulders, hips and so on). Add all this together and what we have is a faster and stronger runner.

Tips: Like anything, if you haven’t cycled before, start easy and progress slowly. No need to rush. After a bike ride, make sure you stretch, particularly hamstrings! Cycling turns your legs over in a smaller circle than running.

We caught up with Salomon International athlete, Philipp Reiter on his thoughts on why CYCLING is good for RUNNERS.

Philipp Reiter, Salomon ©iancorless.com

Philipp Reiter, Salomon ©iancorless.com

Philipp on RECOVERY

Spinning out the legs” on a bike is definitely one of the things I personally look forward too after a hard and/or long run. Spinning makes the blood go through my body faster and takes all the acids and by-products away. Shaking the legs out on a bike makes my muscles ache less and speeds up recovery.

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Philipp on STRENGTH

Even if you just hike or walk around (instead of running on a rest day) your leg muscles always have to push to move the body. Have you ever recognized that you never pull and use the complementary muscles? Using cycling and specific bike shoes/pedals allow you to pull the pedals as well as to push them more intense than you would do without. But what is the advantage to build up the “other” muscles? After many years of running, muscle can become imbalanced and this increases the risk of injuries or other problems with tendons. Cycling will work these unused areas.

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Philipp on IMPACT

Running impacts on bones, hips, tendons… no doubt! Cycling is relatively impact resistant, especially road cycling! However, you must ensure you have correct bike set up and fit. Don’t try to save time or money by cutting corners here. A bike that is too small or too large or one that does not have the correct fit will just impact on your power output and after a while you may get problems in your back or knees!

Philipp on LONG SESSIONS

Philipp Reiter Cycling

Philipp Reiter Cycling

A long bike ride is a great way to have a long endurance session. I usually double my run time, so, if I wanted to do a 2-hour run I would replace with a 4-hour bike. You still get tired, you still get just as hungry and you definitely get the fitness benefits. What you don’t get is the damage and impact. However, you still need to run long… cycling is great is a great alternative to mix things up and provide stimulus but would never replace long runs. You just need to work them into your schedule.

In our next article we will talk about the right kit for cycling and provide you with some guidelines on how to include cycling in your current training plan.

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CYCLING for RUNNERS – The Introduction

 

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Welcome to CYCLING for RUNNERS in conjunction with Scott Sports

Over the coming months and year, Ian Corless and Niandi Carmont in conjunction with SCOTT SPORTS will bring you CYCLING FOR RUNNERS.

Ian, Niandi and a series of special guests will provide you with a series of articles from a male and female perspective on how cycling can benefit you as a runner.

Providing simple and clear information, we will write about our experiences, we will tell you about equipment, provide hints and tips and most importantly, we will provide you with a series of training plans that you can incorporate week by week, month by month to make you a better runner through cycling.

We know 3-types of runner:

  1. The runner who is injured
  2. The runner who is recovering from injury
  3. And thirdly, the runner who is about to be injured

Of course, we joke, but many of you will agree there is some real truth in the joke. Running is not bad for you, however, taken to extremes or if rushed, the impact of repetition can damage and break us. Sometimes a couple of easy days are all we need and then we are able to resume full training. But as often happens, a couple of easy days may not be enough and our eagerness to push and get back to full training causes us to take risks and then the inevitable happens, we break!

Don’t get us wrong. If you want to be a good runner, you need to run. However, we don’t always thing big miles, double day runs or running everyday is necessary. It’s all about balance and ultimately what level we are running at and what our objectives are. As we see it, runners fall into four distinct groups:

  • Group 1: Weight loss/ recreational runner
  • Group 2: Budding enthusiast
  • Group 3: Good age group runner
  • Group 4: Elite/ pro or top-level runner

We could break the groups down again but ultimately, for the purposes of explanation, these four groups will suffice.

Group 1 runner’s will run typically three times a week (maybe four) and they will run twice in the week and once at weekend. During the week they will train from 20-60min and at the weekend they will extend their running beyond an hour. Mileage will be 30-50 miles per week.

Group 2 are pretty dedicated and savvy accumulating three to four runs during the week and running once or twice at the weekend. Sunday will typically be a long run of 90+ min and on Tuesday and maybe Thursday they will add some speed or strength running. Mileage will be 50-75 miles per week.

Group 3 runner’s are very similar to group 2, however, they are running six days a week, they double up runs on a couple of days and at weekend they may do back-to-back longer runs. Mileage will hover around 80-miles per week.

Group 4 are pushing the envelope, they run twice a day, four to five days a week and run long, fast and high during the weekend. They typically hover around 100-miles per week.

We generalise above and of course we will be able to find extremes in all the scenarios. However, the four groups provide a picture. We think the risk of injury is high for all the groups and relatively equal. Why?

Well, group 1 for example will be less experienced (typically) and will have less run history and therefore although the time on feet is less, the percentage risk is high based on experience.

Group 4 by contrast will have loads of experience, they have been involved in sports for years and they are knowledgeable. Risk comes for them from volume and because they are often on the edge looking for small performance gains.

For us, this is where cycling for runners can come in!

Cycling provides a great low impact exercise that can be done in or outdoors, it can be very controlled and importantly it can be as easy or as hard as you like.

Yes, if you want to be a great runner, you need to run. BUT cycling can add to your running and not take away from it…

Just think, how many of you have said, ‘I am just popping out for an easy run!’

Is there such a thing as an ‘easy run?’

In terms of effort, yes! For sure, you can run slow, easy and controlled keeping your heart rate down, keeping your cadence light and just tick-over. But, you are still in contact with the ground. You are still ‘impacting’ with the surface beneath you and you are still passing your body weight through all your muscles, tendons and joints. Recovery runs are not about fitness, they are about loosening off and in many cases, we use recovery runs just to make us feel better. So, why not incorporate some cycling as active recovery?

Long runs can really impact on your body. Hours of running adapt you to the demands that will be placed on you when you race but sometimes we will run the risk of pushing too far and risking injury. Long bike rides on hilly terrain for example can be used to provide multiple hours of low impact exercise. Hours where you can push harder than running without the risk of damaging knees, muscles and ligaments. If incorporated with long runs, you have a great way to do back-to-back sessions while reducing impact injury risk.

Speed can damage our fragile bodies, particularly our muscles and tendons. However, run speed work incorporated with cycling speed work can stress the aerobic system and it will stretch us physically and mentally in new ways.

Hill reps provide great aerobic stress pushing us to our threshold limits, however, what goes up, must come down. Often, it is the running downhill that causes damage. Of course, we need to train for this in running, it’s important. However, cycling hill reps incorporated into a structured training plan can provide a great stimulus that will progress your fitness level and once again, the impact implications are low.

Finally, cycling can just be a blast. It’s a great way to head out and see a new place; arguably, we can cover more distance in less time on a bike. If nothing else, cycling may well just provide you with a well-earned break from running. Cycling will freshen your mind, it will freshen your body and I guarantee, your running will improve.

Part one of cycling for runners will be released on Wednesday October 1st and we will look at the basics to get you started:

  • The bike.
  • How to ensure you have a good fit.
  • Dos and Don’ts of cycling.
  • And we will list 5-points why cycling can make YOU a better runner.
Philipp Reiter Cycling

Philipp Reiter Cycling

To kick things off, Salomon International athlete, Philipp Reiter will also give us his thoughts on why cycling works for him as a trail, mountain and ultra runner.

Stay tuned.

Join us on STRAVA

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Thanks to SCOTT SPORTS for the support and backing

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