Superior 100 2017 Race Summary

Rugged, relentless and remote, Northern Minnesota near the Canadian Border, is the home of the Superior 100 – a course that parallells the North-Shore of Lake Superior traversing the Sawtooth Mountains on the Superior Hiking Trail. Breath taking vistas and panoramas make this point-to-point race a ‘must-do’ on the USA 100-mile scene. It’s a race with history and is one of the oldest 100’s in the US.

This my third year on the race, my first experience coming in 2014, I missed 2015 and I was back in 2016 for some more Minnesota nice! Kurt Decker who works for TC Running was once again my host and a huge thanks to him and of course race director John Storkamp from rock Steady Running for once again allowing me the opportunity to follow and document such a wonderful race.

Gooseberry Falls State Park (Minnesota) is the start line for the race, the finish comes at Lutsen 103.3-miles later, just short of the Canadian border.  It’s a tough race and as US trails go, a gnarly and often muddy one. Heading up and down those sawtooth peaks provides a surprising 6400m of elevation gain and descent.

Mud, tree roots, rocks and a never ending green tunnel of trees pulls runners to the finish line. The race is one of the oldest 100-mile races in the USA and with a capped field of just 250 runners it has a feel that is akin to Western States or Hardrock 100.

Founded in 1991 when there was no more than a dozen 100-mile trail races in the USA, back then if you wanted to run a 100, you had choices like Western States (’74), Old Dominion (’79), Wasatch (’80), Leadville (’83), Vermont (’89), Angeles Crest (’86), Mohican (’90), Arkansas Traveller (’91) and Superior (’91).  Superior quickly earned its reputation!

2017 Race Photography

Portraits HERE

Day 1 HERE

Day 2 to HERE

THE RACE

The smell of coffee, a relaxed atmosphere and the constant chatter of nervous runners was very much the backdrop of Gooseberry Falls State Park as the 2017 Superior 100 was waiting to kick-off and get going.

Race director Storkamp, released the runners on the stroke of 0800 and the field immediately fragmented with podium contenders getting quickly into their race pace – behind others respected the 103-miles ahead of them and eased into a long day and night with a walk.

It soon became apparent that it was going to be a hot day and the forecast was good for the whole weekend with potential clear skies and a full moon for the night section.

At Split Rock River a stunning view of the surrounding landscape and Lake Superior is provided and with approximately 9-miles covered Neal Collick was leading the race by a substantial margin followed Matias Saari and then a strong group lead by Adam Schwarz-Lowe.

In the ladies’ race, it was a relaxed start but Kirsty McBride leading ahead of Gretchen Metsa. It’s worth mentioning here that Superior stalwart and running legend, Susan Donnelly was not only running her 17th 100 but if she finished the race it would be her 100th 100 – wow!

At 20-miles, Metsa had drawn level with McBride in the ladies’ race and Stephanie Hoff was moving up through the ranking along with Tina Johnson and Jamie Solberg – the race was starting to take shape.

Collick continued to pull away from the rest of the men’s field. It was a brave move setting such a fast pace on such a tough course. Saari looked comfortable behind and as did Brian Klug and Paul Shol. Pre-race favourite Schwarz-Lowe was looking ok but out of the top-5, he notably said, “The races hasn’t started yet!”

Silver Bay came just 5-miles later and Collick and Metsa pushed ahead of their respective fields.

At MT Trudee Collick was extending lead and was full of life, he had a spring in his step that defied the distance and terrain. Saari was 2nd and then Klug was following in 3rd. Metsa like her male counterpart was dominating the ladies race and McBride, Johnson, Hoff and Solberg looked to be running for 2nd place. But, it is 100-miles and anything could happen.

Finland at just over 50-miles is a significant marker of the race and provides an insight on how the runner’s are managing their day on the trails. The 2016 edition was a hot one and it’s fair to say that the heat and humidity was once again having an impact as runners struggled to stay hydrated.

The first men came through and no surprise it was Collick ahead of Saari, for the ladies, Metsa was like a machine spending little or not time at the aid stations.

Sonju Lake at 58-miles started to provide more information on how the night ahead would pan out – Collick was still looking strong but Saari was showing some fatigue and Klug complained of a real rough patch and the need for calories. Metsa arrived in the dark, didn’t stop and pushed on – she was on a mission. When Schawrz-Lowe arrived he was in 9th place, but the darkness switches something on in his mind and as he left the aid he said, “I am going hunting!”

It was a cold night, a really cold night and it impacted on the runners, some revered in it, others didn’t. Fatigue and cold brought an end to Saari’s race after he had run in 2nd for so long allowing Shol to move into 2nd and Klug into 3rd. The miles were ticking by and they were getting the job done. Metsa and Collick pushed ahead and in all honesty, they were know in a different race opening up huge gaps on the competition – Collick consistently hovering under course record pace.

Oberg is the final checkpoint and Kurt Decker and the TC Running RV was waiting – music played, pancakes were flipped and the closing 7-miles of the Superior 100 waited the runners.

Collick arrived at 2am – he was ahead of course record pace and was flying! He was relaxed, positive and despite the cold and dark was in a great mood and full of energy. It was over 2-hours later when Shol arrived and closely followed by Klug. Notably though, Schwarz-Lowe’s hunting was going well he was in 4th place.

Metsa arrived in the daylight and without little fuss didn’t stop and pushed on for the closing 7-miles. Her gap was huge over Johnson, Hoff and McBride who followed.

Collick won the Superior 100 2017 edition in 19:31:40 missing the CR by just 1-minute. The trails this year were super slippery in places no doubt sapping some of that speed that would have made a record possible. Shol finished 2nd in 22:12:46 and incredibly, Schwarz-Lowe had moved up from 9th to the final podium place, crossing in 22:14:40. Klug who had run much of the race in 3rd was 4th in 22:34:42 (a huge PR on this course) and Mike Ward rounded out the top 5.

Metsa crossed in 25:23:03 followed by Johnson, Hoff, McBride and Solberg, their times 28:19:14, 28:39:58. 29:53:50 and 30:44:19.

Full results HERE

Notably, Susan Donnelly finished her 17th Superior 100 and her 100th 100-mile race – incredible! Also, John Taylor also completed his 100th 100-miler, what are the chances of that happening?

As with any 100-mile race, the front of the race only tells a small story of the allotted 38-hours to complete the race. Highs and lows are followed by tears and laughter. The assembled crowd in Lutsen welcoming each runner home.

There was no failure… just undone business for those who withdrew or did not make the line in the cut-off time. I have often said running is a metaphor for life and Superior 100 never disappoints. It’s low-key, traditional and like a family reunion. It’s a special race and if the 100 is too far, a 50-mile and classic marathon distance takes place on the same course and concludes at the same venue. Roll on 2018.

A full set of images will be available at iancorless.photoshelter.com

      Image upload should be available by Monday 11th September

Adam Campbell – A Rock And A Hard Place

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On August 30th 2016, Adam Campbell was attempting a big traverse that had never been completed in a single push before in Rogers Pass, BC. Adam was accompanied by two partners, Nick Elson and Dakota Jones. They were fairly early on in the journey, going up relatively moderate terrain (class 3/4). Adam followed Nick and Dakota up a route matching their steps and actions, Adam pulled on a rock that the previous two climbers had used. This giant rock came loose, broke and away and Adam fell. He tumbled backwards, summersaulting and rag dolling over 200 feet (70-80 meters) down a serious of ledges and sharp rocks.

Adam ended up breaking his back, several vertebrae, breaking his hip, breaking his ankle, damaging his wrists, shoulders and knees and had severe lacerations across my body. His helmet was shattered and has cracks across all of it,  It still has blood and hair caked into it. Without it he would have suffered severe head trauma, instead, he just had stitches and a mild concussion.

Adam is alive, not paralyzed and is here to tell his story.

All images ©adamcampbell
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Ian: Adam I’m pleased to say is on the road to recovery after a horrendous accident several months ago, and he’s here to talk to me about the incident and maybe about some lessons that we can all learn from spending time in the mountains. Adam, first of all, it’s a great pleasure for you to be here, and I put the emphasis on ‘here!’

Adam: Yes, that’s entirely true. And first of all thanks, it’s great to chat to you, it’s been a while. But I’m really, really lucky, I came very close to having a very different outcome which could have meant paralysis or very, very close to death as well, so I am very lucky to be here speaking to you in the literal sense.

Ian: Yes, absolutely. This is the sort of interview that I don’t want to do, but I’m pleased that you’re here for me to do it. There’s a slight irony in that but you know what I mean.

Adam: For sure, but at the same time, I think it’s important to have these conversations because there are lessons learned and I think after an accident, to a certain degree, I’m a bit of a survivor now and I think talking about it now, analysing it, is really important for my recovery and also hopefully help some other people avoid some of the things that I could have done differently perhaps to avoid ending up in the situation I did.

Ian: It was an awkward one for me because I didn’t know whether to reach out to you and ask you for an interview, because we know each other but that doesn’t really mean a lot in a situation like this because it can be a very fragile thing to talk about, and I sort of, was a little bit plus or minus in the way that I worded the email to you. I’m really pleased to say that you came back because you realize that there are lessons to be learnt for everybody. Let me go back a little bit because if I remember rightly I think the last time that we did an interview together was when you got hit by lightning at Hard Rock.

[laughs]

Adam: Yes, the Hard Rock incident was definitely the first major mountain incident that I had, that one luckily there was no lasting repercussions. Aaron who I was with at the time, he was my pacer at Hard Rock, he came out and visited me in hospital a couple of months ago and I saw him at the weekend. We’re still, really, really good friends and that incident was a little bit different than this one because the outcome was fine, so maybe I don’t analyse it as much, because I walked away from it.

Ian: I think there was an element of, although many of us realized the seriousness of the incident, there was a real comedy element to it and I don’t wish to undermine what happened but it almost became folklore, “Oh, Adam Campbell got hit by lightning”, and of course when Hard Rock came around this year everybody was commenting, “I wonder who’ll get hit by lightning?”, or, “I wonder if there’ll be that sort of incident.” It’s good to see humour in things, but also we do need to be aware of the real life dangers, and we’ll come onto real life dangers but I just wonder, before we talk in depth about your incident, before you went to the mountains on this trip, and I know that you’ve always respected the mountains and the environment but do you think in hindsight you respected them enough?

Adam: Yes, I’d say I would because I have a few friends who had some very, very serious accidents in the mountains and they include losing their life in there, so I think I do have a real respect for it, but I think sometimes you understand the power of the mountain, and the unpredictable nature of them, but I think you understand that in an intellectual level but until you actually experience it in a real tangible way, I’m not sure if the lessons strike quite as deeply, if that makes sense.

I’ve done quite a lot of avalanche courses and, you spend a lot of time talking about these things and reading up on internet sites. If you’re just reading about them and analysing them from a distance they don’t strike you in quite the same way, I don’t think. Although, I’d say, I respected them on a theoretical level, there’s times I’ve been scared up there because you do understand the risk. I think it’s when you’ve actually seen the powers and unpredictable nature of mountains, it’s very hard to fully, fully respect them.

Ian: That makes sense, complete sense. Let’s first of all just provide a little bit of perspective but I think it’s good to just give a little summary. You were going climbing with Nick Elson and Dakota Jones, and you were going to… well, you were on a single push before Rogers Pass in British Columbia. Just give us an insight into what type of climbing terrain this is. What was the purpose of the day out?

Adam: We were tackling something call the Horseshoe Traverse, which in essence, you’re covering 14 different peaks in Rogers Pass. Rogers Pass is a really beautiful area in Canada and it’s basically the birthplace of mountaineering in Canada, so it’s got a lot of history to it, although Canadian history is not nearly as old as it is in a lot of other places, it’s still a very wild and rugged place with very few people that actually visit it, despite it being somewhat touristy. The specific terrain that we are moving over though is 4th to 5th class terrain, so nothing extremely wild, so we were looking to solo everything.

We did have a couple of ropes with us if we had to repel off some of the backside of mountains as we were down coming, or if the conditions changes drastically on us, but we were looking to solo everything. There was nothing in there that was really at our limit, it was something that was well within our capability of doing. Nobody had done this traverse in a single push before, previous parties had done it, but only a handful of people had done it, and it had taken three or four days, so maybe our initial arrogance was looking to do it in a day but looking at the terrain and the distance and the vertical gain, we figured it was possible to do it in under 24 hours but it was going to be pretty close to that 24-hour mark.

It does involve glacier crossings and some rather complex terrain which slows you down quite a bit.

Ian: To give perspective to this, bearing in mind my audience are runners not climbers, but admittedly heavily influence by Skyrunning and by the adventures of runners like Kilian Jornet, where running ventures into this new area, this sport, that is called Alpine Running. Where does what you were doing fit into this? Was it a run with some climbing, or was it very much climbing with some running?

Adam: It was very much climbing with some running. It was more of a mountaineering outing than anything else.

Ian: Okay, so from a perspective of our audience, you needed to be a competent climber, rather than a competent runner.

Adam: Yes, absolutely yes. There’s a trail that approaches the first peak, and there’s a trail that get you home at the end, so in the 24 hours, or however long it’s going to take us, we probably would have been on trail for all of half an hour.

Ian: Right, okay, okay.

Adam: Very much climbing yes, and I’m not sure how much the audience know about Nick Elson, for instance, but Nick Elson is an incredibly competent mountaineer. He just broke the long-standing Teton Grand Traverse record, which is owned by Rolando Garibotti which is the best known alpinists in Patagonia, and he’s not very, very well-known outside of North America but I would argue that he’s probably the best person in North America at the moment, he’s light and fast, mountain objectives.

He’s incredibly fast, he beat Mike Foote at the Squamish 50 last year by quite a bit which instantly means you’re a very, very competent runner. He finished second at the mountain marathon in Alaska, basically going the same time as Kilian went last year on that course so to give you an idea of his competence level, and he’s also an assistant rock guide, and is a very, very good rock climber. He’s done a lot of things in the coast mountains, he just doesn’t advertise himself at all. Obviously, Dakota needs to introduction with his resume for the audience here.

Ian: Adam if you can be objective on this is, how much does your experience and Dakota’s experience in the mountains as mountaineers compare to say, somebody like Nick or Kilian? I’m just trying to draw a parallel, so the audience can understand your abilities.

Adam: Yes, I know for sure. Dakota, I believe has climbed for quite a long time since he was a teenager. Where he lives in Colorado, very mountainous type of terrain. I think he’s got quite a good history of mountaineering. I did mountaineering for probably the last five years at a pretty decent level, but not Nick and Dakota’s level – they have been doing it their whole lives. I have been moving more and more towards doing these mountain objectives. I was fortunate this summer to get out quite a bit with some of the top guys in the world really. Will Gadd for example, who is one of the best ice climbers in the world. I’ve had some really, really good mentors. Definitely, I would say of the party of three, I was the weak link for sure.

Ian: In terms of what you were doing here, obviously, it was challenging and that’s part of the reason why you’re doing it, and that’s part of the attraction. But in advance of going into it I’m sure the three of you sat down, talked about it. Talked about the speed that you needed to go. Talked about the ability level. Talked about where the difficult sections would be. Did you feel calm, controlled, and relaxed by what lay ahead?

Adam: Absolutely, yes. There’s no single part of it that was outside of our comfort zone. I’ve done several parts of the route myself in individual blocks. I just never linked them together before. I proposed the route to Nick Elson originally. Nick was super keen on it, because he enjoys doing these sorts of big pushes. It’s a challenge. No single part of it is difficult. It’s just linking it all together and try do it fast is where you can add complexity that way. Dakota just happened to be around that weekend, he was spending some time at the Canadian Rockies. When we found that out, we invited him along and he was super keen to come.

Ian: You mentioned earlier about faster and light. Obviously, what you were doing here was going to be a fast and light exercise, because if you’re going to cover that amount of ground, that amount of climbing, you can’t be pulled down and dragged down by lots of equipment. You need to be moving at a pace that will allow you to cover the distance within the safe time. How do you decide how light to go on something like this? What does light look like to the audience?

Adam: We are fortunate that we have some of the top end gear, and top end gear often can be really light. We looked at the route and what the objective dangers are, and what the terrain is like. It’s fortunate that we have got guide books for these things, so you can read what the guide books say. I know a lot of people who live in that area, so I could get some information from them. I’ve actually had some other friends who’ve attempted this traverse before and so we can get some route data from them. I also had done sections of it earlier this year, so I had some first-hand information as well. It gives you a sense of what you need.

From there, we met up in the camp grounds the night before the race. Sorry, not the race… the effort. We just put our gear out and had a look. What we had was crampons – a really lightweight aluminium crampon which just attach on our running shoes for the glacier crossings. We had two sections of 30-meter rope. Our rope was more like a rappel cord. It’s just six millimetres, really lightweight. I was using the Petzl glacier rope. We split that up between two runners. We had a few pieces of gear with us, so just a couple of knots in hand.

In case we had to build a belay anchor or a rappel anchor from, and then we had a couple of slings as well so that we get through over rocks the same thing if we had to do an emergency escape. I also had a small emergency bivy sack with me, which is basically like this baseline kit, but it’s an inflated baseline kit. We each had lamps because of how long we’d be out, and then a light windbreaker, a down jacket because Canadian Rockies can get cold especially at the summit and the weather can roll through. A set of gloves. I don’t think any of us had pants with us, like long pants. But basically from there is more or less what you’d be required to use like UTMB.

We had a little bit of water, a little bit of food, but really not that much. We had enough to stay comfortable while you’re moving, but it would’ve gone uncomfortable to stop moving for a night.

Ian: Yes, and this is the point that I was going to come on to is the great thing about fast and light, is light is great when you’re moving fast. It’s not so great when you’re not moving fast, and you’re going to be able to tell us about what not moving was like.

Adam: For sure. I think there’s a saying in mountaineering that light and fast means “cold, tired, and hungry.”

Ian: [laughs] Yes. I think there’s a real lesson to learn here, because fast and light has become a buzz word. The skyrunning film that came out was called fast and light. I think it’s important. I always try and do a job of making people aware of actually what fast and light means. For you top guys, when you’re moving fast, it’s not really an issue. The problem is that if you fall, if you twist an ankle, if something happens and the weather turns and then you’re stuck. This is when there is a real problem with this type of manoeuvring, but you’re going to be able to provide a perspective of that later on. Let’s cut to the chase.

Let’s talk about the incident… Basically, Nick and Dakota had moved through a section of rock and you were following. There’d been no issues as they moved through, but as you moved through and grabbed hold of a section that had been perfectly safe for the previous two, it moved and came lose, and basically…

…you take over and tell us what happened.

Adam: Yes. I just want to just take one quick set back. The one other part with the light and fast is you want to make sure that you have got the weather. We’re fortunate now with all the forecasting that we have. We made sure that we had a perfect weather window to do this attempt in. We made sure that we had at least 48-hours of good weather predicted, which sort of, adds in element of safety. That means that you can go light and fast, because the weather can change but at least that was one thing that we did account for.

You do have to plan very carefully, because as you say you have very little room for error if things do go wrong. Light and fast also means having just the right equipment for the terrain and route that you’re looking to do.

Ok, back to the incident now. We were probably three and a half hours into the run, and we’re moving up towards the fourth peek on the route. We’re moving in fourth class terrains with the big court side blocks of rock. The rock in that area is normally quite solid. All the rock in the Rockies is quite good, but the rock in Rogers Pass is normally very, very solid court side blocks.

Nick and Dakota were just ahead of me, and I was rushing a little bit to move quickly. Often, you’ll check the rock to make sure that everything is stable as you’re going, but if you’re moving quickly and you’re seeing other people go through a zone, I basically pulled on this block which is maybe the size of a small refrigerator. I felt the rock start to move, and I heard it crack. At that point I knew in some way what was going to happen. As a note, we were all wearing helmets as well, because when you’re scrambling like that with people above you, you need a helmet.

The rock just pulled out on me, and I tumbled backwards down a series of ledges about 200 feet, so 70 to 80 meters. I just basically bounced and rag doll down a series of ledges. I was conscious the whole time, which was quite scary. I still have pretty vivid flashbacks of that happening. I ended up face down. I actually remember slowing down at one point. I’m thinking, “Oh my God, I’m alive. I can’t believe I’m alive.” and then starting to fall again, and then I’m like, “Oh crap, I’m dead.” It was probably saltier language than that. I ended up face down at the base of the rock edge, and all I could see was this pool of blood underneath me. But I was like, “Oh my God I’m alive.” I rolled myself over onto my back and waited for Nick and Dakota to come down.

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I can’t imagine what they were thinking right now. I’m sure they thought they were coming down to a body. But I was conscious the whole time, and yes, it was quite a horrible feeling. As I was laying there, I did a self-assessment, when I knew something was okay because I was able to push myself up onto my back, which in retrospect may not be the smartest thing to do, but you’re not really thinking that clearly at the time. I knew that I had broken my pelvis. I could feel it, and I knew I had broken my ankle, but I didn’t know what kind of internal damage I had, and I knew that there was a lot of blood around me.

Nick and Dakota came down, ran down probably within minutes of this happening. They just have to make their way down the same terrain, and when they got there, I had a locator beacon on me and reach beacon. I had it in my pack, and I also had a cell phone on me, and so I told them where the beacon was on my back pack, and they simply pressed the SOS button on that. We noticed the previous peak there was cellular service. Nick was able to run up to the previous peak with my cell phone, and was able to call Search and Rescue from there.

Dakota stayed with me and made sure I stayed calm. He took out my jacket and my emergency space blanket, and put that on me because I was starting to go in a bit of shock at this point and sort of going in and out of consciousness, and trying to stay with it, but at the same time knowing that I was in a lot of trouble. I knew that I needed help to come quickly because you never know what kind of internal damage is going on. Luckily, Search and Rescue were actually doing a training mission in the area, so within half an hour, a rescue helicopter flown by and had located us.

But then they had to fly back in to Revelstoke to go get a pilot who can longline people in, because not all pilots can longline rescuers in. They had to fly back to town which is 80 Kilometres away, get the new pilot, fly back, set the staging area. They did another flyby to assess where we were. Luckily the terrain that we were in wasn’t so technical that they could longline a rescuer in.

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I remember lying there, watching this helicopter, at the base of the glacier, as they were prepping, and I just lay there, staring at the rotor of the plane just there at the helicopter hoping to see it move because I remember they were going to come and get me. Because of where the wind blows off the glacier, they had to do two flybys, to drop the rescuers off, and then from there, they package you, or they bundle you, make sure that your spine is stable, so they put you on a spinal board. Then they flew me out, and then they flew Nick and Dakota home afterwards.

I was flown to this, it’s like a visitor centre in Rogers Pass, and from there, there was an ambulance crew waiting for me, and they worked on me for over an hour stabilizing me, and making sure that my vitals were in place before getting me in a helicopter and flying me an hour to the main hospital, to the trauma centre, where I was able to get into surgery that night, which is quite lucky.

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Ian: Wow, you’ve sort of described that with such clarity. I need to clarify here that this is only eight or nine weeks ago. It’s almost giving me goose bumps just listening to you describe it, because I’ve got the images that go with it even though I wasn’t there. It’s quite traumatic to listen to. Do you feel in a way a little bit separated from it, although, you’re fully aware of everything that went on, and your body showing the impact of what went on. But do you feel as almost an out of body experience, because you’re describing it as though you’re looking on?

Adam: Yes, I know, for sure. It definitely was. I think because if you’re going in and out of consciousness at the time, it’s mostly just the shock and blood loss. Yes, perhaps there was a little bit of out of body experience going on for sure. But at the time I was very aware of what was going on, and I was trying to stay calm the whole time, again, you know how important it is to stay calm in those situations. I think Nick and Dakota were incredible. I really couldn’t have had two better people because neither of them panicked, which is the last thing that you want in those situations. Dakota just stayed there, holding my hand, sort of stroking me or just doing whatever I needed to just to get some comfort.

I believe that when I was lying there, if I would move a little bit, I would scream on pain. But I don’t really remember that so vividly, what I do remember is the feeling of falling and this feeling of the rocks breaking against, or just say I get these flashbacks and the sound of the sound of the rocks cracking. I have a really, really vivid image of as I was stumbling, because I was stumbling backwards, like seeing the mountain range turned upside down, and thinking how strange it was to see this range upside down. Just how horrific that was.

I do remember at one-point thinking, “I’m dead, this is it. I’m gone.” But at the same time just accepting that, that was my reality. Which sounds maybe kind of morbid, but that was like I’m dead, this is it.

Ian: I guess at that point when you’re falling, we’ve all been there to really varying extents. Even if it’s just tripping over a curb on the way to the shops. You certainly go in slow motion, don’t you? You see the fall coming, you see the pavement or whatever it is getting closer, and that instantaneous thing just seems to become handfuls of seconds rather than the fraction of second that it actually is, and you do get that opportunity to sort of say “Oh, this is going to hurt.” Or in your case, “Oh my God, I’m going to die.”

The reality of when you got to hospital was, you ended up breaking your back, you had several vertebrae broke, you broke your hip, you broke your ankle, you damaged your wrists, shoulders and knees, you had lacerations all over your body, and you went  on to say that had you not been wearing a helmet, then you probably would’ve been toast, you probably wouldn’t have been here because of head trauma.

It is amazing that it is only eight or nine weeks ago because I think myself, and so many other people when we heard of this, well, the instant thoughts were, will you walk again? I’m sure that must have been going through your mind.

Adam: Hell, absolutely. I completely did. I remember being in hospital waiting to go into surgery and wondering this. It’s quite terrifying going into surgery even though, I knew I was around very confident doctors and surgeons. It’s a scary feeling not knowing what’s going to happen to me when I got out of there. Originally they told me I have punctured a lung as well, which didn’t turn out to be true. But yes, you just don’t know what is going to happen.

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My girlfriend is a doctor and she’s from the town where I was flown to, and so her mother was actually the first person to come see me in hospital. She’s called Laura, so Laura who was working in Calgary at the time, got on a flight straight out there and she actually was able to run up to me right before I went to surgery, which is quite moving to have that. When I came out of surgery my mom had flown out as well.

You’re just lying there, in quite a lot of pain and also in this really heavily drugged state because the ambulance people put me on Ketamine, which is quite a powerful narcotic.

I remember the feeling of being in a helicopter and sort of this strange drugged state and this tremendous amount of pain, and then waking up in the hospital corridors being told I was going into surgery, people asking me all these questions, you don’t really know if you can answer. It’s just, it’s so like so much sensory overload really at that point. Yes, not knowing what was going to happen to me for the rest of my life, and then not knowing… Yes, it’s quite powerful.

Ian: Yes. You had eight hours of surgery, you had pins put in your body and then unfortunately some complications arose after the operation with your digestive system basically shutting down and you had to have ongoing treatment for bowel problems, etc. That lasted 10 days and you said in your email that this was almost one of the worst bits because your body started deteriorating, you started to lose muscle mass.

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Adam: I broke my T8 to T11. That’s fine so they put pins in there, I broke my iliac crest, so the top of my hipbone sheared right off and then as they said that I had open lacerations which are actually the biggest concern to them because of infection. There’s rock fall in there, but it was down to the bone across all my hip. Which is pretty horrible and the other parts of me were sore but they weren’t as critical.

The one thing that I found after the fact, there is actually two anaesthesiologists who were working at the hospital and one of them thought that all they would work on is my hip to start and then they would come back and do my spine at a later date because it wasn’t critical. The second anaesthesiologist was like no, this person is young and healthy so we’re just going to do both now, he can handle eight hours of surgery.

Because otherwise I would have sat there in the hospital with a broken back for several days until they got back to operate on it and I understand that dilemma is a doctor because you know this is an emergency trauma centre and they likely have somebody else come in and so how much time and resources to put into helping one person. I’m really fortunate. I found out that after the fact is as always, angels are around the hospital looking out for you and giving you all this special care, so in a lot of ways I got lucky like that. I ended up having, it’s called a “stomach ileus” which means your stomach shuts down.

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That was just horrific, horrific pain. I had never experienced anything like that. The rest of me was pinned, so it was more or less stable at that point. But all my haemoglobin dropped in my body and so they also swelled up to probably like three times my normal size because your body is not able to process in the fluid. I was just sitting in this hospital room and the person across the hall from me he’d been hit by a semi-truck. The other person right beside me had been in a helicopter crash.

Ian: Oh Jeez.

Adam: – Yep, we were pretty messed up.

Ian: Sounds like a hospital ward for Vietnam or something.

Adam: Yes, it certainly is. I mean, the trauma centres really are something else.

Ian: Yes

Adam: I end up going almost 10 days without eating any food and I lost a ton of muscle mass during that time and just really had to feed in a huge way. But the same time I had swelled up quite bad, this is a bit of a funny state because I was like jello but I was losing my body. I was just cannibalizing through the whole process which is pretty wild. Then I was finally allowed to start eating it made me violently ill after 10-days because I ate too much right off the bat, so I ended up having to reintroduce food very slowly back into my system.

Ian: At what point did they allow you to leave the hospital and go home?

Adam: I left the hospital two weeks later but ended up staying for a few days in this town Kamloops for a couple of days then. It was quite amazing actually. The one thing I need to say is, despite this being a horrific accident, my family is spread out around the world, my father lives in Nigeria, my brother lives in Thailand and they flew out to come see me. My mother and my father are estranged like they haven’t really spoken much in the last 10 to 15 years. Because of that they were brought together, by the end of the trip they were going out for dinners together and talking and were hugging. That was very powerful and my girlfriend and I were able to connect in this like incredibly special way.

It’s quite incredible how trauma and tragedy can actually bring people very close together. I also have a lot of my friends from Vancouver who drove six hours to come see me. Which was also incredibly special to have these people come. Even my boss from work, happened to be in Kamloops, he came and saw me in the hospital. You have this really strong community of people around you which was really, really help get the recovery process.

Ian: It’s so good to be able to see those positives out of something that is potentially so negative. You have mentioned in other places about how that process has been, something that you’ve been able to look on. It’s something that you can be really thankful for, there’s a real positive to come out of something so bad. Also, it’s made you made you face maybe your position within the world and within your life and look at your own vulnerabilities?

Adam: Absolutely. It also just made me question a lot of other my approach to things because as athletes we can also all be very selfish with our time and maybe not spend an extra bit of time calling family here. Just some day to day life, you kind of pretend you get too busy to do it. But it’s not, it’s just a bit of an excuse and you realize how important family is in those circumstances and even friends too. But how you just taking a few extra seconds to call somebody can make a really, really big difference in their life. What really struck home for me is, one of the person who was hit by a truck beside me, the entire time I was there never had a single visitor.

I just couldn’t imagine how lonely that would be and how terrified I would have been if I didn’t have that love and support around me. It really, really adds to the healing process.

Ian: Wow.

Adam: For sure

Ian: Well I mean, we’re speaking now, as I said it’s 8 or 9 weeks after the incident and you know, I’m happily, happily, say I’m amazed at the speed of your recovery and I know when I say recovery it’s an ongoing process but you’ve said or your doctors have said that they believe that your recovery will be a complete one. Is that still the situation Adam? Does it look as though everything is going to be really, really good?

Adam: Yes. It does. It seems to be. I mean, yesterday I went ski trailing for the first time which I can’t believe…  I already been back up the mountain. My girlfriend and I went out and did a few laps up in the Rockies and we had some deep powder smell which is incredible. Obviously, my ankle still gives me a lot of grief, I have a lot of soft tissue damage in there and still have some bone fragments there, my hip is incredibly tight, like I’ve got a lot of limited range of motion and if I do too much in a day my body does let me know but I was water running within a two and a half weeks…

Ian: No way.

Adam: Yes. By water running I was like moving slowly in the water but it was slowly starting to come back and just doing anything to get my range in motion back. Doing yoga, doing some strength training and like, physio multiple times a week. The one thing I’m really lucky at is my work has been really understanding and I haven’t had any real pressure to come back to work. I am going back eventually, I’m doing a little bit of work for them but I’ve had the opportunity to really just put all my energy into recovering and into a physio, which I think in those first few months really is critical to your long-term recovery.

Ian: Yes

Adam: I saw my surgeons on the weekend, they gave the green light to start skiing and climbing and going for hikes. I can’t run yet because my ankle still super wonky and my hip is still a little too sore but once those settle down I hope to be able to start jogging again a little bit. Within the next maybe month or so. Which will be amazing and I never would have expected any of this happened so quickly.

Pic by Kos from the summer. I did my first walk run (all uphill) this week - 4*30sec run many minutes walking between them. I have also done some easy routes in the climbing gym. I am far from light footed, as I appear to be in this image, but it's all progress - beyond stoked!

Pic by Kos from the summer. I did my first walk run (all uphill) this week – 4*30sec run many minutes walking between them. I have also done some easy routes in the climbing gym. I am far from light footed, as I appear to be in this image, but it’s all progress – beyond stoked!

Ian: Talk me through this mind process, because I’m fascinated by this. It’s traumatic incident and yes, you’re super thankful that you’re here and you’re alive and so, therefore, you’re going to embrace life. Of course, you are. But that first time that you maybe go for that longer walk or that first time you strap on the skis or that first time you look at the rock face. There’s going to be all sorts of stuff going through your head.

Are you just going to be stubborn and respect that the mountain as you’ve always done but think to yourself no life goes on or is there a real element of inner fear that you’re shielding from me and maybe everybody else but really, it’s there?

Adam: No, of course, there’s a lot of different fears. One, there’s fear to what my ultimate movements going to be like, I don’t know if I am ever going to feel fluid on a run again. Am I ever going to feel smooth and fast? There is fear that… the one thing that really strikes home is that when you have these accidents it doesn’t just impact you it impacts a lot of other people; will I be stressing them too much if I do decide to go climbing again. I don’t know what my comfort level is going to be at. The first time I get to anything with a little bit of exposure, how am I going to feel? Am I going to panic and not want to be there? I don’t know those things yet.

Back to your first question, yes. I remember the first time I had left the hospital, although I was still admitted, stepping aside and feeling the cold breeze rush across my body, I started crying because it felt so good to finally be back outside just feeling the cold wind on my skin. The first few steps I took, I remember the first time I walked, I walked about 10 meters and then the next time, and this was all in hospital with a walker, and then the next time it was 50 meters and then it was can I walk and do a lap of the ward? Then can I do two laps of the ward? Until you set these small little process goals for yourself and you break it down to little chunks and you’re just happy with any little victory you get.

Obviously, there’s going to be setbacks. When I first came back, I was walking a little bit and then the doctors thought that I might have another injury in my foot which basically means, more or less the metatarsal of your foot might be broken and that this can be very, very serious with long-term repercussions. I was told I had to be non-weight-bearing again. All of a sudden I’d gone from walking two kilometres to being back in a wheelchair and mentally struggling with that quite a bit but you also just have to accept the process of what comes. You can’t set too many expectations.

I’ve not once put expectations on myself as to what my recovery should be or what it should look like because it’s very individual and the doctors don’t know. It’s a best guess on their effort based on past experiences but my body’s different from other people. My mind is different. At the same time, also, I just didn’t want the pressure of saying, “I have to be able to run a 5K by January,” and not do it and be disappointed. There’s no purpose in my recovery process. It’s very day-to-day. Some days I wake up and I feel quite good and loose and other days I wake up and I feel like I’m getting hit by a truck because I did too much the previous day or I slept funny the night before, I had a beer too many the night before.

Ian: Enjoy those beers.

Adam: Yes, for sure.

Ian: Obviously, the last nine weeks have given you a real opportunity to look at so many different things but I guess one of the things that you really look back at and analyse was that day or what was going to be a day in the mountains. I’m sure you’ve gone over everything and analysed what you were doing and maybe tried to reassure yourself that what you were doing was correct. What’s the outcome been of that looking back? Are you happy and content that you three guys did all the right things?

Adam: No, definitely not because something happened. I did something wrong. I don’t really believe that bad luck necessarily happens in the mountains. One, you’re putting yourself in a dangerous environment so you’ve obviously taken luck out of the equation in that sense. Something that I probably did wrong at the time was, when we were rushing, we’re going fast, but there’s a difference between moving fast and efficiently and rushing and because Nick and Dakota were ahead of me, I was probably rushing a little bit. Just because they went through somewhere safely doesn’t mean you get to. In retrospect, I probably should’ve tested the rock first, that I pulled on.

The other thing, too, is when you’re moving through that terrain unroped, you don’t really want to be pulling on blocks. You more want to be pushing down on things because if you’re pushing down on things, they’re not going to move. If you’re pulling up, when you’re rock-climbing, roped up, you’re pulling on holds and things. If you are secured to the wall, it’s less likely to be risky.

That’s probably the biggest thing. Don’t rush. The way that you move in the terrain can be very, very significant so I was probably using incorrect technique in that kind of, blocky terrain, but in terms of what we did with the rescue itself, that can have a slight element of luck in that, we had cell service but we also had just enough equipment to keep me comfortable. Like having the emergency space blanket was incredible, having a light down jacket to put on made a huge difference, having the right partners. That can really come into it. If either one of them had panicked, I probably would’ve panicked a little bit as well but going to the mountain with people that you really, really trust and have the experience, Nick and Dakota have a lot of experience, so I was lucky to have those two guys with me.

Ian: I’m sure you’ve had plenty of conversations with Nick and Dakota. What impact has this accident had on them? I did see Dakota very quickly after this incident because he came over to the ‘Rut’ but it wasn’t appropriate to have a chat with him about this incident because he was racing and I didn’t want to affect his thought process, his mind, but I’m sure that both he and Nick have been really shook up by this. Dakota wrote an article on iRunFar and I quote a section, “I don’t think I was scarred from Adam’s accident. Not like him certainly, and not very badly in an emotional way either. But that accident really drove home the seriousness of what a lot of us do on a regular basis, often without considering the possibilities. In that event I was given a very visceral demonstration of what can happen in the mountains. A single misstep, a tiny poor judgement, or simply bad luck, and all of a sudden you’re in a crumpled, bloody heap with the dust of rockfall settling around you. It’s very real, and it’s scary.” article link here

Adam: Definitely. I think they both understand that it’s dangerous moving in that terrain. I’ve had regular contact with Nick and Dakota. They’ve both gone back into the mountain since then and they’ve both gone climbing since then. I don’t see how this doesn’t have impact you in some way. Dakota just went and did a rope safety course for mountain rescue so clearly he was impacted, realizing either it was the limitations of what his knowledge base was or he just, I’m just saying that, the more skills that you have to help, the more likely you are to be able to help in the situation.

Having that wilderness first aid course or any kind of first aid course, just when you’re going out and doing these big objectives is a valuable thing to have. Nick had a bit more experience because he’s done The Apprentice Rock Guide, you’re trained to be an alpine guide at that point. That comes with quite a lot of mountain rescue training and theoretical knowledge but the difference between that and seeing one of your friends actively falling down the side of a mountain. It’d be very traumatic to watch that happen and to think that you’re coming up on a body. I think it would definitely make you think twice in a lot of situations or just reinforce how dangerous those environments can be.

I was rather thrilled to be able to take my skis for a walk in the mountains and actually get in some decent turns with Laura. I am so thankful to my support network for helping me get back into the hills so quickly. I have to continue to be patient and listen to my body, but this was a rather huge step/stride forward

I was rather thrilled to be able to take my skis for a walk in the mountains and actually get in some decent turns with Laura. I am so thankful to my support network for helping me get back into the hills so quickly. I have to continue to be patient and listen to my body, but this was a rather huge step/stride forward

Ian: I’m not going to ask the question of what the future holds because as you’ve said, there’s no point in setting a target for a 5K run. That will happen in its own due course and we just have to hope that all the stepping stones are in the right place. As you say every now and again, there’s going to be a step backwards but the direction is forwards and obviously, myself and the whole community wish you the very best with this Adam. I mean, it’s an amazing story and I’m just glad that you’re here to be able to tell it.

Adam: Yes, thanks so much for the interview and I hope a few people have picked up one or two little tips from this but I guess the biggest takeaway is mountains are dangerous. Going for any little trail run in the woods can be dangerous. We have the ability to move very, very fast as runners into the wilderness and we’re often alone all It only takes is a broken ankle by stepping on the wrong thing then all of a sudden you have a very, very horrible walk home. Especially when you’re going for trail runs. It’s one thing to be lightning fast but make sure that you have just enough gear to survive and bring you home because those things can make a difference. Look at Dave Mackey, for instance…

Ian: I was going to come on to Dave.

Adam: He was going out for an evening run and his life changed on that evening run and in a very, very profound way. He got unlucky in the way that his injury happened. I’d been lucky in that the bones that I’d broke are ones that are basically non-weight-bearing. If I’d fallen a centimetre in a different direction, my outcome could’ve been very different and I’m aware that, there’s not anything that I did special. Knowing it’s in the way that I fell, I broke my back but I didn’t damage my spine in a serious way. I did to a certain degree because I still had some tingling in my feet and hands and things but that should, in theory, go away over time.

These things can happen when you’re outside in the mountains or even just heading out in the woods. An ounce of prevention, an ounce of caution is always a smart thing for sure, really having as emergency blanket with you, having a little bivy sack, having a cell phone, having a light jacket. Even in the middle of summer, if you could go into shock, having a jacket on can save your life. These things, they’re so light these days that we’re able to carry a lot of stuff with us.

Ian: These days, there is no real reason not to carry some of this stuff because it is so light, and as you say, we’ve got all the technology, it’s never been easier to carry this stuff. We have all these amazing packs that fit our body, we have down jackets that way grams, we have windproof, waterproofs, we’ve got spot trackers, in-reach trackers, mobile phones. The technology is really, really there.

Final thoughts?

Adam: I received thousands and thousands of messages, I actually received so many messages that I had to stop going on social media because I just needed to take a big step back from it all, and just focus on myself, and recover for a bit. It was incredibly empowering, and you I just felt the love from everybody, but at the same time, to open your email and just have thousands of messages every time from people is a little overwhelming at that point what with everything I had going on. But it shows you incredible level of support that we have in our little community of people here, which is so touching.

The other thing, in the last two months I’ve actually had two friends or acquaintances die in mountain accidents, and that also really, really struck home, it shows how vulnerable we are. One of them was skiing and the other person was climbing in the Himalayas. It was just very, very touching, and I actually went to one of the funerals and being there and hearing the stories of everybody around this person was very moving. When you know somebody in one context in their life, for example, I knew this girl in a climbing sense, but then you forget just how much depth people have to their life, and how rich they are.

It was a real reminder that everybody has an incredible story, and it’s worth taking time to get to know people because you never know what you can find out from them. There’s always so much complexity to people.

Adam and Laura

Adam and Laura

And finally….

“Over the past few months this amazing woman has been my rock, she has shown me that true beauty, love and joy can be found in even the most trying of circumstances. That spirit defines her.
She was by my side from the moment I went into surgery and has been there every step from there on forward.
In that time we have laughed, cried, struggled and shared the most incredible journey together, a journey that keeps on getting better and better. 
She is the most incredible partner. She is loving, caring, compassionate, adventurous, athletic, curious, smart, passionate, fun and incredibly beautiful and, soon enough, I am proud to announce that I will get to call her my wife. Last week she said “yes” and agreed to share her life with me.
We are beyond thrilled and I am so incredibly lucky, she makes me better in every way.” – Adam Campbell

Episode 119 – Speedgoat on the AT and Pipp and Richard talk Superior 100

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This is Episode 119 of Talk Ultra and we have a 1-hour special interview with Speedgoat Karl Meltzer on his incredible record breaking FKT on the AT. We also have interviews with the male and female winners of the Superior 100, Mallory Richard and Frank Pipp. We have the news and Ian is going solo!

 

KARL ON THE AT

On Sept. 18 at 3:38 a.m Karl “Speedgoat” Meltzer emerged from the Appalachian Trail’s southern terminus at Springer Mountain, Ga., and set a new Appalachian Trail thru-hike speed record with a time of 45 days 22 hours and 38 minutes.  Meltzer started his supported run at 5 a.m. on Aug. 3 from Mt. Katahdin, Maine, and averaged approximately 47 miles per day at a pace of 3.2 miles per hour.  Meltzer’s time beats the previous record by more than 10 hours, which was set by Scott Jurek in 2015.

The project, in planning for more than two years, was accomplished with a small core crew consisting of Meltzer’s father, Karl Sr., and crew chief Eric Belz.  Others joined the crew to support Meltzer for short periods throughout the hike, including Meltzer’s wife and fellow ultrarunners.   The crew traveled alongside Meltzer every day, providing him with food, water, medical attention and logistical support.  Meals were prepared and taken in a van, which also served as Meltzer and Belz’s sleeping quarters.

00:09:39 INTERVIEW WITH SPEEDGOAT

RUNNING BEYOND BOOK well I have a first copy in my hand and I have to say I am somewhat pleased and happy. It’s taken a couple of years and at times it never felt quite real. The book in my hand confirms it is real and Spanish, German, Italian and UK versions will be available in the coming months. I believe Spain is first (September) Italy is October and the UK November. I don’t have a date on the German edition yet! – HERE

01:13:43 NEWS

SALOMON GLEN COE SKYLINE HERE

  1. Jonathan Albon 6:33:52
  2. Tom Owens 6:37:21
  3. Marc Lauenstein 6:54:37
  4. Finlay Wild 7:00:57
  5. Greg Vollet 7:10:19
  1. Jasmin Paris 8:15:56
  2. Malene Bikken Haukoy 8:23:04
  3. Sarah Ridgway 8:44:40
  4. Ruth Croft 9:10:33
  5. Martina Valmassoi 9:14:37

Mamores VK HERE

Ring of Steall HERE

RUN THE RUT

ULTRA HERE

CCC HERE

VK HERE

SUPERIOR 100 HERE

01:35:32 INTERVIEW with FRANK PIPP

Pipp crossed the line in 20:24:00 a superior, Superior 100 champion. His run for a rookie 100-mile runner was incredible. Uhan had run a clever and smart race, he had saved something for those closing challenging miles and he pulled away from Jenkins and Schwarz-Lowe. His finish 22:46 was a solid 8-minutes ahead of Jenkins who had no doubt had the race of his life… he had managed to pull ahead of Schwarz-Lowe and take the final podium place by just 1-minute. But this only tells half the story. In the closing miles, under darkness, tired, fatigued and lacking focus, Jenkins had run into a head height true branch that cut his head open sending him flat to the ground. Somehow he managed to pick himself up and find the effort and pace to hold off a charging Schwarz-Lowe.

Richard finished next, first lady and 5th overall with a new course record 23:51. Her performance was stunning and almost looked effortless. It was impressive! Tina Johnson finished 2nd and Stephanie Hoff 3rd, 29:50 and 30:52 respectively. Queen of the Superior 100 finished 4th in 31:07 and in doing so, achieved her 16th buckle.

02:20:22 INTERVIEW with MALLORY RICHARD

RUN RABBIT RUN

Alex Nichols runs his first 100 wins in 17:57 and takes home 12,000 dollars. Nice! Mark Hammon 2nd in 19:19 and Kyle Curtin 3rd 19:27. Incredibly Jeff Browning was 4th… he is having some year!

Courtney Dawalter won the ladies race (not a nam I know) ahead of Alissa St Laurent and Nicole Kalogeropoulos. Their times 21:23, 22:38 and 23:10.

Notable drops were Nikki Kimball who has won the race in the past and Sage Canaday dropped in the men’s race.

WASATCH 100

Darcy Piceu came from behind to win in 23:15 and Trevor Fuchs 21:13

DEVILS RIDGE 70K

Yun Yanqiao run 6:30 to finish 11 minutes in front of Francois D’Haene. In the women’s race, Lucy Bartholomew pipped Sally McRae.

Kilian postpones Everest HERE

What about this lady that is saying she has set the AT record? HERE

Meghan Hicks of iRunFar scored a new FKT on Colorado’s Nolan’s 14 route. Hicks finished the 100-ish-mile epic over 14 peaks above 14,000 feet in 59:36. Hicks became the first female to complete the route to the ultimate trailhead in under 60 hours, and also broke the FKT to the 14th high point. Fellow Hardrocker Nick Pedatella was on the route at the same time and finished in 57:31. It is believed that Ted Mahon is the only other finisher this year, going a quick 55:37 in late August. Taken from ©iRunFar

UP & COMING RACES

Australia

Queensland

100 km | 100 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

100 Mile | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

50 km | 50 kilometers | October 02, 2016 | website

Bribie Beach Bash 50 km | 50 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

South Australia

Yurrebilla Trail 56km Ultra | 56 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Belgium

Brussels Capital Region

80 km | 80 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Brazil

127 km | 127 kilometers | October 06, 2016 | website

254 km | 254 kilometers | October 06, 2016 | website

Canada

Alberta

Iron Horse Ultra 100 Km (CAN) | 100 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Iron Horse Ultra 100 Miles (CAN) | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

British Columbia

Golden Ultra | 80 kilometers | September 23, 2016 | website

Ontario

Run for the Toad 50K | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Run Off the Grid 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Quebec

Ultra Trail du Bout du Monde | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Chile

Atacama Crossing (Chile) 2016 | 250 kilometers | October 02, 2016 | website

Patagonian International Marathon – 63K | 63 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Croatia

Valamar Trail 53 | 53 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Valamar Trail 73 | 73 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Estonia

Haanja Jala100 – 100 km | 100 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Finland

Eastern Finland

Vaarojen Ultramaraton | 86 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

France

Alpes-de-Haute-Provence

Trail Edelweiss | 55 kilometers | October 02, 2016 | website

Ardèche

Les Crêtes 53 km | 53 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Les Sommets 107 km | 107 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Aveyron

100 km de Millau | 100 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Calvados

66 km | 66 kilometers | October 02, 2016 | website

Charente

75 km | 75 kilometers | October 02, 2016 | website

Corrèze

80 km | 80 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Côte-d’Or

Alésia Trail – La Vercingétorix | 51 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Haute-Corse

A Paolina | 70 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Haute-Savoie

Trail des Aiguilles Rouges | 50 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Ille-et-Vilaine

100 km de la Vallée du Semnon | 100 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

50 km de la Vallée du Semnon | 50 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Loire-Atlantique

Trail de Mauves en Vert – 50 km | 53 kilometers | October 02, 2016 | website

Loir-et-Cher

Ultrail de Beauval | 65 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Nord

La Cafougnette | 59 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Puy-de-Dôme

Grand Trail du Sancy/Mont-Dore | 60 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Pyrénées-Orientales

100 Miles Sud de France | 100 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Vienne

Tour de la vienne pédestre | 250 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Germany

Baden-Württemberg

KuSuH Trail 100 | 100 miles | September 23, 2016 | website

Bavaria

Churfranken Trailrun | 73 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

North Rhine-Westphalia

50 km von Hitdorf | 50 kilometers | October 02, 2016 | website

Greece

Spartathlon | 245 kilometers | September 30, 2016 | website

Ireland

Galway

60k Duathlon | 60 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Ulster

Udderly Mad 63K Ultra Moo | 63 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Isle of Man

Isle of Man Mountain Ultra | 51 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Italy

Friuli-Venezia Giulia

Magredi Mountain Trail 100 Mile | 100 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Lombardy

Marathon Trail Lago di Como – Long Distance | 115 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Piedmont

54 km | 54 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Morenic Trail | 109 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Japan

Akita Nairiku 100km Marathon | 100 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Akita Nairiku 50km Marathon | 50 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Muraoka Ultra Marathon – 100K | 100 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Muraoka Ultra Marathon – 66K | 66 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Muraoka Ultra Marathon – 88K | 88 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Shizuoka to Yamanashi | 85 kilometers | September 23, 2016 | website

Ultra Trail Mt Fuji | 161 kilometers | September 23, 2016 | website

Kenya

Kenya Wildlife 50K | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Latvia

70 km | 70 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Macedonia

Krali Marko Trails 90 km | 90 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Malaysia

Gunung 5 Nuang | 100 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Morocco

UltraTrail Atlas Toubkal | 105 kilometers | September 29, 2016 | website

Nepal

Royal Penguin Ultra Marathon | 60 kilometers | October 06, 2016 | website

Netherlands

South Holland

Den Haag Ultra Marathon | 60 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

Norway

Nordmarka Ultra Challenge | 82 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Philippines

65 km | 65 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Poland

120K | 120 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

260K | 260 kilometers | September 29, 2016 | website

60K | 60 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

90K | 90 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Portugal

180 km | 180 kilometers | October 07, 2016 | website

Azores Triangle Adventure | 103 kilometers | October 07, 2016 | website

South Africa

100K Ultra | 100 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

50K Ultra | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Extreme | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Legends 68km Ultra Marathon | 68 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Spain

Castile and León

Ultra de Gredos | 82 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Catalonia

Ultra Pirineu | 103 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Valencian Community

Mondúber Utrail | 78 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Ultra Trail Del Rincon 170 km | 170 kilometers | October 07, 2016 | website

Sweden

52 km | 52 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Switzerland

Valais

Humani’Trail Les Diablerets | 55 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Turkey

Kaçkar Ultra Maratonu 64K | 64 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Lycian Way Ultramarathon | 250 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

LYUM Discovery 4G | 80 kilometers | September 27, 2016 | website

LYUM Discovery 6G | 120 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

LYUM Zor1Gün | 102 kilometers | September 28, 2016 | website

Ultra Maraton 6G | 250 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

United Kingdom

Cornwall

Atlantic Coast 3-Day Challenge | 78 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Cumbria

3×3000 Ultra Trail | 80 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Gloucestershire

Cotswold Way Century | 102 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Cotswold Way Challenge Multistage Ultra | 57 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Northern Ireland

Causeway Coast Ultra Marathon | 39 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

North Yorkshire

“Round Ripon” Ultra Studley Roger | 35 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

Shropshire

The Longmynd Hike | 50 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

Surrey

Downslink Ultra | 38 miles | October 02, 2016 | website

Wales

Gower Ultra 50 | 50 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

USA

Alabama

Birmingham Stage Race – 2 Days | 36 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Birmingham Stage Race – 3 Days | 53 miles | September 23, 2016 | website

Arizona

100 mile Ultra & Relay | 100 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

80 mile Hopi Trail Relay Run | 80 miles | September 23, 2016 | website

Flagstaff 56K Endurance Run | 56 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Flagstaff Sky Race 55K | 55 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Mogollon Monster 100 | 106 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Ultra 50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Arkansas

Arkansas Traveller 100 | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

California

Berkeley Trail Adventure – 50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Cuyamaca 100K Endurance Run | 100 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Headwaters Ultra – 50K | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Pacifica Summit Run 50K | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Super Tahoe Triple Marathon | 124 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Tahoe Trifecta | 39 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Trail Runner Ultra Race of Champions 100K | 100 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Triple Marathon | 78 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Uber Rock 50K Trail Race | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Colorado

100K Trail Race | 100 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

50K Trail Race | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

50 Mile Trail Race | 50 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Bobcat Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Georgia

Georgia Jewel 100 Mile Run | 100 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Georgia Jewel 35 Mile Run | 35 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Georgia Jewel 50 Mile Run | 50 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Tortoise and the Hare 50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Idaho

Foothills 50K Frenzy | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Priest Lake 50K Ultra Marathon | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Illinois

The Hennepin Hundred – 100M | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

The Hennepin Hundred – 100M Relay | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

The Hennepin Hundred – 50M | 50 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

Kansas

50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

FlatRock 50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

FlatRock 50K Ultra Trail Race | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Lake Perry Rocks! 50K | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Kentucky

Cloudsplitter 100K | 100 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Cloudsplitter 100 Mile | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

Cloudsplitter 50K | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Louisiana

Children of the Cane 100K | 100 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Children of the Cane 100 Miler | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

Children of the Cane 50K | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Maine

100 Mile WALKING Relay 10 Person Teams | 100 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

200 Mile Relay 12 Person Teams | 200 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

200 Mile ULTRA Relay 4 Person Teams | 200 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

200 Mile ULTRA Relay 6 Person Teams | 200 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Michigan

DWD Hell 50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

DWD Hell 50M | 50 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Hungerford Games 50-Mile Ultra Marathon | 50 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Reebok Ragnar Michigan | 200 miles | September 30, 2016 | website

New Jersey

The Mountain Madness 50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

New Mexico

Mt. Taylor 50k | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

New York

Ragnar Relay Adirondacks | 210 miles | September 23, 2016 | website

North Carolina

50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

50 Miles | 50 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Ohio

100K | 100 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

100 Mile | 100 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

75K | 75 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Oregon

Mountain Lakes 100 | 100 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Pennsylvania

Blues Cruise 50k Trail Ultra | 50 kilometers | October 02, 2016 | website

Trails 4 Tails Ultra Run | 40 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

South Carolina

Swamp Rabbit Urban Ultra 50K | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Tennessee

Rock/Creek StumpJump 50K Ultra | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

Texas

100k | 100 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

100k | 62 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

100K | 100 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

100k relay | 62 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

100M | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

100 miler | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

100m relay | 100 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

50k | 31 miles | October 01, 2016 | website

50k | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

50 Miler | 50 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Utah

50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

50 Mile | 50 miles | September 24, 2016 | website

Bear 100 | 100 miles | September 23, 2016 | website

Elk 50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Grand to Grand Ultra | 160 miles | September 25, 2016 | website

Vermont

50 Km Run | 50 kilometers | September 25, 2016 | website

50 Mile Run | 50 miles | September 25, 2016 | website

Virginia

50K | 50 kilometers | October 01, 2016 | website

GrindStone 100 | 101 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Washington

Bigfoot 120 Mile Endurance Run | 120 miles | October 07, 2016 | website

Cle Elum Ridge 50K | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

West Virginia

West Virginia Trilogy – Day One 50 km | 50 kilometers | October 07, 2016 | website

Wisconsin

Driftless 50k Trail Race | 50 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

Vietnam

100 km | 100 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

70 km | 70 kilometers | September 24, 2016 | website

03:10:36 CLOSE

 

03:12:30

ITunes http://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/talk-ultra/id497318073

Stitcher You can listen on iOS HEREAndroid HERE or via a web player HERE

Libsyn – feed://talkultra.libsyn.com/rss

Website – talkultra.com

Superior 100 2016 Race Summary

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Packet pick-up was as bustling and busy as usual. It was s series of high fives and hello’s as the runners entered the hall to collect numbers ahead of the next day’s Superior 100. Traversing the Sawtooth Mountains on the Superior Hiking Trail in the far reaches Northern Minnesota near the Canadian Border, the Superior 100 course parallells the North-Shore of Lake Superior. The race rolls along a series of sawtooth peaks with breath-taking vistas.

It’s a race with history and a race that is unique, very unique.

I was last at this race in 2014 and I was blown away by the experience. Believe me, folks down in Minnesota are some of the nicest you will ever meet. I wrote an article on my last trip called Minnesota Nice. I had wondered if my 2016 experience could live up to the 2014 experience.

The simple answer, yes!

As in 2014, I was looked after by Kurt Decker who works for TC Running. TC is the ‘go-to’ place for running shoes and apparel in the Twin Cities area and Kurt, well, Kurt is the ‘Godfather of Trail’ in this area. Kurt and the TC Running crew man an awesome aid station at Oberg (95-miles) on the Superior route and as the last aid before the 103-mile finish line, it’s a really important one. Music, fresh food, open fire, incredible crew and an abundance of chairs make this an oasis that is difficult to leave for that final 7-mile push for the line.

Gooseberry Falls State Park (Minnesota) is the start line for the race, the finish comes at Lutsen 103.3-miles later, just short of the Canadian border. A 38-hour cut-off, 13 aid stations and 6400m+ of elevation gain and descent make this race one of the toughest in the USA.

iancorless-com_superiot2016-4422As race director, John Storkamp says,’ it’s Rugged, Relentless and Remote.’ It is. Taking place on almost 100% single-track, Superior 100 is a special race of mud, tree roots, rocks and a never ending green tunnel of trees that pulls runners to the finish line. The race is one of the oldest 100-mile races in the USA and with a capped field of just 250 runners it has a feel that is akin to Western States or Hardrock 100. Founded in 1991 when there was no more than a dozen 100-mile trail races in the USA, back then if you wanted to run a 100, you had choices like Western States (’74), Old Dominion (’79), Wasatch (’80), Leadville (’83), Vermont (’89), Angeles Crest (’86), Mohican (’90), Arkansas Traveller (’91) and Superior (’91).  Superior quickly earned its reputation!

Superior 100 is old school.

You can view the runners portraits from the 100 HERE

You can view race images HERE

You can purchase race images HERE

The 2016 Race

The 20% chance of rain was looking less and less likely on the start line of the 2016 edition of the Superior 100. Fresh coffee was free flowing and the 250 runners who would toe the line milled around chatting and talking about the day, night, day and possible 2nd night that lay ahead. It was chilled, calm, relaxed and un-cluttered. At the stroke of 0800 Storkamp released the runners and almost immediately the race fragmented with the podium contenders leading the race. At the rear, many participants were already walking with a full understanding of the task ahead – better to ease in and finish strong and not the other way around.

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Joe Uhan, Jeff Vander Kooi, Adam Schwarz-Lowe, Doug Kleemier, Ben Vanhoose, Joshua Nichols, Brian Klug and Timbo Jenkins amongst others dictated the early pace. It soon became apparent that it was going to be a hot and humid day. Timbo Jenkins arrived first at Split Rock River where a stunning view of the surrounding landscape and Lake Superior was provided. With approximately 9-miles covered Jenkins started to walk. He looked us in the eye and said, ‘this is not where I am supposed to be… how did I end up leading the race?’ It was Timbo’s first 100 and as is often the case, he was feeling good in the first 10-miles. Schwarz-Lowe, Uhan and the other main contenders followed and at aid 1, Frank Pipp was 6-minutes behind Jenkins.

In the ladies’ race, it was a relaxed start for two-time winner (2014 and 2015) Mallory Richard and three-time winner, Susan Donelly (who was running her 16th Superior 100, yes, 16th). I have a simple rule for long races, watch what the experienced runners do and copy it, if you can. In this scenario, it was relatively easy for the other ladies to copy as experience was saying, taking it nice and slow and steady!

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Carla Goulart lead the race followed by Mallory Richard 5-minutes later. Amy Broadmore, Tina Johnson, Janet Hausken, Tracy Denbleyker and then a group of 4 or 5 followed within a 30-minute window.

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At 20-miles, Richard had drawn level with Goulart in the ladies’ race and Janet Hausken was trailing 20-minutes later – the race was starting to take shape. Jenkins despite his comments at 9-miles had somehow continued to pull away from the rest of the men’s field. It was a brave move for a rookie ‘hundo’ runner and his 7-minute gap over Kleemier, Schwarz-Lowe, Peltonen and Uhan was looking good.

Silver Bay came just 5-miles later and any hard work by Jenkins was undone as 2014 champion, Schwarz-Lowe drew level along with pre-race favourite, Uhan. The writing was starting to appear on the wall. Importantly, Frank Pipp, also running his first 100 had closed to 4th and trailed the front group by just 5-minutes. In the ladies’ race, Richard was opening up a gap and the remaining ladies could only see her run off into the distance. Goulart was still holding a strong 2nd place over 30-minutes ahead of Janet Hausken and Tina Johnson was another 8-minutes back.

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At MT Trudee it was all change, in just a short section of trail, Pipp had caught the front men and passed them. No easy task! Uhan followed 6-minutes back and Schwarz-Lowe was another 2-minutes later. Early leader Jenkins was 4th 28-minutes behind Pipp and it was looking like he had made the classic rookie mistake of going out too fast – ‘I’m feeling rubbish; I may quit’ he shouted as he went past. Kurt shouted, ‘keep plugging buddy, it’s a 100-miles, anything can happen!’

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For the ladies’, Richard was in the form of 2014 and 2015 and was grabbing the 2016 race by the scruff of its neck. At Tettegouche her lead was 12-minutes over Hausken. Early raced leader Goulart was cooked and had now dropped back to 5th lady over 30-minutes behind the leader. Crystal Hutchings and Tina Johnson had moved into 3rd and 4th with the experienced Susan Donnelly in 7th.

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Finland at just over 50-miles signified in the midway point of the race and it was soon becoming apparent the impact a day of sun and humidity was having on the race – exhaustion, dehydration and fatigue was the order of the day! Richard was now in a race against herself and ultimately the other men in the race, her lead over 2nd place was 2 hours and 12 minutes. But guess what, early race leader Goulart has found some inner strength and closed the gap from 5th to be back in 2nd 8-minutes ahead of Johnson. Was this going to be one of those incredible comebacks?

In the men’s race it was a similar story for Jenkins. He was still running in 4th but he hadn’t dropped and he was closing the gap on Schwarz-Lowe in 3rd and Uhan in 2nd. Pipp was still leading the race by over 30-minutes now and many thought he was either on for an incredible first 100-miler victory or a potential detonation over the next couple of hours.iancorless-com_superior2016-7125

Darkness was now upon the race and the 20% of chance of rain came… the only problem being that 20% became 100% and for a good 8-10 hours the heavens saturated the Superior 100 course making what is already slippery and challenging terrain even more challenging.

Pipp pushed on at the front of the race with no pacer. At Crosby Manitou his lead was 50-minutes over Uhan and Jenkins had had one of those great comebacks to be sitting in 3rd level with Schwarz-Lowe. Richard was now not only obliterating the ladies race but she was lying 6th overall level with Steven Graupner. Johnson, Hausken and Hoff were all now running for 2nd.

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Cramer Road at 79.9-miles signified a significant marker with the final 25% of the race ahead, it’s here that places can change as a full day of running takes its toll. Despite this being a first 100, Pipp was showing no sign of flagging. On the contrary, he was looking strong! He arrived with 14:49 elapsed and believe it or not, early race leader Jenkins was back in 2nd with 16:09 elapsed and Uhan back at 16:23 and Schwarz-Lowe was 4th in 16:41. If Pipp didn’t blow up the race was his, but the fight for 2nd was wide open. Richard arrived in the ladies race with 17:37 elapsed and I am sure she had eyes on the men in-front of her. Johnson was still in 2nd but 4-hours back and experienced Superior runner, Donnelly had moved all the way up to 3rd, her 16th finish was looking guaranteed.

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Kurt was waiting at Oberg with his TC Running aid station. The pancakes were cooking, the music was playing and at 02:45 Pipp arrived like a train. It was 3-hours later that Jenkins arrived still in 2nd. Remember, he nearly dropped at 30-miles… anything can happen in a 100! However, Uhan and Schwarz-Lowe had closed the gap and the trio left together. With just over 7-miles to go, this was going to be one hell of a finish.

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Pipp crossed the line in 20:24:00 a superior, Superior 100 champion. His run for a rookie 100-mile runner was incredible. Uhan had run a clever and smart race, he had saved something for those closing challenging miles and he pulled away from Jenkins and Schwarz-Lowe. His finish 22:46 was a solid 8-minutes ahead of Jenkins who had no doubt had the race of his life… he had managed to pull ahead of Schwarz-Lowe and take the final podium place by just 1-minute. But this only tells half the story. In the closing miles, under darkness, tired, fatigued and lacking focus, Jenkins had run into a head height true branch that cut his head open sending him flat to the ground. Somehow he managed to pick himself up and find the effort and pace to hold off a charging Schwarz-Lowe.

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Richard finished next, first lady and 5th overall with a new course record 23:51. Her performance was stunning and almost looked effortless. It was impressive! Tina Johnson finished 2nd and Stephanie Hoff 3rd, 29:50 and 30:52 respectively. Queen of the Superior 100 finished 4th in 31:07 and in doing so, achieved her 16th buckle.

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What followed was a long day and night of struggle and strife. Some achieved their goals, others failed to complete the challenge that they had set themselves. There was no failure… just undone business. You see, Superior 100, more than any other 100 I have witnessed is so much more than a race, it’s an experience. It’s a low-key traditional race experience and one that I encourage anyone to participate in. It’s a special race and if the 100 is too far, a 50-mile and classic marathon distance takes place on the same course and concludes at the same venue. I have often used this quote and having witnessed the highs and lows of the 2016 Superior 100, I am going to use it again for all those who have unfinished business.

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It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.”

 

Check out Superior Trail Races and consider being one of the lucky 250 in 2017

HERE

Race Images are available HERE

Episode 91 – Boulet Nichols Robbins Forsberg

Talk Ultra Logo

Episode 91 of Talk Ultra brings you with interviews Mont-Blanc 80km winner, Alex Nichols, we speak with WSER ladies winner Magdalena Boulet and we also chat with Gary Robbins about his FKT. Emelie Forsberg is back for a Smiles and Miles and this week Niandi Carmont co-hosts as Karl is getting ready for Speedgoat.

00:11:38 NEWS

Help Nepal – Nepal images ‘FACES of NEPAL’ – order a print and all funds donated to Nepal charities https://iancorless.org/2015/04/28/nepal-appeal-nepalearthquake/

HARDROCK 100

  1. Kilian Jornet 23:28 new CR and holds records both ways now
  2. Mike Foote 25:45
  3. Adam Campbell 26:49
  1. Anna Frost 28:22
  2. Darcy Piceu 28:57 won 3 times before
  3. Darla Askew 32:05

 

ICE TRAIL TARENTAISE article HERE

1 – Luis Alberto  HERNANDO 07:43:00

2 – Manuel MERILLAS MOLEDO 07:50:27

3 – Clement MOLLIET 07:54:29

1 – Emelie FORSBERG 09:17:21

2 – Magdalena LACZAK 09:30:37

3 – Anna STRAKOVA 09:48:46

FKT for Gary Robbins – In Washington on the 95-mile Wonderland Trail around Mount Rainier, Gary Robbins ran 18:52 to cut just over two hours from Kyle Skaggs’s previous supported record, which had stood since 2006.

00:35:48 INTERVIEW

Gary Robbins

SCOTT JUREK completes the AT 46 days 8 hours 7 or is it 8 minutes? article HERE 

DOLOMITES SKYRACE article HERE

  1. Tadei Pivk 2:02:47
  2. Ionut Zinca 2:03:18
  3. Pascal Egli 2:03:46
  1. Megan Kimmel 2:25:57 – new CR
  2. Laura Orgue 2:26:58
  3. Elisa Desco 2:28:36

EIGER ULTRA TRAIL

  1. Caroline Chaverot 12:45
  2. Andrea Huser 12:52
  3. Francesca Canepa 13:13
  1. Urs Jenzer 11:44
  2. Jason Schlarb 11:50
  3. Davis Quelhas 12:27

MARCO DE GASPERI set a new FKT. He raced from Courmayeur up 15,780-foot Mont Blanc in 6:43:52, just under the previous 6:45:24 mark that had stood since 1995. The route covers nearly 50k while gaining 12,303 feet of elevation.

COLORADO 14ers RECORD After 9 days, 21 hours, and 51 minutes, Andrew Hamilton had climbed all 58 of Colorado’s 14000-foot peaks and was the new FKT holder.

01:27:00 INTERVIEW

AKEX NICHOLS

TALK TRAINING 

How to pick the correct shoe article HERE

02:11:26 INTERVIEW

MAGDALENA BOULET

02:54:23 SMILES AND MILES with Emelie Forsberg

UP & COMING RACES

Australia

New South Wales

Altra Centennial Park Ultra100km | 100 kilometers | August 02, 2015 | website

Altra Centennial Park Ultra 50km | 50 kilometers | August 02, 2015 | website

Queensland

Flinders Tour – 50 km | 50 kilometers | July 26, 2015 | website

Austria

Dirndltal Extrem Ultramarathon | 111 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

Canada

Alberta

Canadian Death Race | 125 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

Quebec

Pandora 24 Ultra X Trail 100M | 100 miles | July 25, 2015 | website

Ecuador

RacingThePlanet: Ecuador 2015 | 250 kilometers | July 26, 2015 | website

Finland

Lapland

NUTS Midnight Sun Trail Ultra 125 km | 125 kilometers | July 24, 2015 | website

NUTS Midnight Sun Trail Ultra 55K | 55 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

France

Haute-Corse

Via Romana – 62 km | 62 kilometers | August 02, 2015 | website

Haute-Loire

La Loire Integrale | 1025 kilometers | August 05, 2015 | website

Haute-Savoie

Trail du Tour des Fiz | 61 kilometers | July 26, 2015 | website

Isère

Défi de l’Oisans | 200 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Trail de L’Etendard | 65 kilometers | August 02, 2015 | website

Jura

Tour du Lac de Vouglans | 71 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

Savoie

Courchevel X Trail 54 km | 54 kilometers | August 02, 2015 | website

EDF Cenis Tour 50 | 50 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

EDF Cenis Tour 73 | 73 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

La 6000D | 63 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Germany

Bavaria

Chiemgauer 100 k Mountain Ultra Run | 100 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Chiemgauer 100 mi Mountain Ultra Run | 100 miles | July 25, 2015 | website

Chiemsee-Ultramarathon Juli | 108 kilometers | July 31, 2015 | website

Brandenburg

Berliner MauerwegNachtlauf | 62 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Lower Saxony

Süntel-Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Guadeloupe

Rèd Mammel | 50 kilometers | July 24, 2015 | website

Ultra Transkarukera | 120 kilometers | July 24, 2015 | website

India

Himachal Pradesh

The Himalayan Crossing | 353 kilometers | July 27, 2015 | website

The SPITI | 126 kilometers | July 30, 2015 | website

Indonesia

Les Foulées de la Soie en indonénie | 100 kilometers | August 06, 2015 | website

Mount Rinjani Ultra | 52 kilometers | August 07, 2015 | website

Ireland

Munster

Keith Whyte Waterfront Ultra Marathon | 36 miles | July 25, 2015 | website

Italy

Aosta Valley

Monte Rosa Walser Ultra Trail | 50 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

Sicily

Etna Trail | 64 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol

Südtirol Ultra Skyrace – 121 km | 121 kilometers | July 24, 2015 | website

Südtirol Ultra Skyrace – 66 km | 66 kilometers | July 24, 2015 | website

Veneto

Trans d’Havet Ultra | 80 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Latvia

Cēsis ECO Trail 80 km | 80 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

Madagascar

Isalo Raid – Grand Raid | 80 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Mauritius

Trail des 7 Couleurs | 120 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

Mongolia

Mongolia Sunrise to Sunset 100K | 100 kilometers | August 05, 2015 | website

Peru

Moyobamba Trail Running Festival | 80 kilometers | July 26, 2015 | website

Philippines

TransCebu Ultramarathon 105 Km | 105 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

TransCebu Ultramarathon 55 Km | 55 kilometers | July 26, 2015 | website

Portugal

Ultra-Trail Nocturno da Lagoa de Óbidos | 50 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

Réunion

Trail du Grand Ouest | 60 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

Russia

Elbrus Mountain Race by adidas outdoor | 105 kilometers | July 30, 2015 | website

Golden Ring Ultra Trail | 50 kilometers | August 02, 2015 | website

Golden Ring Ultra Trail 100 | 100 kilometers | August 02, 2015 | website

Singapore

50 km | 50 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Spain

Aragon

Calcenada Vuelta al Moncayo – 104 km | 104 kilometers | August 07, 2015 | website

Gran Trail Aneto-Posets | 109 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Vuelta al Aneto | 58 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Cantabria

Trail La Herradura de Campoo – 55 km | 55 kilometers | July 26, 2015 | website

Trail La Herradura de Campoo – Trail Etapas 28+32 | 60 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Catalonia

Ultra Catllaràs | 55 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Principality of Asturias

Ultra Trail DesafíOSOmiedo | 86 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

Sweden

Tierra Arctic Ultra | 120 kilometers | August 07, 2015 | website

Switzerland

Grisons

Swiss Alpine Marathon K78 | 78 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Obwald

MOUNTAINMAN Ultra | 80 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Ticino

Ultra Race – 130 km | 128 kilometers | August 07, 2015 | website

Ultra Race – 80 km | 81 kilometers | August 07, 2015 | website

Valais

La Spéci-Men | 72 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Turkey

RunFire Cappadocia Ultra Marathon | 220 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

United Kingdom

East Riding of Yorkshire

The Montane Lakeland 100 | 100 miles | July 24, 2015 | website

The Montane Lakeland 50 | 50 miles | July 25, 2015 | website

England

Round the Rock | 48 miles | August 01, 2015 | website

Round the Rock Ultra Marathon | 48 miles | August 01, 2015 | website

Hampshire

Oxfam Trailwalker GB (South) | 100 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Stirling

Devil o’ the Highlands Footrace | 43 miles | August 01, 2015 | website

USA

Alaska

Resurrection Pass 100 Mile Ultra Trail | 100 miles | August 07, 2015 | website

Arizona

Vertigo 63K Night Trail Run | 63 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

Arkansas

Full mOOn 50K | 50 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

California

Angeles Crest 100 mile endurance run | 100 miles | August 01, 2015 | website

Badwater 135 | 135 miles | July 28, 2015 | website

Big Basin Trail Run 50 km | 50 kilometers | July 26, 2015 | website

Harding Hustle 50K | 50 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Montaña de Oro 50km | 50 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

San Francisco Ultramarathon | 52 miles | July 26, 2015 | website

Colorado

Grand Mesa 100M | 100 miles | July 25, 2015 | website

Grand Mesa 37.5M | 60 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Grand Mesa 50M | 50 miles | July 25, 2015 | website

Never Summer 100km | 100 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Ouray 100 Mile Endurance Run | 100 miles | July 31, 2015 | website

Ragnar Relay Colorado | 200 miles | August 07, 2015 | website

Wild West Relay | 200 miles | July 31, 2015 | website

Idaho

Wild Idaho 50K Enrudance Run | 50 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

Wild Idaho 50M Enrudance Run | 50 miles | August 01, 2015 | website

Maine

Down East Sunrise Trail Team Relay | 102 miles | July 24, 2015 | website

Maryland

Catoctin 50k Trail Run | 50 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Minnesota

Minnesota Voyageur Trail 50 Mile Run | 50 miles | July 25, 2015 | website

Montana

HURL Elkhorn 50 K Ultramarathon | 50 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

HURL Elkhorn 50 Mile Ultramarathon | 50 miles | August 01, 2015 | website

Nevada

Ruby Mountain Relay | 184 miles | July 31, 2015 | website

North Carolina

Mattamuskeet Death March | 100 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

The March | 50 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Ohio

Burning River 100 Mile Endurance Run | 100 miles | July 25, 2015 | website

Burning River 50 Mile Endurance Run | 50 miles | July 25, 2015 | website

Oregon

Cascade Lakes Relay | 132 miles | July 31, 2015 | website

Elkhorn Relay | 203 miles | August 07, 2015 | website

Relay | 132 miles | July 31, 2015 | website

Siskiyou Out Back Trail Run 50K | 50 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Siskiyou Out Back Trail Run 50M | 50 miles | July 25, 2015 | website

Pennsylvania

Viaduct Trail 100 Mile Ultramarathon | 100 miles | August 01, 2015 | website

Viaduct Trail 50 Mile Ultramarathon | 50 miles | August 01, 2015 | website

Texas

50K | 50 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

Utah

Kat’cina Mosa 100K Mountain Challenge Run | 100 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

Speedgoat 50K Ultra Marathon | 50 kilometers | July 25, 2015 | website

Ultra Adventure Tushars 100 Mile | 100 miles | July 31, 2015 | website

Ultra Adventure Tushars 93K | 93 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

Vermont

Moosalamoo Ultra – 36 M | 36 miles | August 01, 2015 | website

Virginia

Dahlgren Heritage Rail Trail 50 km | 50 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

Washington

Bigfoot 200 Mile Endurance Run | 205 miles | August 07, 2015 | website

Grand Ridge 50K Trail Run (August) | 50 kilometers | August 01, 2015 | website

White River 50 Mile Trail Run | 50 miles | July 25, 2015 | website

03:11:15 CLOSE

03:14:45

Show links:

Website – talkultra.com

Richtersveld Wildrun™ 2015 – This Week!

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It is days before the second Richtersveld Wildrun™ kicks off and anticipation is building for what promises to be a tight race through one of the most biologically diverse regions in the world.

This four day, 150km stage race is one of the most challenging trail runs in South Africa and runners can expect to take on a harsh, mountainous desert as they are tested to the limit. Similar in format o the iconic Marathon des Sables, ‘Wildrun’ is notably different in that runners are not self sufficient: equipment is transported for them and food is provided.

At the front of the field, three of Southern Africa’s top trail runners and an American ultra-running legend will go toe-to-toe as they battle it out for top spot. Bernard Rukadza and Katya Soggot will both return to defend their titles and will come up against the likes of South African long distance trail running champion, Thabang Madiba and three-time Western States 100 mile champion, Nikki Kimball.   Both Rukadza and Madiba have been enjoying superb form in 2015 with Rukadza securing his second straight ProNutro AfricanX title in March and Madiba taking second place at the same race and at the Otter African Trail Run in October 2014. Madiba will be hoping to go one better at the Wildrun™ and take first place, but he will be up against it thanks to Rukadza’s form and route experience from the 2014 event. This is also the first time Madiba is taking on a run of this magnitude and he will have to adapt quickly to stay in the hunt.

Day 2 of the 2014 Richtersveld Wildrun, 'Die Koei' to Hakkiesdoring, Northern Cape, South Africa on 5th June 2014

“Stage racing is one of the races that helps to find your strength in running. You learn to push while in pain and learn techniques to apply to survive all stages. A win will be a big bonus for me but I’m looking forward to give all my best,” said Madiba.

In the ladies field, Katya Soggot will be representing South Africa off the back of a string of victories in the Western Cape, including the Spur Silvermine Mountain XL, Spur Cape Summer Trail Series™, Three Peaks Challenge, Matroosberg Challenge and Jonkershoek and Helderberg Mountain Challenges. She has been virtually unbeatable locally and will relish the opportunity to measure herself against an ultra-runner of Kimball’s calibre. With three Western States 100 titles as well as an Ultra Trail du Mont Blanc and Marathon des Sables title, Kimball is one of the top ultra runners of her time and will be hard to beat, but Soggot’s experience from the 2014 event is sure to come in handy.

“The magnitude of untouched wilderness, the comfort and welcome at every rest camp, and the elves who made it so. My feet touched where angels fear to tread. I never dreamt I would have the privilege to relive such an experience and I am overwhelmed with gratitude to Boundless Southern Africa and Wildrunner for the opportunity,” – Katya Soggot

Since its inception in 2014, the Richtersveld Wildrun™ has had amazing support from Boundless Southern Africa and marketing manager, Roland Vorwerk was equally excited about the quality of racing anticipated.

“The Richtersveld Wildrun™ route includes many of the Park’s most spectacular features, and includes trails that very few people get to traverse. We are looking forward to these runners experiencing the unique natural and cultural landscape of the /Ai/Ais-Richtersveld Transfrontier Park and meeting the communities associated with this innovative event.”

Mens Four Medal Ceremony

From a British perspective, Olympic rower and all around endurance athlete, James Cracknell was scheduled to race the 4 day Richtersveld Wildrun. However, James already had a commitment in place to commentate for the BBC on a rowing event in Poland. This race commentary was due to finish in time to allow James to travel to South Africa. Unfortunately, the commentating has been extended by one day and although James will still travel to South Africa he will arrive late and miss day one of the race. Needless to say, James is somewhat perturbed by this. Never happy taking the easy option, James and myself are currently looking at doing day 1 of the race at the end. Of course, this would mean a solo run but the team at Wildrunner have confirmed that they can make this happen. So, although James will not be able to compete head-to-head with other runners, we will have an overall time for the 4 day run that we can compare to other competitors.

“What more can be said other than this is going to be one hell of a race! Bernard Rukadza has been on fire in the Cape recently, winning everything from marathons to short Spur Trail Series™ events, but Thabang Madiba comes with the South African long distance trail champion label and arguably more endurance experience. I can’t wait to see these two trail heavy weights going head to head, solo, and in the magical Richtersveld desert,” said Owen Middleton, MD of Wildrunner – the events company behind the Wildrun™.

You will be able to follow the Richtersveld Wildrun through images and words here on this website, via Twitter @talkultra, on Facebook HERE and on Instagram @iancorlessphotography

Episode 81 – Murphy Polyakova Zahab Laithwaite

Ep81

Episode 81 of Talk Ultra is out… Mike Murphy talks about pushing to the limits (and beyond) at The Coastal Challenge, Elena Polyakova talks about ultra running in Turkey and the up and coming Cappadocia Ultra Trail and Ray Zahab fills us in on his last expedition. Marc Laithwaite return for Talk Training and we discuss Maffetone. A Blog, Up and Coming Races, the News and Speedgoat Karl co-hosts.

00:17:09 NEWS
 
Sean O’Brien 100k
Ryan Smith 8:41
Seth Swanson 8:57
Jorge Pacheo
Magdalena Boulet 9:51
Anita Ortiz 10:40
Silke Koester 11:11
Tarawera 100k
Dylan Bowman 7:44 CR
Jorge Maravilla 8:01
Yoshikazu Hara 8:12
Ruby Muir 9:02 CR
Ruth Croft 9:14
Nuria Picas 9:40
 
MSIG Sai Kung 28k
Dai Matsumoto 2:49
Elisa Desco 3:41
 
MSIG Sai Kung 50k
Samir Tamang 4:48
Mira Rai 5:39
 
The Coastal Challenge
Iain Don Wauchope 22:29:08
Ashur Youseffi 26:09:54
Roiny Villegas 26:23:53
Veronica Bravo 29:35:20
Nikki Kimball 32:31:50
Maria Rivera 34:07:13
00:39:29 INTERVIEW
 
MIKE MURPHY pushed things to the limit at the 2015 The Coastal Challenge, in this interview we discuss his experiences in-depth.
 
Black Canyon 100k
Ford Smith 8:31 (18 years old)
Dave Mackey 8:33
Ryan Ghelfi 8:40
Caroline Boller 10:05
Angela Shartel 10:55
Gina Lucrezi 11:51
 
Red Hot 55k
Alex Nichols 3:48
Rob Krar 3:51
Jim Walmsley 3:54
Ashley Erba (19 years old) 4:29
Kara Henry 4:44
Kerrie Bruxvoort 5:03
 
Susitna 100
David Johnston 21:29
Rachel Gano 29:34
01:48:18 INTERVIEW
 
ELENA POLYAKOVA has pioneered ultra running in Turkey. In this interview we discuss her experiences and the up and coming TNF Cappadocia Ultra Trail 
 
02:20:12 INTERVIEW
 
RAY ZAHAB is no stranger to adventure, earlier this year he ventured into Patagonia. We hear all about it.
 
02:53:04 BLOG
Iain Don Wauchope writes about The Coastal Challenge – HERE
 
02:53:37 TALK TRAINING
 
Marc Laithwaite talks Maffetone
References:
 
Maffetone for Better Endurance HERE
Paleo, Maffetone and the Method HERE
03:28:23 UP & COMING RACES
 

Australia

New South Wales

Wild Women on Top Sydney Coastrek 100 km Team Challenge | 100 kilometers | March 06, 2015 | website

Wild Women on Top Sydney Coastrek 50 km Team Challenge Day: Party All Night | 50 kilometers | March 06, 2015 | website

Wild Women on Top Sydney Coastrek 50 km Team Challenge Day: Sun, Sand, Surf | 50 kilometers | March 06, 2015 | website

Victoria

Dendy Park Urban Trail 50K | 50 kilometers | March 01, 2015 | website

Cayman Islands

Off the Beaten Track | 50 kilometers | March 01, 2015 | website

Finland

Lapland

Rovaniemi 150 | 150 kilometers | February 20, 2015 | website

France

Ille-et-Vilaine

Endu’Rance Trail des Corsaires | 64 kilometers | February 28, 2015 | website

Loire-Atlantique

Le Trail du Vignoble Nantais – 50 km | 50 kilometers | March 01, 2015 | website

Puy-de-Dôme

Ultra trail de Vulcain | 81 kilometers | March 01, 2015 | website

Germany

Hesse

Lahntallauf 50 KM | 50 kilometers | February 28, 2015 | website

Hong-Kong

Rotary HK Ultramarathon | 50 kilometers | March 01, 2015 | website

Italy

Tuscany

Terre di Siena 50 km | 50 kilometers | March 01, 2015 | website

Malaysia

TITI 200KM | 200 kilometers | March 06, 2015 | website

Mexico

Ultra Caballo Blanco | 50 miles | March 01, 2015 | website

New Zealand

Bedrock50 | 53 kilometers | February 21, 2015 | website

Taupo 155 km Great Lake Relay | 155 kilometers | February 21, 2015 | website

Taupo 67.5 km Great Lake Relay | 67 kilometers | February 21, 2015 | website

Waiheke Round Island 100 km Relay | 100 kilometers | February 28, 2015 | website

Peru

North Face Endurance Chalenge Peru 50K | 50 kilometers | February 28, 2015 | website

North Face Endurance Chalenge Peru 80K | 80 kilometers | February 28, 2015 | website

Philippines

Davao50 | 50 kilometers | February 22, 2015 | website

Luneta to Tagaytay(LU2TA) Midnight Ultramarathon 60km | 60 kilometers | February 21, 2015 | website

Portugal

Trail Terras do Sicó | 50 kilometers | March 01, 2015 | website

Ultra Trail Terras do Sicó – 100 km | 100 kilometers | February 28, 2015 | website

Senegal

Raid Téranga 250 | 250 kilometers | February 22, 2015 | website

South Africa

South African Addo Elephant 44 km Trail Run | 44 miles | February 28, 2015 | website

South African Addo Elephant 76 km Trail Run | 76 kilometers | February 28, 2015 | website

Three Cranes Challenge | 106 kilometers | February 26, 2015 | website

Spain

Andalusia

Ultra Trail Sierras del Bandolero | 150 kilometers | March 06, 2015 | website

Canary Islands

Transgrancanaria | 125 kilometers | March 06, 2015 | website

Catalonia

UT les Fonts | 120 kilometers | March 06, 2015 | website

United Kingdom

Essex

St Peters Way Ultra | 45 miles | March 01, 2015 | website

Northumberland

Coastal Trail Series – Northumberland – Ultra | 34 miles | February 28, 2015 | website

Telford and Wrekin

Millennium Way | 38 miles | March 01, 2015 | website

USA

Alabama

Black Warrior/Phillip Parker 50k Trail Run | 50 kilometers | February 21, 2015 | website

Mount Cheaha 50K | 50 kilometers | February 28, 2015 | website

Alaska

Chena River to Ridge Endurance Race 45 Mile | 45 miles | February 28, 2015 | website

Iditarod Trail Invitational 1000 mile | 1000 miles | March 01, 2015 | website

Iditarod Trail Invitational 350 mile | 350 miles | March 01, 2015 | website

Arizona

Elephant Mountain – 50K | 50 kilometers | February 21, 2015 | website

Ragnar Relay Del Sol | 200 miles | February 20, 2015 | website

Ultra Adventures Antelope Canyon 100 Mile | 100 miles | February 21, 2015 | website

Ultra Adventures Antelope Canyon 50 Mile | 50 miles | February 21, 2015 | website

Ultra Adventures Antelope Canyon 55K | 55 kilometers | February 21, 2015 | website

Arkansas

LOVit 100k | 100 kilometers | February 21, 2015 | website

LOVit 100 Mile | 100 miles | February 21, 2015 | website

Sylamore Trail 50k | 50 kilometers | February 21, 2015 | website

California

Chabot Trail Run 50K | 50 kilometers | February 21, 2015 | website

FOURmidable 100K | 100 kilometers | February 21, 2015 | website

FOURmidable 50K | 50 kilometers | February 21, 2015 | website

Lake Natoma 50K | 50 kilometers | March 01, 2015 | website

Montara Mountain 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | February 21, 2015 | website

Orange Curtain 100K | 100 kilometers | February 28, 2015 | website

Orange Curtain 50K Afternoon | 50 kilometers | February 28, 2015 | website

Orange Curtain 50K Morning | 50 kilometers | February 28, 2015 | website

Razorback 100K Endurance Race | 100 kilometers | February 28, 2015 | website

Razorback 100 Mile Endurance Race | 100 miles | February 28, 2015 | website

Razorback 125 Mile Endurance Race | 125 miles | February 28, 2015 | website

Razorback 50K Endurance Race | 50 kilometers | February 28, 2015 | website

Razorback 50 Mile Endurance Race | 50 miles | February 28, 2015 | website

Run for Amma 50K | 50 kilometers | February 28, 2015 | website

Run for Amma 50 Miler | 50 miles | February 28, 2015 | website

Salmon Falls 50K | 50 kilometers | February 28, 2015 | website

Sycamore 100k | 100 kilometers | February 28, 2015 | website

West Coast 50K | 50 kilometers | February 22, 2015 | website

Colorado

Headless Horsetooth Fat Ass 50K | 50 kilometers | February 21, 2015 | website

Florida

Everglades 50K Trail Race | 50 kilometers | February 21, 2015 | website

Everglades 50 Mile Trail Race | 50 miles | February 21, 2015 | website

Manasota Track Club 50K Ultra | 50 kilometers | February 21, 2015 | website

Louisiana

Q50 50M Ultra | 50 miles | February 28, 2015 | website

Maryland

Frozen Heart 50 km | 50 kilometers | February 21, 2015 | website

Hashawha Hills 50 km Trail Run | 50 kilometers | February 28, 2015 | website

New Jersey

Febapple Frozen Fifty – 50K | 50 kilometers | February 21, 2015 | website

Febapple Frozen Fifty – 50M | 50 miles | February 21, 2015 | website

New Mexico

Race Across New Mexico – Alien Encounter (4 Marathons) | 100 miles | February 27, 2015 | website

Race Across New Mexico – Heart of New Mexico (4 Marathons) | 106 miles | February 24, 2015 | website

North Carolina

Mount Mitchell Challenge | 40 miles | February 28, 2015 | website

Oklahoma

Tulsa Running Club Post Oak Lodge 50K Trail Run | 50 kilometers | February 28, 2015 | website

Texas

A2B2: Alamo To Border 2 | 162 miles | February 27, 2015 | website

Cowtown Ultra Marathon | 50 kilometers | March 01, 2015 | website

Cross Timbers Trail Runs 50M | 50 miles | February 21, 2015 | website

Race Across Texas – Border to Border (22 Marathons) | 587 miles | March 04, 2015 | website

Race Across Texas – The Wild West (4 Marathons) | 106 miles | March 06, 2015 | website

Virginia

The Reverse Ring | 71 miles | February 21, 2015 | website

Washington

Lord Hill 50 Km | 50 kilometers | February 22, 2015 | website

03:31:56 CLOSE
03:35:27

Links:

ITunes http://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/talk-ultra/id497318073

Libsyn – feed://talkultra.libsyn.com/rss

Website – talkultra.com

Ever wondered, what is too much in an ultra?

©iancorless.com_TCC2015_Day5-2322

Ever wondered, what is too much in an ultra?

Canadian, Mike Murphy last week ran The Coastal Challenge in Costa Rica. He was having a battle royal with South African, Iain Don Wauchope. Showing real grit, on day two Mike pulled back a huge time deficit (due to going off course on day one) and took over the race lead.

©iancorless.com_TCC2015_Day2b-0401

Mike then lost the lead again on day three. The stage was set for a head-to-head battle but Mike started to suffer… on the evening of day five (with just one day left) Mike was pulled out of the race by the medics and eventually ended up in hospital.

©iancorless.com_TCC2015_Day1-0124

All is okay and Mike is now back in Canada. But he just sent me this message:

“I’m ALIVE! Got home from the hospital (Vancouver) last night, and my issues/injuries seem to stable and/or improving. The list is:
Broken Radius, Arm/elbow infection, Heat stroke, Hyponatremia, Blood loss (causing anemia).”

Believe me, Mike is one of the most committed runners I have ever witnessed in a race. Costa Rica and The Coastal Challenge offered each and every competitor a unique set of challenges. Lets face it, that is the attraction isn’t it? Relentless heat, high humidity, long stretches of open beach, dense forest, fire roads, water crossings, technical river beds and a plethora of other challenges.

©iancorless.com_TCC2015_Day2-0053

But can you be too committed in a race?

Welcome your thoughts and have you ever pushed yourself too far?

The Coastal Challenge #TCC2015 Day 5 Race Images

©iancorless.com_TCC2015_Day5-2508

Race summary HERE

The Coastal Challenge #TCC2015 Day 2 Savegre Valley to Dominical Beach

©iancorless.com_TCC2015_Day2-0368

 

TCC 2015 Day s Savegre Valley – Dominical Beach

39km

2250+ ascent

Days don’t come much more exciting than day two of The Coastal Challenge… could Frosty pull back the time lost to Veronica Bravo? Could Mike Murphey refocus after going off course on day 1, loosing a chunk of time to Iain Don Wauchope and then going into the red trying to pull back time?

Well the simple answer is yes!

Both Frosty and Mike Murphey showed incredible powers of recovery and lead the race  from the front.

©iancorless.com_TCC2015_Day2b-0350

Frosty took an early lead from Veronica Bravo and slowly but surely extended her lead as day-2 threw everything at her; tough climbs, sections of fire trail, gnarly descents, km’s of fire trail, water crossings and then a long hot stretch of relentless beach.

©iancorless.com_TCC2015_Day2-0129

“Today was true Costa Rican; jungle, trail, beaches and wonderful people… oh, and darn hot! I felt good for 20km but I didn’t like the fast section of road but I was able to push to the end. A good day” – Anna Frost.

As the finish came, Frosty had clawed back all lost time on day-1 and took the overall lead of the ladies classification. Veronica Bravo didn’t have a bad day… Frosty was just having a great day. Veronica looked strong and relaxed mile-after-mile and always gave a smile.

©iancorless.com_TCC2015_Day2b-1095

Nikki Kimball rounded out the top-3 for the ladies and as we expected, Nikki is just pacing herself. Post race Nikki said, “I am just off ski’s and the heat and humidity is relentless. It’s so different to Marathon des Sables where the heat is dry. But then again, I am not in the shape I was in for the 2014 MDS?”

©iancorless.com_TCC2015_Day2-0188

Mike Murphey pushed and pushed, slowly pulling away and extended a lead over Joe Grant who he had run with over the first climb and descent. Running so hard in this heat, humidity and with such mixed terrain was a consummate performance. Mike certainly showed his speed, endurance and commitment, so much so it gave Mike a course record for the Savegre Valley – Dominical Beach stage. Mike had said the previous day,

“I love some motivation and to chase, so I plan to go for it. I need to pull back the time I lost from going off course and then gain some time for the lead. I love that.”

©iancorless.com_TCC2015_Day2-0053

Joe Grant had felt really good and matched Mike step-by-step in the early stages while Iain Don Wauchope (day-1 stage winner) chased some 90-seconds to 2-minutes back. But Joe rolled his ankle and then had to run cautiously.

©iancorless.com_TCC2015_Day2b-0474

 

Eventually, Joe and Iain joined forces and ran the final stages together but Mike was long gone… they crossed the line almost 30-minutes back confirming Mike as the new race leader with Iain in 2nd and Joe in 3rd.

©iancorless.com_TCC2015_Day2-0088

 

1-Mike Murphey – Canada- 4:03:57
2- Joe Grant – UK – 4:32:22
3- Iain Don Wauchope – South Africa – 4:32:22

 

1st – Anna Frost – 4:57:20
2nd – Veronica Bravo – 5:21:05
3rd – Nikki Kimball – 5:35:10

Overall classification to follow (times)

Mike Murphey and Anna Frost are current leaders.