‘Failure’ …or is it? – on IRUN4ULTRA

“Notice here that I place ‘failure’ in commas – for me, Gary didn’t fail. He achieved a great deal, he just didn’t achieve his goal.

Just as John Kelly had failed on 2 previous occasions, he triumphed on a 3rd attempt and the victory was sweet.

Gary of course was left on the floor, a tired wreck facing demons.”

Read the full article on IRUN4ULTRA HERE

Karl “Speedgoat” Meltzer – “Made To Be Broken” The Appalachian Trail Movie

Last September, Red Bull athlete and ultra-runner Karl “Speedgoat” Meltzer finally captured his white whale when on his third attempt in eight years, he set a new Appalachian Trail thru-hike speed record with a time of 45 days 22 hours and 38 minutes. Now, the story behind the trek from Mt. Katahdin, Maine, to Springer Mountain, Ga., is told in the new documentary “Karl Meltzer: Made To Be Broken” which will debut on Red Bull TV and can be streamed for free beginning April 13.

The 42-minute documentary captures the ups and downs of Meltzer’s world record run, from injuries and sleep deprivation to the challenges faced by his close-knit crew, which included his father, wife and former Appalachian Trail record holder, Scott Jurek.

Read the daily reports from Karl’s FKT HERE

Read the full in-depth interview HERE

Listen to Karl talk in-depth and discuss the highs and lows HERE 

“The trail challenges people. It has changed a lot of people’s lives and visions of what they can do and what they can’t do,” Meltzer proclaims in the film’s opening minutes. “The A.T. is the hardest, most iconic trail in the United States, and I’ve always been drawn back to it.”

The Appalachian Trail runs from Maine to Georgia stretching 2,190 miles through 14 states.  It is roughly the distance between Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., as the crow flies.  A thru-hiker will experience 464,500 feet of elevation change, or 16 climbs of Mt. Everest.  Thousands of people attempt an Appalachian Trail thru-hike every year, yet only one in four hikers finish the journey, and they typically take five to seven months to complete the entire trail, according to the Appalachian Trail Conservancy.

For more information on the project visit www.redbull.com/atrun.

 

 

The Green Tunnel – Speedgoat Karl Meltzer and the Appalachian Trail

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‘Speedgoat’ Karl Meltzer needs no introduction to the ultra-world, Speedgoat was running 100’s when most of us didn’t even know they existed. So much so, he has won more 100’s than any other runner; 38 at the last count. Five of those hundreds came at Hardrock 100, impressive! Speedgoat’s tally of runs and records make history and in 2016, he finally added the ‘FKT’ for the Appalachian Trail to his palmares. It was a long time coming, two previous attempts (2008 and 2014) had left him short but 2016 was different. Speedgoat had had the opportunity to assess his past attempts while helping his buddy, Scott Jurek, achieve his own FKT on the AT in 2015! With this information and a wealth of ultra-running experience, Speedgoat was a different man in the ‘Green Tunnel’ in 2016.

On Sept. 18 at 3:38 a.m., professional ultra-runner and Red Bull athlete Karl “Speedgoat” Meltzer emerged from the Appalachian Trail’s southern terminus at Springer Mountain, Ga., and set a new Appalachian Trail thru-hike speed record with a time of:

45-days 22-hours and 38-minutes.

Speedgoat started his supported run at 5 a.m. on Aug. 3 from Mt. Katahdin, Maine, and averaged approximately 47 miles per day at a pace of 3.2 miles per hour.  Speedgoat’s time beats the previous record by more than 10 hours, which was set by Scott Jurek in 2015.

The project, in planning for more than two years, was accomplished with a small core crew consisting of Speedgoat’s father, Karl Sr., and crew chief Eric Belz.  Others joined the crew to support Speedgoat for short periods throughout the hike, including Speedgoat’s wife, Sheryl and fellow ultra-runners such as David Horton.  The crew travelled alongside Meltzer every day, providing him with food, water, medical attention and logistical support. Speedgoat’s time on the trail typically began around 5 a.m. and ended between 7 p.m. and 9 p.m.

 Download and view a full map of the Appalachian Trail HERE

The Appalachian Trail runs from Maine to Georgia stretching 2,190 miles through 14 states.  It is roughly the distance between Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., as the crow flies.  A thru-hiker will experience 464,500 feet of elevation change, or 16 climbs of Mt. Everest.  Thousands of people attempt an Appalachian Trail thru-hike every year, yet only one in four hikers finish the journey, and they typically take five to seven months to complete the entire trail.

Here is Speedgoat’s story.

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Ian: Many, congratulations Karl, you did it!

Karl: Yes, thanks. It was a long journey but yes, it’s over. Thank God. All the misery and pain is over.

Ian: All the misery and pain. Well you say that, but it’s not is it? Because now you’re going through media and interviews and repeating the same story to a lot of different people.

Karl: At least a dozen times yesterday…!

Ian: [laughs]

Karl: Yes, I did talk yesterday for maybe six hours. Then we did the CNN World Sports thing, which was right around the corner from the hotel I was staying at. Yes, it was a busy day. By the time I got to the last three interviews I was like, “Can you ask me what’s next one more time.” But it was good. There was a lot of part of that going on. I have quite a few more this afternoon, but they don’t start till 11.

Ian: That’s good. That’s good, so you can give me some time and hopefully we can ask some interesting questions. Epic journey, epic journey. It was fantastic being here in the UK getting the updates from Red Bull. What I was doing was re-showing them on my website and getting the audience engaged, because they really wanted to know what was happening. Right from the off, it appears you started with some real intention and nailing it for the first seven days. In retrospect, do you think that maybe you were pushing a bit too hard in those early seven days?

Karl: Actually, everything was super textbook and really good all the way for the first 19 days. The first seven days you get to go in New Hampshire, you must get to that point to set yourself up and put yourself in a good position. Honestly, I felt on my game… I was getting plenty of sleep. Everything was working out well. I wasn’t overly tired. I wasn’t pushing myself or getting to those points where I was worked or thinking, “Oh my God, I’m not going to get up tomorrow.”

New Hampshire went perfectly well. The big game in New Hampshire is the Route 302 which is called Crawford notch. It was 47 miles over Mount Washington and then over Carter Ridge, it was a huge day. I finished it a little after 10:00 PM. The following day I think I went like 28 miles, but that 28 miles was ridiculously hard but I was good that day…

Generally speaking, through 19 days before my shin started bothering me, I was a full day ahead of Jen Pharr’s pace, and when I got to that point I was like just stay even with her, with her pace through Pennsylvania which was my plan, and then just try to close it out from there. My shin went down running on flat grass, the easiest piece of the trail of all, flat grassy piece but it just tweaked and I was like, “Uh.” When I was going along I was like, “Oh man, that might be the one that throws me off.” And it did, it obviously did.

Ian: It’s interesting with day 19 because that was the day that I phoned in and spoke to Eric Belz whilst you were on the trail. He was giving me an update of how things had been going. He gave me an itinerary of what it’d been like and how you were crushing the miles, how they were giving you ice cream and looking after you. I will come on to that… One of the things I remember reading on the day nine (I think it was) reports, when you were going through Mount Lafayette, Eric referred to a knife edge. I couldn’t quite place what the knife edge was. What was that?

Karl: You mean in New Hampshire? Well, there’s a ridge called San Antonio Ridge. It’s not that technical of a knife edge. You’re on a ridge line that’s fairly narrow, but it’s not super. It’s not like exposed or anything. Yes, he had been up there before in 2014, he hiked that section with me when I was doing trail at that time too. New Hampshire is ridiculously hard. That might have been what he was referring to as a knife edge. It wasn’t really super techie or anything like that. It’s called San Antonio Ridge, and it’s a very very super popular place. You see more hikers on that trail probably in New Hampshire than anywhere else other than maybe Mount Washington.

Ian: And then day 10, you’re into Flume Gorge the White Mountains, and I think that was the first sign where you were beginning to show some wear and tear on your feet. Eric also touched on the fact that you were mentally beginning to feel a little fatigued. Neither of those things obviously turned into a big issue, but one of the important things about anything like this where you’re doing multi-day and going out for another 40, 50 miles is maintenance. What was that maintenance side like, and how did Eric and Senior (Karl’s Dad), and Sheryl (Karl’s wife) keep you on track, and how did you react to them keeping you on track?

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Karl: We had some protocols. Every time I stop, when I stop at the end of the day, my dad’s job if you want to call it that, Sr’s job, was to have me setup so I can clean my feet. He’ll just setup a bin of water and some cleaning stuff, some soap or whatever. The first thing I do when I came in, I sit down, he took my shoes off and I clean my feet up. I never had any blisters on my toes over the whole time, the whole trip. They were solid as rock. I had a blister on my heels, but those things we drain them early in the thing and run and they just went away. Generally, we just cleaned my feet and got those taken care of, have them dried out, and just moved on.

That was the protocol for that. After we did that, once we cleaned my feet and I was good. I was sitting on a higher chair and I went to a lower chair, put my feet up, put ice on my shins and I ate my dinner as I was icing my shins, and then I went straight into bed. I was in bed within 30 minutes usually after every stop; after every night, which was super-fast. I certainly fell asleep quickly. It was really good. They were super-efficient in terms of taking care of things. The further we get down the trail, the more efficient they got. When you did talk to Eric, we were at a place called Bake Oven Knob and that was in Pennsylvania. I think that was my day 20, maybe 20 or 21?  Maybe 20.

That morning, when I woke up at Bake Oven Knob that was the day my shin was probably was at its worst. It was like on fire. I woke up at 4:15 AM in the morning or something like that and I couldn’t really extend on my right leg. It was swollen and red and I’m like, “Oh god.” I’m like, “I need to sit here and ice it a couple of times this morning before I get going anywhere.” I did that because again, I was a day ahead of Jen’s itinerary, I had a little time to I waste to say I had money in the bank, it’s not my style, or miles in the bank, that’s not my style but I had to do it.

We did that, and then finally after a few hours, I put my shoes on and I started moving. I believe I only covered 32 miles that day. After 25 miles during that day, again my shin was on fire. Pennsylvania is all rocky so your leg is twisting around a lot. It was just aggravating it even more. After 25, I stopped again I said, “Hey, I got to ice this thing a couple of times.” And then we’ll just see what happens. It felt a little better after I sat for a while and then I went another seven miles down the trail, and I think we finished at 32.

Ian: Yes, that was the day that Mike joined you. He made a comment that because you are obviously protecting your shin, your knee was buckling underneath you during the run. What’s going through your mind at this point Karl? Because it wouldn’t be an underestimation to say that completing the AT in a fast time has been a priority for you for years. I think we both knew before you went into this when we discussed it that this was probably the last chance to get this record. Did you see it? All the hard work starting to potentially crumble beneath your shin?

Karl: Well, maybe? I think the thing is Scott got hurt, Jen got hurt, I got hurt. With my knee buckling thing, that issue was with me back in May before it even started. The whole thing is like it wasn’t affecting my running. I just put on a knee wrap on my knee, and that reminded me not to extend out, hyper extend my knee. The brace isn’t going to do something bad, the brace isn’t going to stop you from hyper extending your knee.

But it was protecting a little bit from doing that just in my mind and just physically. But then that day again, when Mike was walking with me and my shin was killing me, my knee buckled a couple of times and Mike was walking behind me. I was like, “Oh my God. Why is this happening?” And feel like, “Why are these things aren’t falling into place?” But yes, I was a little worried about it for sure. I was just like, “Well, who is my knee going down now too?” I started to get mentally frustrated. I started getting a little upset.

Again, having that cushion that I had built up made huge difference because it gave me time. It’s not like I fell 40 miles behind quickly because I was hurt. I was still in it. I just said to myself, “You just got to stick with it for a while and see what happens.” I do remember in 2008 when both my shins were bothering me, and on the Pony Express when they were bothering me, you sort of keep using them and keep walking through it, it sorts of goes away. I said, “Well, we’ll see if that happens here.” As you saw, we did 32, and then we did 50 something, and then we did 16 which again my shin was on fire that day too. The next day, we did 50 something…

Ian: It was interesting watching because there was obviously this dilemma going through your mind, and I’m sure your crew’s mind. You had your blinkers on, and it was very interesting following some of the comments on Facebook. The doubters were going to doubt, and of course they were going to say, “Oh no, the shin is hurting. That’s it. He’s got no chance.” The one thing that I kept going back to in commenting on was, “Look guys, Karl is completely 100% blinkered for this. We discussed it. He knows what he has to do because he experienced it with Scott and there were valuable learning lessons.”

One of the things that was worrying me from the side-lines was that I could see this accordion. I could see you suffering, and then the next day it was almost as though you refused to accept that your body was doing what is was doing, and you were bullying it into doing what you wanted it to do. A classic example was day 20 when you did 35 miles, but then the next day you spent 17 hours on the trail. Of course, this is a real bouncing act, isn’t it? Because that’s your bloody mindedness wanting to get it done, but then the problem comes with day 22; you can be wrecked. How did you manage that? Did you just think to yourself, “You know what, I’m just going to give this everything and see what happens?”

Karl: Yes, absolutely. I think what was funny too is I was sort of telling myself in a jokingly kind of way that, “Well gee Karl, you did 16 miles yesterday so you’re rested for tomorrow.” Seriously, it didn’t make a difference in the rest there because I went to bed 7:15, or 7:30 as opposed to maybe 9:00 or something like that. Because I don’t really do well with sleep deprivation, that made a difference for me the next morning to get up and say, “Okay, I’m up and wired, I’m awake.” I’m kind of, “I’m going to do what I can. I know my shin is going to hurt, just deal with it.”

The rest helped me be able to go those 50 plus miles after the short days if my shin wasn’t bothering me. It was amazing, my shin with those shorter days was not able to re-heal overnight, of course. But the swelling went down so I had more time to just settle down a little bit. I could keep going, and then my gig going into Duncannon, Pennsylvania which is the end of the rocky section of Pennsylvania, I survived. I crashed hard going down that trail a couple of times. You’ll see that in the film probably which is quite entertaining for all the people watching.

When I finally got to Duncannon, it was just a two mile walk through town. I walked through town and I said,” Let’s just… I’m only eight miles behind where Jen was. I’ll stop here, I need to rest and wake up in the morning, we’ll see what happens.” We stayed in this nasty camp around in Duncannon. We got up the next morning. I was driven to where I stopped walking that morning, and I started walking uphill. It was a steep rocky climb for about maybe a mile and half, going uphill wasn’t so bad. It was going downhill where my toes would extend out forward, which would make it sore and hurt.

I get to the top of the climb and the terrain sort of changed where it started to get smooth. There’s an area there called Cumberland Valley where Pennsylvania is sort of known for being smooth. I knew that was coming, and it’s funny because I reached that ridge line and turned into Cumberland Valley and there’s this CVATC, we manage the trail here. I was like, “Uh, Cumberland Valley ATC. Thank God I’m here.” The uphill section is gradual, very gradual uphill I’d say. I started running, yep, very slowly running the gradual uphill’s.

I said to my dad, I said, “I’ll just start to run uphill now and see what happens.” Instead of running downhill, I started running uphill. It was weird but the shin pain went away. When the terrain got smooth and the shin pain went away, I think it is a 53, a 60, and 57 miles all in a row, boom boom boom! That got me right back where Jen was and even put me ahead of her pace. Once again, the confidence builds up, “My shin doesn’t hurt. Man, I’m back. I’m back in the game.” Again, I never felt I ran off pace. I was so confident I could still get there as long as I stayed fairly close to that pace.

Ian: What are the frustrating things I guess for me and people who were following you. Was that for reasons that you discussed prior to departing was that Red Bull and Appalachian Trail didn’t want people to know exactly where you were. Your updates were coming out maybe two to three days late. But day 22 to day 25, certainly looked as though it was a real crunch phase in the whole thing. As you said, day 22 you did 16.4 miles in seven hours, but you benefited from good rest, good sleep. The next day you get back up on the trail, and then day 24, you do 35 miles. Day 25, it didn’t list how many miles you’ve done.

Basically, it reaffirmed how far you’d gone, how far you had to go, what your age was, and it was saying this is crunch time. I got a real sense of feeling that it was a massive pivotal point within the whole thing that this reading between the lines from the feedback and from what Eric was saying. How you pivoted on this point was where the success or failure was going to happen. As you just said, you go into day 26, and you banged out 60.1 miles. I remember writing at the time, I just can’t comprehend it because 60.1 miles for any of us is a big day out just on its own.

Karl: Yes, and the funny thing is too, 60 is a lot more than 50! 10 miles is three hours whatever, but it’s a huge difference because you don’t get that sleep. You don’t get that rest. You don’t get that recovery. Yes, but it was sometimes that was logistics, and sometimes the terrain was tough; that’s near Shenandoah I think? The terrain is a little bit smoother in there, so your average pace is no longer 3.2, it might be like 3.5. That .3 miles per hour over that long period is five miles or whatever. It made a difference in terms of being able to go 60. 60 was huge no doubt about it. I think Scott only pulled one 60-mile day too. Yes, it was confidence. It got me back.

Ian: That day 26 was the day that your dad, Senior, came back onto the trail. One of the questions that cropped upon Facebook on the Talk Ultra feed was that. There was an obvious reference to Sheryl and Senior throughout the whole thing. Its’ obvious how important those people are in your life. This process, because it’s so intense for you and let’s face it, you’re tired, you’re fatigued, you can be cranky, you can be moody, you can be probably pretty offensive at times. But the one thing that I could imagine from the outside looking in is that this type of experience as a family can only bring everybody so much closer together. I just wondered what impact Senior joining you on day 26 had on you producing that 60.1 miles?

Karl: It’s funny that… I can be a little annoying jerk and stuff like that. It was funny, I talked to Dave Horton along the trail about this, he was inspirational too.

He was like “When I was on the trail,” and he knows, because he’s done it, so he understands. He’s like, “When I was on the trail, I would yell at my wife, and I would say not so nice things, and things like that. And he’s like, “It’s sad that we feel like we can say mean and cruel things to our spouse or our dad or something like that, but not others.” I wouldn’t say those types of things to Belz as I’d say it to Sheryl, or say it to my dad. It’s bad that we do that huh?

But I guess we accept the fact that they won’t bite back, or something like that. My dad would just kind of let it blow it over his head. Sheryl will sometimes take it a little more offense, but that’s okay. She sort of mostly will let it blow over her head. She knew that I was dealing with a lot of mental misery. It definitely brings them closer together; they did such an incredible job of always being positive when I would come to a stop. Even if I was grumpy or something like that, they still didn’t bite back at me or yell at me or something like that. It was more like, “Karl, just relax. Calm down.”

Ian: Yes, I’m sure there was a fair amount of stuff said.

Karl: Yes. My dad was incredible, I mean he, well Belz was sort of crew chief. My dad was sort of the monkey worker on the side, always kind of doing stuff. My dad doesn’t sleep. The guy moves back and forth all the time. I mean, he was awake at 3:30 in the morning going back and forth to his truck when I was still sleeping, like, “Why is he up now?”.

He never took a nap when they had an opportunity to rest; they needed a rest too! He just would never do that. He was so into it. It was so cool to spend that time with my dad. Even though I wasn’t there spending time with him, I knew he was always there and helping me out. Yes, it brings us closer for sure. It was quite the experience, having them there.

Ian: So, day 26, 60.1 miles. Day 27, 55.8. Day 28 was just another whopping day. And at this point, I’m looking at my computer and a photograph came on your Facebook page, and it drew complete parallels to the photo last year of Scott Jurek. Remember when everybody discussed about his vegan diet and Marshall Ulrich went on record and said, “You can’t do the AT without eating meat”.

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And there’s this photograph of you with your Red Bull scarf around your neck looking damn drawn, looking damn lean. And it just goes to show the incredible impact that the trail, the multiple days of hours and hours and hours on the trail has. Belz said to me that you were having ravioli and mandarin oranges. What was the diet like, and could they predict what you wanted?

Karl: Well, they couldn’t really… They would go and say “Hey Karl, what do you want today to eat? If you want some food, just find something.” I would more or less eat anything. I ate a lot of good food too. The stories came out where it was like Meltzer doses on some beer and candy. Well, it’s not true. I didn’t do it on beer and candy. That’s just the media doing their thing. I ate a fair bit of meat.

I think Belz probably cooked me five or six or seven rib eyes when I’d come the end of the day. I had a steak and some asparagus and some rice and things like that. But I had a great dinner every night. I think that was really, really important. And even though many people thought that I was looking skinny… I’m a skinny guy anyway, and you know me! I’m a skinny guy anyway. Over the whole entire trip, when I weighed myself two days later at the Red Bull office, I had lost three pounds, that’s all!

So, I gained maybe a pound or two back after I finished, but the bottom line is, I was eating a lot of food. I mean, the stuff that I was eating on the trail, I was pretty much eating real food. My last gel I ate was in Maine. I didn’t eat that much gel or chump things or anything like that. I went to real food because I still feel like that just fills up your belly a little more. It doesn’t mean it gives you better energy, but it fills you up a little more.

I ate a combination of anything. Dave Horton would bring chicken for me and ice cream. And I think it was dense calories. So, I was eating a lot. Scott, being vegan, it’s going to be a lot harder for him to get as much protein. He certainly knows what he’s doing, don’t get me wrong, but he lost 19 pounds when he was done. Being vegan, you probably can’t get as many calories. And he was eating all day long, too. He was doing the same kind of thing, and I think, what Marshall said, it’s like, you do need to eat meat. You need to eat a lot of protein. I drank a lot of Ultragen, a lot of calories there. I did a lot of that kind of stuff. I ate a lot of sweets. I ate a lot of cinnamon buns.

Ian: [laughs] What where you eating Karl…?

Karl: It’s kind of funny, but it’s just calories, you know?

Ian: What were you eating between seeing the crew? Or was that not so much of a priority? Because I’m just trying to think that let’s say you see your crew every ten miles. As you’ve said, that’s three or four hours. Maybe even longer in some places. So, you’ve got to be eating something while you’re out on the trail. You can’t just be relying until you see Eric and Senior and Sheryl.

Karl: Yes. I had a small pouch on my little waist pack, and I would just have like a quesadilla or something like that, or a steak and cheese wrap, or something like that. A piece of chicken, a cinnamon bun, a donut, even. I never buy donuts, but they were so good on the trail. I had a little bit of candies for some straight sugar. That article was true. I did eat some candies. Spree was my favorite. They’re just little sugar things. And yes, I ate a combination of protein and sugar and carbohydrates. I would bring a piece of pizza along with me.

But I did eat as much as possible! When I stopped at the van, I probably consumed at least 500 calories. Fruit. I ate a lot of fruit. Those mandarin oranges and canned peaches were just the greatest thing ever. I ate so many mandarin oranges, it’s kind of silly. But I like them. That kind of stuff was boom boom boom and I’d eat a whole can of it in like a minute.

Ian: Just to sort of clarify there, because your pace is going slower, did you feel as though you could take in more calories and that it had less stomach distress? Because we all know the balancing act between eating calories and it sitting in your stomach. And your stomach having to work to digest that food. It doesn’t always go in line with trying to move quicker or faster. But I’m guessing your hiking and jogging pace was allowing you to eat big calories and it not causing any gastric distress?

Karl: You’re right. When you’re going slower, you can definitely digest food. Not once did I have a stomach problem the whole time. I was never like, oh my god, my stomach’s upset because I ate that whole pint of ice cream in three minutes. I did eat an entire pint of ice cream in a few minutes one time. And you would think, “I’m never going to be able to run for a couple of hours.”

But it’s funny because you take that in and you suck it down and I would start hiking and it was like, I was good for about an hour or so after that. I wouldn’t have to eat any food. But after an hour, I’m like, “I need to get in my pouch and get me something to eat.” Your body is such a furnace on these multi-day things like this, that it really doesn’t matter how much you eat at once, because you are. You’re moving a lot slower.

I mean, my average heart rate was probably 100. I’m going to guess, but somewhere in that ballpark. It wasn’t that high. So, I could digest, I could use the fuel and the power from whatever I was eating and not have that stomach distress. Again, any 100-mile race, or smaller, shorter races, there is that fine balance of taking in too much at one time. But it is pretty easy to just eat whatever you want and not have that problem.

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And Dave Horton would say the same thing, and so I’m sure Scott would say the same thing. It didn’t matter how much I ate at a stop. It never bothered the stomach. Scott’s stomach never bothered him either. Dave Horton said he had a lot of problems. He’s like, “I could never eat like you, Karl.” I sat there one time, he brought me a bucket of chicken, and I got a big bucket of chicken at one place, and I ate like the whole thing.

And he’s sitting there watching me eating, and he’s like, “Man, I could never eat like that. I couldn’t eat it when I was done.” And he’s like, “You are amazing.” I’m just like, just give me another piece.” I would just take it right down. I didn’t have problems with that. It was just fortunate, you know. Obviously, that’s why I didn’t lose 19 pounds, probably.

Ian: Absolutely.

Karl: It was cool to be able to do that.

Ian: Let me talk about day 29, Virginia. Again, I’ve said pivotal points. And it appears this was another pivotal point. That day, you covered 50.4 miles. And Eric said that it was relatively pain-free because you’d found a new way of taping your shin. What was that? Was that just a little bit of luck, of trying different methods? Because I know that you’d been wearing a compression sock and you’d tried taping it.

And you were icing as much as you often could. But you found a way of taping that seems to just work?

Karl: That information came from Scott when I was in Duncannon. Belz called Scott and I was just talking about my shin, why it was bothering me, where it was hurting that kind of a thing. Scott has a physical therapist background, so he’s like, “Try to get a brace or like a wrap – that will compress your interior tibialis, the muscle there over your shin. And compress the muscle belly.

Don’t put the wrap over your tendon, down lower towards your foot. When my leg came on fire, that wrap was down on my tendon on the lower part of my foot, and it was there and it was freaking killing me. I changed the location of it a little bit, and it just didn’t hurt as much. That was a game changer.

There were a few game changers in this whole thing that gave me the record basically. There’s another one down the road I’ll explain in a minute, but the allocation of that wrap helped. I never took it off all the way to the end. I’m like, “Just wear it.” Even though it wasn’t bothering me later. I’m like, “Just keep it on dude.”

Ian: Exactly. If it ain’t broke, don’t change it. Don’t change it. You said the game changer, and it was that game changer that strapping that made you on day 30 cover 60 miles.

Karl: Little things that count.

Ian: What was very interesting was that you’d obviously got out for the day, you’d planned to stop at 6:00 PM, but that blinkered vision, that feeling good, maybe the reassurance in this new taping sent you out for another 11 miles. Of course, at the end of that day, you’re feeling damn good. Your crew are thinking, “This is amazing Karl. Is just absolutely killing it.” I made a comment when I wrote about this and I said that you were killing it and I was blown away by your tenacity.

Karl: It was amazing how it came about.

Ian: Yes, amazing. First, tell me about that, that come back and what goes through your mind to bang out 60 miles when you’re 30 days into something incredible like this? And then tell me about the day after.

Karl: It was weird. I’m running long like, “Why doesn’t my shin hurt anymore?” Obviously, I was trying to do the right thing here with the wrap and icing and all that stuff. But it’s just like suddenly it went away. [laughs] It’s hard to explain why and everything else, but it went away so it gave me more and more confidence. I kept telling myself, “Don’t be greedy here. You still have tomorrow. You still have 15 more days to go. You just got to be patient with it. Don’t do anything stupid. Always watch where you’re stepping.” Again, my shin was still a little tight, it just didn’t have that searing pain that it had before.

Believe me, I was just like blown out of the water that it wasn’t hurting anymore. I was quite surprised. And even everyone like Belz, my dad was just like, “Wow. How come it’s not hurting anymore?” I don’t know how to explain that. It’s like Jen, she had the same thing, Scott had the same thing. I’m sure when Scott hurt his knee or his quad, he tore his quad muscle like a week later it healed. How does that stuff heal while you’re doing 50 miles a day? God, I don’t know. Your body is just adopting to it.

Ian: Can I ask a question Karl, how much other pain did you have?

Karl: Well, soreness like if you run a hard race, the next day you wake up and you’re sore and you’re hobbling around. On these types of things, your body starts to adopt after two to three weeks. I never had that deep soreness or anything like poke your muscles out and you get that sore pain. Not once that I ever really have that type of thing. The real pain is between your ears. [laughs]

You try to deal with it mentally, but as I get going every day, your legs are just heavy like you’re carrying around these two heavy cement logs but you don’t have that excruciating soreness pain. If you’re not having that and you’re still able to walk, you can always walk. And walk is what you’re doing most of the time anyway. If you could walk fast, and I taught myself how to walk a little faster than normal, and I was just able to keep going.

The jogging, you don’t jog very fast. You’re jogging slow. You’re barely picking your feet up off the ground or you’re stumble all the time. The real pain, it really isn’t there– that much. It’s just the pain is between your head and you’re just trying to keep moving forward.

Ian: Let’s go to day 31, because it certainly seemed as though that extra 11 miles that you banged out on the evening of day 30 may very well have been 11 miles too far and certainly that’s what Eric was touching on… in his report from that day where that you were feeling tired, you were feeling fatigued, you’ve got a blister under your foot, and as I can only imagine, I think I would have been done a long time ago…. I don’t have the mental or physical strength to maybe put myself through what you’re putting yourself through, but the highs of day 30 probably were feeling pretty rubbish on day 31?

Day 30 was Virginia when you were in the Shenandoah National Park. That’s when you’d had your leg taped up and you’re sort of planning to finish at 6:00 PM, and then you went out for 11 miles in the evening, and then you did 60 miles that day. But day 31 was Blue Ridge Parkway section. You were very fatigued, and you had got a blister under your foot, your crew got you a little bit happier by giving you two steaks for dinner.

Karl: Yes, the blister thing under my foot I must mention, this is probably the ultimate game changer. There is a guy, Johnathan Basham, he holds the record of the long trail. Jonathan I’ve known for a long time. He was pretty close to there. He came out to visit me, he’s the stay-at-home dad. He’s got two kids, two young kids, and his wife is an ER doc. Now, his wife was off that day. He could come out and say hello, and see how I was doing.

He shows up, and I come in to the stop where my crew was and my left foot was killing me under the bottom center of my foot. I’ve had a neuroma under there for a long time – for years. The same pain, the pain of that under my left foot felt like my neuroma. It was numb. It was pretty excruciating to step on it. I got to the stop and I said, “Man, my foot is just on fire. It’s killing me.” Jonathan was sitting there, and he says, “Karl, how’s it going.” I took my shoe, “Oh my God.” Every time I would put my foot down in the ground, it would start throbbing, like throbbing hard.”

John looks at it,” No, Andre Thompson had this too back when he did it. It’s just a really deep blister, like way, super deep blister under your foot.” I was like, really? “Do you have anything to try to drain that thing?” I said, “Well, I have a scalpel.” It was a needle type scalpel. He’s like, “No, that blister gets wider as you stick it. Do you have like a needle or a safety pin or something like that?” I was like, “Well, we have a safety pin.” We tried that, and it got a little bit of fluid out, but not everything. He’s like, “I’ll tell you what, tomorrow, I’ll bring you a surgical needle.”

He shows up on cue at four o’clock in the morning, and I’m awake ready for him. We stick my foot with the needle, and we got all the fluid out. I put my socks and my shoe on, and I started hiking again, all pain was gone, and my foot was an entirely new foot. The pain was absolutely gone. That was the ultimate game changer. Yes, it was incredible. Suddenly I could get running again… it totally got me jogging again.

Ian: This way day 32?

Karl: Yes. I guess it’s 32.

Ian: Yes, day 32 you did 57 miles. I think what’s interesting here is you’ve just said that draining your foot was a game changer. But also, day 32 was also nearly the day where you ruined your whole attempt. Because that was the night that you actually slept out on the trail. You slept at Scorched Earth Gap instead of continuing for another four miles to your crew. You bedded down on the trail. You had a bad night and then what followed on day 33 was one of those days that probably your crew and you want to forget in that you were just completely exhausted.

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You couldn’t function. They found you face down asleep on the trail and basically you just said, “I need to sleep.” During the middle of the day you went and slept for three hours. I guess that was a really awful time for Eric and Senior and Sheryl in that they’re looking and thinking, “Carl, is this it? Is this over?” What was going through your mind at that point?

Karl: When I slept on the trail, Eric packed the tent, he had food for me and he did everything right. I got to him a little after ten so it was kind of a late night for me too. They got there and we went to bed to sleep and I did not sleep very well. We tossed and turned a little bit and it just wasn’t very good sleep. We got up at four o’clock in the morning and I got my shoes on and stuff and I started walking. Eric picked up the tent stuff behind me. He said we’d all just catch up. I started walking and I was just super-duper fatigued.

Every time I went uphill I was just like, I couldn’t. I was just so slow. My legs were so tired. That lactic acid burned and built up after every step. We went in a mile or two slow and I said, let me crash for 20 min. Give me a 20-minute power nap and see if that makes a difference. That’s when you saw the picture where I was face down trying to sleep on the trail. I was only down for 20 minutes on the trail that time and Belz was like, “Okay Carl. It’s 20 minutes.” I was like, “All right.” I got up. The same thing. It was just like I had nothing in the tank!

It was like going on empty. I finally get the van. Five hours for 10 miles which is ridiculously slow. I got to the van and I was like, “I need to sleep.” I just walked there and I went right down. Sheryl was there and my dad was a little like, “You know you can’t do that.” I’m like, “Well, I’m sleeping for two hours.” This is when I was the ultimate jerk. I won the award for the ultimate jerk. I was just like, “No. I’m not going anywhere. I’m sleeping. Leave me alone.”

Two hours. I slept for a while and, did that help me? I guess it helped me a little bit in terms of waking up and having a little more energy. But we were kind of milling around the van and stuff like that and I was just really frustrated. Obviously didn’t have a pack while I was sleeping and stuff like that. I just kind of got up and I just walked off. I was mad. I just kind of walked off and got on the trail and l said, “Don’t give up.” I told myself, “Don’t give up yet.” I just got on the trail I started walking south… my crew never saw me leave.

Ian: I know. I can imagine them going to look for you and suddenly you’ve disappeared and then they have no idea where you are. You’re somewhere down the trail of course. Then they are rushing packing things away to go and meet you at the next stop.

Karl: I expected someone to come behind and say, “Hey, wait. Where are, you going?” But I kept looking back and, “No.” I walked about a mile and a half or something like that and I saw a couple of other hikers. I said, “Hey you guys. If you see people down the trail, if they’re looking for a Speedgoat. Tell them, I am on the trail.” Then another mile or two went by and Sheryl came running backwards towards me. It was a short section. It was like five and a half miles or something.

She came running backward. She just gave me some water. I didn’t need water or anything. She gave me some stuff and I just kept walking to the next stop and then I consumed a massive pint of ice cream. Still frustrated and all that but I got my craft together a little bit and put my pack on and I walked those seven miles. That’s when Dave Horton showed up again and was saying to me, “You got to keep going. You’re still in it. The foods are in front of you. You still have it, Karl.”

He was trying to inspire me to do another seven or eight miles. He was like, “You’ve done the seven or eight. You’re still three miles ahead!” I’m like, “What dude? I need to sleep.” I had to the stop and I decided that I would be better off sleeping instead of trying to push seven more miles and get there in the dark. I need to sleep. I knew that if I slept eight hours I’d be much better tomorrow. That’s what I did and then obviously, you know things turned back in my favour again.

Ian: Yes.

Karl: It’s funny, I had one day where I was just so tired that I just walked into the van and “boom”. Then I went down for three hours. A lot of it is in your head but at the same time, I just felt like I had to do that. Again, I wasn’t out of it because I heard I was a little bit ahead over general. I wasn’t out of the game yet.

Ian: It brings up so many questions. But let’s think back to your last attempt when you failed. We’ve discussed that in-depth and one of the things that seem to be far more significant about the failure last time was probably not so much your physical self, but more to do with your mental self and the fact that your crew weren’t quite doing what you needed. Now you obviously learned from that process. You got to witness Scott last year and we discussed in the build-up to this attempt and questioned, did you have the grit? Did you have the blinkers? Where you prepared to go back out when you were tired? Was your crew going to be nailing it?

It’s just unequivocal yes to all those points this time around, isn’t it? You knew what had to be done. But also, what is so important is that Eric and Senior and Sheryl just seemed to be so on the ball – making sure that you had what you need. They were there for you. I know that you’ll give them credit. But we know how hard it is to follow somebody for 40 days on the trail with minimal sleep, looking after you, finding you, feeding you, packing up, breaking down. It’s just an incredible challenge.

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Karl: Well, they stayed positive all the time. That was the whole thing. Instead of arguing or not, not giving me grief about being a jerk or something like that. It rubbed off me. The positive parts rubbed off me. Why aren’t they yelling back at me? Sheryl and I had a few conversations that weren’t so pleasant. But at the same time, she kept saying, “You’re not out of this yet. You can do this. You can still do this.” I had to believe in that and she helped me believe in that.

Again, they didn’t get negative and kind of walk away. They just said, “Karl, you’re still in it. Don’t give up yet.” I still knew in the back of my head that I was still in it but I never wanted to quit. There’s a lot of time and effort spent on this thing. Not just Redbull, but all the money in support. It’s just one of those things that you must stay positive and it worked. It worked. The crew was amazing. Crew was super important.

Ian: After day 33, I think Eric said it was probably the lowest day of the whole AT experience. It was a day where you covered 23 miles. You physically and mentally were feeling jaded. Day 34 comes around in you’re in Virginia and the calculations are done. That from here on, in its 50-plus mile days to get the record. You go out and you bang out 50 miles as though it’s a normal scenario. It goes back to the amazing highs and lows of being out on the trail. Do you think that 50-plus mile day was the Karl Meltzer determination, or was it the fact that day 33 was a shorter day, and you got more rest and you managed to get out there and kick trail butt?

Karl: A combination of both. I just said to myself after Sheryl locked me out that morning the dark and it wasn’t so good for a little while but I kind of turned the switch on of being happier Karl again. I tried to not being mean Karl. It just said, “All right Karl, turn the switch on. What are you doing? Get your shit together?” I just sort of did and I came into a happier place and then it just turned back to good old Karl on the trail. It was amazing.

Ian: Okay. Then at this point Scott is joining you on the trail?

Karl: A little later. I think a little bit later maybe he joined me. Somewhere like day 37 or something like that.

Ian: Okay, so, talk me through from, say, day 36 because this is the point where I wrote on my website that you could smell the barn, and I know that I was probably a little bit premature with you smelling the barn…

Karl: Just a little, yes, but that’s okay.

Ian: But you knew what I meant in writing that. At that point you’re much closer to the goal than you were at the beginning. And although the smell of the barn might be a faint one, it’s there, it’s in your nostrils. And there are no guarantees because there was still a long way to go. But I guess mentally there must’ve been a change for you, and if there was a change, what was that change?

Karl: Well, you’re right, I mean, I smelled a little. I knew if I kept my crap together I could still get it. That feeling came around day 40 or day 41. I was like, “If your body holds up, you can do this” then I knew I could bang out 80-something miles in the last day. That’s when I started to smell the barn, it was probably 40, 41. I was near Smoky Mountain National Park, and that’s when I knew that I kind of had it. And then Scott came in there too, he was amazing, he ran into places to crew for me that other crew couldn’t get to.

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He did whatever to help me, he brought my stuff into camp overnight that one time and that my crew wouldn’t have been able to do. He was inspirational. Whenever we ran together we just were chatting about old times, and the miles went by a lot faster that way too. He made a huge difference. Then he took off one day, he had to go to New York, so he jumped on a plane to New York, came back the next day.

Ian: Brilliant.

Karl: Yes, that was pretty cool. Scott said,” Yes, I’m coming back for sure”, and he made a big difference for sure.

Ian: Yes, certainly on social media Scott’s presence was significant because the community fully realized not only what you were undertaking, but the true nature of the sport. Scott had got the record, you’d been there, you’d helped, and then he was returning that favour even though you were going to potentially break something that he’d worked very hard for. There’s many questions that we could go on and ask about but what was Scott’s demeanor during the attempt? How did he verbally encourage you on the trail, and what hints and tips was he giving you that maybe you knew but maybe you didn’t know?

Karl: Well, clearly, if you would have shown up and Scott was there, you would never know at the time that he held the record and that’s kind of the friend he is, he’s just like — Whatever you need to do, he would take over some logistical stuff. You would never know that I was breaking his record, he was just there to help me, kind of like when I was there to help him. He just did what he needed to do to make me move forward. The funny thing is that on the last day Jenny was like, “Hey, Karl, why don’t you take an eight-hour nap?”

She was just joking around, of course, but it’s just like, “No, Jenny, I want to get it”. But, no, you would never know that he was the guy that held the record because he was just helping me, and that was special, and I felt that from him. He was just like, “I’m just going to do what I need to do”.

Ian: Yes. Day 36, 57 miles. Day 37 was another 50 plus mile a day. Day 38 was 55.6 miles. At this point it looks as though you were cruising. Were you?

Karl: Yes, yes, more or less. Those mileages are basically I needed to get that far, but road logistics had something to do with that too, it was like, “Today you have to do 55 because you can’t stop before that”. Some of those big miles came like that, but I wanted to stay a certain amount ahead of Jen, so that I knew that the last day I’d be safe if I did the 85 miles. So, yes, I was cruising, though, I was still getting done early, I was getting to bed by 8-8:30 PM.

And, yes, it’s just about 15 hours. I get out the door at five o’clock every morning, and I could get those miles in well. It’s hilly down there, but it’s smoother, so you can definitely move better, especially on downhill. You could go a tiny bit faster if it wasn’t so technical, and I was just able to get those miles in, and get to sleep at the same time.

Ian: On day 40 Dave Horton had to leave the trail early but he turned to you at one point, and said, “You can do this. You should quit now if you don’t plan on beating Scott’s record”. Basically, reading between the lines, you’ve got this! Did you feel as though you had this at day 40?

Karl: Yes. I mean, I knew only if my body held up, like I said. Yes, I knew that because, again, the last day I knew I could blow out a lot of miles. And Jen didn’t blow out the last day and nor did Scott. He was just struggling to get there. I had the opportunity, and that was basically by blowing out that last day. I had a 20-mile lead, or whatever you want to call it. So, that gave me the confidence to know that once I started on Saturday morning, I’m going to the end. That’s where I gained all the ground.

Ian: The last day, or the last couple of days lived up to a Meltzer trademark that 100 miles is not that far.

Karl: [laughs]

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Ian: I still find it ridiculously unbelievable that after 40 plus days banging out an average of 40 odd miles a day. That you have the strength, physically and mentally, to bang out what was 88 miles…

Karl: 85.4.

Ian: 85.4. And it was interesting, Karl, because I thought back to our interview just before you went out to the AT, and I said to you, I don’t know if you can remember it, but I said, “Are you prepared? Are you prepared to not sleep in those final days to get it done?”. It just seemed as though everything clicked into place physically and mentally, despite highs and lows. Scott called it his masterpiece. Do you feel as though it’s your masterpiece?

Karl: I don’t know if “Masterpiece” is the best word. I was kind of a mess after 19 days. [laughter] But, it was just his call on it. Scott was kind of a mess too at the end. It was totally, necessarily not a masterpiece either, but to me, I call it more of a stamp. Obviously with a lot of 100 mile wins, this was raising the bar just another time, and to say that I’ve won all these hundreds, and then actually did something bigger and more beyond, winning all those hundreds– It was, in my eyes– It’s sort of a stamp in my career. Will I keep running? Of course, I will.

I’ll keep going, I’m not going to end it, but I have nothing to prove. It feels good to be successful the third time. This time I finally got it done and it makes me feel like I can still do this. I’ll be able to go after the 50 age plus records maybe, in a year and a half or something like that. We’ll see what happens, I don’t know.

Ian: Well, you’ve got the record – 45 days, 22 hours, 38 minutes. I’ve got to ask one question… But you went the opposite way to Scott, and one question that springs to my mind, it sprung to several other people’s minds too, is it two records or is it one record?

Karl: I think it’s two records and I even said it to Scott, it’s different, he finished in a different way. George is smooth to finish; Maine is ridiculously hard. Just think, Comrades has a record up and down, right? Hardrock has a record back-and-forth. In Hardrock it doesn’t recognize it that way but we all know there’s two. I think there’s a north to south bound on the AT for sure.

Ian: Okay, so does that mean that you might have a go the other way?

[laughter]

Karl: Not the right time to ask that question but at the same time I doubt it, I think the fact that I got this one time, that was what I was shooting for and I don’t need to do it again. I would have to have quite the incentive to try again but I don’t think so. The misery is too much, it’s just mentally incredibly tiring. Not so much the physical things, just the misery of every morning getting up at four o’clock and grinding out the day. It’s just ridiculous.

Ian: I cannot even fathom it Karl. Many congratulations on the ‘stamp!’

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REVIEW of 2016 in Trail, Mountain, Ultra and Skyrunning

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As a year comes to end, it’s always nice to be able to look back and appreciate some of the highlights that all come together that allows one to decide if it was a good or bad year. For me personally, 2016 was a cracker and I am truly thankful for all the opportunities that came up.

Looking back and deciding on what a highlight is, is of course a tricky thing. It’s very personal and it also requires a great memory. So, I will declare right from the off that these are ‘my’ highlights and yes, I am going to miss some key performances, runners, experiences and so on that should be in the list. So, please feel free to comment and remind me.

It would make sense to start in January and move through to December in a logical way… I am not going to do that, I am writing this off the cuff.

Jim Walmsley has been on fire in 2016 and ironically, despite an amazing run and course record at JFK50, FKT’s for the Rim-to-Rim and Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim in the Grand Canyon and countless other victories, it will be his Western States performance that well and truly cements Jim as one of the most exciting runners to rise in 2016. He said pre Western States that he was there to win and win with a course record. He flew along the trails and at one point was almost 30-minutes under the record. As he passed 90-miles everyone was re-writing the history books and then boom! Jim went off course. I caught up with a full and in-depth interview with Jim and you can listen to that HERE and read it HERE. Jim for many is the male Ultra-runner of the Year with victories at Stagecoach Line 55km, Franklin Mountains Trail Run, Lake Sonoma, Mesquite Canyon, Moab Red Hot 55k, Bandera 100k and the recent JFK50. 2017 is going to be a very exciting one.

Rob Young set off on a journey Across the USA looking for a new record, fame, glory and an opportunity to raise a load of money for charity. Somewhere along the way he lost a grasp of reality, perspective and ruined what was a remarkable story be cheating and deceiving the whole ultra running community. Ultimately, Rob is a story of an individual who tried to do good and maybe we should ask what went wrong rather than preach about his morals.

That brings me on to Mark Vaz. What is it with FKT’s and delusional behaviour? Mark seemed to think that running from Land’s End to John O’Groats 31-hours quicker than anyone else for the 860-mile journey was a good idea. It’s not even a convincing lie. As many pointed out, the god of ultra -running, Yiannis Kouros, couldn’t have done it as quick as Mr. Vaz claimed… oh dear!

Pete Kostelnick by contrast embraced the FKT concept and showed the world that the claims made by Rob Young are possible by smashing a 30+ year old Guinness record out of the ether by running Across the USA a full 4-days quicker than anyone else. As records go, this is an absolute doozy and when you look deep and hard into this 40+ day journey, you soon start to understand the difficulty and complexity of running 70+ miles a day. You can listen to an in-depth interview with Pete HERE and read the story HERE. In addition, we must also add to this story, Pete’s incredible and record breaking run at Badwater 135. This achievement has been overshadowed by the USA run but as a stand alone run, it’s also a cracker.

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Karl Meltzer did it, he finally completed the Appalachian Trail in a new record breaking time after failing on two previous occasions.  His time was some 10-hours quicker than Scott Jurek’s set in 2015, however, Karl did run in the opposite direction and has said, post run, he feels that they are two records. Notably, Karl helped Scott in 2015 and Scott helped Karl in 2016. It’s a remarkable story and one that truly reflects our sport of ultra-running. Karl’s record of 45-days, 22-hours and 38-minutes now sits in the record books and well and truly establishes Karl as one of ‘the’ greatest ultra-runners in the world. This is also backed up with his 38 100-mile victories and 5 victories at Hardrock 100. Listen to the in-depth interview HERE and read HERE

Talking of Hardrock 100, Kilian Jornet and Jason Schlarb held hands and crossed the line together in 2016. It was a wonderful moment that split the ultra-running audience in two. Some would have preferred a race to the line while others discussed the wonderful gesture and statement this moment made. Whichever camp you sit in, it was back-to-back victories for Kilian and a career defining moment for Jason Schlarb. Something he discussed in my in-depth interview HERE. For equality, we also need to mention Anna Frost nailing a back-to-back ladies victory. As I understand it, these three Musketeers will all return in 2017.

Aaron Denberg got a bee in his bonnet about Hardrock 100 lottery and decided to create a law suit. Many believe Mr. Denberg makes some good points but questioned if his approach was the correct one? Hardrock 100 released statements and have since removed the payment of a fee by each runner to enter the lottery, something which was apparently illegal! This will run and run (pardon the pun) but ultimately, is Hardrock a victim of it’s own success?

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Caroline Chaverot for me, without doubt, female ultra-runner of the year. This French lady has been on fire all the way from victory in Transgrancanaria early in the year to a most recent win in Hong Kong on December 2nd. Along the way, Caroline won UTMB, became Skyrunning World Champion for the ultra distance and won the IAU World Trail Championships in Portugal. Add to these incredible results, victories at Madirea Island Ultra Trail, Mont-Blanc 80km and the UTWT world title for 2016 and I lower my head and bow to Queen Caroline. Plus she has made the lottery for Hardrock in 2017… exciting!

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Adam Campbell survives a horrific fall and not only lives to tell the tale but has a remarkable recovery, listen to the interview HERE and read HERE

Lizzy Hawker sneaked from under the radar and once again picked up the gauntlet testing her personal boundaries and voyage of self-discovery. After years of injury, Lizzy completed the GHT (Great Himalayan Trail). A 1600km, east to west journey across Nepal. It was, as Lizzy promised, a “beautiful, rough, hard and unforgettable journey”. It was about many things, but also about trying to raise money to give opportunities to Nepali runners, particularly girls, for whom one chance can be a catalyst for much wider change.

Damian Hall set a new FKT on the UK’s South West Coast Path 10-hours, 15-minutes and 18-seconds for the 630-mile jaunt.

Jeff Browning, what a year…! Winner Hurt 100, 3rd at Western States, 4th at Hardrock 100 and 4th at Run Rabbit Run – that is some year, the WSER/Hardrock double a stand out and fastest combined time.

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Kilian Jornet won Hardrock 100 and attempted to summit Everest. The Summits Of My Life project continues on into 2017 after Kilian and his team decided to pull the plug on a 2016 attempt as weather detonated.

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Emelie Forsberg was quiet in 2016 after damaging her ACL and having an operation, she did however return to Trofeo Kima and put the record straight with a victory… she hopes the course record will come in 2018 when the race will take place once again. Emelie discussed her injury HERE

Beth Pascall went from strength-to-strength in 2016 and elevated the Lakeland 100 (UK) record to a whole new level by placing 4th overall. Listen to her interview HERE

Zach Miller did what he always does and lead from the front. At UTMB many predicted, me included, that it was going to be a story of glorious victory with a stunning ‘off-the-front’ performance or carnage with a monumental blow-up! In reality it was both, the blow-up came and he somehow managed to hold on for grim death to still get a top-10 place, he will win this race one day! Jump forward to December and Zach did it again at San Francisco 50. This time he had company and many are saying that ‘this’ race was one of the highlights of the year as Zach and Hayden Hawks traded blows at the front. Zach won with a course record and he took home the $10,000 prize. Hayden finished just 2-minutes back. Note that name! If you want to know what it’s like to put it ALL on the line, take a look at Zach’s final 2-minutes of that incredible 5:56:03 run.

Andrew Miller became the youngest winner of the iconic Western States and today, myself and so many others still know very little about this 20-year old. Certainly, Jim Walmsley had an impact on the kudos and plaudits that Andrew should have received. Running 15:39:36 at WSER takes some doing but I can’t help but think that Biology and chemistry are a priority as Andrew starts his sophomore year at Northern Arizona University. He will be back at WSER in 2017!

Kaci Lickteig has been nailing it and nailing it and finally got the Western States victory that she has longed for and then contrasted it with victory at the Bear 100. You can listen to Kaci’s post Western States interview HERE

Andrea Huser runs and races it would appear ‘every’ weekend. She is relentless. As I understand it, Andrea raced on thirteen occasions but I may have missed some/ She had victories at Raid de La Reunion Swiss Irontrail T201 Eiger Ultratrail 101km, Lavaredo, Trail d’Albertville, Trail Des Allobroges and Maxi-Race Annecy. Phew… any other year and the lack of Caroline Chaverot and Andrea would be female ultra-runner of the year.

©iancorless.com_SWC2016-6453.jpg

Luis Alberto Hernando won Transvulcania, became Skyrunning World Champion for the ultra distance and became IAU World Trail Champion. That is a solid year and Luis has raced less having become a Dad. Had his feet not fallen apart at UTMB, he may well have been in the running with Jim for male ultra-runner of the year.

©iancorless.com_Transgrancanaria2016-1724

Diego Pazos is a name to watch and has surprised many in 2016. He’s my heads-up for the future. He had a notable result at Transgrancanaria early in 2016 but what followed was quite incredible, his victory at Mont-Blanc 80km a highlight!

©iancorless.com_Transgrancanaria2016-1481

Didrik Hermansen won Transgrancanaria and then placed 2nd at Western States. That is solid and shows real diversity. What will 2017 hold for him? Listen HERE and as Sondre corrects me, Didrik ran 6:45 and 6:38 for 100k.

iancorless-com_runningbeyondbook-06784

Running Beyond Book was released in October and November to a worldwide audience and has been translated into Spanish, Italian, German, Swedish and of course is available in English. Containing 240-pages, this large coffee table books documents the sport of trail, ultra, mountain and skyrunning in images and words, HERE

Dan Lawson (UK) won the IAU 24 Hour European Championships in 2016 with a distance of 261.843 kilometres (162.702 mi).

iancorless-com_glencoe2016-9946

Jasmin Paris has elevated herself to a whole new level in 2016. This quiet and shy fell runner set new records for the UK’s ‘Rounds’ and in the process placed 6th at UTMB (her first 100) won Tromso SkyRace, won Glencoe Skyline, became the Skyrunner World Series Extreme Champion 2016 and in addition to countless other races, also placed on the podium at the Skyrunning World Championships for the ultra distance behind Caroline Chaverot. Interviews with Jasmin Paris HERE, HERE, HERE and HERE

Joe Grant set a new record on the 14’ers in 31-days by cycling between trailheads and then summiting all the 14’ers (50+ of them) on foot to then return back to his cycle and then continue on his journey. He was self-sufficient for the whole trip. “I did set a speed record, but that wasn’t my goal,” says Grant, 33, an accomplished ultrarunner who finished second at the 2012 Hardrock 100. “The goal was to challenge myself and see the state, although the previous record served as a reference for how long I could take.” taken from trailrunningmag.

Megan Hicks also completed a ’14’ journey, the Nolans 14 in Colorado. She completed the journey in 57:19:19 to the summit of the 14th peak and then completed the journey back to the Fish Hatchery Trailhead in under 60-hours – 59:36. Her time is the fastest ever completed by a woman.

Nicky Spinks continues to inspire and while she may have lost her ‘Round’ records to Jasmin Paris, she went on to set a new benchmark with a record for a double Bob Graham Round – Nick is an inspiration! You can listen to an interview with her HERE

Ludovic Pommeret ran the most controlled and impressive UTMB ever moving from not being in contention to slowly but surely ticking off the runners ahead and taking the crown at the largest ultra in the world. Add to this victory four other victories and Ludovic is one to keep an eye on in ’17.’

Caroline Boller set new American Trail 50-mile record 5:48:01

Gina Slaby set new female 100-mile WR 13:45:49 for ‘any’ surface, Anne Trason had the previous record of  13:47:41 set in the early 90’s.

Skyline Scotland achieved a first with Glencoe Skyline achieving Skyrunner World Status in the Extreme category and as such, the 2016 edition of the race had arguably one of the best fields assembled on UK soil for a mountain race. HERE

Jon Albon transitioned from obstacle racing (something he still does and excels at) to Skyrunning and won the 2016 Skyrunner World Series Extreme category. We are going to see more of him in 2017! HERE

Samantha Gash ran across India in a project called ‘Run India’ as a means to create awareness and raise money. Covering over 3000km you can listen to her story in episode 125 of Talk Ultra out on Friday 16th December.

Ida Nilsson started the year with a win in Transvulcania, she took victory at The Rut and then in early December won San Francisco 50. Without doubt, Ida is a star of the future. Listen to Ida talk about Transvulcania HERE

Stu Leaney breaks Michael Wardian’s 50km treadmill record by just 7-seconds

Mina Guli ran 40-marathons across 7 deserts on 7 continents in 7 weeks to raise awareness for water, listen to the interview HERE

Jason Schlarb started his year by prepping for Hardrock 100 by skiing the course, listen to the interview HERE

Skyrunning and the world series (SWS) elevated to new heights with an increased circuit that traveled the globe and the addition of the new Extreme series.

And finally (maybe), Donnie Campbell just recently set a new Winter Ramsay Round record to finish a very solid year!

******

So what have I missed? 

I am well aware that I will have missed some key performances in 2016 and I welcome you commenting and letting me know. Of course, many performances, races or experiences will resonate on a personal level for you. I can think of many British performances that are worthy of a nod – Jo Meek’s 2nd at the CCC, Paul Giblin 5th at Western States, Joasia Zakrzewski’s medal at the 100k World Champs for example.

Be great to hear from you…

Episode 120 – Alex Nichols, Emelie Forsberg and Jasmin Paris

A_GRAVATAR

Episode 120 – Alex Nichols tells us all about his first 100-miler and how how he won it! Emelie Forsberg tells us about her return to Kima and finding solace and new skills in India. Jasmin Paris is on fire and we sum up an incredible 2016 and ‘another’ round record and finally Speedgoat Karl answers your questions about the Appalachian Trail FKT.

KARL ON THE AT

Some questions from listeners:

Daniel “DJ” Denton Funny: will he burn the van because it has his permanent stench after not showering for over 40 days, and, Serious: did the experience result in a deeper bond/relationship with is father and wife?

Seth Holling What was his thoughts on the smokies? Was the smokies tougher or easier than expected? Would he recommend tacklinnog the smokies first (NB) or last (SB)? Also, did he find a sixer that was left for him at Davenport gap where the AT crosses I-40 🍺

Chris Morgan Ask Karl if he had to push through any injuries?
And if he did how did he do it and did they go away? Or did they become something that needed constant management.

Florian Schuetz What made the difference compared to his previous attempts? Why did he manage to break the time this year? Better fitness, no injuries, mental game, etc.

Brett Slater I’d be interested in his foot care regimen and how he avoids calf issues.

David Nowaczewski Ask him what the heck happened on the day he was found face down on the trail?

Ray Jackson Jr. Ask him how it feels to finally be home and in a place where he can rest without deadlines.

Stephen Cousins What are Karl’s thoughts about Kaiha Bertolini?

Paul Weir I’d ask Karl, what was it like having scott help you beat his record?

Brett Hillier Advice for anyone trying to attempt a long distance FKT?

Gary Broughton When Scott Jurek broke the record, people called it his ‘masterpiece’. Does Karl consider this his masterpiece?

Meghan Kennihan Ask his thoughts on the supposed girl that broke his record unsupported two days after him Kailia

Francis Pardo Details on fueling strategy. Did it change over the course of time?

Chris Highcock What next?

Matt Dooley Was there any luxury he missed /craved on the trail

Finn Melanson In almost every aspect for a speed record attempt, going SOBO is a completely different hike than going NOBO. Should there be separate records for direction?

Pete Williams speedgoat is a ganster. nuff respect

Garrett English Does he still feel 2190 miles isn’t that far?

RUNNING BEYOND BOOK is now available in Spain, Germany and Italy and the UK edition will be delivered to UK audiences, USA audiences and Southern Hemisphere audiences from November 3rd: more info – HERE

RunningBeyond_JKT
Order the book
Spain HERE, Germany HERE, Italy HERE, Southern Hemisphere HERE, USA HERE

00:20:11 NEWS

SPARTATHLON

  1. Andrzej Radzikowski 23:01
  2. Marc Bonfiglio 23:35
  3. Radek Brunner 24:06
  1. Katalin Nagy (4th overall) 25:22
  2. Pam Smith 27:11
  3. Zsuzsanna Maraz 27:44

Flagstaff SkyRace

Joe Gray and Sarah Keyes won the VK

In the SkyRace (39km) Joe Gray did the double ahead of Tayte Pollman and Patrick Parsel – 4:00, 4:00.3 and 4:11 respectively.

Alicia Shay (now Vargo) won the ladies 4:51 ahead of Kristi Knecht and Sandi Nypaver 4:53 and 4:54

GRAND TO GRAND

Florian Vieux and Emilie Leconte won the self-supported race with Sebastien Nain and Elisabet Barnes taking 2nd.

UTMF

Became a ‘really’ short race due to bad weather and Dylan Bowman and Fernanda Maciel ran great races to win the 27-mile race

ULTRA PIRINEU

Miguel Heras was back to winning ways with a dominant performance and just missed Kilian’s record. he finished in 12:05.Jessed Hernandez and Cristofer Clemente was 3rd. Cristofer became Skyrunner World Series champion for the Ultra distance.

Gemma Arenas tool the race win and Skyrunner World Series. Hillary Allen and Anna Comet placed 2nd and 3rd in the race.

Jasmin Paris sets another FKT on a UK round in wales

00:29:00 INTERVIEW with Jasmin Paris

BEAR 100

Kaci Lickteig and Mick Jurynec/ Ryan Weibel (joint) won in 20:27 and 19:33

Rob Krar was back with a victory at Berkeley Trail Adventure 50 mile

Rob Young found guilty

Jim Walmsley FKT R2R and R2R2R – amazing 

01:31:39 INTERVIEW with Alex Nichols

02:05:55 INTERVIEW with Emelie Forsberg

UP & COMING RACES

Andorra

Els 2900 Alpine Run | 70 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Argentina

La Pachamama 100 km | 100 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

La Pachamama 53 km | 53 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

La Pachamama 73 km | 73 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

Australia

New South Wales

Freedom Trail Run – 50k | 50 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

Hume & Hovell 100 | 100 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Hume & Hovell 50 | 50 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Washpool/Gibraltar World Heritage Trails 50 km | 50 kilometers | October 16, 2016 | website

Victoria

Great Ocean Walk 100 km Trail Run | 100 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Great Ocean Walk 100 mile Trail Run | 100 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Bahamas

50K | 50 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

Canada

Nova Scotia

Valley Harvest Ultra Marathon | 50 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

Quebec

Bromont Ultra 160 km | 160 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Bromont Ultra 55 km | 55 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

Bromont Ultra 80 km | 80 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

Croatia

109,8 km | 109 kilometers | October 21, 2016 | website

161.4 km | 161 kilometers | October 21, 2016 | website

Finland

Western Finland

Wihan kilometrit – 100 km | 100 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Wihan kilometrit – 50 km | 50 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

France

Aude

Grand Raid des Cathares | 170 kilometers | October 13, 2016 | website

Raid des Bogomiles | 96 kilometers | October 14, 2016 | website

Aveyron

Endurance Trail | 100 kilometers | October 20, 2016 | website

Intégrale des Causses | 63 kilometers | October 21, 2016 | website

La Solitaire | 65 kilometers | October 21, 2016 | website

Essonne

Trail du Viaduc des Fauvettes 50 km | 50 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

Ille-et-Vilaine

Entre Palis et Mégalithes | 64 kilometers | October 16, 2016 | website

Pyrénées-Orientales

100 Miles Sud de France | 100 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Grande Traversée Mer Montagne | 110 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Saône-et-Loire

Com Com Trail 68km | 68 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Savoie

Grand Trail du Lac – 72 km | 72 kilometers | October 16, 2016 | website

Somme

100 km | 100 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

100 km Relais | 100 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Tarn-et-Garonne

50 km | 50 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

Germany

Bavaria

Herbstlauf Schloss Thurn Hobbylauf | 87 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Greece

Rodopi Advendurun 100 miles | 100 miles | October 21, 2016 | website

Hong-Kong

Challenger – Whole Course | 78 kilometers | October 16, 2016 | website

Prohiker – Round-trip Course | 156 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

India

Karnataka

110 km | 110 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

50 Km | 50 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

80 km | 80 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

National Capital Territory of Delhi

Bhatti Lakes 100 Mile | 100 miles | October 15, 2016 | website

Bhatti Lakes 220 km | 220 kilometers | October 14, 2016 | website

Bhatti Lakes 50 Mile | 50 miles | October 14, 2016 | website

Indonesia

MesaStila 4 Peaks | 65 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

MesaStila 5 Peaks | 100 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Italy

Emilia-Romagna

100 km | 100 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Tartufo Trail 50 km | 50 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

Tartufo Trail 66 km | 66 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

Friuli-Venezia Giulia

Cormorultra | 69 kilometers | October 16, 2016 | website

Magredi Mountain Trail 100 Mile | 100 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Magredi Mountain Trail 40 Mile | 40 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Japan

Inagawa 100km Ultra “TOASHI” Fun Run | 100 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Korea

Ultra Trail Jeju – 100km | 100 kilometers | October 14, 2016 | website

Morocco

The Saharan Challenge | 84 kilometers | October 20, 2016 | website

New Zealand

100k | 100 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

50k | 50 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

74k | 74 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Portugal

180 km | 180 kilometers | October 07, 2016 | website

Azores Triangle Adventure | 103 kilometers | October 07, 2016 | website

Réccua Douro Ultra Trail | 80 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Réunion

La Mascareignes | 67 kilometers | October 21, 2016 | website

Le Grand Raid | 164 kilometers | October 20, 2016 | website

South Africa

100 km | 100 kilometers | October 14, 2016 | website

100 km over 2 days | 100 kilometers | October 14, 2016 | website

100 Miles | 100 miles | October 14, 2016 | website

Bonitas Golden Gate Challenge | 70 kilometers | October 21, 2016 | website

Spain

Aragon

Long Trail Guara Somontano | 50 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Ultra Trail Guara Somontano | 102 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Basque Country

Hiru Haundiak | 100 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Valencian Community

Ultra Trail Del Rincon 100 km | 100 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Ultra Trail Del Rincon 170 km | 170 kilometers | October 07, 2016 | website

Sweden

Sörmland Ultra Marathon | 50 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Switzerland

Vaud

54 km | 54 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

United Kingdom

Cornwall

Atlantic Coast 3-Day Challenge | 78 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Cumbria

Ennerdale 50k Trail Run | 50 kilometers | October 16, 2016 | website

Lakes in a Day | 50 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Oxfordshire

Autumn 100 | 100 miles | October 15, 2016 | website

Oxfordshire RidgeWay Ultra – Black Route | 53 miles | October 11, 2016 | website

Oxfordshire RidgeWay Ultra – Red Route | 43 miles | October 11, 2016 | website

Rotherham

Rowbotham’s Round Rotherham International Trail Event | 50 miles | October 15, 2016 | website

USA

Arizona

Canyon De Chelly Ultra | 55 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Cave Creek Thriller 50K | 50 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

California

100 Miler | 100 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

50 Miler | 50 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Coyote Ridge 50 Km Trail Run | 50 kilometers | October 16, 2016 | website

Dick Collins Firetrails 50 | 50 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Euchre Bar Massacre 50 M | 50 miles | October 15, 2016 | website

Midnight Express Ultra 72 | 72 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Owen’s Peak Man vs Horse 50K Trail Adventure | 50 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

Skyline to the Sea 50km | 50 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Super Tahoe Triple Marathon | 124 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Tahoe Double Marathon | 52 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Tahoe Trifecta | 39 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Triple Marathon | 78 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Twin Peaks 50 km | 50 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Twin Peaks 50 Miler | 50 miles | October 15, 2016 | website

Colorado

50K Trail Race | 50 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

Animas Surgical Hospital Durango 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Indian Creek 51 km | 51 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Indian Creek 52 Mile | 52 miles | October 15, 2016 | website

Connecticut

Trail 2 Trail Series Chatfield Hollow State Park 50K | 50 kilometers | October 16, 2016 | website

Florida

50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Georgia

Relay | 60 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Hawaii

Peacock Ultramarathons 100K | 100 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Peacock Ultramarathons 50K | 50 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Illinois

50K | 50 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Des Plaines River Tail 50 Miles | 50 miles | October 15, 2016 | website

Farmdale 33 Mile Trail Runs | 33 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Farmdale 50 Mile Ultra Trail Run | 50 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Kansas

100K | 100 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

100 Mile | 100 miles | October 15, 2016 | website

50K | 50 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

50 Mile | 50 miles | October 15, 2016 | website

Heartland 100 Mile Race | 100 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Twilight 50K | 50 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Maine

The Pounder | 50 kilometers | October 16, 2016 | website

The Punisher | 50 miles | October 16, 2016 | website

Massachusetts

50 M | 50 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

TARC 100 | 100 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Missouri

Dogwood Canyon 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | October 16, 2016 | website

Montana

Le Grizz Ultramarathon | 50 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Ultramarathon | 50 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Nebraska

Market to Market Relay | Iowa | 75 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Market to Market Relay | Nebraska | 78 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

New Mexico

Deadman Peaks Trail 50 Mile Run | 50 miles | October 15, 2016 | website

New York

50K | 50 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

50 Mile | 50 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Tesla Hertz 100K Run | 100 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Tesla Hertz 100 Mile Run | 100 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Tesla Hertz 50K Run | 50 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Tesla Hertz 50 Mile Run | 50 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

North Carolina

Pilot Mountain to Hanging Rock Ultra 50K Run | 50 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Pilot Mountain to Hanging Rock Ultra 50- Mile Run | 50 miles | October 15, 2016 | website

Tuna Run 200 | 200 miles | October 21, 2016 | website

WC-50 Ultra Trail Marathon 50k | 50 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

WC-50 Ultra Trail Marathon 50M | 50 miles | October 15, 2016 | website

Oklahoma

Pumpkin Holler Hunnerd 100K | 100 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Pumpkin Holler Hunnerd 100 Mile | 100 miles | October 15, 2016 | website

Pumpkin Holler Hunnerd 50K | 50 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Oregon

50K | 50 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Columbia River Power 50K | 50 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Pennsylvania

50K | 50 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

50 km | 50 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

Green Monster 50K Trail Challenge | 50 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

Oil Creek Trail Runs 100 Miles | 100 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Oil Creek Trail Runs 50K | 50 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Oil Creek Trail Runs 50 Miles | 50 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Texas

Bigfoot Trail Race | 50 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

Bigfoot Trail Race 50K | 50 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

McKinney Roughs 50K | 50 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Utah

50 Miler | 50 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Pony Express Trail 100 | 100 miles | October 21, 2016 | website

Pony Express Trail 50 | 50 miles | October 21, 2016 | website

Red Rock Relay Park City Edition | 65 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Virginia

GrindStone 100 | 101 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

The Wild Oak Trail 100 “Hot” TWOT | 100 miles | October 14, 2016 | website

Washington

Bigfoot 100k Endurance Run | 100 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Bigfoot 120 Mile Endurance Run | 120 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Defiance 50K | 50 kilometers | October 08, 2016 | website

Ft. Steilacoom 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | October 15, 2016 | website

West Virginia

West Virginia Trilogy – Day One 50 km | 50 kilometers | October 07, 2016 | website

West Virginia Trilogy – Day Two 50 Mile | 50 miles | October 08, 2016 | website

Wisconsin

50 Miler | 50 miles | October 15, 2016 | website

Glacial 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | October 09, 2016 | website

Glacial 50M Trail Run | 50 miles | October 09, 2016 | website

02:43:45 CLOSE

 

02:46:45

ITunes http://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/talk-ultra/id497318073

Stitcher You can listen on iOS HEREAndroid HERE or via a web player HERE

Libsyn – feed://talkultra.libsyn.com/rss

Website – talkultra.com

Episode 119 – Speedgoat on the AT and Pipp and Richard talk Superior 100

A_GRAVATAR

This is Episode 119 of Talk Ultra and we have a 1-hour special interview with Speedgoat Karl Meltzer on his incredible record breaking FKT on the AT. We also have interviews with the male and female winners of the Superior 100, Mallory Richard and Frank Pipp. We have the news and Ian is going solo!

 

KARL ON THE AT

On Sept. 18 at 3:38 a.m Karl “Speedgoat” Meltzer emerged from the Appalachian Trail’s southern terminus at Springer Mountain, Ga., and set a new Appalachian Trail thru-hike speed record with a time of 45 days 22 hours and 38 minutes.  Meltzer started his supported run at 5 a.m. on Aug. 3 from Mt. Katahdin, Maine, and averaged approximately 47 miles per day at a pace of 3.2 miles per hour.  Meltzer’s time beats the previous record by more than 10 hours, which was set by Scott Jurek in 2015.

The project, in planning for more than two years, was accomplished with a small core crew consisting of Meltzer’s father, Karl Sr., and crew chief Eric Belz.  Others joined the crew to support Meltzer for short periods throughout the hike, including Meltzer’s wife and fellow ultrarunners.   The crew traveled alongside Meltzer every day, providing him with food, water, medical attention and logistical support.  Meals were prepared and taken in a van, which also served as Meltzer and Belz’s sleeping quarters.

00:09:39 INTERVIEW WITH SPEEDGOAT

RUNNING BEYOND BOOK well I have a first copy in my hand and I have to say I am somewhat pleased and happy. It’s taken a couple of years and at times it never felt quite real. The book in my hand confirms it is real and Spanish, German, Italian and UK versions will be available in the coming months. I believe Spain is first (September) Italy is October and the UK November. I don’t have a date on the German edition yet! – HERE

01:13:43 NEWS

SALOMON GLEN COE SKYLINE HERE

  1. Jonathan Albon 6:33:52
  2. Tom Owens 6:37:21
  3. Marc Lauenstein 6:54:37
  4. Finlay Wild 7:00:57
  5. Greg Vollet 7:10:19
  1. Jasmin Paris 8:15:56
  2. Malene Bikken Haukoy 8:23:04
  3. Sarah Ridgway 8:44:40
  4. Ruth Croft 9:10:33
  5. Martina Valmassoi 9:14:37

Mamores VK HERE

Ring of Steall HERE

RUN THE RUT

ULTRA HERE

CCC HERE

VK HERE

SUPERIOR 100 HERE

01:35:32 INTERVIEW with FRANK PIPP

Pipp crossed the line in 20:24:00 a superior, Superior 100 champion. His run for a rookie 100-mile runner was incredible. Uhan had run a clever and smart race, he had saved something for those closing challenging miles and he pulled away from Jenkins and Schwarz-Lowe. His finish 22:46 was a solid 8-minutes ahead of Jenkins who had no doubt had the race of his life… he had managed to pull ahead of Schwarz-Lowe and take the final podium place by just 1-minute. But this only tells half the story. In the closing miles, under darkness, tired, fatigued and lacking focus, Jenkins had run into a head height true branch that cut his head open sending him flat to the ground. Somehow he managed to pick himself up and find the effort and pace to hold off a charging Schwarz-Lowe.

Richard finished next, first lady and 5th overall with a new course record 23:51. Her performance was stunning and almost looked effortless. It was impressive! Tina Johnson finished 2nd and Stephanie Hoff 3rd, 29:50 and 30:52 respectively. Queen of the Superior 100 finished 4th in 31:07 and in doing so, achieved her 16th buckle.

02:20:22 INTERVIEW with MALLORY RICHARD

RUN RABBIT RUN

Alex Nichols runs his first 100 wins in 17:57 and takes home 12,000 dollars. Nice! Mark Hammon 2nd in 19:19 and Kyle Curtin 3rd 19:27. Incredibly Jeff Browning was 4th… he is having some year!

Courtney Dawalter won the ladies race (not a nam I know) ahead of Alissa St Laurent and Nicole Kalogeropoulos. Their times 21:23, 22:38 and 23:10.

Notable drops were Nikki Kimball who has won the race in the past and Sage Canaday dropped in the men’s race.

WASATCH 100

Darcy Piceu came from behind to win in 23:15 and Trevor Fuchs 21:13

DEVILS RIDGE 70K

Yun Yanqiao run 6:30 to finish 11 minutes in front of Francois D’Haene. In the women’s race, Lucy Bartholomew pipped Sally McRae.

Kilian postpones Everest HERE

What about this lady that is saying she has set the AT record? HERE

Meghan Hicks of iRunFar scored a new FKT on Colorado’s Nolan’s 14 route. Hicks finished the 100-ish-mile epic over 14 peaks above 14,000 feet in 59:36. Hicks became the first female to complete the route to the ultimate trailhead in under 60 hours, and also broke the FKT to the 14th high point. Fellow Hardrocker Nick Pedatella was on the route at the same time and finished in 57:31. It is believed that Ted Mahon is the only other finisher this year, going a quick 55:37 in late August. Taken from ©iRunFar

UP & COMING RACES

Australia

Queensland

100 km | 100 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

100 Mile | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

50 km | 50 kilometers | October 02, 2016 | website

Bribie Beach Bash 50 km | 50 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

South Australia

Yurrebilla Trail 56km Ultra | 56 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Belgium

Brussels Capital Region

80 km | 80 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Brazil

127 km | 127 kilometers | October 06, 2016 | website

254 km | 254 kilometers | October 06, 2016 | website

Canada

Alberta

Iron Horse Ultra 100 Km (CAN) | 100 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Iron Horse Ultra 100 Miles (CAN) | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

British Columbia

Golden Ultra | 80 kilometers | September 23, 2016 | website

Ontario

Run for the Toad 50K | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Run Off the Grid 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Quebec

Ultra Trail du Bout du Monde | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Chile

Atacama Crossing (Chile) 2016 | 250 kilometers | October 02, 2016 | website

Patagonian International Marathon – 63K | 63 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Croatia

Valamar Trail 53 | 53 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Valamar Trail 73 | 73 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Estonia

Haanja Jala100 – 100 km | 100 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Finland

Eastern Finland

Vaarojen Ultramaraton | 86 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

France

Alpes-de-Haute-Provence

Trail Edelweiss | 55 kilometers | October 02, 2016 | website

Ardèche

Les Crêtes 53 km | 53 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Les Sommets 107 km | 107 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Aveyron

100 km de Millau | 100 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Calvados

66 km | 66 kilometers | October 02, 2016 | website

Charente

75 km | 75 kilometers | October 02, 2016 | website

Corrèze

80 km | 80 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Côte-d’Or

Alésia Trail – La Vercingétorix | 51 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Haute-Corse

A Paolina | 70 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Haute-Savoie

Trail des Aiguilles Rouges | 50 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Ille-et-Vilaine

100 km de la Vallée du Semnon | 100 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

50 km de la Vallée du Semnon | 50 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Loire-Atlantique

Trail de Mauves en Vert – 50 km | 53 kilometers | October 02, 2016 | website

Loir-et-Cher

Ultrail de Beauval | 65 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Nord

La Cafougnette | 59 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Puy-de-Dôme

Grand Trail du Sancy/Mont-Dore | 60 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Pyrénées-Orientales

100 Miles Sud de France | 100 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Vienne

Tour de la vienne pédestre | 250 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Germany

Baden-Württemberg

KuSuH Trail 100 | 100 miles | September 23, 2016 | website

Bavaria

Churfranken Trailrun | 73 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

North Rhine-Westphalia

50 km von Hitdorf | 50 kilometers | October 02, 2016 | website

Greece

Spartathlon | 245 kilometers | September 30, 2016 | website

Ireland

Galway

60k Duathlon | 60 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Ulster

Udderly Mad 63K Ultra Moo | 63 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Isle of Man

Isle of Man Mountain Ultra | 51 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Italy

Friuli-Venezia Giulia

Magredi Mountain Trail 100 Mile | 100 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Lombardy

Marathon Trail Lago di Como – Long Distance | 115 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Piedmont

54 km | 54 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Morenic Trail | 109 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Japan

Akita Nairiku 100km Marathon | 100 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Akita Nairiku 50km Marathon | 50 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Muraoka Ultra Marathon – 100K | 100 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Muraoka Ultra Marathon – 66K | 66 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Muraoka Ultra Marathon – 88K | 88 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Shizuoka to Yamanashi | 85 kilometers | September 23, 2016 | website

Ultra Trail Mt Fuji | 161 kilometers | September 23, 2016 | website

Kenya

Kenya Wildlife 50K | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Latvia

70 km | 70 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Macedonia

Krali Marko Trails 90 km | 90 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Malaysia

Gunung 5 Nuang | 100 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Morocco

UltraTrail Atlas Toubkal | 105 kilometers | September 29, 2016 | website

Nepal

Royal Penguin Ultra Marathon | 60 kilometers | October 06, 2016 | website

Netherlands

South Holland

Den Haag Ultra Marathon | 60 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Norway

Nordmarka Ultra Challenge | 82 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Philippines

65 km | 65 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Poland

120K | 120 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

260K | 260 kilometers | September 29, 2016 | website

60K | 60 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

90K | 90 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Portugal

180 km | 180 kilometers | October 07, 2016 | website

Azores Triangle Adventure | 103 kilometers | October 07, 2016 | website

South Africa

100K Ultra | 100 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

50K Ultra | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Extreme | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Legends 68km Ultra Marathon | 68 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Spain

Castile and León

Ultra de Gredos | 82 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Catalonia

Ultra Pirineu | 103 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Valencian Community

Mondúber Utrail | 78 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Ultra Trail Del Rincon 170 km | 170 kilometers | October 07, 2016 | website

Sweden

52 km | 52 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Switzerland

Valais

Humani’Trail Les Diablerets | 55 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Turkey

Kaçkar Ultra Maratonu 64K | 64 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Lycian Way Ultramarathon | 250 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

LYUM Discovery 4G | 80 kilometers | September 27, 2016 | website

LYUM Discovery 6G | 120 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

LYUM Zor1Gün | 102 kilometers | September 28, 2016 | website

Ultra Maraton 6G | 250 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

United Kingdom

Cornwall

Atlantic Coast 3-Day Challenge | 78 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Cumbria

3×3000 Ultra Trail | 80 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Gloucestershire

Cotswold Way Century | 102 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Cotswold Way Challenge Multistage Ultra | 57 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Northern Ireland

Causeway Coast Ultra Marathon | 39 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

North Yorkshire

“Round Ripon” Ultra Studley Roger | 35 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

Shropshire

The Longmynd Hike | 50 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

Surrey

Downslink Ultra | 38 miles | October 02, 2016 | website

Wales

Gower Ultra 50 | 50 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

USA

Alabama

Birmingham Stage Race – 2 Days | 36 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Birmingham Stage Race – 3 Days | 53 miles | September 23, 2016 | website

Arizona

100 mile Ultra & Relay | 100 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

80 mile Hopi Trail Relay Run | 80 miles | September 23, 2016 | website

Flagstaff 56K Endurance Run | 56 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Flagstaff Sky Race 55K | 55 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Mogollon Monster 100 | 106 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Ultra 50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Arkansas

Arkansas Traveller 100 | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

California

Berkeley Trail Adventure – 50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Cuyamaca 100K Endurance Run | 100 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Headwaters Ultra – 50K | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Pacifica Summit Run 50K | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Super Tahoe Triple Marathon | 124 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Tahoe Trifecta | 39 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Trail Runner Ultra Race of Champions 100K | 100 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Triple Marathon | 78 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Uber Rock 50K Trail Race | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Colorado

100K Trail Race | 100 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

50K Trail Race | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

50 Mile Trail Race | 50 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Bobcat Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Georgia

Georgia Jewel 100 Mile Run | 100 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Georgia Jewel 35 Mile Run | 35 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Georgia Jewel 50 Mile Run | 50 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Tortoise and the Hare 50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Idaho

Foothills 50K Frenzy | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Priest Lake 50K Ultra Marathon | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Illinois

The Hennepin Hundred – 100M | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

The Hennepin Hundred – 100M Relay | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

The Hennepin Hundred – 50M | 50 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

Kansas

50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

FlatRock 50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

FlatRock 50K Ultra Trail Race | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Lake Perry Rocks! 50K | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Kentucky

Cloudsplitter 100K | 100 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Cloudsplitter 100 Mile | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

Cloudsplitter 50K | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Louisiana

Children of the Cane 100K | 100 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Children of the Cane 100 Miler | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

Children of the Cane 50K | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Maine

100 Mile WALKING Relay 10 Person Teams | 100 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

200 Mile Relay 12 Person Teams | 200 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

200 Mile ULTRA Relay 4 Person Teams | 200 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

200 Mile ULTRA Relay 6 Person Teams | 200 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Michigan

DWD Hell 50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

DWD Hell 50M | 50 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Hungerford Games 50-Mile Ultra Marathon | 50 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Reebok Ragnar Michigan | 200 miles | September 30, 2016 | website

New Jersey

The Mountain Madness 50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

New Mexico

Mt. Taylor 50k | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

New York

Ragnar Relay Adirondacks | 210 miles | September 23, 2016 | website

North Carolina

50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

50 Miles | 50 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Ohio

100K | 100 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

100 Mile | 100 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

75K | 75 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Oregon

Mountain Lakes 100 | 100 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Pennsylvania

Blues Cruise 50k Trail Ultra | 50 kilometers | October 02, 2016 | website

Trails 4 Tails Ultra Run | 40 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

South Carolina

Swamp Rabbit Urban Ultra 50K | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Tennessee

Rock/Creek StumpJump 50K Ultra | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Texas

100k | 100 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

100k | 62 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

100K | 100 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

100k relay | 62 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

100M | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

100 miler | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

100m relay | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

50k | 31 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

50k | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

50 Miler | 50 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Utah

50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

50 Mile | 50 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Bear 100 | 100 miles | September 23, 2016 | website

Elk 50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Grand to Grand Ultra | 160 miles | September 25, 2016 | website

Vermont

50 Km Run | 50 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

50 Mile Run | 50 miles | September 25, 2016 | website

Virginia

50K | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

GrindStone 100 | 101 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Washington

Bigfoot 120 Mile Endurance Run | 120 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Cle Elum Ridge 50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

West Virginia

West Virginia Trilogy – Day One 50 km | 50 kilometers | October 07, 2016 | website

Wisconsin

Driftless 50k Trail Race | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Vietnam

100 km | 100 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

70 km | 70 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

03:10:36 CLOSE

 

03:12:30

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Speedgoat Karl Meltzer #AT Appalachian Trail FKT – Day 45

Image Red Bull content pool

Go Speedgoat!

Day 46: The most anticipated day on the Appalachian Trail yet. Karl and his crew were up at 3:05 a.m., and Karl went through his morning breakfast routine before hitting the trail at 3:50 a.m. to start his final 85-mile hike to Springer Mountain in Georgia. The trail sections between crew stops today are between 11 and 15 miles. Karl is keeping around a 3.5 mph pace with some faster sections.  

Karl’s support crew has grown with more friends and family coming out to support him. His sister, niece and wife Cheryl have been hiking in and running with him to the crew stops to keep him company. Karl is in good spirits, and the crew consensus is that Karl is starting to “smell the barn.” He’s talkative at crew stops but is moving through them very quickly, taking just two minutes or less, just enough time to grab a water bottle, a to-go sandwich and some candy.

Karl left Tesnatee Gap at 5:15 p.m., which is the halfway point for the day. He has 40 miles ahead of him. There is no sleep planned tonight. He’s going to push through and try to beat the record by as wide a margin as he can.

Go Karl!

Many thanks to Karl, Eric and Red Bull for their cooperation on the AT record

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Speedgoat Karl Meltzer #AT Appalachian Trail FKT – Day 42-44 Update

day44

Karl can’t smell the barn, he can see a glow from the flames long off in the distance and no matter which we you look at it, Speedgoat id 3 days from glory or glory. Yes, if he fails, he is glorious in defeat. If he succeeds, he is glorious in success.

The supported FKT currently belongs to Scott Jurek with a time of 46 days, 8 hours, and 7 minutes.

Many thanks to Red Bull, Eric, Senior and Karl for the support.

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Day 42 North Carolina

The temperature has been heating up and the humidity is rising as Karl travels further into North Carolina, but it doesn’t seem to be impacting him too much. He’s maintaining his cool thanks to cold towels provided by Seni or at crew stops. Scott’s presence is helping Karl’s pace, but Scott has to leave after tomorrow for a day. He’ll be back soon to support Karl at the finish. The crew rested today along the border of the Great Smoky Mountains national Park. Tomorrow, Karl will be attempting to hike through the Smokies at the quickest pace possible without burning himself out. That is why today’s mileage will only be around 40 miles. Tomorrow will be one of the biggest challenges Karl has faced as he summits the tallest mountain on the AT.Knowing Speedboat, this big challenge shouldn’t be big at all.

Day 43 North Carolina

Karl entered Great Smoky Mountain National Park early this morning. This mountain range is the biggest challenge Karl has faced since the White Mountains in new Hampshire.

Also located in their mountain range is the tallest mountain on the AT, Clingman’s Dome, which Karl got through without any hiccups, and he and the crew even got to appreciate the beauty this part of the trail offers. Karl decided to camp on the trail again tonight. It didn’t go very well last time and the shelter Karl chose to stope at is a 20 mile hike from the road. Scott hiked in to take care of Karl for the night. Senior and Eric camped at the next day’s first crew stop to have a big hot breakfast waiting for Karl. Nearly knocking out the Smokies all in one day (55 miles today) is a huge deal and has put Karl in a good position for tomorrow to have a relatively easy day. Though as all previous Appalachian Trail FKT record holders would say, “there’s no easy day on the trail.”

Day 44 Smoky Mountain National Park

Karl exited the Smokies this morning and crossed over the iconic Fontana Dam. He disappeared as quickly as he appeared: he’s moving fast. Scott had to leave today but he will be back tomorrow to help crew Karl to the finish. His company on the trail has been greatly appreciated; the strong bond among the ultra community is at work here. Karl had ups and downs mentally throughout the day, but physically his body is holding up well. He’s consistently knocked out each crew stop on time, and that allowed him to finish the day with 46 miles before sundown. As he reaches the final days, every ounce of energy counts, every step is critical.

Right now Karl is roughly 130 miles from Springer Mountain.- the finish line of the Appalachian Trail. When he rolled into bed tonight he made the remark that he doesn’t “smell barn yet” but that is sure to change within the next 24 to 48 hours. It’s crunch time, and whether Karl wants to cut the record close or shatter it is completely in his hands. If his body stays healthy and his crew strong, odds are, Karl will be the next AT record holder. Only the next 48 hours will tell.

©iancorless.com_TCC2015_Day5-0333

 All content http://atrun.redbull.com/karl-meltzer-mobile/p/1

Speedgoat Karl Meltzer #AT Appalachian Trail FKT – Day 29-35 Update

day-38

Eric and  ‘Senior’ are keeping Karl on track. It’s a rollercoaster ride of highs and lows and at times it has looked a little stressful but as I have said all along, Speedgoat has gone into this AT attempt with a complete understanding of what needs to be done… He learned this in 2015 when crewing Scott and he witnessed it in the latter stages when Scott pushed on and on relentlessly. As I write this, Karl is through day 38 with 1761-miles covered and 428-miles to go. Karl would say to me, “I can smell the barn!” And yes, a very feint smell of the barn may well fill Speedgoat’s nostrils but he has got some seriously long and hard days ahead. In the true sprit of the sport, Scott Jurek and Jenny Jurek have now joined Karl on the trail and they will help push through and hopefully all Speedgoat to achieve his dream. We have an epic couple of weeks ahead!

Many thanks to Karl, Eric and Red Bull for the continued support and help.

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karl-sleeping

Day 29 Virginia

This morning Karl and crew woke up amongst white-tailed deer. This 107-mile stretch of trail through Shenandoah truly is beautiful. Karl’s progress is going well and the shin that was bothering him is now taped and feeling much better. Pain free, Karl can pick up the pace and today he logged 50.4 miles. The routine is run/jog/ hike, stop, ice, eat, sleep and repeat. The AT is not easy but today was a good day!

Day 30 Virginia 

Karl exited the Shenandoah National Park today after a little more than two days. Karl’s foot blisters are flaring up a little but he is still pushing. Some new lunch options are helping keep spirits up with Karl trading in his PB&J for pork sliders. tonight the crew planned to stop at 1800 but Karl felt strong and insisted that he kept going… He covered another 11 miles and racked up 60 miles. Yes, 60 miles. Karl is killing it and whether he sets the record or not I personally and blown away by his tenacity. Rest is key but Karl didn’t hit the sack till midnight.

Day 31 Virginia

A busy day on the Blue Ridge Parkway section and Karl was extremely fatigued. Sometimes you need to know when not to push on and those extra 11 miles the previous day may well have been 11 miles too far! He was sluggish but still smiling though. At midday, Karl came off the trail limping. The blister under his foot had filled with fluid and he couldn’t apply any pressure. The crew jumped into action, drained the blister, bandaged Karl up and he continued on at jogging pace. Karl crossed the James River Footbridge which is an iconic and beautiful spot on the Appalachian Trail. Karl ate two steaks for dinner and then went to bed.

Day 32 Virginia

Karl is holding up well considering the fatigue, he also hopes that the bottom of his foot stays dry so the blister can heal. Health is as important as fitness and success on the AT can really come down to the small things. Karl slept on the trail tonight at Scorched Earth Gap. Today Karl did an astonishing 57 miles…

Day 33 Virginia

Bedding down on the trail last night was almost a fatal decision for Karl’s AT attempt. Karl and crew could have pushed on for 4 miles and had the comfort of the van, instead Karl just crashed on the trail… he had a bad night’s sleep. Desperate and drained, Karl stopped mid trail in the morning and sept. His crew found him, face down, sleeping in the dirt. They pushed him on to McAfee Knob where the van had stopped. For three hours Karl slept, it was needed! But Karl woke up and disappeared without saying a word. The crew met him at the next stop and a pint of ice cream worked wonders. Two minutes later, the pint was gone and Karl was off. Karl’s friend Dave, met him on the trail later in the day with some fried chicken and the reassuring words of, ‘you can do this, the question is, do you have the grit?’ – I think we all know the answer. Karl is digging deeper than he ever has with a real understanding of what needs to be done. After two more sections. Karl stopped. He insisted he couldn’t go any further without getting more sleep – everyone agreed! It was a 23-mile day and just goes to show how tough and challenging the AT is. It was a real low day on the AT for Karl.

Day 34 Virginia

Karl woke up rested today from a long night’s sleep/ He started off charging hard. Have no doubts, Karl knows exactly what needs to be done on a daily basis to beat this AT record and he has the blinkers on… In all honesty, he had the blinkers on right from day one. The AT has thrown its ups and downs – what else would one expect from the AT. Karl bounced back today with a 50+ day. Karl was jogging a great deal more today because the terrain is pretty slick. There are hills here but nothing drastic. Karl has a tight gap to beat the AT record and he attributes his motivation to his wife, Cheryl. Karl is optimistic though and he has 12-days to push. Karl pushed on for an additional 16-miles today with Cheryl by his side. When they finished, Eric had pasta waiting. From here on in it’s 50 miles a day for Speedgoat to beat the record… Pretty sure the arrival of Scott and Jenny Jurek will help!

Day 35 Virginia

Karl woke up tired, it was tough to get going but the routine clicked as the morning wore on. Terrain has some rocks and is mountainous but not as severe as Pennsylvania. The miles are beginning to even out and Karl is in good spirits, that is really important as what lies ahead is tough. A variety of food keeps rolling along and peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are a hit. It was a 49.2-mile day and Speedgoat is on track for the record.
horton-jurek-meltzer

Image ©karlmeltzer

The arrival of Scott Jurek and David Horton no doubt is a super motivation for Karl. Scott (and Jenny) now plan to return the favour Karl gave in 2015 to Scott’s successful record. David has had to return back to work but with this crew and Scott pushing, the chances of getting the record is increasing despite the tough and challenging target of 50 miles a day. Like I said, Karl knows what he has to do!

All content http://atrun.redbull.com/karl-meltzer-mobile/p/1

Speedgoat Karl Meltzer #AT Appalachian Trail FKT – Day 8-14 Update

day16karl

Last week we provided an update of Speedgoat Karl’s first 7-days on the ‘AT’ as he tries to set an ‘FKT.’ You can read that HERE

Karl is now 16-days into his journey and in Connecticut. Below we provide an update of days 8 to 14.

Day 8 New Hampshire

Today on all levels was challenging. After a long and challenging day yesterday, Karl continued his hike but slowed his pace down. A highlight of today was that Karl reached the summit of Mt Washington as conditions were harsh. Dense fog, cold air and gusty wind made the hike anything but easy. Karl continued after a late summit to Crawford Notch where he had a very late arrival. Though he is pushing himself, it’s important to note that getting in late also means less rest, which is critical in any situation and especially when you are trying to set a record.

Day 9 Mt Lafayette, NH

Karl left on time today, however, when reaching the Knife’s Edge, our crew could tell from his demeanour that he is becoming even more exhausted with every step. Thankfully Karl made a trail companion through the Knife’s Edge that accompanied him for a while. It’s important to remember that as much as this is a physical feat, it’s mental too! Karl said that this hiker was important because at some points he helped keep the pace steady. Karl eventually lost the hiker on the downhill but nonetheless, every person Karl runs into on this journey is important to his success. While hikers’ journeys and motivations are diverse as the trail itself, the challenges of the trail reveal the common bonds between them. Karl decided to stop one stop early at Flume Gorge to catch up on rest and recharge his body for another long day on the Green Tunnel.

Day 10 Flume Gorge, NH

Karl finished the trek through the White Mountains at the end of Day 10. Not surprisingly, the White Mountains took a toll on both Karl’s feet and mentality. Karl is starting to form blisters around the bottom of his feet, as expected Karl got to his final destination before sunset which provided him plenty of opportunity to eat a good meal and relax before getting sleep. The crew brought Karl one of his favourite foods on the train, ice cream! It lifted his spirits. Karl’s attitude is amazing. The night ended well with jokes and laughter.

Day 11 Hanover, NH

Karl picked up the pace as he headed towards the city of Hanover. Karl arrived in Hanover before expected and instead of sitting to eat and replenish, he insisted on walking while eating to keep the pace. He is an absolute machine! Karl experienced a dramatic shift in landscape as he ran through the city of Hanover – buildings and cars surrounded him as the AT guided him onwards and out of the city. While the change in scenery was welcomed, the surroundings were blurred by very severe storms in the area. A system rolled in during the morning hours and another one later in the night. Torrential rain and lightening caused Karl to arrive later than usual at 9:45pm. Though he won’t be getting normal hours of sleep to lead him into the day 12, he will have a running companion which hopefully will allow him mentally and physically to keep record speed pace.

Day 12 Wallingford, VT

Hello Vermont! Karl had a friend come and run part of the trail with him today which was instrumental in keeping good and efficient pace. Day 12 was a quick day, relatively speaking. However, there was a swarm of bees on part of the trail. Eric, (Karl’s are chief) went ahead as Karl is no fan of bees – Eric got stung! Thankfully for Karl, Eric must have given the bees all they needed and it was a clear passage. As the terrains flattens out from the White Mountains, Karl will hopefully pick up pace a little allowing him to gain more time.

Day 13 Stratton-Arlington Rd, VT

Karl continued to trek south and is crushing the pace once again with an amazing attitude. The terrain is still mountainous but nothing like the harsh terrain of the White Mountains, the Green Mountain National Forest is kinder. Karl shaved off his beard today, it prevent flies, fleas ticks and other bugs getting a free ride and it’s a little cooler! The temperatures on the trail vary a great deal but is seasonally hot. Karl finished the day early catching the crew off guard. Even Karl Sr was taken by surprise, he had intended to join Karl on the final stretch in. Cheryl (Karl’s wife) prepared dinner and the route was planned for tomorrow. Bed by 9pm and hopefully the energy batteries will be restored for tomorrow.

Day 14 Mt Greylock, MA

Karl’s morale is high as he continues south. Eric (Karl’s crew) says this is down to a new iPod with new music. It keeps Karl occupied and at pace while running. Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are another key element! Some rain today and bad weather today but Karl pushed on and is till, at times, arriving earlier than anticipated at certain points. The highest point in Massachusetts, Mt Greylock was the finish for Karl’s run today. A big meal and a nice bed waited. Though the terrain is less mountainous, roots still remain throughout the trail. In moments of fatigue, this can be extremely tough. The view from Mt Greylock was that of another planet, fog was so thick they could only see 2-5 feet. Green trees that surround the trail gave it a very eerie feeling.

Current stats show Karl has covered 757.4 miles with 1432.6 remaining. Please keep in mind that these figures are current at the time of writing.

©iancorless.com_TCC2015_Day5-2469

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Many thanks to Red Bull for the information and support. Content ©redbull